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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3044 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3044 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 84, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 343, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 214, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 134, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 348, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 317, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 408, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 156, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
  [SJR: 0.674]   [H-I: 38]   [48 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1043-4526
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3044 journals]
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 82


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T08:15:36Z
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 81


      PubDate: 2017-03-20T17:12:53Z
       
  • Nanotechnology for Food Packaging and Food Quality Assessment
    • Authors: M. Rossi; D. Passeri; A. Sinibaldi; M. Angjellari; E. Tamburri; A. Sorbo; E. Carata; L. Dini
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): M. Rossi, D. Passeri, A. Sinibaldi, M. Angjellari, E. Tamburri, A. Sorbo, E. Carata, L. Dini
      Nanotechnology has paved the way to innovative food packaging materials and analytical methods to provide the consumers with healthier food and to reduce the ecological footprint of the whole food chain. Combining antimicrobial and antifouling properties, thermal and mechanical protection, oxygen and moisture barrier, as well as to verify the actual quality of food, e.g., sensors to detect spoilage, bacterial growth, and to monitor incorrect storage conditions, or anticounterfeiting devices in food packages may extend the products shelf life and ensure higher quality of foods. Also the ecological footprint of food chain can be reduced by developing new completely recyclable and/or biodegradable packages from natural and eco-friendly resources. The contribution of nanotechnologies to these goals is reviewed in this chapter, together with a description of portable devices (“lab-on-chip,” sensors, nanobalances, etc.) which can be used to assess the quality of food and an overview of regulations in force on food contact materials.

      PubDate: 2017-03-16T15:26:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2017.01.002
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 80


      PubDate: 2017-02-24T08:31:58Z
       
  • Influence of High Hydrostatic Pressure Technology on Wine Chemical and
           Sensorial Characteristics: Potentialities and Drawbacks
    • Authors: C. Nunes; M.C. Santos; J.A. Saraiva; S.M. Rocha; M.A. Coimbra
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): C. Nunes, M.C. Santos, J.A. Saraiva, S.M. Rocha, M.A. Coimbra
      During last years, scientific research on high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as a nonthermal processing technology for preservation or aging of wine has increased substantially. HHP between 200 and 500MPa is able to inactivate bacteria and yeasts in red and white wines, suggesting that it may be used for wine preservation. However, these treatments have been shown to promote changes on sensorial and physicochemical characteristics in both red and white wines, not immediately in the first month, but along storage. The changes are observed in wine color, aroma, and taste due mainly to reactions of phenolic compounds, sugars, and proteins. These reactions have been associated with those observed during wine aging, leading to aged-like wine characteristics perceived by sensorial analysis. This chapter will present the influence of HHP technology on wine chemical and sensorial characteristics, criticaly discussing its potentialities and drawbacks. The appropriate use of HHP, based on the scientific knowledge of the reactions occuring in wine promoted by HHP, will allow to exploit this technology for wine production achieving distinct characteristics to address particular market and consumer demands.

      PubDate: 2017-02-17T06:27:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2017.01.003
       
  • Metabolomics, Nutrition, and Potential Biomarkers of Food Quality, Intake,
           and Health Status
    • Authors: J.-L.
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): J.-L. Sébédio
      Diet, dietary patterns, and other environmental factors such as exposure to toxins are playing an important role in the prevention/development of many diseases, like obesity, type 2 diabetes, and consequently on the health status of individuals. A major challenge nowadays is to identify novel biomarkers to detect as early as possible metabolic dysfunction and to predict evolution of health status in order to refine nutritional advices to specific population groups. Omics technologies such as genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics coupled with statistical and bioinformatics tools have already shown great potential in this research field even if so far only few biomarkers have been validated. For the past two decades, important analytical techniques have been developed to detect as many metabolites as possible in human biofluids such as urine, blood, and saliva. In the field of food science and nutrition, many studies have been carried out for food authenticity, quality, and safety, as well as for food processing. Furthermore, metabolomic investigations have been carried out to discover new early biomarkers of metabolic dysfunction and predictive biomarkers of developing pathologies (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type-2 diabetes, etc.). Great emphasis is also placed in the development of methodologies to identify and validate biomarkers of nutrients exposure.

      PubDate: 2017-02-17T06:27:11Z
       
  • Pathogens of Food Animals: Sources, Characteristics, Human Risk, and
           Methods of Detection
    • Authors: C.M. Logue; N.L. Barbieri; D.W. Nielsen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): C.M. Logue, N.L. Barbieri, D.W. Nielsen
      Pathogens associated with food production (livestock) animals come in many forms causing a multitude of disease for humans. For the purpose of this review, these infectious agents can be divided into three broad categories: those that are associated with bacterial disease, those that are associated with viruses, and those that are parasitic in nature. The goal of this chapter is to provide the reader with an overview of the most common pathogens that cause disease in humans through exposure via the food chain and the consequence of this exposure as well as risk and detection methods. We have also included a collection of unusual pathogens that although rare have still caused disease, and their recognition is warranted in light of emerging and reemerging diseases. These provide the reader an understanding of where the next big outbreak could occur. The influence of the global economy, the movement of people, and food makes understanding production animal-associated disease paramount to being able to address new diseases as they arise.

      PubDate: 2017-02-11T05:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.009
       
  • Nanotechnology Approaches for Increasing Nutrient Bioavailability
    • Authors: S.M. Jafari; D.J. McClements
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): S.M. Jafari, D.J. McClements
      Health-promoting ingredients such as phenolic compounds, vitamins, and minerals are being increasingly introduced into foods and beverages to produce “functional foods” specifically designed to improve human health, well-being, and performance. However, it is often challenging to incorporate these nutraceuticals into foods because they have poor solubility characteristics, impart undesirable flavor profiles, are chemically unstable, or have low bioavailability. This problem can often be overcome by encapsulating the bioactive components in nanoparticle-based delivery systems. The bioavailability of encapsulated bioactive agents often increases when the size of the particles containing them decreases, due to their faster digestion, ability to penetrate the mucus layer, or direct uptake by cells. Nanoparticles can be formulated to survive passage through specific regions of the gastrointestinal tract and then release their payload at a specified point, thus maximizing their potential health benefits. Nutraceutical-loaded nanoparticles can be fabricated through lipid formulations, natural nanocarriers, specialized equipment, biopolymer nanoparticles, and miscellaneous techniques. Classification into these five groups is based on the main mechanism or ingredient used to fabricate the nanoparticles. This chapter focuses on the utilization of food-grade nanoparticles for improving the performance of nutraceuticals in functional foods and beverages.

      PubDate: 2017-01-30T03:07:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.008
       
  • Metabolic Phenotyping of Diet and Dietary Intake
    • Authors: J. Brignardello; E. Holmes; I. Garcia-Perez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): J. Brignardello, E. Holmes, I. Garcia-Perez
      Nutrition provides the building blocks for growth, repair, and maintenance of the body and is key to maintaining health. Exposure to fast foods, mass production of dietary components, and wider importation of goods have challenged the balance between diet and health in recent decades, and both scientists and clinicians struggle to characterize the relationship between this changing dietary landscape and human metabolism with its consequent impact on health. Metabolic phenotyping of foods, using high-density data-generating technologies to profile the biochemical composition of foods, meals, and human samples (pre- and postfood intake), can be used to map the complex interaction between the diet and human metabolism and also to assess food quality and safety. Here, we outline some of the techniques currently used for metabolic phenotyping and describe key applications in the food sciences, ending with a broad outlook at some of the newer technologies in the field with a view to exploring their potential to address some of the critical challenges in nutritional science.

      PubDate: 2017-01-30T03:07:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.002
       
  • Characterization and Applications of Marine Microbial Enzymes in
           Biotechnology and Probiotics for Animal Health
    • Authors: T.H. Nguyen; V.D. Nguyen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): T.H. Nguyen, V.D. Nguyen
      Marine microorganisms have been recognized as potential sources of novel enzymes because they are relatively more stable than the corresponding enzymes derived from plants and animals. Enzymes from marine microorganisms also differ from homologous enzymes in terrestrial microorganisms based on salinity, pressure, temperature, and lighting conditions. Marine microbial enzymes can be used in diverse industrial applications. This chapter will focus on the biotechnological applications of marine enzymes and also their use as a tool of marine probiotics to improve host digestion (food digestion, food absorption, and mucus utilization) and cleave molecular signals involved in quorum sensing in pathogens to control disease in aquaculture.

      PubDate: 2017-01-22T09:36:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.007
       
  • Improvement of Soybean Products Through the Response Mechanism Analysis
           Using Proteomic Technique
    • Authors: X. Wang; S. Komatsu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): X. Wang, S. Komatsu
      Soybean is rich in protein/vegetable oil and contains several phytochemicals such as isoflavones and phenolic compounds. Because of the predominated nutritional values, soybean is considered as traditional health benefit food. Soybean is a widely cultivated crop; however, its growth and yield are markedly affected by adverse environmental conditions. Proteomic techniques make it feasible to map protein profiles both during soybean growth and under unfavorable conditions. The stress-responsive mechanisms during soybean growth have been uncovered with the help of proteomic studies. In this review, the history of soybean as food and the morphology/physiology of soybean are described. The utilization of proteomics during soybean germination and development is summarized. In addition, the stress-responsive mechanisms explored using proteomic techniques are reviewed in soybean.

      PubDate: 2017-01-22T09:36:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.006
       
  • Health Risks of Food Oxidation
    • Authors: M. Estévez; Z. Li; O.P. Soladoye; T. Van-Hecke
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): M. Estévez, Z. Li, O.P. Soladoye, T. Van-Hecke
      The impact of dietary habits on our health is indisputable. Consumer's concern on aging and age-related diseases challenges scientists to underline the potential role of food on the extension and guarantee of lifespan and healthspan. While some dietary components and habits are generally regarded as beneficial for our health, some others are being found to exert potential toxic effects and hence, contribute to the onset of particular health disorders. Among the latter, lipid and protein oxidation products formed during food production, storage, processing, and culinary preparation have been recently identified as potentially harmful to humans. Upon intake, food components are further degraded and oxidized during the subsequent digestion phases and the pool of compounds formed in the lumen is in close contact with the lamina propria of the intestines. Some of these oxidation products have been found to promote inflammatory conditions in the gut (i.e., bowel diseases) and are also reasonably linked to the onset of carcinogenic processes. Upon intestinal uptake, some species are distributed by the bloodstream causing an increase in oxidative stress markers and impairment of certain physiological processes through alteration of specific gene expression pathways. This chapter summarizes the most recent discoveries on this topic with particular stress on challenges that we face in the near future: understanding the molecular basis of disease, the suitability of using living animals vs in vitro model systems and the necessity of using massive genomic techniques and versatile mass spectrometric technology.

      PubDate: 2017-01-22T09:36:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.005
       
  • Use of Foodomics for Control of Food Processing and Assessing of Food
           Safety
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): D. Josić, Ž. Peršurić, D. Rešetar, T. Martinović, L. Saftić, S. Kraljević Pavelić
      Food chain, food safety, and food-processing sectors face new challenges due to globalization of food chain and changes in the modern consumer preferences. In addition, gradually increasing microbial resistance, changes in climate, and human errors in food handling remain a pending barrier for the efficient global food safety management. Consequently, a need for development, validation, and implementation of rapid, sensitive, and accurate methods for assessment of food safety often termed as foodomics methods is required. Even though, the growing role of these high-throughput foodomic methods based on genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic techniques has yet to be completely acknowledged by the regulatory agencies and bodies. The sensitivity and accuracy of these methods are superior to previously used standard analytical procedures and new methods are suitable to address a number of novel requirements posed by the food production sector and global food market.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T13:25:29Z
       
  • Methodologies for the Characterization of the Quality of Dairy Products
    • Authors: Karoui
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): R. Karoui
      The growing interest of consumers in food quality and safety issues has contributed to the increasing demand for sensitive and rapid analytical technologies. Physicochemical, textural, sensory, etc., methods have been used to evaluate the quality and authenticity of milk and dairy products. Despite the importance of these standard methods, they are expensive and time consuming. Recently, spectroscopic methods have shown great potential due to speed of analysis, minimal sample preparation, high repeatability, low cost, and, most of all, the fact that these techniques are noninvasive and nondestructive and, therefore, could be applied to any on-line monitoring system. This chapter gave examples of the application of the most commonly traditional methods for the determination of the quality of milk and dairy products. A special focus is devoted to the use of infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies for the evaluation of the quality of dairy products.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T13:25:29Z
       
  • Bacillus Probiotic Enzymes: External Auxiliary Apparatus to Avoid
           Digestive Deficiencies, Water Pollution, Diseases, and Economic Problems
           in Marine Cultivated Animals
    • Authors: Jorge Olmos Soto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): Jorge Olmos Soto
      Exploitation of marine fishes is the main source of several life-supporting feed compounds such as proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates that maintain the production of most trading marine organisms by aquaculture. However, at this rate the marine inventory will go to the end soon, since fishery resources are finite. In this sense, the availability of the principal ingredients obtained from marine fishes is going to decrease considerably, increasing the diet prices and affecting the economy of this activity. Therefore, aquaculture industry needs to find nonexpensive land unconventional resources of protein, carbohydrates, and lipids and use bacterial probiotics to improve digestion–assimilation of these unfamiliar compounds. Bacillus subtilis is a cosmopolitan probiotic bacterium with a great enzymatic profile that could improve nutrient digestion–assimilation, induce healthy growth, and avoid water pollution, decreasing economic problems and increasing yields in the aquaculture industry. In this chapter, we present how Bacillus enzymes can help marine animals to assimilate nutrients from unconventional and economic plant resources.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T13:25:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.001
       
  • Phenolic Compounds and Its Bioavailability: In Vitro Bioactive Compounds
           or Health Promoters?
    • Authors: I.C.F.R. Ferreira; N. Martins; L. Barros
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): I.C.F.R. Ferreira, N. Martins, L. Barros
      Botanical preparations present a widespread and secular history of use. In fact, natural matrices possess a rich pool of phytochemicals, with promising biological effects. Among them, phenolic compounds have revealed to confer very important attributes to improve the well-being and longevity of worldwide population. Numerous in vitro studies have been carried out evaluating the wide spectrum of bioactivities of phenolic compounds, including its health effects, but through in vivo experiments some of these previous results cannot be properly confirmed, and considerable variations are observed. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including the assessment of bioavailability and bioefficacy of phenolic compounds, still continue to be largely investigated and considered a great hot topic among the food science and technology researchers. Thus, based on these crucial aspects, this chapter aims to provide an extensive approach about the question of the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, describing its biosynthetic routes and related mechanisms of action; to focus on the current facts and existing controversies, highlighting the importance of in vivo studies and the impact of phenolic compounds on the quality of life and longevity.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T13:25:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.004
       
  • Marine Enzymes and Microorganisms for Bioethanol Production
    • Authors: M.R. Swain; V. Natarajan; C. Krishnan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): M.R. Swain, V. Natarajan, C. Krishnan
      Bioethanol is a potential alternative fuel to fossil fuels. Bioethanol as a fuel has several economic and environmental benefits. Though bioethanol is produced using starch and sugarcane juice, these materials are in conflict with food availability. To avoid food–fuel conflict, the second-generation bioethanol production by utilizing nonfood lignocellulosic materials has been extensively investigated. However, due to the complexity of lignocellulose architecture, the process is complicated and not economically competitive. The cultivation of lignocellulosic energy crops indirectly affects the food supplies by extensive land use. Marine algae have attracted attention to replace the lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol production, since the algae grow fast, do not use land, avoid food–fuel conflict and have several varieties to suit the cultivation environment. The composition of algae is not as complex as lignocellulose due to the absence of lignin, which renders easy hydrolysis of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars. Marine organisms also produce cold-active enzymes for hydrolysis of starch, cellulose, and algal polysaccharides, which can be employed in bioethanol process. Marine microoorganisms are also capable of fermenting sugars under high salt environment. Therefore, marine biocatalysts are promising for development of efficient processes for bioethanol production.

      PubDate: 2017-01-07T13:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.12.003
       
  • Marine Enzymes: Production and Applications for Human Health
    • Authors: T. Eswara Rao; M. Imchen; R. Kumavath
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2017
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): T. Eswara Rao, M. Imchen, R. Kumavath
      Marine microbial enzymes have wide applications in bioindustries. Selection of microorganisms for enzyme production at the industrial level requires good yield and high production rate. A number of enzymes such as amylase, caseinase, lipase, gelatinase, and DNases have been discovered from microbes isolated from extreme marine environments. Such enzymes are thermostable, tolerant to a varied range of pH and other harsh conditions required in industrial applications. Novelty in their structure and characteristics has shown promising scope to the researchers in academia and industry. In this chapter, we present a bird's eye view on recent research works in the field of enzyme production from marine origin as well as their potential biological applications relevant to human health.

      PubDate: 2017-01-07T13:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.006
       
  • Protein Hydrolysates and Biopeptides: Production, Biological Activities,
           and Applications in Foods and Health Benefits. A Review
    • Authors: Nasri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): M. Nasri
      In recent years, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding the production, characterization, and applications of protein hydrolysates and food-derived biopeptides due to their numerous beneficial health effects. In this regard, research is mainly focused on investigating the therapeutic potential of these natural compounds. Based on their amino acids composition, sequences, hydrophobicity, and length, peptides released from food proteins, beyond their nutritional properties, can exhibit various biological activities including antihypertensive, antioxidative, antithrombotic, hypoglycemic, hypocholesterolemic, and antibacterial activities among others. Protein hydrolysates are essentially produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of whole protein sources by appropriate proteolytic enzymes under controlled conditions, followed by posthydrolysis processing to isolate desired and potent bioactive peptides from a complex mixture of active and inactive peptides. Therefore, because of their human health potential and safety profiles, protein hydrolysates and biopeptides may be used as ingredients in functional foods and pharmaceuticals to improve human health and prevent diseases. In this review, we have focused on the major variables influencing the enzymatic process of protein hydrolysates production. The biological properties of protein hydrolysates will be described as well as their applications in foods and health benefits.

      PubDate: 2017-01-07T13:23:37Z
       
  • Biotechnological Applications of Marine Enzymes From Algae, Bacteria,
           Fungi, and Sponges
    • Authors: S. Parte; V.L. Sirisha; J.S. D’Souza
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): S. Parte, V.L. Sirisha, J.S. D’Souza
      Diversity is the hallmark of all life forms that inhabit the soil, air, water, and land. All these habitats pose their unique inherent challenges so as to breed the “fittest” creatures. Similarly, the biodiversity from the marine ecosystem has evolved unique properties due to challenging environment. These challenges include permafrost regions to hydrothermal vents, oceanic trenches to abyssal plains, fluctuating saline conditions, pH, temperature, light, atmospheric pressure, and the availability of nutrients. Oceans occupy 75% of the earth's surface and harbor most ancient and diverse forms of organisms (algae, bacteria, fungi, sponges, etc.), serving as an excellent source of natural bioactive molecules, novel therapeutic compounds, and enzymes. In this chapter, we introduce enzyme technology, its current state of the art, unique enzyme properties, and the biocatalytic potential of marine algal, bacterial, fungal, and sponge enzymes that have indeed boosted the Marine Biotechnology Industry. Researchers began exploring marine enzymes, and today they are preferred over the chemical catalysts for biotechnological applications and functions, encompassing various sectors, namely, domestic, industrial, commercial, and healthcare. Next, we summarize the plausible pros and cons: the challenges encountered in the process of discovery of the potent compounds and bioactive metabolites such as biocatalysts/enzymes of biomedical, therapeutic, biotechnological, and industrial significance. The field of Marine Enzyme Technology has recently assumed importance, and if it receives further boost, it could successfully substitute other chemical sources of enzymes useful for industrial and commercial purposes and may prove as a beneficial and ecofriendly option. With appropriate directions and encouragement, marine enzyme technology can sustain the rising demand for enzyme production while maintaining the ecological balance, provided any undesired exploitation of the marine ecosystem is avoided.

      PubDate: 2017-01-07T13:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.10.005
       
  • Nutritional Aspects of Dysphagia Management
    • Authors: C. Gallegos; E. Brito-de la Fuente; P. Clavé; A. Costa; G. Assegehegn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): C. Gallegos, E. Brito-de la Fuente, P. Clavé, A. Costa, G. Assegehegn
      This chapter describes the nutritional aspects of dysphagia management by starting with the definition of these two conditions (dysphagia and malnutrition) that share three main clinical characteristics: (a) their prevalence is very high, (b) they can lead to severe complications, and (c) they are frequently underrecognized and neglected conditions. From an anatomical standpoint, dysphagia can result from oropharyngeal and/or esophageal causes; from a pathophysiological perspective, dysphagia can be caused by organic or structural diseases (either benign or malignant) or diseases causing impaired physiology (mainly motility and/or perception disorders). This chapter gathers up-to-date information on the screening and diagnosis of oropharyngeal dysphagia, the consequences of dysphagia (aspiration pneumonia, malnutrition, and dehydration), and on the nutritional management of dysphagic patients. Concerning this last topic, this chapter reviews the rheological aspects of swallowing and dysphagia (including shear and elongational flows) and its influence on the characteristics of the enteral nutrition for dysphagia management (solid/semisolid foods and thickened liquids; ready-to-use oral nutritional supplements and thickening powders), with special focus on the real characteristics of the bolus after mixing with human saliva.

      PubDate: 2016-12-27T13:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.008
       
  • Production of Enzymes From Agricultural Wastes and Their Potential
           Industrial Applications
    • Authors: S. Bharathiraja; J. Suriya; M. Krishnan; P. Manivasagan; S.-K. Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): S. Bharathiraja, J. Suriya, M. Krishnan, P. Manivasagan, S.-K. Kim
      Enzymatic hydrolysis is the significant technique for the conversion of agricultural wastes into valuable products. Agroindustrial wastes such as rice bran, wheat bran, wheat straw, sugarcane bagasse, and corncob are cheapest and plentifully available natural carbon sources for the production of industrially important enzymes. Innumerable enzymes that have numerous applications in industrial processes for food, drug, textile, and dye use have been produced from different types of microorganisms from agricultural wastes. Utilization of agricultural wastes offers great potential for reducing the production cost and increasing the use of enzymes for industrial purposes. This chapter focuses on economic production of actinobacterial enzymes from agricultural wastes to make a better alternative for utilization of biomass generated in million tons as waste annually.

      PubDate: 2016-12-27T13:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.003
       
  • Bioactive Properties of Maillard Reaction Products Generated From Food
           Protein-derived Peptides
    • Authors: K. Arihara; L. Zhou; M. Ohata
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): K. Arihara, L. Zhou, M. Ohata
      Food protein-derived peptides are promising food ingredients for developing functional foods, since various bioactive peptides are released from food proteins. The Maillard reaction, which plays an important role in most processed foods, generates various chemical components during processing. Although changes of amino acids or proteins and reduced sugars by the Maillard reaction have been studied extensively, such changes of peptides by the Maillard reaction are still not resolved enough. Since food protein-derived peptides are widely utilized in many processed foods, it deserves concern and research on the changes of peptides by the Maillard reaction in foods during processing or storage. This chapter initially overviewed food protein-derived bioactive peptides. Then, Maillard reaction products generated from peptides are discussed. We focused particularly on their bioactivities.

      PubDate: 2016-12-27T13:20:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.005
       
  • Analysis of Nitrite and Nitrate in Foods: Overview of Chemical, Regulatory
           and Analytical Aspects
    • Authors: Merino
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): L. Merino, U. Örnemark, F. Toldrá
      In this chapter, several factors that should be considered for selecting and developing suitable analytical methods for determining nitrite/nitrate are presented. Nitrite and nitrate occurrence and suitability are a controversial issue. Nitrite is an approved additive considered a foremost curing ingredient for the preservation of meat products. Nitrate is a natural constituent of the human diet that, however, raises fears for its suggested potential harmfulness related to carcinogenesis and environmental contamination. Chemical, regulatory, and analytical aspects are discussed in the light of the need to obtain reliable data of nitrite and nitrate for law enforcement purposes, exposure estimates, and investigation of their physiological role in the human body. In addition, current metrological aspects to ensure the “fitness for purpose” of the selected method are suggested and discussed.

      PubDate: 2016-12-19T11:55:08Z
       
  • Biomedical Applications of Enzymes From Marine Actinobacteria
    • Authors: K. Kamala; P. Sivaperumal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 December 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): K. Kamala, P. Sivaperumal
      Marine microbial enzyme technologies have progressed significantly in the last few decades for different applications. Among the various microorganisms, marine actinobacterial enzymes have significant active properties, which could allow them to be biocatalysts with tremendous bioactive metabolites. Moreover, marine actinobacteria have been considered as biofactories, since their enzymes fulfill biomedical and industrial needs. In this chapter, the marine actinobacteria and their enzymes’ uses in biological activities and biomedical applications are described.

      PubDate: 2016-12-19T11:55:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.11.002
       
  • Food Processing Antioxidants
    • Authors: F.J. Hidalgo; R. Zamora
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): F.J. Hidalgo, R. Zamora
      Food processing has been carried out since ancient times as a way to preserve and improve food nutritional and organoleptic properties. Although it has some undesirable consequences, such as the losses of some nutrients and the potential formation of toxic compounds, a wide range of benefits can be enumerated. Among them, the increased total antioxidant capacity of many processed foods has been known for long. This consequence has been related to both the release or increased availability of natural antioxidants and the de novo formation of substances with antioxidant properties as a consequence of the produced reactions. This review analyzes the chemical changes produced in foods during processing with special emphasis on the formation of antioxidants as a consequence of carbonyl-amine reactions produced by both carbohydrate- and lipid-derived reactive carbonyls. It discusses the lastest advances produced in the characterization of carbonyl-amine adducts and their potential action as primary (free radical scavengers), secondary (chelating and other ways to prevent lipid oxidation), and tertiary (carbonyl scavengers as a way to avoid lipid oxidation consequences) antioxidants. Moreover, the possibility of combining amino compounds with different hydrophobicity, such as aminophospholipids and proteins, with a wide array of reactive carbonyls points out to the use of carbonyl-amine reactions as a new way to induce the formation of a great variety of substances with antioxidant properties and very variable hydrophilia/lipophilia. All presented results point out to carbonyl-amine reactions as an effective method to generate efficacious antioxidants that can be used in food technology.

      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.10.002
       
  • Marine Enzymes in Cancer: A New Paradigm
    • Authors: R.H. Prabhu; K.S. Bhise; V.B. Patravale
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): R.H. Prabhu, K.S. Bhise, V.B. Patravale
      Over the last decades, the vast chemical and biodiversity of marine environment has been identified as an important source of new anticancer drugs. The evolution of marine life is a result of competition among microorganisms for space and nutrients in the marine environment, which drives marine microorganisms to generate diverse enzyme systems with unique properties to adapt to harsh conditions of ocean. Therefore, marine-derived sources offer novel enzymes endowed with extraordinary properties. Recent advances in cancer therapy have facilitated enzyme therapy as a promising tool. But, the available information on the use of enzymes derived from marine sources as therapeutic agents for cancer therapy is scanty. The potential utility of marine enzymes in cancer therapy will be discussed in this chapter.

      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.10.001
       
  • Bioremediation of Industrial Waste Through Enzyme Producing Marine
           Microorganisms
    • Authors: P. Sivaperumal; K. Kamala; R. Rajaram
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): P. Sivaperumal, K. Kamala, R. Rajaram
      Bioremediation process using microorganisms is a kind of nature-friendly and cost-effective clean green technology. Recently, biodegradation of industrial wastes using enzymes from marine microorganisms has been reported worldwide. The prospectus research activity in remediation area would contribute toward the development of advanced bioprocess technology. To minimize industrial wastes, marine enzymes could constitute a novel alternative in terms of waste treatment. Nowadays, the evidence on the mechanisms of bioremediation-related enzymes from marine microorganisms has been extensively studied. This review also will provide information about enzymes from various marine microorganisms and their complexity in the biodegradation of comprehensive range of industrial wastes.

      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.10.006
       
  • Enzymes in Fermented Fish
    • Authors: Giyatmi; H.E. Irianto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): Giyatmi, H.E. Irianto
      Fermented fish products are very popular particularly in Southeast Asian countries. These products have unique characteristics, especially in terms of aroma, flavor, and texture developing during fermentation process. Proteolytic enzymes have a main role in hydrolyzing protein into simpler compounds. Fermentation process of fish relies both on naturally occurring enzymes (in the muscle or the intestinal tract) as well as bacteria. Fermented fish products processed using the whole fish show a different characteristic compared to those prepared from headed and gutted fish. Endogenous enzymes like trypsin, chymotrypsin, elastase, and aminopeptidase are the most involved in the fermentation process. Muscle tissue enzymes like cathepsins, peptidases, transaminases, amidases, amino acid decarboxylases, glutamic dehydrogenases, and related enzymes may also play a role in fish fermentation. Due to the decreased bacterial number during fermentation, contribution of microbial enzymes to proteolysis may be expected prior to salting of fish. Commercial enzymes are supplemented during processing for specific purposes, such as quality improvement and process acceleration. In the case of fish sauce, efforts to accelerate fermentation process and to improve product quality have been studied by addition of enzymes such as papain, bromelain, trypsin, pepsin, and chymotrypsin.

      PubDate: 2016-12-05T09:36:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.10.004
       
  • Series Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research, Volume 79


      PubDate: 2016-10-24T04:10:51Z
       
  • Mechanism and Aquaculture Application of Teleost Enzymes Adapted at Low
           Temperature
    • Authors: C.-L. Wu; B.-Y. Li; J.-L. Wu; C.-F. Hui
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): C.-L. Wu, B.-Y. Li, J.-L. Wu, C.-F. Hui
      Environment temperature highly influences the physiological condition of poikilothermic teleost. There are different physiological and biochemical responses between fish in different habitats. In order to take profit of fish adapted to different temperatures, some important enzymes have been isolated, assayed, and analyzed. Enzyme expression patterns and properties were evaluated in lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase studies. In this chapter, we try to identify the mechanisms of enzyme activity at low temperature by comparing different studies on enzyme kinetics and regulation. The protein–protein interaction between monomers, protein–solvent interaction, and protein substrate correlation are discussed. Studying fish enzymes could accumulate the understanding of marine organism's enzyme function during adaptation in different temperature zones. Based on these mechanisms, the application of cold-adapted enzymes in aquaculture system is illustrated. Furthermore, this information may create a possible explanation of fish physiological and biochemical evolution route and construct an appropriate strategy to overcome the climate change.

      PubDate: 2016-10-10T16:25:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.08.004
       
  • Bioprospects of Microbial Enzymes from Mangrove-Associated Fungi and
           Bacteria
    • Authors: K. Saravanakumar; N. Rajendran; K. Kathiresan; J. Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): K. Saravanakumar, N. Rajendran, K. Kathiresan, J. Chen
      Mangroves ecosystem provides the unique habitat for the colonization of fungi and bacteria. Interestingly, the enzymes derived from mangroves associated microorganisms have enormous economic value in industries of agriculture, pulp, paper, medicine, sewage treatments, etc. Microbial enzyme activity is required for the metabolism of plants and animals. In addition, the enzymes are also involved in aquatic animal food cycle and degradation of mangroves detritus. However, the understanding of current status of mangroves associated microorganism-derived enzymes and its application is required to improve the future omics studies. Therefore, this chapter is summarizing the current reports and application on enzymes derived from mangroves associated bacteria and fungi.

      PubDate: 2016-10-03T01:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.08.003
       
  • Enzymes From Rare Actinobacterial Strains
    • Authors: J. Suriya; S. Bharathiraja; P. Manivasagan; S.-K. Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): J. Suriya, S. Bharathiraja, P. Manivasagan, S.-K. Kim
      Actinobacteria constitute rich sources of novel biocatalysts and novel natural products for medical and industrial utilization. Although actinobacteria are potential source of economically important enzymes, the isolation and culturing are somewhat tough because of its extreme habitats. But now-a-days, the rate of discovery of novel compounds producing actinomycetes from soil, freshwater, and marine ecosystem has increased much through the developed culturing and genetic engineering techniques. Actinobacteria are well-known source of their bioactive compounds and they are the promising source of broad range of industrially important enzymes. The bacteria have the capability to degrade a range of pesticides, hydrocarbons, aromatic, and aliphatic compounds (Sambasiva Rao, Tripathy, Mahalaxmi, & Prakasham, 2012). Most of the enzymes are mainly derived from microorganisms because of their easy of growth, minimal nutritional requirements, and low-cost for downstream processing. The focus of this review is about the new, commercially useful enzymes from rare actinobacterial strains. Industrial requirements are now fulfilled by the novel actinobacterial enzymes which assist the effective production. Oxidative enzymes, lignocellulolytic enzymes, extremozymes, and clinically useful enzymes are often utilized in many industrial processes because of their ability to catalyze numerous reactions. Novel, extremophilic, oxidative, lignocellulolytic, and industrially important enzymes from rare Actinobacterial population are discussed in this chapter.

      PubDate: 2016-10-03T01:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.08.002
       
  • Marine Microbial Amylases: Properties and Applications
    • Authors: J. Suriya; S. Bharathiraja; M. Krishnan; P. Manivasagan; S.-K. Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): J. Suriya, S. Bharathiraja, M. Krishnan, P. Manivasagan, S.-K. Kim
      Amylases are crucial enzymes which hydrolyze internal glycosidic linkages in starch and produce as primary products dextrins and oligosaccharides. Amylases are classified into α-amylase, β-amylase, and glucoamylase based on their three-dimensional structures, reaction mechanisms, and amino acid sequences. Amylases have innumerable applications in clinical, medical, and analytical chemistries as well as in food, detergent, textile, brewing, and distilling industries. Amylases can be produced from plants, animals, and microbial sources. Due to the advantages in microbial production, it meets commercial needs. The pervasive nature, easy production, and wide range of applications make amylase an industrially pivotal enzyme. This chapter will focus on amylases found in marine microorganisms, their potential industrial applications, and how these enzymes can be improved to the required bioprocessing conditions.

      PubDate: 2016-09-26T00:41:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.07.001
       
  • Extremozymes from Marine Actinobacteria
    • Authors: J. Suriya; S. Bharathiraja; M. Krishnan; P. Manivasagan; S.-K. Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): J. Suriya, S. Bharathiraja, M. Krishnan, P. Manivasagan, S.-K. Kim
      Marine microorganisms that have the possibility to survive in diverse conditions such as extreme temperature, pH, pressure, and salinity are known as extremophiles. They produce biocatalysts so named as extremozymes that are active and stable at extreme conditions. These enzymes have numerous industrial applications due to its distinct properties. Till now, only a fraction of microorganisms on Earth have been exploited for screening of extremozymes. Novel techniques used for the cultivation and production of extremophiles, as well as cloning and overexpression of their genes in various expression systems, will pave the way to use these enzymes for chemical, food, pharmaceutical, and other industrial applications.

      PubDate: 2016-09-13T13:16:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.08.001
       
  • Usefulness of Alginate Lyases Derived from Marine Organisms for the
           Preparation of Alginate Oligomers with Various Bioactivities
    • Authors: S. Takeshita; T. Oda
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): S. Takeshita, T. Oda
      Alginate-degrading enzyme, alginate lyase, catalyzes the cleavage of glycosidic 1–4 O-linkages between uronic acid residues of alginate by a β-elimination reaction leaving a 4-deoxy-l-erythro-hex-4-ene pyranosyluronate as nonreducing terminal end. The enzymes from a wide variety of sources such as marine molluscs, seaweeds, and marine bacteria have been discovered and studied not only from a point of view of enzymological interest of enzyme itself but also for elucidation of fine chemical structure of alginate, structure–activity relationship of alginate, and biological activities and physicochemical features of the enzymatic digestion products. Based on the substrate specificities, alginate lyases are classified into three groups: poly(β-d-mannuronate) lyase, poly(α-l-guluronate) lyase, and bifunctional alginate lyase, which are specific to mannuronate, guluronate, and both uronic acid residues, respectively. We have studied enzymological aspects of these three types of alginate lyases, and bioactivities of enzymatically digested alginate oligomers. In this chapter, we described the purification and characterization of three types of alginate lyases from different marine origins and overviewed the bioactivities of alginate oligomers.

      PubDate: 2016-09-13T13:16:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.07.003
       
  • Marine Microorganism: An Underexplored Source of l-Asparaginase
    • Authors: A.A. Prihanto; M. Wakayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): A.A. Prihanto, M. Wakayama
      l-Asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of l-asparagine to l-aspartic acid. This enzyme has an important role in medicine and food. l-Asparaginase is a potential drug in cancer therapy. Furthermore, it is also applied for reducing acrylamide, a carcinogenic compound in baked and fried foods. Until now, approved l-asparaginases for both applications are few due to their lack of appropriate properties. As a result, researchers have been enthusiastically seeking new sources of enzyme with better performance. A great number of terrestrial l-asparaginase-producing microorganisms have been reported but unfortunately, almost all failed to meet criteria for cancer therapy and acrylamide reducing agent. As a largest area than Earth, marine environment, by contrast, has not been optimally explored yet. So far, a great challenge facing an exploration of marine microorganisms is mainly due to their harsh, mysterious, and dangerous environment. It is clear that marine environment, a gigantic potential source for marine natural products is scantily revealed, although several approaches and technologies have been developed. This chapter presents the historical of l-asparaginase discovery and applications. It is also discussed, how the marine environment, even though offering a great potency but is still one of the less explored area for l-asparaginase-producing microorganisms.

      PubDate: 2016-09-13T13:16:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.07.005
       
  • Marine Microbes as a Potential Source of Cellulolytic Enzymes
    • Authors: N. Trivedi; C.R.K. Reddy; A.M. Lali
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2016
      Source:Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
      Author(s): N. Trivedi, C.R.K. Reddy, A.M. Lali
      Marine environment hosts the wide range of habitats with remarkably high and diverse microbial populations. The ability of marine microorganisms to survive in extreme temperature, salinity, and pressure depends on the function of multivarious enzyme systems that in turn provide vast potential for biotechnological exploration studies. Therefore, the enzymes from marine microorganism represent novel bio catalytic potential with stable and reliable properties. Microbial cellulases constitute a major group of industrial enzymes that find applications in various industries. Majority of cellulases are of terrestrial origin, and very limited research has been carried out to explore marine microbes as a source of cellulases. This chapter presents an overview about the types of marine polysaccharases, classification and potential applications of cellulases, different sources of marine cellulases, and their future perspectives.

      PubDate: 2016-09-13T13:16:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/bs.afnr.2016.07.002
       
 
 
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