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Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3042 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 3042 Journals sorted alphabetically
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 81, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 328, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 206, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 128, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 340, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 309, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 400, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access  
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access  
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 8, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 160, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription  
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access  
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 153, SJR: 1.907, h-index: 126)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.151, h-index: 83)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.711, h-index: 78)
Annales d'Endocrinologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.394, h-index: 30)
Annales d'Urologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Cardiologie et d'Angéiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.177, h-index: 13)
Annales de Chirurgie de la Main et du Membre Supérieur     Full-text available via subscription  
Annales de Chirurgie Plastique Esthétique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.354, h-index: 22)
Annales de Chirurgie Vasculaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Academic Pediatrics
  [SJR: 1.402]   [H-I: 51]   [20 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1876-2859
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3042 journals]
  • Including Pediatric Residents in a Standardized Process of Rapid Sequence
           Intubation in a Pediatric Emergency Department: A Pilot Program
           (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Benjamin T. Kerrey; Brad Sobolewski; Tara Kopp; Javier Gonzalez-del-rey
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Benjamin T. Kerrey, Brad Sobolewski, Tara Kopp, Javier Gonzalez-del-rey


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.026
       
  • Leadership for Urban Primary Care Education and Transformation (LUCENT)
           (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Rita Rossi-Foulkes; Anna Volerman; Alisa McQueen; Deborah Burnet
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Rita Rossi-Foulkes, Anna Volerman, Alisa McQueen, Deborah Burnet


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.027
       
  • Simulated Encounter in Primary Care (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Candice C. Dye; Nancy Tofil
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Candice C. Dye, Nancy Tofil


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.028
       
  • Leadership Development: An Integrated Approach to Changing Trainee
           Leadership Attitudes, Skills, and Beliefs (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Susan B. Hathaway; John Rosen; Angela L. Myers; Rachel Laws
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Susan B. Hathaway, John Rosen, Angela L. Myers, Rachel Laws


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.029
       
  • Responsibility for Patient Care in Graduate Medical Education: Defining
           and Assessing Ownership of Clinical Care (Research Abstract)
    • Authors: Katie A. Greenzang; Jennifer C. Kesselheim
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Katie A. Greenzang, Jennifer C. Kesselheim


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.030
       
  • Interpreter Use Training Through Simulation (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Kathryn Diamond-Falk; Brian Youth
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Kathryn Diamond-Falk, Brian Youth


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.031
       
  • Outcomes of a Novel Curriculum on De-Escalating Angry Caregivers for
           Pediatric Residents (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Sarah L. Hilgenberg; Alyssa Bogetz; Collin Leibold; David Gaba; Rebecca Blankenburg
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Sarah L. Hilgenberg, Alyssa Bogetz, Collin Leibold, David Gaba, Rebecca Blankenburg


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.032
       
  • A Novel Simulation-Based Ultrasound Curriculum (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Vinod Havalad; Joanne Claveria; William Tsai
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Vinod Havalad, Joanne Claveria, William Tsai


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.033
       
  • Sim One, Teach One - Senior Resident-Led Pediatric Intern Procedural
           Training (Research Abstract)
    • Authors: Svetlana Melamed; Beverley Robin
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Svetlana Melamed, Beverley Robin


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.035
       
  • A Simulation-Based Procedural Curriculum for Pediatric Interns Improves
           Self-Perceived Competence (Research Abstract)
    • Authors: Meera S. Meerkov; Thomas G. Saba
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Meera S. Meerkov, Thomas G. Saba


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.036
       
  • A Simulation-Based Longitudinal Procedural Curriculum for Pediatric
           Residents Improves Self-Perceived Competence (Research Abstract)
    • Authors: Jason B. Fischer; Thomas Saba
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Jason B. Fischer, Thomas Saba


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.037
       
  • Simulation Curriculum Associated With Improved Resident Self-Confidence in
           Code Team Leadership Skills (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Cailyn Rood; Amanda Rogers; Abigail Schuh; Michael C. Weisgerber; Robert Treat
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Cailyn Rood, Amanda Rogers, Abigail Schuh, Michael C. Weisgerber, Robert Treat


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.038
       
  • Improving Care of Children Admitted to the Hospital With Failure to Thrive
           (FTT) (QI Abstract)
    • Authors: Taylor Heald-Sargent; Daphne Vander Roest; Jennifer Chapman; Joseph Hageman; Jasmine Umana; Asad Qadir; Brittany Hodgson; Marguerite Costitch; Katherine Anderson; Martin Duncan; Jill Glick
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Taylor Heald-Sargent, Daphne Vander Roest, Jennifer Chapman, Joseph Hageman, Jasmine Umana, Asad Qadir, Brittany Hodgson, Marguerite Costitch, Katherine Anderson, Martin Duncan, Jill Glick


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.039
       
  • Resident Leadership at Neonatal Resuscitations (Research Abstract)
    • Authors: Andrew Z. Heling; Wayne A. Price; Kenya McNeal-Trice; Sofia R. Aliaga
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Andrew Z. Heling, Wayne A. Price, Kenya McNeal-Trice, Sofia R. Aliaga


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.040
       
  • Phys Ed: Pediatric Intern Curriculum for Techniques in Physical
           Examination (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Fatima Al Dhaheri; Aisha Barber
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Fatima Al Dhaheri, Aisha Barber


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.041
       
  • Resident Experiences With the Individualized Curriculum: Current State and
           Future Opportunities (Platform Presentation)
    • Authors: Daniel J. Schumacher; Mary Pat Frintner; William Cull
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Daniel J. Schumacher, Mary Pat Frintner, William Cull


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.042
       
  • Prime: Inaugural Years & Impact of a Resident-Led Medical Education
           Interest Group (Platform Presentation)
    • Authors: Regina L. Toto; Christine March; Liny John; Hilary Michel; Benjamin Miller
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Regina L. Toto, Christine March, Liny John, Hilary Michel, Benjamin Miller


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.043
       
  • Achieving Consistent Expectations and Empowering Senior Residents on
           Inpatient Family-Centered Rounds (QI Abstract)
    • Authors: Erin E. King; Heather Dahlquist; Patricia Hickey
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Erin E. King, Heather Dahlquist, Patricia Hickey


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.044
       
  • A Novel Approach to Training Pediatrician-Scientists During Intern Year of
           Pediatric Residency Training (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Audrea M. Burns; Jake A. Kushner; Mark A. Ward; Jordan S. Orange
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Audrea M. Burns, Jake A. Kushner, Mark A. Ward, Jordan S. Orange


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.045
       
  • Telephone Management Training by Podcast - Length and Content
           Considerations (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Michael J. Cosimini; Juan Espinoza
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Michael J. Cosimini, Juan Espinoza


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.046
       
  • Overcoming Barriers to the Implementation of an Academic Half Day
           (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Amy C. Stier; Emily S. Peterson; Eyad Hanna; Erin Howe; Glenda Rabe
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Amy C. Stier, Emily S. Peterson, Eyad Hanna, Erin Howe, Glenda Rabe


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.047
       
  • Surfboards Program: An Innovative Mixed Methods Comprehensive Pediatric
           Resident Boards Review Curriculum (Descriptive Abstract)
    • Authors: Amanda J. Rogers; Michael Weisgerber; Jennifer Di Rocco; Sara Lauck
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Amanda J. Rogers, Michael Weisgerber, Jennifer Di Rocco, Sara Lauck


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.048
       
  • Is a Positive Developmental-Behavioral Screening Score Sufficient to
           Justify Referral' A Review of Evidence and Theory
    • Authors: R. Christopher Sheldrick; Daryl Garfinkel
      Pages: 464 - 470
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): R. Christopher Sheldrick, Daryl Garfinkel
      In their recommendations on screening for autism and developmental disabilities, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends referral subsequent to a positive screening result. In this article, we argue that positive screening results are not always sufficient to justify a referral. We show that although positive predictive values are often low, they actually overstate the probability of having a disorder for many children who screen positive. Moreover, recommended screening thresholds are seldom set to ensure that the benefits of referral will equal or exceed the costs and risk of harm, which is a necessary condition for an optimal threshold in decision analysis. Drawing on recent recommendations for the Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Medicine, we discuss the implications of this argument for pediatric policy, education, and practice. In particular, we recommend that screening policies be revised to ensure that the costs and benefits of actions recommended in the event of a positive screen are appropriate to the screening threshold. We recommend greater focus on clinical decision-making in the education of physicians, including shared decision-making with patients and their families. Finally, we recommend broadening the scope of screening research to encompass not only the accuracy of specific screening instruments, but also their ability to improve decision-making in the context of systems of care.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.01.016
       
  • How Often Are Parents Counseled About Family Planning During Pediatric
           Visits' Results of a Nationally Representative Sample
    • Authors: Maya Venkataramani; Tina L. Cheng; Barry S. Solomon; Craig Evan Pollack
      Pages: 476 - 478
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Maya Venkataramani, Tina L. Cheng, Barry S. Solomon, Craig Evan Pollack
      Objective Maternal family planning plays an important role in child, maternal, and family health; children's health care providers are in a unique position to counsel adult caregivers regarding contraception and appropriate birth spacing. We sought to determine the prevalence of caregiver family planning counseling by children's health care providers during preventive care visits for infants and young children. Methods Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2009 to 2012 as well as National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2009 to 2011 were analyzed to determine the weighted frequency of family planning/contraception counseling provided during preventive, primary care visits for children younger than the age of 2 years. Results Family planning/contraception counseling or education was documented in only 16 of 4261 preventive care visits in primary care settings for children younger than the age of 2 years, corresponding to 0.30% (95% confidence interval, −0.08% to 0.68%) of visits nationally. Similar frequencies were calculated for preventive visits with children younger than 1 year and with infants younger than 60 days of age. Conclusions Despite Bright Futures' recommendations for children's health care providers to address caregiver family planning during well infant visits, documented counseling is rare. The results indicate that there are missed opportunities to promote family health in the pediatric setting.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.03.001
       
  • Which Pediatricians Comanage Mental Health Conditions'
    • Authors: Cori Green; Amy Storfer-Isser; Ruth E.K. Stein; Andrew S. Garner; Bonnie D. Kerker; Moira Szilagyi; Karen G. O'Connor; Kimberly E. Hoagwood; Sarah M. Horwitz
      Pages: 479 - 486
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Cori Green, Amy Storfer-Isser, Ruth E.K. Stein, Andrew S. Garner, Bonnie D. Kerker, Moira Szilagyi, Karen G. O'Connor, Kimberly E. Hoagwood, Sarah M. Horwitz
      Objective Given the prevalence of mental health (MH) conditions (MHC) in children, pediatricians should initiate treatment alone or in collaboration with a specialist for children with MHC. However, the majority of pediatricians do not manage or comanage common MHC even with an on-site MH provider. We examined which physician, practice, and training characteristics are associated with pediatricians' comanaging at least half of their patients with MHC. Methods We analyzed responses of general pediatricians (n = 305) from the American Academy of Pediatrics 2013 Periodic Survey. Practice characteristics include presence of an on-site MH provider and perceived access to services. Independent variables included sociodemographics, training experiences, and interest in further training. The outcome was comanagement of ≥50% of patients with MHC. Weighted univariate, bivariate, and multivariable analyses were performed. Results Of the pediatricians who reported comanaging ≥50% of their patients with MHC, logistic regression analysis showed that pediatricians who completed ≥4 weeks of developmental behavioral pediatrics training had 1.8 increased odds (95% confidence interval 1.06, 3.08, P = .03) of comanagement, those very interested in further education in managing/treating MHC had 2.75 increased odds (95% confidence interval 1.63, 3.08, P < .001), and those with more training in MH treatment with medications had 1.4 increased odds (95% confidence interval 1.12, 1.75, P = .004) of comanaging children with MHC. Conclusions Specific educational experiences and interest in further education in managing or treating MHC were significantly associated with comanaging ≥50% of patients, suggesting that enhanced MH training among pediatricians could increase the comanagement of children with MHC.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.014
       
  • Attitudes and Experiences of Early and Midcareer Pediatricians With the
           Maintenance of Certification Process
    • Authors: Bobbi J. Byrne; Mary Pat Frintner; Heather N. Abraham; Amy J. Starmer
      Pages: 487 - 496
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Bobbi J. Byrne, Mary Pat Frintner, Heather N. Abraham, Amy J. Starmer
      Objective Maintenance of certification (MOC) value and relevance have been recent topics of controversy and discussion in medicine. Systematically assessing pediatrician's attitudes and experiences to encourage and inform future modifications is important. Methods We surveyed 866 pediatricians in 2014 who graduated from residency 10 to 12 years ago and are part of a larger longitudinal study. Cross-sectional quantitative and qualitative data on understanding, attitudes, barriers, and needs specific to MOC part 2 (self-assessment/continued learning activities) and part 4 (quality improvement projects) were analyzed. McNemar tests compared responses on questions specific to part 2 with those specific to part 4. Multivariable logistic regression considered differences in participants who did and did not have positive part 4 attitudes. Results A total of 77.8% completed the survey. Comparing part 4 to part 2, there was less understanding of requirements (59.9%, 72.9%, P < .001), more agreement that relevant available activities is a barrier (67.6%, 44.0%, P < .001), stronger agreement that more choices would be helpful (72.8%, 53.8%, P < .001), and less perceived impact on patient care or lifelong learning (12.5%, 47.2%, P < .001). Participants reporting that part 4 improves care were less likely to agree that time to fulfill requirements (adjusted odds ratio = 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.18–0.51) and relevant available activities (adjusted odds ratio = 0.22, 95% confidence interval 0.13–0.39) were barriers. Qualitative analysis revealed themes including time, cost, and relevance. Conclusions Pediatricians expressed significant frustration with the MOC process, poor understanding of requirements, and barriers with the process, especially for part 4. Increasing diplomate education on the process and increasing available and relevant activities may be important to optimize physician's continuous learning.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.019
       
  • Food Insecurity Screening in Pediatric Primary Care: Can Offering
           Referrals Help Identify Families in Need'
    • Authors: Clement J. Bottino; Erinn T. Rhodes; Catherine Kreatsoulas; Joanne E. Cox; Eric W. Fleegler
      Pages: 497 - 503
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Clement J. Bottino, Erinn T. Rhodes, Catherine Kreatsoulas, Joanne E. Cox, Eric W. Fleegler
      Objective To describe a clinical approach for food insecurity screening incorporating a menu offering food-assistance referrals, and to examine relationships between food insecurity and referral selection. Methods Caregivers of 3- to 10-year-old children presenting for well-child care completed a self-administered questionnaire on a laptop computer. Items included the US Household Food Security Survey Module: 6-Item Short Form (food insecurity screen) and a referral menu offering assistance with: 1) finding a food pantry, 2) getting hot meals, 3) applying for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and 4) applying for Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Referrals were offered independent of food insecurity status or eligibility. We examined associations between food insecurity and referral selection using multiple logistic regression while adjusting for covariates. Results A total of 340 caregivers participated; 106 (31.2%) reported food insecurity, and 107 (31.5%) selected one or more referrals. Forty-nine caregivers (14.4%) reported food insecurity but selected no referrals; 50 caregivers (14.7%) selected one or more referrals but did not report food insecurity; and 57 caregivers (16.8%) both reported food insecurity and selected one or more referrals. After adjustment, caregivers who selected one or more referrals had greater odds of food insecurity compared to caregivers who selected no referrals (adjusted odds ratio 4.0; 95% confidence interval 2.4–7.0). Conclusions In this sample, there was incomplete overlap between food insecurity and referral selection. Offering referrals may be a helpful adjunct to standard screening for eliciting family preferences and identifying unmet social needs.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.10.006
       
  • Changes and Factors Associated With Tobacco Counseling: Results From the
           AAP Periodic Survey
    • Authors: Robert McMillen; Karen G. O'Connor; Judith Groner; Susanne Tanski; Elyse R. Park; Jonathan D. Klein
      Pages: 504 - 514
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Robert McMillen, Karen G. O'Connor, Judith Groner, Susanne Tanski, Elyse R. Park, Jonathan D. Klein
      Introduction The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises pediatricians to counsel parents and patients who use tobacco to quit. This study assesses changes in counseling between 2004 and 2010, and factors associated with counseling in 2010. Methods In 2004 and 2010, the Periodic Survey, a national survey of AAP members, inquired about tobacco counseling. Chi-square tests were performed to compare responses by survey year. Bivariate and multivariable analyses examined factors associated with counseling. Results Similar proportions of pediatricians in both years (N2004 = 535 and N2010 = 549) advised adolescents who smoke to quit (85% vs 81%), discussed quitting techniques (34% vs 32%), and recommended nicotine replacement medications (17% vs 18%). More pediatricians in 2010 reported helping patients assess reasons for and against continuing to smoke (56% vs 48%), providing quitting materials (20% vs 15%), and referring patients to cessation programs (18% vs 13%). More pediatricians in 2010 reported providing quitting materials to parents who smoke (14% vs 10%) and referring to smoking cessation programs (16% vs 11%) (all P < .05). Pediatricians' confidence in their ability to counsel, with more tobacco prevention training, and routine documentation of patients' tobacco smoke exposure were associated with counseling about cessation. Conclusions Most pediatricians advised patients and parents who smoke to quit, and these percentages did not change from 2004 to 2010. Although percentages for assisting with cessation did increase for several activities, most pediatricians still do not do so. Opportunities exist to improve clinicians' protection of children from tobacco and tobacco smoke through quit-line referrals, motivational interviewing, and offering medications.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.01.002
       
  • Statin Use and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and
           Adolescents
    • Authors: Nina R. Joyce; Justin P. Zachariah; Charles B. Eaton; Amal N. Trivedi; Gregory A. Wellenius
      Pages: 515 - 522
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Nina R. Joyce, Justin P. Zachariah, Charles B. Eaton, Amal N. Trivedi, Gregory A. Wellenius
      Objective There is increasing evidence of an association between statin use and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in adults, yet this relationship has never been studied in children or adolescents and may have important implications for assessing risks and benefits of treatment in this population. We estimated the association between statin use and the risk of T2DM in children with and without a dyslipidemia diagnosis. Methods Propensity scores were used to match new users of statins with a minimum 50 percent of days covered (PDC) in the first year of use to up to 10 nonusers. Analyses were stratified by a dyslipidemia diagnosis based on recent evidence suggesting a potentially protective effect of familial hypercholesterolemia on T2DM. In sensitivity analyses, we varied this period of exclusion and PDC. Cox proportional hazard models compared the hazard of the outcome between the exposed and unexposed patients. Results A total of 21,243,305 patients met the eligibility criteria, 2085 (0.01%) of whom met the exposure definition and 1046 (50%) of whom had a dyslipidemia diagnosis. Statin use was associated with an increased risk of T2DM in children without dyslipidemia (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.20–3.22), but not in children with dyslipidemia (hazard ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.65–1.90). The results were consistent across variations in the exclusion period and PDC. Conclusions Statin use was associated with an increased likelihood of developing T2DM in children without dyslipidemia. Physicians and patients need to weigh the possible risk of T2DM against the long-term benefits of statin therapy at a young age.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.02.006
       
  • Infant Regulatory Problems and Obesity in Early Childhood
    • Authors: Elizabeth Peacock-Chambers; Jenny S. Radesky; Samantha E. Parker; Barry Zuckerman; Julie C. Lumeng; Michael Silverstein
      Pages: 523 - 528
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Elizabeth Peacock-Chambers, Jenny S. Radesky, Samantha E. Parker, Barry Zuckerman, Julie C. Lumeng, Michael Silverstein
      Objective Difficult infant temperament is associated with higher weight status in infancy. However, the association of infant temperament, including regulatory capacities, has not been well studied as a possible predictor of future weight status in early childhood. We examined prospective associations of infant regulatory difficulties with obesity in early childhood in a large, diverse cohort. Methods We used data from 5750 children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study—Birth Cohort, excluding preterm infants and infants small or large for gestational age. Infant regulatory ability was measured at age 9 months by the Infant Toddler Symptom Checklist (ITSC). We created a multivariable logistic regression model comparing risk of obesity at preschool age in infants with ITSC scores ≥6 to infants with scores <6. We further examined the association when stratified by a measure of maternal sensitivity. Results The cohort of children was 48% non-Hispanic white, and 51% were boys. Twenty-one percent of children with ITSC scores ≥6 were obese at preschool age. Infants with ITSC scores ≥6 had 32% increased odds of being obese at preschool age (adjusted odds ratio 1.32 [95% confidence interval 1.03, 1.70]). The strongest association existed among children described as demanding attention constantly. There was no difference in the association when comparing mothers with high or low maternal sensitivity. Conclusions Infant regulatory difficulties are associated with a higher risk of obesity at preschool age. Helping parents manage and respond to difficult infant behaviors before preschool may serve as a focal point for future interventions.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.11.001
       
  • Home Sweet Home: Parent and Home Environmental Factors in Adolescent
           Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages
    • Authors: Laura M. Bogart; Marc N. Elliott; Allison J. Ober; David J. Klein; Jennifer Hawes-Dawson; Burton O. Cowgill; Kimberly Uyeda; Mark A. Schuster
      Pages: 529 - 536
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Laura M. Bogart, Marc N. Elliott, Allison J. Ober, David J. Klein, Jennifer Hawes-Dawson, Burton O. Cowgill, Kimberly Uyeda, Mark A. Schuster
      Objective Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are key contributors to obesity among youth. We investigated associations among parental and home-related factors (parental attitudes and consumption; home availability) regarding 3 types of SSBs—soda, sports drinks, and fruit-flavored drinks—with consumption of each type of SSB in a general school-based sample of adolescents. Methods Data were collected across 3 school semesters, from 2009 to 2011. A total of 1313 seventh grade student–parent dyads participated. Students completed in-class surveys across 9 schools in a large Los Angeles school district; their parents completed telephone interviews. Youth were asked about their SSB consumption (soda, sports drinks, and fruit-flavored drinks), and parents were asked about their attitudes, consumption, and home availability of SSBs. Results We estimated expected rates of youth SSB consumption for hypothetical parents at very low (5th) and very high (95th) percentiles for home/parental risk factors (ie, they consumed little, had negative attitudes, and did not keep SSBs in the home; or they consumed a lot, had positive attitudes, and did keep SSBs in the home). Youth of lower-risk parents (at the 5th percentile) were estimated to drink substantially less of each type of beverage than did youth of higher-risk parents (at the 95th percentile). For example, youth with higher-risk parents averaged nearly double the SSB consumption of youth of lower-risk parents (2.77 vs 1.37 glasses on the previous day; overall model significance F 22,1312 = 3.91, P < .001). Conclusions Results suggest a need to focus on parental and home environmental factors when intervening to reduce youths' SSB consumption.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.01.015
       
  • Evaluation of a Speed Mentoring Program: Achievement of Short-Term Mentee
           Goals and Potential for Longer-Term Relationships
    • Authors: Melissa M. Cellini; Janet R. Serwint; Donna M. D'Alessandro; Elaine E. Schulte; Cynthia Osman
      Pages: 537 - 543
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Melissa M. Cellini, Janet R. Serwint, Donna M. D'Alessandro, Elaine E. Schulte, Cynthia Osman
      Objective Speed mentoring provides brief mentoring and networking opportunities. We evaluated 1) a national speed mentoring program's ability to encourage in-person networking and advice-sharing, and 2) 2 potential outcomes: helping mentees achieve 3-month goals, and fostering mentoring relationships after the program. Methods An outcome approach logic model guided our program evaluation. Sixty mentees and 60 mentors participated. Each mentee met with 6 mentors for 10 minutes per pairing. At the program, mentees created goals. At 3 months, mentors sent mentees a reminder e-mail. At 4 months, participants received a Web-based survey. Results Forty-two (70%) mentees and 46 (77%) mentors completed the survey. Participants reported the program allowed them to share/receive advice, to network, to provide/gain different perspectives, and to learn from each other. Mentors as well as mentees identified shared interests, mentor–mentee chemistry, mentee initiative, and mentor approachability as key qualities contributing to ongoing relationships. Many mentor–mentee dyads had additional contact (approximately 60%) after the program and approximately one-third thought they were likely to continue the relationship. Goal-setting encouraged subsequent mentor–mentee contact and motivated mentees to work toward attaining their 3-month goals. The mentors aided mentees goal attainment by providing advice, offering support, and holding mentees accountable. Conclusions A national speed mentoring program was an effective and efficient way to establish national connections, obtain different perspectives, and receive advice. Goal-setting helped mentees in achieving 3-month goals and fostering mentoring relationships outside of the program. These elements continue to be a part of this program and might be valuable for similar programs.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.12.012
       
  • How Do US Pediatric Residency Programs Teach and Evaluate Community
           Pediatrics and Advocacy Training'
    • Authors: Cara Lichtenstein; Benjamin D. Hoffman; Rachel Y. Moon
      Pages: 544 - 549
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Cara Lichtenstein, Benjamin D. Hoffman, Rachel Y. Moon
      Objective In 2013, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education updated requirements for training in community pediatrics and advocacy in pediatric residency programs. In light of this update, the aim of this study was to better understand how community pediatrics is being taught and evaluated in pediatric residency programs in the United States. Methods Cross-sectional exploratory study using a Web-based survey of pediatric residency program directors in September 2014. Questions focused on teaching and evaluation of 10 community pediatrics competencies. Results Of 85 programs (43% response rate), 30% offered a separate training track and/or 6-block individualized curriculum in community pediatrics or advocacy. More than 75% required all residents to learn 7 of 10 competencies queried. Respondents in urban settings were more likely to teach care of special populations (P = .02) and public speaking (P < .01). Larger programs were more likely to teach (P = .04) and evaluate (P = .02) community-based research. Experiential learning and classroom-based didactics were the most frequent teaching methodologies. Many programs used multiple teaching methodologies for all competencies. Observation was the most frequent evaluation technique used; portfolio review and written reflection were also commonly reported. Conclusions Our findings show a strong emphasis on community pediatrics and advocacy teaching among responding US pediatric residency programs. Although respondents reported a variety of teaching and evaluation methods, there were few statistically significant differences between programs.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.02.011
       
  • Pediatrician Maintenance of Certification Using American Board of
           Pediatrics' Performance Improvement Modules
    • Authors: Marina Arvanitis; Neal A. deJong; Laurel K. Leslie; Darren A. DeWalt; Gregory D. Randolph; Kori B. Flower
      Pages: 550 - 561
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Marina Arvanitis, Neal A. deJong, Laurel K. Leslie, Darren A. DeWalt, Gregory D. Randolph, Kori B. Flower
      Background From 2010 to 2014, pediatricians completed Part 4 Maintenance of Certification (MOC) through practice- or organization-developed quality improvement (QI) activities approved by the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP). Organization-developed activities were online modules, such as the ABP's Performance Improvement Modules (PIMs), through which pediatricians implemented QI strategies in practice and reported quality measures. Objectives Aim 1 was to assess the proportion of pediatricians who completed practice- vs organization-developed QI activities for Part 4 MOC and to test the relationship between activities and pediatrician demographics. Aim 2 was to assess the relationship between PIM completion and improvement in care processes and outcomes as determined by PIM quality measures. Methods For aim 1, using deidentified demographic data from the ABP, we summarized QI activity completion and performed bivariate testing by pediatrician demographics. For aim 2, using deidentified parent and pediatrician-reported quality measures from the Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Asthma, Hand Hygiene, and Influenza PIMs, we used 2-sample tests of proportions to calculate pre–post changes in quality measures. Results For aim 1, of 50,433 pediatricians who completed Part 4 MOC from 2010 to 2014, 22% completed practice-developed and 78% organization-developed activities. More pediatricians completed organization-developed activities, regardless of age, gender, or subspecialty status. The majority (73%) of pediatricians who completed organization-developed activities completed ABP PIMs. For aim 2, PIM completion was associated with improvement on nearly all pediatrician- and parent-reported quality measures. Conclusions At the outset of the Part 4 MOC system, pediatricians most commonly completed online, organization-developed activities. Pediatricians and parents reported improvements in care processes and outcomes associated with PIMs, suggesting PIMs can be an effective means of facilitating practice improvement.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.03.014
       
  • Physician Knowledge and Attitudes About Hepatitis A and Current Practices
           Regarding Hepatitis A Vaccination Delivery
    • Authors: Noele P. Nelson; Mandy A. Allison; Megan C. Lindley; Michaela Brtnikova; Lori A. Crane; Brenda L. Beaty; Laura P. Hurley; Allison Kempe
      Pages: 562 - 570
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Noele P. Nelson, Mandy A. Allison, Megan C. Lindley, Michaela Brtnikova, Lori A. Crane, Brenda L. Beaty, Laura P. Hurley, Allison Kempe
      Objective To assess physicians': 1) knowledge and attitudes about hepatitis A disease and hepatitis A (HepA) vaccine, 2) child care and school HepA vaccine mandates, 3) practices related to HepA vaccine delivery, 4) factors associated with strongly recommending HepA vaccine to all 1- to 2-year-olds, and 5) feasibility of implementing HepA catch-up vaccination at health maintenance visits. Methods A national survey was conducted among representative networks of pediatricians and family medicine physicians (FMs) from March to June, 2014 via e-mail or mail on the basis of provider preference. Results Response rates were 81% (356 of 440) among pediatricians and 75% (348 of 464) among FMs. Less than 50% correctly identified that hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is usually asymptomatic in young children and that morbidity from HAV disease increases with age. Ninety-two percent of pediatricians and 59% of FMs strongly recommend HepA vaccine for all 1- to 2-year-olds. In addition to practice specialty, belief that HepA vaccine is required for kindergarten enrollment was the most robust predictor of strong physician recommendation. Conclusions Gaps in knowledge regarding HAV infection and hepatitis A recommendations and lack of a strong recommendation for routine HepA vaccination of young children among FMs likely contribute to suboptimal coverage. Closing knowledge gaps and addressing barriers that prevent all physicians from strongly recommending HepA vaccine to 1- to 2-year-olds could help increase HepA vaccine coverage and ultimately improve population protection against HAV infection.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.01.001
       
  • Impact of Nonmedical Vaccine Exemption Policies on the Health and Economic
           Burden of Measles
    • Authors: Melanie D. Whittington; Allison Kempe; Amanda Dempsey; Rachel Herlihy; Jonathan D. Campbell
      Pages: 571 - 576
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Melanie D. Whittington, Allison Kempe, Amanda Dempsey, Rachel Herlihy, Jonathan D. Campbell
      Objective Despite relatively high national vaccination coverage for measles, geographic vaccination variation exists resulting in clusters of susceptibility. A portion of this geographic variation can be explained by differences in state policies related to nonmedical vaccine exemptions. The objective of this analysis was to determine the magnitude, likelihood, and cost of a measles outbreak under different nonmedical vaccine exemption policies. Methods An agent-based transmission model simulated the likelihood and magnitude of a measles outbreak under different nonmedical vaccine exemption policies, previously categorized as easy, medium, or difficult. The model accounted for measles herd immunity, infectiousness of the pathogen, vaccine efficacy, duration of incubation and communicable periods, acquired natural immunity, and the rate of recovery. Public health contact tracing was also modeled. Model outcomes, including the number of secondary cases, hospitalizations, and deaths, were monetized to determine the economic burden of the simulated outbreaks. Results A state with easy nonmedical vaccine exemption policies is 140% and 190% more likely to experience a measles outbreak compared with states with medium or difficult policies, respectively. The magnitude of these outbreaks can be reduced by half by strengthening exemption policies. These declines are associated with significant cost reductions to public health, the health care system, and the individual. Conclusions Strengthening nonmedical vaccine exemption policies is 1 mechanism to increase vaccination coverage to reduce the health and economic effect of a measles outbreak. States exploring options for decreasing their vulnerability to outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases should consider more stringent requirements for nonmedical vaccine exemptions.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.03.001
       
  • Miles Away Milestones: A Framework for Assessment of Pediatric Residents
           During Global Health Rotations
    • Authors: Gitanjli Arora; Tania Condurache; Maneesh Batra; Sabrina M. Butteris; Traci Downs; Lynn Garfunkel; Charles Andrew Newcomer; Kathy L. Perkins; Charles Schubert; Nicole E. St Clair
      Pages: 577 - 579
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Gitanjli Arora, Tania Condurache, Maneesh Batra, Sabrina M. Butteris, Traci Downs, Lynn Garfunkel, Charles Andrew Newcomer, Kathy L. Perkins, Charles Schubert, Nicole E. St Clair


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2016.12.018
       
  • Variation in Safe Sleep and Breastfeeding Practices Among Non-Hispanic
           Black Mothers in the US According to Birth Country
    • Authors: Margaret G.K. Parker; Eve R. Colson; Lauren Provini; Denis V. Rybin; Stephen M. Kerr; Timothy Heeren; Michael J. Corwin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Margaret G.K. Parker, Eve R. Colson, Lauren Provini, Denis V. Rybin, Stephen M. Kerr, Timothy Heeren, Michael J. Corwin
      Objective To examine variation in safe sleep and breastfeeding practices among US non-Hispanic black (NHB) mothers according to birth country Methods We analyzed NHB mothers that were surveyed regarding safe sleep and breastfeeding practices when their infants were 2-6 months of age in 2011-14, as part of a larger national study. We examined prevalences of safe sleep and breastfeeding practices according to birth country and examined odds of adherence to American Academy of Pediatrics recommended safe sleep and breastfeeding practices in foreign born NHBs, compared to US born NHBs. Our multivariate models included adjustment for maternal age, education, income, and US geographic region, and infant age at the time of the survey. Results Among 828 NHB mothers, 690 (83%) were US born, 42 (5%) were African born, 47 (6%) were Haitian born, 24 (3%) were Jamaican born, and 25 (3%) were born elsewhere. In the analysis of 803 US, African, Haitian, and Jamaican born mothers, we found that Jamaican born mothers had a lower rate of supine sleep compared to US born mothers (40% vs. 66%, aOR 0.34 [95%CI 0.18, 0.63]). African born mothers had lower rates of bedsharing compared to US born mothers (25% vs. 11%, aOR 0.22 [95% CI 0.11, 0.46]). Foreign-born mothers had higher rates of any and exclusive breastfeeding, compared to US born mothers (40% and 85% vs. 13% and 23%, respectively). Conclusion Safe sleep and breastfeeding practices vary among US NHB mothers according to birth country. These data illustrate the importance of recognizing heterogeneity of safe sleep and breastfeeding practices within racial/ethnic groups.

      PubDate: 2017-07-18T05:12:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.07.003
       
  • Shared Decision-Making with Parents of Acutely Ill Children: A Narrative
           Review
    • Authors: Paul L. Aronson; Eugene D. Shapiro; Linda M. Niccolai; Liana Fraenkel
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Paul L. Aronson, Eugene D. Shapiro, Linda M. Niccolai, Liana Fraenkel
      Background Shared decision-making (SDM) has mostly been used with adults and parents in the primary care setting, and there is limited knowledge on the use of SDM with parents of acutely ill children. Objective To review the literature on SDM with parents in the management of acutely ill children. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE, SCOPUS, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov for English language studies published from the time of database inception to February, 2017. Study Eligibility Criteria Use of SDM with parents for children age ≤18 years with an acute medical problem. Results We identified 2 ongoing clinical trials and 10 published studies meeting inclusion criteria: 2 using hypothetical SDM scenarios, 1 mixed-methods study, and 7 intervention studies. Only 1 study compared an SDM intervention to usual care in a randomized controlled trial. The limited literature demonstrates that parents of acutely ill children have differing preferences for testing and/or treatment, and that they generally want the opportunity to express those preferences through an SDM process. Use of SDM often results in acutely ill children undergoing fewer and/or less intensive testing or treatment, though the effect on outcomes is unclear. Conclusions and Implications Parents welcome participation in SDM for management decisions with their acutely ill child. Further investigation is needed to determine how best to implement SDM with parents of acutely ill children and to assess the impact of SDM on outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-07-18T05:12:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.06.009
       
  • Evaluation of an electronic clinical decision support tool for incident
           elevated BP in adolescents
    • Authors: Elyse Olshen Kharbanda; Stephen E. Asche; Alan Sinaiko; James D. Nordin; Heidi L. Ekstrom; Patricia Fontaine; Steven P. Dehmer; Nancy E. Sherwood; Patrick J. O’Connor
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Elyse Olshen Kharbanda, Stephen E. Asche, Alan Sinaiko, James D. Nordin, Heidi L. Ekstrom, Patricia Fontaine, Steven P. Dehmer, Nancy E. Sherwood, Patrick J. O’Connor
      Objective To evaluate, among adolescents 10-17 years with an incident hypertensive BP (≥95th percentile) at a primary care visit, whether TeenBP, a novel electronic health record (EHR) linked clinical decision support tool (CDS), improved recognition of elevated BP and return for follow-up BP evaluation. Methods We conducted a pragmatic cluster randomized trial in 20 primary care clinics in a large Midwestern medical group. Ten clinics received the TeenBP CDS, including an alert to remeasure a hypertensive BP at that visit, an alert that a hypertensive BP should be repeated in 1-3 weeks and patient-specific order sets. In the 10 usual care (UC) clinics, elevated BPs were displayed in red font in the EHR. Comparisons between CDS and UC used generalized linear mixed models. Results The study population included 607 CDS patients and 607 UC patients with an incident hypertensive BP. In adjusted analyses, at the index visit, CDS patients were more likely to have their hypertensive BP based on two or more BPs (47.1% versus 27.6%, p=0.007) and to have elevated BP (ICD-9 796.2) diagnosed (28.2% versus 4.2%, p<0.001). In a multivariate model adjusting for age, sex, SBP percentile, and visit type, rates for repeat BP measurement within 30 days were 14.3% at TeenBP CDS clinics versus 10.6% at UC clinics (p=0.07). Conclusions The TeenBP CDS intervention significantly increased repeat BP measurement at the index visit and recognition of a hypertensive BP. Rates for follow-up BP measurement at 30 days were low and did not differ between TeenBP and UC subjects.

      PubDate: 2017-07-18T05:12:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.07.004
       
  • Types of Objects in the Sleep Environment Associated with Infant
           Suffocation and Strangulation
    • Authors: Christopher E. Gaw; Thitphalak Chounthirath; Jonathan Midgett; Kyran Quinlan; Gary A. Smith
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Christopher E. Gaw, Thitphalak Chounthirath, Jonathan Midgett, Kyran Quinlan, Gary A. Smith
      Objective To investigate the circumstances of death and types and roles of objects present in the sleep environment at the time of death for infants who died from suffocation or strangulation during sleep. Methods This study analyzed 1,736 reported incidents of accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed (ASSB) of infants younger than one year of age. These fatalities occurred from 2000 through 2012 and were reported to the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission. Results The mean age of ASSB death was 3.76 months (SD: 2.51). Infants younger than five months accounted for 67.3% (1,168/1,736) of all reported fatalities and 58.3% (1,009/1,731) were male. Deceased infants were often found in a crib or bassinet (30.6%; 383/1,253) or in the prone orientation (84.9%; 595/701). The most common objects associated with infant ASSB were pillows (24.5%; 425/1,736), mattresses (21.0%; 364/1,736), blankets (13.1%; 228/1,736), and walls (11.5%; 199/1,736). Wedged (43.3%; 616/1,424) or positioned on top of an object (25.9%; 369/1,424) were the most common positions associated with death. Infants were often found wedged between a mattress and wall (30.2%; 181/599) or oriented face-down or prone on top of a pillow (52.2%; 187/358). Sleep surface sharing was associated with 6.5% (112/1,736) of ASSB deaths. Conclusions Pillows and blankets are objects in sleep environments frequently associated with unintentional suffocation and strangulation of infants. Increased efforts should be made to remove these and other objects from sleep environments of infants.

      PubDate: 2017-07-18T05:12:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.07.002
       
  • Integrated Mental Health Training for Pediatric and Psychology Trainees
           Using Standardized Patient Encounters
    • Authors: Sandra H. Jee; Constance Baldwin; Rita Dadiz; Marybeth Jones; Linda Alpert-Gillis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Sandra H. Jee, Constance Baldwin, Rita Dadiz, Marybeth Jones, Linda Alpert-Gillis
      Teaser Primary care pediatricians and psychology practitioners who co-manage mental health problems can develop interdisciplinary communication and collaborative skills from joint standardized patient encounters and debriefings, combined with brief didactics. Learners demonstrated increased confidence in shared management of behavior health problems.

      PubDate: 2017-07-18T05:12:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.06.014
       
  • APA Research Award Acceptance Speech
    • Authors: Rita Mangione-Smith
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Rita Mangione-Smith


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.07.001
       
  • Effectiveness of the Spirometry 360™ Quality Improvement Program for
           Improving Asthma Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial
    • Authors: Rita Mangione-Smith; Chuan Zhou; Michael J. Corwin; James A. Taylor; Fiona Rice; James W. Stout
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Rita Mangione-Smith, Chuan Zhou, Michael J. Corwin, James A. Taylor, Fiona Rice, James W. Stout
      Objective To determine the effectiveness of the Spirometry 360™ distance learning quality improvement (QI) program for enhancing the processes and outcomes of care for children with asthma. Methods Cluster randomized controlled trial involving 25 matched pairs of pediatric primary care practices. Practices were recruited from two practice-based research networks: the Slone Center Office-based Research Network at Boston University, Boston, MA and the Puget Sound Pediatric Research Network in Seattle, WA. Study participants included providers from one of the 50 enrolled pediatric practices and 626 of their patients with asthma. Process measures assessed included: spirometry test quality and appropriate prescription of asthma controller medications. Outcome measures included: asthma-specific health-related quality of life, and outpatient, emergency department and inpatient utilization for asthma. Results At baseline, 25.4% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 50.4% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. During the six month post-intervention period, 28.7% of spirometry tests performed in control practices and 49.9% of tests performed in intervention practices were of high quality. The adjusted difference-of-differences analysis revealed no intervention effect on spirometry test quality. Adjusted differences-of-differences analysis also revealed no intervention effect on appropriate use of controller medications or any of the parent/patient-reported outcomes examined. Conclusion In this study, the Spirometry 360™ distance learning QI program was ineffective in improving spirometry test quality or parent/patient-reported outcomes. QI programs like the one assessed here may need to focus on practices with lower baseline performance levels or be tailored for those with higher baseline performance.

      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.06.015
       
  • Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp Promotes Fellowship Readiness and Enables
           Retention of Knowledge (Research Abstract)
    • Authors: Scott Ceresnak; David Axelrod Loren Sacks Kara Motonaga Emily Johnson
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics, Volume 17, Issue 5
      Author(s): Scott R. Ceresnak, David M. Axelrod, Loren D. Sacks, Kara S. Motonaga, Emily R. Johnson, Catherine D. Krawczeski


      PubDate: 2017-07-09T04:57:28Z
       
  • “The Wait”
    • Authors: Julia Michie; Bruckner
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Julia Michie Bruckner


      PubDate: 2017-05-16T20:27:11Z
       
  • The Road to Tolerance and Understanding
    • Authors: Peter G. Szilagyi; Benard P. Dreyer; Elena Fuentes-Afflick; Tamera Coyne-Beasley; Lewis First
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Peter G. Szilagyi, Benard P. Dreyer, Elena Fuentes-Afflick, Tamera Coyne-Beasley, Lewis First


      PubDate: 2017-05-07T13:31:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.03.008
       
  • Developing the PedsValue Modules - A National Pediatric High Value Care
           Curriculum
    • Authors: Carolyn S. Avery; Jimmy Beck; Ryan Padrez; Lauren LaRue Walker; Lisa E. Herrmann; Suzanne Woods; Alan R. Schroeder; Adam Schickedanz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2017
      Source:Academic Pediatrics
      Author(s): Carolyn S. Avery, Jimmy Beck, Ryan Padrez, Lauren LaRue Walker, Lisa E. Herrmann, Suzanne Woods, Alan R. Schroeder, Adam Schickedanz


      PubDate: 2017-04-24T03:53:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.04.006
       
 
 
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