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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3175 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3175 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 376, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 375, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 429, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 189, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 164, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease
  [SJR: 1.268]   [H-I: 45]   [10 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1548-5595
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3175 journals]
  • Diabetes and the Kidney: Sweet Dreams
    • Authors: James Novak; Jerry Yee
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): James E. Novak, Jerry Yee


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Diabetic Kidney Disease (c. 2018)
    • Authors: Katherine Tuttle
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Katherine R. Tuttle


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • The Global Epidemiology of Diabetes and Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Digsu Koye; Dianna Magliano Robert Nelson Meda Pavkov
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Digsu N. Koye, Dianna J. Magliano, Robert G. Nelson, Meda E. Pavkov
      The prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with the greatest increases occurring in low- and middle-income countries. In most developed countries, type 2 diabetes is presently the leading cause of end-stage renal disease and also contributes substantially to cardiovascular disease. In countries with weaker economies type 2 diabetes is rapidly replacing communicable diseases as a leading cause of kidney disease and is increasingly competing for scarce health care resources. Here, we present a narrative review of the prevalence and incidence of diabetes-related kidney disease worldwide. Mortality among those with diabetes and kidney disease will also be explored. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease, we will also examine the level of awareness of this disease among people who have it.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Competing Risk of Death With End-Stage Renal Disease in Diabetic Kidney
           Disease
    • Authors: Yue Jiang; Jason Fine Amy Mottl
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Yue Jiang, Jason P. Fine, Amy K. Mottl
      The concept of competing risks is particularly relevant to survival analyses of diabetic ESRD given the high likelihood of death prior to ESRD. Approaches such as Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression models operate on the assumption that there are no competing risks for the event of interest, yielding uninterpretable and generally biased estimates in the presence of competing risks. The cumulative incidence function and Fine-Gray regression are more appropriate methodologies for survival analysis when competing risks are present. We present an example taken from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes, a randomized trial of people with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were stratified according to baseline markers of kidney disease: (1) no kidney disease; (2) low estimated glomerular filtration rate; (3) microalbuminuria alone; and (4) macroalbuminuria. The macroalbuminuria group had the highest risk for ESRD and demonstrated the most marked difference between the Kaplan-Meier and cumulative incidence estimator. Cox and Fine-Gray regression models yielded similar risk estimates for baseline characteristics, with the exception of diabetes duration, which was significant in the Cox but not Fine-Gray model. We underscore the importance of competing risk methods, particularly when the competing risk is common, as is the case in diabetic kidney disease.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Glycemic Control as Primary Prevention for Diabetic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Richard MacIsaac; George Jerums Elif Ekinci
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Richard J. MacIsaac, George Jerums, Elif I. Ekinci
      Improving strategies to prevent the development and progression of CKD is a highly desirable outcome for all involved in the care of patients with diabetes. This is because CKD is a major factor contributing to morbidly and mortality in patients with diabetes. Furthermore, diabetes is the leading cause of ESRD in most developed countries. Although tight glucose control is now an established modality for preventing the development and progression of albuminuria, evidence is now accumulating to suggest that it can also ameliorate glomerular filtration rate loss and possibly progression to ESRD. These benefits of intensive glucose control appear to be most pronounced when applied to patients with the early stages of CKD. Recently, medications that belong to the sodium glucose cotransporter-type 2 inhibitor and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor analogue classes have been shown to reduce progression of CKD in patients with type 2 diabetes and relatively well-preserved kidney function. Here, we review the evidence from observational and interventional clinical studies that link good glucose control with the primary prevention of diabetic kidney disease with a focus on preventing early glomerular filtration rate loss.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • New Glucose-Lowering Agents for Diabetic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Lisanne Vos; Thushan Hettige Mark Cooper
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Lisanne C. de Vos, Thushan S. Hettige, Mark E. Cooper
      The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing and is associated with a range of complications including nephropathy. New antidiabetic agents are sought which also have positive effects to diminish diabetic complications. Examples of promising new classes of such agents are glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors. In addition to cardiovascular protective effects such as weight loss and decreased blood pressure of some of these agents, there is evidence for renoprotective effects with these agents. This review elaborates on the main results of renoprotective effects of these 3 treatment classes. In conclusion, currently available trials have demonstrated renoprotective effects for certain glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, liraglutide and semaglutide, and the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors, empagliflozin and canagliflozin. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors did not show a significant renoprotective effect. Nevertheless, larger studies with respect to renoprotective effects of these 3 drug classes are currently being performed, and thus, no conclusions for all of these agents can yet be made.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Treatment of Diabetic Kidney Disease With Hypertension Control and Renin
           Angiotensin System Inhibition
    • Authors: Vikram Patney; Kunal Chaudhary Adam Whaley-Connell
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Vikram Patney, Kunal Chaudhary, Adam Whaley-Connell
      The global incidence and prevalence of diabetes continues to expand due primarily to the influences of obesity and the contribution of obesity to the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The rising prevalence of type 2 diabetes has driven an increase in rates of CKD in the past 3 decades in the United States. In turn, so have the rates for complications related to type 2 diabetes including CKD, eg, diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Although incident rates for DKD have stabilized in the recent years, diabetes continues to be the leading cause of ESRD in the United States. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study data and other population-level studies support that lowering blood pressure reduces kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, strategies targeting renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system interruption have shown to improve DKD outcomes to a greater extent than other classes of antihypertensive regimens.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Acute Kidney Injury and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Samuel Mon-Wei; Joseph Bonventre
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Samuel Mon-Wei Yu, Joseph V. Bonventre
      Diabetic kidney disease, commonly termed diabetic nephropathy (DN), is the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) worldwide. The characteristic histopathology of DN includes glomerular basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, nodular glomerular sclerosis, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Diabetes is associated with a number of metabolic derangements, such as reactive oxygen species overproduction, hypoxic state, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation. In the past few decades, our knowledge of DN has advanced considerably although much needs to be learned. The traditional paradigm of glomerulus-centered pathophysiology has expanded to the tubule-interstitium, the immune response and inflammation. Biomarkers of proximal tubule injury have been shown to correlate with DN progression, independent of traditional glomerular injury biomarkers such as albuminuria. In this review, we summarize mechanisms of increased susceptibility to acute kidney injury in diabetes mellitus and the roles played by many kidney cell types to facilitate maladaptive responses leading to chronic and end-stage kidney disease.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Inflammatory Mechanisms as New Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for
           Diabetic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Radica Alicic; Emily Johnson Katherine Tuttle
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Radica Z. Alicic, Emily J. Johnson, Katherine R. Tuttle
      Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the leading cause of CKD and end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) worldwide. Approximately 30-40% of people with diabetes develop this microvascular complication, placing them at high risk of losing kidney function as well as of cardiovascular events, infections, and death. Current therapies are ineffective for arresting kidney disease progression and mitigating risks of comorbidities and death among patients with DKD. As the global count of people with diabetes will soon exceed 400 million, the need for effective and safe treatment options for complications such as DKD becomes ever more urgent. Recently, the understanding of DKD pathogenesis has evolved to recognize inflammation as a major underlying mechanism of kidney damage. In turn, inflammatory mediators have emerged as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for DKD. Phase 2 clinical trials testing inhibitors of monocyte-chemotactic protein-1 chemokine C-C motif-ligand 2 and the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway, in particular, have produced promising results.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Role of Kidney Biopsies for Biomarker Discovery in Diabetic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Helen Looker; Michael Mauer Robert Nelson
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Helen C. Looker, Michael Mauer, Robert G. Nelson
      Although estimated glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria are well-established biomarkers of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), additional biomarkers are needed, especially for the early stages of the disease when both albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate may still be in the normal range and are less helpful for identifying those at risk of progression. Traditional biomarker studies for early DKD are challenging because of a lack of good early clinical end points, and most rely on changes in existing imprecise biomarkers to assess the value of new biomarkers. There are well-characterized changes in kidney structure, however, that are highly correlated with kidney function, always precede the clinical findings of DKD and, at preclinical stages, predict DKD progression. These structural parameters may thus serve as clinically useful end points for identifying new biomarkers of early DKD. In addition, investigators are analyzing tissue transcriptomic data to identify pathways involved in early DKD which may have associated candidate biomarkers measurable in blood or urine, and differentially expressed microRNAs and epigenetic modifications in kidney tissue are beginning to yield important observations which may be useful in identifying new clinically useful biomarkers. This review examines the emerging literature on the use of kidney tissue in biomarker discovery in DKD.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • The Promise of Systems Biology for Diabetic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Frank Brosius; Wenjun
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2
      Author(s): Frank C. Brosius, Wenjun Ju
      Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) has a complex and prolonged pathogenesis involving many cell types in the kidney as well as extrarenal factors. It is clinically silent for many years after the onset of diabetes and usually progresses over decades. Given this complexity, a comprehensive and unbiased molecular approach is best suited to help identify the most critical mechanisms responsible for progression of DKD and those most suited for targeted intervention. Systems biological investigations provide such an approach since they examine the entire network of molecular changes that occur in a disease process in a comprehensive way instead of focusing on a single abnormal molecule or pathway. Systems biological studies can also start with analysis of the disease in humans, not in animal or cell culture models that often poorly reproduce the changes in human DKD. Indeed, in the last decade, systems biological approaches have led to the identification of critical molecular abnormalities in DKD and have directly led to development of new biomarkers and potential treatments for DKD.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Table of Contents for National Kidney Foundation 2018 Spring Clinical
           Meeting Abstracts April 10-14, 2018
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Implementation of a Program to Manage Transition of Care for End-Stage
           Renal Disease (ESRD) Patients Discharged from the Hospital
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Cardiovascular Risk Stratification Tool Evaluation in Renal Transplant
           Recipients
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Depression and Medication Adherence in Patients on Hemodialysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Transition from Pediatric to Adult Dialysis Care in an Adult with Special
           Considerations Due to Neurocognitive Aspects of Asperger Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Peritoneal Dialysis in Octogenerians
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • QI Project to Increase Venipuncture Best Practice in Patients with GFR
           < 60mg/dl
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Quality of Life in Patients with Early Stage CKD After Mindful Eating
           Intervention to Improve Self-Management of Dietary Intake
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Future/Previous Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Measurement of Glomerular Filtration Rate as a Diagnostic Test: Old
           Limitations and New Directions and Challenges Worthy of an Olympic
           Gold Medal
    • Authors: Donald Molony; Jerry Yee
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Donald A. Molony, Jerry Yee


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • A Roadmap for Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate: Where Have We Been,
           Where Are We Now, and Where Do We Need to Go'
    • Authors: Lesley Inker
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lesley A. Inker


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate; Laboratory Implementation and
           Current Global Status
    • Authors: Greg Miller; Graham R.D. Jones
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): W. Greg Miller, Graham R.D. Jones
      In 2002, the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines for identifying and treating CKD recommended that clinical laboratories report estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with every creatinine result to assist clinical practitioners to identify people with early-stage CKD. At that time, the original Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation based on serum creatinine measurements was recommended for calculating eGFR. Because the MDRD Study equation was developed using a nonstandardized creatinine method, a Laboratory Working Group of the National Kidney Disease Education program was formed and implemented standardized calibration traceability for all creatinine methods from global manufacturers by approximately 2010. A modified MDRD Study equation for use with standardized creatinine was developed. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration developed a new equation in 2009 that was more accurate than the MDRD Study equation at values above 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. As of 2017, reporting eGFR with creatinine is almost universal in many countries. A reference system for cystatin C became available in 2010, and manufacturers are in the process to standardize cystatin C assays. Equations for eGFR based on standardized cystatin C alone and with creatinine are now available from the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration and other groups.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Pragmatic Use of Kidney Function Estimates for Drug Dosing: The Tide Is
           Turning
    • Authors: Joanna Hudson; Thomas Nolin
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Joanna Q. Hudson, Thomas D. Nolin
      Creatinine clearance has been the most common method of estimating kidney function for the purpose of drug dosing for decades. The availability and extensive clinical use of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) now provides clinicians a potential alternative. Currently, data demonstrating the validity of eGFR-based drug dosing is limited, but proof of principle has been established and the tide related to use of eGFR for drug dosing appears to be turning. Use of the same kidney function estimate for management of kidney disease, drug development and dosing, and harmonization in all clinical arenas would be ideal. Use of multiple equations can lead to differences in kidney function estimates and corresponding drug dosing regimens, which necessitates clinical judgment and a pragmatic approach when rendering drug dosing decisions. Careful consideration of the risk-benefit ratio of individual drugs and dosing regimens within each patient is warranted. Going forward, FDA guidance will likely incentivize pharmaceutical manufacturers to generate eGFR-based dosing recommendations in addition to creatinine clearance for inclusion in the label of newly approved drugs. However, dosing information for currently approved drugs will continue to be based on creatinine clearance alone, so clinicians must be vigilant in the assessment of kidney function in order to provide optimal pharmacotherapy.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Assessment of Glomerular Filtration Rate and End-Stage Kidney Disease Risk
           in Living Kidney Donor Candidates: A Paradigm for Evaluation, Selection,
           and Counseling
    • Authors: Lesley Inker; Farrukh Koraishy Nitender Goyal Krista Lentine
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lesley A. Inker, Farrukh M. Koraishy, Nitender Goyal, Krista L. Lentine
      Living donor kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment option for ESRD. However, recent data suggest a small increase in the long-term risk of kidney failure in living kidney donors when compared to healthy nondonors. These data have led to a need for reconsideration of how donor candidates are evaluated and selected for donation. A Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) work group completed a comprehensive clinical practice guideline for evaluation of living kidney donor candidates in 2017, based on systematic evidence review, de novo evidence generation, and expert opinion. Central to the evaluation framework is assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), which is used to screen for kidney disease and aid the prediction of long-term kidney failure risk after donation. Accurate estimation of the level of GFR and risk of kidney failure, and communication of estimated risks, can support evidence-based donor selection and shared decision-making. In this review, we discuss approaches to optimal GFR estimation in the donor evaluation process, long-term risk projection, and risk communication to donor candidates, integrating recommendations from the new KDIGO guideline, other recent literature, and experience from our own research and practice. We conclude by highlighting topics for further research in this important area of transplant medicine.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Kidney Function in Obesity—Challenges in Indexing and Estimation
    • Authors: Alex Chang; Waleed Zafar Morgan Grams
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alex R. Chang, Waleed Zafar, Morgan E. Grams
      As the prevalence of obesity continues to increase worldwide, an increasing number of people are at risk for kidney disease. Thus, there is a critical need to understand how best to assess kidney function in this population, and several challenges exist. The convention of indexing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to body surface area (BSA) attempts to normalize exposure to metabolic wastes across populations of differing body size. In obese individuals, this convention results in a significantly lower indexed GFR than unindexed GFR, which has practical implications for drug dosing. Recent data suggest that “unindexing” estimated GFR (multiplying by BSA/1.73 m2) for drug dosing may be acceptable, but pharmocokinetic data to support this practice are lacking. Beyond indexing, biomarkers commonly used for estimating GFR may induce bias. Creatinine is influenced by muscle mass, whereas cystatin C correlates with fat mass, both independent of kidney function. Further research is needed to evaluate the performance of estimating equations and other filtration markers in obesity, and determine whether unindexed GFR might better predict optimal drug dosing and clinical outcomes in patients whose BSA is very different than the conventional normalized value of 1.73 m2.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Glomerular Filtration Rates in Asians
    • Authors: Boon Wee; Teo Luxia Zhang Jinn-Yuh Guh Sydney C.W. Tang
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Boon Wee Teo, Luxia Zhang, Jinn-Yuh Guh, Sydney C.W. Tang, Vivekanand Jha, Duk-Hee Kang, Roberto Tanchanco, Lai Seong Hooi, Kearkiat Praditpornsilpa, Xianglei Kong, Li Zuo, Gek Cher Chan, Evan J.C. Lee
      The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines recommended the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for the classification of CKD, but its accuracy was limited to North American patients with estimated GFR <60 mL/min per 1.73 m2 body surface area of European (White) or African (Black) descent. The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) developed another equation for estimating GFR, derived from a population that included both participants without kidney disease and with CKD. But many ethnicities were inadequately represented. The International Society of Nephrology, Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes committee promulgated clinical practice guidelines, which recommended the CKD-EPI equation. Investigators in Asia subsequently assessed the performance of these GFR estimating equations—the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study equation, the CKD-EPI equation (creatinine only), and the CKD-EPI equations (creatinine and cystatin C). In this review, we summarize the studies performed in Asia on validating or establishing new Asian ethnicity GFR estimating equations. We included both prospective and retrospective studies which used serum markers traceable to reference materials and focused the review of the performance of GFR estimation by comparisons with the GFR estimations obtained from the CKD-EPI equations.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Assessment of Kidney Function in Patients With Cancer
    • Authors: Torres Costa; Silva Elerson Costalonga Fernanda Coelho Renato Caires Emmanuel
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Verônica Torres da Costa e Silva, Elerson C. Costalonga, Fernanda O. Coelho, Renato A. Caires, Emmanuel A. Burdmann
      Cancer patients are living longer. The sequelae of cancer treatment and the role of comorbid conditions present before the diagnosis, such as CKD, have been increasingly recognized. The interface between CKD and cancer is multifaceted. CKD is frequently observed in patients with cancer, and cancer treatment contributes to CKD development and progression. In addition, CKD has been recognized as an important risk factor for cancer development and reduced specific cancer survival. In this context, an accurate evaluation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) during oncologic treatment is pivotal and is used to define surgery strategies, program prophylactic management of contrasted examinations, make decisions on cisplatin eligibility, and adjust drug prescriptions, particularly chemotherapy agents. Although the most commonly used equations to estimate GFR based on serum creatinine levels in clinical practice (Cockcroft-Gault, Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study, and CKD Epidemiology Collaboration equations) have not been validated in patients with cancer in large prospective studies, there is increasingly evidence supporting the use of CKD Epidemiology Collaboration equation to assess the GFR in patients with cancer, including for the use of chemotherapy prescriptions. Many patients with cancer may have changes in nutrition status and clearance measurements such as exogenous filtration markers might be extremely useful when clinical decisions differ depending on the GFR level. Future perspectives include the advent of new serum GFR biomarkers such as cystatin C, beta-trace protein, and beta-2 microglobulin as well as the GFR assessment by measuring total kidney parenchymal volume through image examinations.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Alternatives for the Bedside Schwartz Equation to Estimate Glomerular
           Filtration Rate in Children
    • Authors: Hans Pottel; Laurence Dubourg Karolien Goffin Pierre Delanaye
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hans Pottel, Laurence Dubourg, Karolien Goffin, Pierre Delanaye
      The bedside Schwartz equation has long been and still is the recommended equation to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in children. However, this equation is probably best suited to estimate GFR in children with chronic kidney disease (reduced GFR) but is not optimal for children with GFR >75 mL/min/1.73 m2. Moreover, the Schwartz equation requires the height of the child, information that is usually not available in the clinical laboratory. This makes automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) along with serum creatinine impossible. As the majority of children (even children referred to nephrology clinics) have GFR >75 mL/min/1.73 m2, it might be interesting to evaluate possible alternatives to the bedside Schwartz equation. The pediatric form of the Full Age Spectrum (FAS) equation offers an alternative to Schwartz, allowing automatic reporting of eGFR since height is not necessary. However, when height is involved in the FAS equation, the equation is essentially equal to the Schwartz equation for children, but there are large differences for adolescents. Combining standardized biomarkers increases the prediction performance of eGFR equations for children, reaching P10 ≈ 45% and P30 ≈ 90%. There are currently good and simple alternatives to the bedside Schwartz equation, but the more complex equations combining serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, and height show the highest accuracy and precision.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate From a Panel of Filtration
           Markers—Hope for Increased Accuracy Beyond Measured Glomerular
           Filtration Rate'
    • Authors: Lesley Inker; Andrew Levey Josef Coresh
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lesley A. Inker, Andrew S. Levey, Josef Coresh
      The recent Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes 2012 CKD guidelines recommend estimating GFR from serum creatinine (eGFRcr) as a first-line test to assess kidney function and using cystatin C or measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as confirmatory tests. eGFRcr may be inaccurate in people with variation in muscle mass or diet, and eGFRcys is not more accurate than eGFRcr. eGFRcrcys is more accurate than either, but it is not independent of eGFRcr. Measured GFR is not practical and is susceptible to error due to variation in clearance methods and in the behavior of exogenous filtration markers. Over the past few years, we have hypothesized, and begun to test the hypothesis, that a panel of filtration markers (panel eGFR) from a single blood draw would require fewer demographic or clinical variables and could estimate GFR as accurately as measured GFR. In this article, we describe the conceptual background and rationale for this hypothesis and summarize our work thus far including evaluation of novel low-molecular-weight proteins and metabolites and then outline how we envision that such a panel could be used in clinical practice, research, and public health.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Measured GFR in Routine Clinical Practice—The Promise of Dried Blood
           Spots
    • Authors: Petter Bjornstad; Amy Karger David Maahs
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Petter Bjornstad, Amy B. Karger, David M. Maahs
      Accurate determination of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is crucial for the diagnosis of kidney disease. Estimated GFR (eGFR) calculated by serum creatinine and/or cystatin C is a mainstay in clinical practice and epidemiologic research but lacks precision and accuracy until GFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Furthermore, eGFR may not precisely and accurately represent changes in GFR longitudinally. The lack of precision and accuracy is of concern in populations at high risk for kidney disease, as the dissociation between changes in eGFR and GFR may lead to missed diagnoses of early kidney disease. Therefore, improved methods to quantify GFR are needed. Whereas direct measures of GFR have been too cumbersome for screening and ambulatory care, a practical method of measuring GFR by iohexol clearance using dried capillary blood spots exists. In this review, we examine the current literature and data addressing GFR measurements by dried capillary blood spots and its potential application in high-risk groups.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Challenges in Measuring Glomerular Filtration Rate: A Clinical Laboratory
           Perspective
    • Authors: Jesse Seegmiller; John Eckfeldt John Lieske
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jesse C. Seegmiller, John H. Eckfeldt, John C. Lieske
      The assessment of kidney function is a cornerstone in the clinical management and health of the patient. Although the kidneys perform many physiologic functions and are essential for maintaining homeostasis, kidney function is typically evaluated, quantitated, and understood using the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Although GFR can be directly measured using a variety of externally administered glomerular filtration markers, in general practice, the GFR is usually estimated (eGFR) using endogenous markers that are cleared primarily by kidney filtration. Common situations exist where the GFR needs to be measured (mGFR) in order to proceed with care. This manuscript will review laboratory challenges in the assessment of GFR. Key points to consider when implementing a mGFR testing protocol are the following: marker selection, clearance methodology (urinary vs solely plasma measurements of filtration marker), sample collection, number of samples to collect, staff required, and analytical measurement technology for the filtration marker selected. We suggest those wanting to implement mGFR testing examine site-specific institutional resources along with patient population and proceed with the approaches best suited for their clinical needs and laboratory resources available.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Measurement and Estimation of Residual Kidney Function in Patients on
           Dialysis
    • Authors: Tariq Shafi; Andrew Levey
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tariq Shafi, Andrew S. Levey
      Residual kidney function (RKF) in patients on dialysis is strongly associated with survival and better quality of life. Assessment of kidney function underlies the management of patients with chronic kidney disease before dialysis initiation. However, methods to assess RKF after dialysis initiation are just now being refined. In this review, we discuss the definition of RKF and methods for measurement and estimation of RKF, highlighting the unique aspects of dialysis that impact these assessments.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Kinetic Glomerular Filtration Rate in Routine Clinical
           Practice—Applications and Possibilities
    • Authors: Sheldon Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 25, Issue 1
      Author(s): Sheldon Chen
      When the [creatinine] is changing, the kidney function can still be tracked with a quantitative technique called kinetic glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The equation yields useful information on the severity of acute kidney injury, the clinical course of kidney and dialysis clearances, and the timing of kidney recovery. It has been validated in at least 3 independent studies, where it performed sufficiently well in intensive care unit and kidney transplant settings, and in head-to-head comparisons with biomarkers. Because it is based on a mathematical model, the kinetic GFR faces limitations depending on the accuracy of its assumptions. As the assumptions more accurately reflect the complexities of biology, some of these limitations can be overcome in a more sophisticated model. Kinetic GFR is an easy-to-use, low-cost tool that should be more widely incorporated into medical practice.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T07:51:29Z
       
  • Learning From Kids
    • Authors: Alicia Neu; Jerry Yee
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Alicia Neu, Jerry Yee


      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
  • When Kidneys Grow up
    • Authors: Joshua Samuels
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Joshua A. Samuels


      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
  • Measurement and Estimation of Glomerular Filtration Rate in Children
    • Authors: Ayesa Mian; George Schwartz
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ayesa N. Mian, George J. Schwartz
      Rapid, accurate, and precise measures of kidney function are essential for daily management of patients. While plasma and urinary clearances provide the greatest accuracy for assessing glomerular filtration rate (GFR), these are often impractical particularly for the care of children. Serum creatinine, the most commonly used endogenous marker, is simple, convenient, and practical but less accurate because of the influence of non-GFR determinants such as muscle mass, which increases with age in children. GFR estimating equations have been developed for adults and children to improve the accuracy of endogenous biomarkers, such as creatinine and cystatin C, by accounting for some of the non-GFR determinants, thus enhancing the practitioner's ability to assess GFR. In the steady state, when height is used as a surrogate for growth, there is a strong correlation between height/SCr and GFR. Current national guidelines recommend routine reporting of the estimated GFR alongside the serum creatinine value for adults using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration creatinine-based formula and the updated Schwartz “bedside” formula (CKiD 2009) for children.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
  • Holding Water: Congenital Anomalies of the Kidney and Urinary Tract, CKD,
           and the Ongoing Role of Excellence in Plumbing
    • Authors: Lars Cisek
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Lars J. Cisek
      Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tracts can result in diminished natal kidney function, possibly through common embryologic pathway disruption or as a result of development taking place in the face of disordered ‘post-renal’ drainage. Impaired conduit and reservoir function present potential for an ongoing assault leading to further deterioration and progression of chronic kidney disease, a risk that extends to adults with these conditions, even after “correction”. The drainage and storage aspects of the urinary system that can impact kidney function are reviewed with attention to correctable or manageable problems including: Bladder dysfunction wherein the low pressure storage of urine is compromised requiring the kidney to work against a pressure gradient, the classic post renal failure problem. The kidney in the aftermath of obstruction which may have lost concentrating capacity leading to a tendency to dehydration (‘pre-renal’ failure) and through polyuria which exacerbates bladder pressure problems. Further there is an added challenge in evaluation for ongoing or reemergent obstruction in a significantly dilated system where the capacious system leads to slow turnover of urine often requiring a ureteral stent or nephrostomy to clearly establish clinical significance of delayed drainage. Stasis where slow urine flow leads to buildup of debris (stone) or potentiates infection. Vessicoureteral reflux which allows for introduction of lower urinary tract bacteria to the kidney and can lead to pyelonephritis. Conditions which combine problems such as posterior urethral valves where the bladder outlet obstruction compromises kidney function potentially impairing concentrating ability, creates bladder compromise often reducing emptying efficiency or elevating bladder storage pressures, as well as dilating the system potentially promoting stasis. Cognizance of the potential for plumbing problems to further kidney deterioration as patients with congenital urinary tract anomalies, even after they have been repaired is incumbent on those caring for these patients as they age. Thoughtful evaluation of those patients in whom kidney compromise maybe aggravated by drainage and storage disorder will optimize native renal function.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
  • Glomerular Diseases in Children
    • Authors: Scott Wenderfer; Joseph Gaut
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Scott E. Wenderfer, Joseph P. Gaut
      Unique challenges exist in the diagnosis and treatment of glomerular diseases with their onset during childhood. Mounting evidence supports the notion that earlier onset cases occur due to larger numbers of genetic risk alleles. Nearly all causes of adult-onset glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and thrombotic microangiopathy have also been described in children, although the prevalence of specific causes differs. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis, and minimal change disease remain the most common causes of glomerular disease in younger children in the United States and can be diagnosed clinically without need for biopsy. IgA nephropathy is the most common pediatric glomerular disease diagnosed by kidney biopsy and is considered the most common chronic glomerulopathy worldwide. In both developing and developed countries, there is a strong relationship between infectious diseases and nephritis onset or relapse. Although research has led to a better understanding of how to classify and manage glomerular diseases in children, the need for disease-specific biomarkers of activity and chronicity remains a hurdle. The strength of the immune system and the growth and maturation that occurs during adolescence are unique and require age-specific approaches to disease management.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
  • Monogenic Hypertension in Children: A Review With Emphasis on Genetics
    • Authors: Anjali Aggarwal; David Rodriguez-Buritica
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Anjali Aggarwal, David Rodriguez-Buritica
      Hypertension (HT) is a public health problem in children particularly related to the epidemic of overweight and obesity. Monogenic forms of HT are important in the differential diagnosis in children presenting with severe or refractory HT, who have a family history of early-onset HT, unusual physical examination findings, and/or characteristic hormonal and biochemical abnormalities. Most genetic defects in these disorders ultimately result in increased sodium transport in the distal nephron resulting in volume expansion and HT. Genetic testing, which is increasingly available, has diagnostic, therapeutic, and predictive implications for families affected by these rare conditions.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
  • Acute Kidney Injury in Children
    • Authors: Scott Sutherland; David Kwiatkowski
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, Volume 24, Issue 6
      Author(s): Scott M. Sutherland, David M. Kwiatkowski
      Acute kidney injury (AKI) has become one of the more common complications seen among hospitalized children. The development of a consensus definition has helped refine the epidemiology of pediatric AKI, and we now have a far better understanding of its incidence, risk factors, and outcomes. Strategies for diagnosing AKI have extended beyond serum creatinine, and the most current data underscore the diagnostic importance of oliguria as well as introduce the concept of urinary biomarkers of kidney injury. As AKI has become more widespread, we have seen that it is associated with a number of adverse consequences including longer lengths of stay and greater mortality. Though effective treatments do not currently exist for AKI once it develops, we hope that the diagnostic and definitional strides seen recently translate to the testing and development of more effective interventions.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T07:17:58Z
       
 
 
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