for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

Publisher: Elsevier   (Total: 3175 journals)

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Showing 1 - 200 of 3175 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Practical Logic of Cognitive Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Academic Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.402, h-index: 51)
Academic Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.008, h-index: 75)
Accident Analysis & Prevention     Partially Free   (Followers: 90, SJR: 1.109, h-index: 94)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.612, h-index: 27)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33, SJR: 2.515, h-index: 90)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Anaesthesiologica Taiwanica     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.338, h-index: 19)
Acta Astronautica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 377, SJR: 0.726, h-index: 43)
Acta Automatica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.02, h-index: 104)
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Ecologica Sinica     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.172, h-index: 29)
Acta Haematologica Polonica     Free   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.123, h-index: 8)
Acta Histochemica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.604, h-index: 38)
Acta Materialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236, SJR: 3.683, h-index: 202)
Acta Mathematica Scientia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.615, h-index: 21)
Acta Mechanica Solida Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.442, h-index: 21)
Acta Oecologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.915, h-index: 53)
Acta Otorrinolaringologica (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Acta Otorrinolaringológica Española     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.311, h-index: 16)
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Poética     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.365, h-index: 73)
Acta Sociológica     Open Access  
Acta Tropica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.059, h-index: 77)
Acta Urológica Portuguesa     Open Access  
Actas Dermo-Sifiliograficas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Actas Urológicas Españolas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.383, h-index: 19)
Actas Urológicas Españolas (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.141, h-index: 3)
Actualites Pharmaceutiques Hospitalieres     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.112, h-index: 2)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acute Pain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Ad Hoc Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.967, h-index: 57)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.514, h-index: 92)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Additive Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.039, h-index: 5)
Additives for Polymers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advanced Cement Based Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129, SJR: 5.2, h-index: 222)
Advanced Engineering Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 1.265, h-index: 53)
Advanced Powder Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.739, h-index: 33)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.299, h-index: 15)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12, SJR: 2.071, h-index: 82)
Advances in Anesthesia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.169, h-index: 4)
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Applied Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.054, h-index: 35)
Advances in Applied Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.801, h-index: 26)
Advances in Applied Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 49)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 3.31, h-index: 42)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.277, h-index: 43)
Advances in Botanical Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.619, h-index: 48)
Advances in Cancer Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 2.215, h-index: 78)
Advances in Carbohydrate Chemistry and Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.9, h-index: 30)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.139, h-index: 42)
Advances in Cell Aging and Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Chemical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.183, h-index: 23)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.665, h-index: 29)
Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.268, h-index: 45)
Advances in Clinical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.938, h-index: 33)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.314, h-index: 130)
Advances in Computers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.223, h-index: 22)
Advances in Dermatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Digestive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 3.25, h-index: 43)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 0.486, h-index: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42, SJR: 5.465, h-index: 64)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Food and Nutrition Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54, SJR: 0.674, h-index: 38)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 2.558, h-index: 54)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 2.325, h-index: 20)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21, SJR: 0.906, h-index: 24)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.497, h-index: 31)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.396, h-index: 27)
Advances in Immunology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36, SJR: 4.152, h-index: 85)
Advances in Inorganic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 1.132, h-index: 42)
Advances in Insect Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 1.274, h-index: 27)
Advances in Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Intl. Accounting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Course Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.764, h-index: 15)
Advances in Lipobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.645, h-index: 45)
Advances in Mathematics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 3.261, h-index: 65)
Advances in Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.489, h-index: 25)
Advances in Medicinal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Microbial Physiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.44, h-index: 51)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Molecular Toxicology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.324, h-index: 8)
Advances in Nanoporous Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Oncobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.885, h-index: 45)
Advances in Parallel Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 11)
Advances in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 2.37, h-index: 73)
Advances in Pediatrics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.4, h-index: 28)
Advances in Pharmaceutical Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Pharmacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 1.718, h-index: 58)
Advances in Physical Organic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.384, h-index: 26)
Advances in Phytomedicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.248, h-index: 11)
Advances in Plant Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Plant Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 1.5, h-index: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.478, h-index: 32)
Advances in Radiation Oncology     Open Access  
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.1, h-index: 2)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Space Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 378, SJR: 0.606, h-index: 65)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.823, h-index: 27)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29, SJR: 1.321, h-index: 56)
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 1.878, h-index: 68)
Advances in Water Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46, SJR: 2.408, h-index: 94)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.973, h-index: 22)
Aerospace Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 334, SJR: 0.816, h-index: 49)
AEU - Intl. J. of Electronics and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 36)
African J. of Emergency Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 6)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 3.289, h-index: 78)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 432, SJR: 1.385, h-index: 72)
Agri Gene     Hybrid Journal  
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15, SJR: 2.18, h-index: 116)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 1.275, h-index: 74)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.546, h-index: 79)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 1.879, h-index: 120)
Ain Shams Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, h-index: 14)
Air Medical J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.234, h-index: 18)
AKCE Intl. J. of Graphs and Combinatorics     Open Access   (SJR: 0.285, h-index: 3)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.922, h-index: 66)
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Alergologia Polska : Polish J. of Allergology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.436, h-index: 12)
Alexandria J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Algal Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 9, SJR: 2.05, h-index: 20)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Allergologia et Immunopathologia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.46, h-index: 29)
Allergology Intl.     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.776, h-index: 35)
Alpha Omegan     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.121, h-index: 9)
ALTER - European J. of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.158, h-index: 9)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48, SJR: 4.289, h-index: 64)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ambulatory Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Heart J.     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 3.157, h-index: 153)
American J. of Cardiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50, SJR: 2.063, h-index: 186)
American J. of Emergency Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 0.574, h-index: 65)
American J. of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 1.091, h-index: 45)
American J. of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.653, h-index: 93)
American J. of Human Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31, SJR: 8.769, h-index: 256)
American J. of Infection Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.259, h-index: 81)
American J. of Kidney Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32, SJR: 2.313, h-index: 172)
American J. of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42, SJR: 2.023, h-index: 189)
American J. of Medicine Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American J. of Obstetrics and Gynecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190, SJR: 2.255, h-index: 171)
American J. of Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62, SJR: 2.803, h-index: 148)
American J. of Ophthalmology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American J. of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 1.249, h-index: 88)
American J. of Otolaryngology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.59, h-index: 45)
American J. of Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.653, h-index: 228)
American J. of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 2.764, h-index: 154)
American J. of Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36, SJR: 1.286, h-index: 125)
American J. of the Medical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.653, h-index: 70)
Ampersand : An Intl. J. of General and Applied Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.066, h-index: 51)
Anaesthesia & Intensive Care Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61, SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Anaesthesia Critical Care & Pain Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Cirugia Vascular     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.209, h-index: 27)
Anales de Pediatría (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription  
Anales de Pediatría Continuada     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.104, h-index: 3)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4, SJR: 2.577, h-index: 7)
Analytica Chimica Acta     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.548, h-index: 152)
Analytical Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 165, SJR: 0.725, h-index: 154)
Analytical Chemistry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.18, h-index: 2)
Analytical Spectroscopy Library     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Anesthésie & Réanimation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anesthesiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22, SJR: 0.421, h-index: 40)
Angiología     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.124, h-index: 9)
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last   [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Journal Cover Advances in Life Course Research
  [SJR: 0.764]   [H-I: 15]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1040-2608
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3175 journals]
  • Understanding trends in family formation trajectories: An application of
           Competing Trajectories Analysis (CTA)
    • Authors: Matthias Studer; Aart C. Liefbroer; Jarl E. Mooyaart
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 36
      Author(s): Matthias Studer, Aart C. Liefbroer, Jarl E. Mooyaart
      Over the past 50 years, family formation trajectories have undergone major changes in the events that occur as well as in the timing and order of these events. Whereas previous studies showed when and how these shifts occur, not much research has been conducted to test why these changes have taken place. This paper tests two possible explanations, namely cultural (secularization) and economic (youth unemployment) change using the Fertility and Family survey of the Netherlands conducted in 2008. We also employed a new method, Competing Trajectories Analysis (CTA), which combines features of sequence analysis and event history analysis, to examine the relationship between secularization and youth unemployment and pathways into adulthood. Our results show that the start of family formation is postponed in times of high secularization and youth unemployment, when pathways including early marriage and parenthood become less popular, and cohabiting without having children becomes more popular.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.02.003
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Pathways to commitment in living-apart-together relationships in the
           Netherlands: A study on satisfaction, alternatives, investments and social
           support
    • Authors: Roselinde van der Wiel; Clara H. Mulder; Ajay Bailey
      Pages: 13 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 36
      Author(s): Roselinde van der Wiel, Clara H. Mulder, Ajay Bailey
      The non-institutionalised, flexible nature of living-apart-together (LAT) raises questions about partner commitment in the context of the debate about the individualisation of society. We explored how partner commitment in LAT relationships in the Netherlands is shaped by individuals’ satisfaction with, alternatives to, investments in and social support for their relationship. The underlying theoretical framework is an extended version of the Investment Model of Commitment. We conducted 22 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with men and women. The major themes that were addressed in the analysis were commitment, satisfaction, alternatives, investments, social support, relationship history and future plans. Participants were emotionally highly attached to their partner, but they doubted their commitment to maintaining their relationship in the future. Satisfaction with the current partner and intrinsic investments, such as emotions and effort, were described as contributing the most to feelings of commitment. Social support, quality of alternatives and extrinsic investments, such as material ties, were felt to contribute the least. Relationship history and life experience played an important role in how middle-aged and older individuals, of whom many were divorced, perceived the four determinants and experienced commitment. In this context, the LAT arrangement expressed fear of commitment and getting hurt, which was further reflected in limited investments. The paper concludes that although emotional attachment appears to be high among people in LAT relationships, they may have a relatively limited belief and interest in life-long partnerships.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.03.001
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Pathways between socioeconomic status and health: Does health selection or
           social causation dominate in Europe'
    • Authors: Rasmus Hoffmann; Hannes Kröger; Eduwin Pakpahan
      Pages: 23 - 36
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 36
      Author(s): Rasmus Hoffmann, Hannes Kröger, Eduwin Pakpahan
      Health differences which correspond to socioeconomic status (SES) can be attributed to three causal mechanisms: SES affects health (social causation), health affects SES (health selection), and common background factors influence both SES and health (indirect selection). Using retrospective survey data from 10 European countries (SHARELIFE, n = 20,227) and structural equation models in a cross-lagged panel design, we determine the relative importance in terms of explanatory power of social causation and health selection in the life course from childhood to old age. Both SES and health heavily depend on their prior status, albeit more for SES than health. During the transition from childhood to working ages, social causation and health selection are equally weak. Turning to the second phase (transition from working ages to old age) causation increases while selection decreases which makes causation the dominant mechanism in older age. While the contribution of common background factors remains difficult to assess, this study shows that both social causation and health selection are responsible for health inequalities; however, their relative importance changes with age. Life course modelling can complement causal analysis by revealing interactions between the processes of SES and health and their contribution to health inequality.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.02.002
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Adults who co-reside and the young adulthood factors that lead them there
    • Authors: Michael J. Merten; Amanda L. Williams; Ashley N. Harvey; Leslie Haughey
      Pages: 37 - 44
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 36
      Author(s): Michael J. Merten, Amanda L. Williams, Ashley N. Harvey, Leslie Haughey
      It has become common for young people to continue living with their parents into adulthood. While there are a number of social, economic, and cultural factors contributing to this dynamic, less is known about how individual behaviors, mental health, and family relationships across the life course contribute to parent/adult child coresidence. The present study used data from 9268 participants of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to examine pathways connecting early economic hardship and “rushing to adulthood” during the teenage years with young adult constrained resources, mental health, and parent-child relationships to predict adult residency with parents. Results suggest that family economic hardship sets into motion cumulative disadvantages through adolescent precocious events that constrain resources in young adulthood, deteriorate mental health through increased depressive symptoms, and damage relationships with parents contributing to indirect pathways leading to parent-adult child coresidence.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Internal migration over young adult life courses: Continuities and changes
           across cohorts in West Germany
    • Authors: Sergi Vidal; Katharina Lutz
      Pages: 45 - 56
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 36
      Author(s): Sergi Vidal, Katharina Lutz
      This study examines internal migration as part of unfolding life courses, scrutinizing stability and change across socio-historical contexts from post-war Germany. We inquire whether the structure of family and labour market life courses intersect with migration experience in early adult ages for men and women born around 1939–41, 1949–51, 1964 and 1971. We then establish how recent changes in the transition to adulthood are reflected in the life courses of internal migrants. We accomplish this using exploratory mining of event histories on retrospective monthly records of life events occurring between ages 16 and 30 from the West German samples of the German Life History Study. Our descriptive analyses reveal that the structure of young adults’ life courses intersects with internal migration experience. Differences in the life courses of movers and stayers have increased across socio-historical periods, and are more apparent in the labour market trajectory than in the family trajectory. Diversity in internal migrants’ trajectories reflect the complex ways in which young adults negotiate life courses, and align with the generalized protraction of school-to-work transitions and the delay of family projects. Our research adds to recent studies that underline the value of situating migration events in the wider biographical and structural contexts. Findings contribute to map in efficient ways the full complexity of individual life courses.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.03.003
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Do women’s pre-birth relative wages moderate the parenthood effect on
           gender inequality in working hours'
    • Authors: Jonas Wood; Tine Kil; Leen Marynissen
      Pages: 57 - 69
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 36
      Author(s): Jonas Wood, Tine Kil, Leen Marynissen
      Although young couples increasingly divide paid and ​unpaid work equally, the transition to parenthood is associated with the production of gender inequality. Given the rising prevalence of female breadwinner households in Europe, this paper assesses whether the parenthood effect on gender inequality in employment is counteracted in couples where women were the main income providers before the onset of family formation. Using longitudinal micro-data (1999–2010) from the Belgian Crossroads Bank for Social Security and the National Register, population-averaged logit models assess the effect of pre-birth relative earnings on parental employment strategies following the transition to parenthood. Results indicate that a female main earner constellation positively relates to egalitarian and female-oriented employment strategies. Although pre-birth relative earnings affect the magnitude of the negative relationship between parenthood and gender inequality in paid work, male-oriented parental employment strategies continue to occur most, even among female main earner couples. Hence, variation in pre-birth relative earnings cannot fully account for the rise in gender inequality in employment following the transition to parenthood, suggesting that cultural as well as structural factors limit parents to opt for an egalitarian employment division.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.04.002
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Secondary traumatization, relationship problems, and adult children’s
           well-being: Long-term effects of World War II in the Netherlands
    • Authors: Matthijs Kalmijn
      Pages: 70 - 79
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Matthijs Kalmijn
      The hypothesis of secondary traumatization argues that children raised by parents who were traumatized by war, have more mental health problems than other children. Past evidence for this hypothesis is not consistent. This paper re-examines the hypothesis by analyzing a large nationally representative survey of adult children in the Netherlands in 2002-2003 (n = 3,413) with retrospective information on parental trauma caused by the experience of World War II. Using regression models with an elaborate set of controls, it is found that adult children whose parents suffered from World War II, had poorer mental health and experienced more negative life events. About a third of these long-term effects was mediated by the problems traumatized parents had in maintaining secure relationships with their spouse and children when they were raising their children. Echoing this finding, it is found that traumatized parents have poorer relationships with their children when the children are adult.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.04.004
      Issue No: Vol. 36 (2018)
       
  • Early neighborhood conditions and trajectories of depressive symptoms
           across adolescence and into adulthood
    • Authors: Peter B. Barr
      Pages: 57 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 35
      Author(s): Peter B. Barr
      Early life conditions, including childhood socioeconomic status (SES) or exposure to adverse conditions, can have long-term consequences on mental health. However, relatively little has examined the long-term influence of exposure to adverse neighborhood conditions in early life. Both neighborhood disadvantage and neighborhood disorder have been consistently linked to mental health outcomes, especially depression. The current analysis uses data from all waves of the National Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to determine the influence of neighborhood context on trajectories of depressive symptoms from adolescence into adulthood. We find that neighborhood disadvantage has no influence on initial levels or change over time in depressive symptoms after adjusting for individual level covariates. However, neighborhood disorder is associated with greater initial levels of depressive symptoms during adolescence and this difference persists throughout the early life course. Additionally, while female respondents had greater levels of depressive symptoms across time, the effect of neighborhood conditions did not vary by sex. Our results demonstrate that early neighborhood conditions are an important risk factor for long-term patterns of depressive symptoms, above and beyond important proximal factors such as family SES, family composition, and race-ethnicity.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.01.005
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2018)
       
  • Micro-level experiences of macro-level change: A cohort perspective on
           China’s shift away from state-sector employment
    • Authors: Wen Fan; Fangsheng Zhu; Phyllis Moen
      Pages: 77 - 86
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 35
      Author(s): Wen Fan, Fangsheng Zhu, Phyllis Moen
      An expanding and more lucrative private sector characterizes China’s economic transition over the last four decades. But have these labor market opportunities been equally distributed, or does historical timing of labor force entries matter' Drawing on a life-course, cohort perspective and nationally representative occupational histories (2003 and 2008 Chinese General Social Surveys), we examine the odds of a private-sector first job and of shifts from state- to private-sector jobs for two reform cohorts entering the labor market between 1978 and 2008. We find cohort variations in the impact of structural location (education and party affiliation) in predicting sector of first job and sector shifts. The least educated (high school dropouts) from the Late Reform cohort are most impacted by the expanding private sector, in terms of their first job (in private/hybrid firms and self-employment). Party membership takes on a different meaning over time, promoting Early Reform cohort members’ private-sector entry, but being a deterrent for Late Reform cohort members. A key potential consequence of Chinese economic reform based on our cohort comparisons: increasing transfer of those with less educational and political credentials from the state to the private sector, either through first-job availability or through (forced) self-employment following layoffs. The China case demonstrates the value of a cohort and life-course perspective grounded in careful institutional and historical analysis for capturing the impact of historical timing in shifting opportunity structures shaping individuals’ work lives and for understanding social change.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.01.006
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2018)
       
  • Without the ties that bind: U.S. young adults who lack active parental
           relationships
    • Authors: Caroline Sten Hartnett; Karen L. Fingerman; Kira S. Birditt
      Pages: 103 - 113
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 35
      Author(s): Caroline Sten Hartnett, Karen L. Fingerman, Kira S. Birditt
      Parents are an important source of affection and support for young adults in the U.S., so those who lack parental relationships are a potentially vulnerable group. This study outlines how common it is for young adults to report lacking an active parental tie and provides a portrait of these young adults. Analysis of the 2008–2009 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 5090) reveals that the vast majority of young adults ages 25–32 in the U.S. – 97.6% – have an active relationship with at least one parent figure. Only a small share of young adults lack a relationship with a mother figure (6%), due primarily to early maternal death. A larger share of young adults lack a relationship with a father figure (20%), usually because their father figure is deceased or they never had a father figure (rather than having become estranged over time). Young adults who are Black or from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are more likely to lack parental ties in young adulthood. In addition, prior events such as parental separation or incarceration are associated with an elevated likelihood of being estranged in early adulthood (though these events are rarely followed by estrangement with an existing parent figure).

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.01.004
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2018)
       
  • Extended working lives and late-career destabilisation: A longitudinal
           study of Finnish register data
    • Authors: Aart-Jan Riekhoff
      Pages: 114 - 125
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 35
      Author(s): Aart-Jan Riekhoff
      This article analyses whether the trend of extending working lives has coincided with a destabilisation of late careers in Finland. On one hand, reforms that eliminate alternative exit pathways typically have been aimed at simplifying the transition from work to retirement. On the other hand, the need to work longer might entail a risk of increasing transitions between work and non-employment, as well as between jobs. Destabilisation is defined as the process of increasing complexity within individual life-course patterns over time. Using register-based Finnish Linked Employer-Employee Data, complexity within individual sequences of annual labour-market statuses between ages 51 and 65 is calculated for the Finnish population born between 1937 and 1948 (N = 238,099). Distinction is made between sequences that only include transitions between employment and non-employment and sequences that include transitions between different jobs as well. Results show that the average late-career complexity has decreased when only transitions between work, unemployment, and pension types are considered, especially among women and the higher-educated. Less change is observed among the lower-educated. When transitions between jobs are included, the results show a slight late-career destabilisation among men and lower-educated, but a decrease in complexity among women and higher-educated. The findings suggest that late-career complexity was increasingly determined by transitions between jobs rather than between spells of employment and non-employment. However, lower-educated older workers continued to be at greater risk of early exit, while at the same time experiencing destabilising employment careers.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.01.007
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2018)
       
  • Early childhood attachment and suicidal ideation among young Kenyan men
    • Authors: Michael L. Goodman; Derrick Gibson; Thiennga T. Vo; Aaron Wang; Stanley Gitari; Ben Raimer
      Pages: 126 - 134
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 35
      Author(s): Michael L. Goodman, Derrick Gibson, Thiennga T. Vo, Aaron Wang, Stanley Gitari, Ben Raimer
      The interpersonal theory of suicide posits that suicide behavior is driven by two interpersonal dynamics – perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness. Attachment theory posits that one’s sense of belonging may stem from social attachments during childhood. In this study, we investigate whether these two theories may be meaningfully combined to provide a life course perspective on suicide ideation among young Kenyan men (age 18–34 years). We find that respondents who recalled childhood attachments that were less safe and warm were significantly more likely to report suicide ideation, a pathway that was significantly mediated by present loneliness. Consistent with the interpersonal theory of suicide, the association between loneliness and suicide ideation was significantly mediated by less meaning in life and hope. Suicide ideation in adulthood may be prevented by promoting more secure attachments during childhood.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T15:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 35 (2018)
       
  • Multidimensional and fluctuating experiences of loneliness from childhood
           to young adulthood in Northern Finland
    • Authors: Anna Reetta Rönkä; Anja Taanila; Arja Rautio; Vappu Sunnari
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Anna Reetta Rönkä, Anja Taanila, Arja Rautio, Vappu Sunnari
      Loneliness is a negative, involuntary experience, common among children and adolescents. It has been recently suggested that young adults are especially prone to loneliness, as they experience many transitions while establishing their own lifestyles; however, there is a lack of research on the experience of loneliness among this age group. In the present study, the lived experiences of past and current loneliness from childhood to young adulthood in people (aged 27–28 years) born in Northern Finland were examined. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 participants who self-reported that they were very lonely in adolescence. Their responses were analyzed with a theory-guided, qualitative content analysis method, in which the meanings of loneliness over their life courses were explored. As a result, loneliness experiences of young adults are described using five dimensions: Personal, Relational, Physical context, Life event, and Sociocultural. These dimensions revealed the entangled ways in which loneliness is experienced; how it emerges, intensifies, and is alleviated; and what consequences it carries. The duration and intensity of loneliness experienced by the participants fluctuated over the course of their lives, and six distinct trajectories of loneliness were constructed from the data. Loneliness had a variety of causes and detrimental consequences; chronic loneliness was developed through the entangled effects of self and other related adversities over time, and matters related to the Sociocultural dimension of loneliness. (Hetero)gender(ed)norms centrally affected intensification of loneliness. To reduce the risk of chronic loneliness and improve wellbeing and health, early and multilevel interventions – individual, relational, communal, and societal – are warranted.

      PubDate: 2018-01-09T21:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.01.003
       
  • The effect of an early-career involuntary job loss on later life health in
           Europe
    • Authors: Jonas Voßemer; Michael Gebel; Olena Nizalova; Olga Nikolaieva
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2018
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jonas Voßemer, Michael Gebel, Olena Nizalova, Olga Nikolaieva
      Recent years have witnessed an increase in interest towards the long-term health consequences of early-career job loss and youth unemployment. Relying on detailed retrospective data from the third wave (2008/09) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) this paper investigates whether an involuntary job loss in the first 10 years after labour market entry has lasting negative effects on health more than 30 years later. The results show that an early-career involuntary job loss due to a layoff or plant closure increases the probability of fair or poor self-rated health in late life by about 6 percentage points. Moreover, examining the mechanisms behind this relationship, the analysis reveals that the subsequent unemployment risks and employment instability only explain a small share of the total effect. In line with previous studies, these findings highlight the importance of early career experiences for workers’ later life health.

      PubDate: 2018-01-09T21:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2018.01.001
       
  • Residential mobility and dynamic neighborhood change during the transition
           to adulthood
    • Authors: Noli Brazil; William A.V. Clark
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 33
      Author(s): Noli Brazil, William A.V. Clark
      This article examines the neighborhood attainment outcomes of individuals transitioning out of adolescence and into adulthood. Given the dynamic nature of this period, we may expect significant upward and downward changes in young adult residential environments relative to the adolescent neighborhood. Using U.S. data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we examined movement across matrices of neighborhood poverty and quality. While, as expected, there is stickiness on the diagonal, that is movement which extends inequality, we found large groups of young adults making upward and downward moves, particularly Hispanics. The study points to life course events related to human capital, income and household formation as important factors shaping significant movement up and down the neighborhood poverty and quality distributions.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T00:52:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.06.001
      Issue No: Vol. 33 (2017)
       
  • A life course model for a domains-of-life approach to happiness: Evidence
           from the United States
    • Authors: Anthony R. Bardo
      Pages: 11 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 33
      Author(s): Anthony R. Bardo
      A great deal of methodological attention has been given to identifying age patterns in happiness. Yet, few studies have questioned why any specific age pattern should exist, and researchers have tended to focus on socio-psychological rather than socio-structural mechanisms. Thus, I blend life course and subjective well-being theories and utilize multiple waves of nationally representative cross-sectional data from the United States to throw light on the important role of socio-structural mechanisms. Specifically, the age pattern in happiness is driven by distinct patterns in levels, and importance, of satisfaction with specific areas of life. These distinct patterns, which are grounded in the successful aging paradigm, largely explain the slightly increasing quadratic age pattern in American’s happiness that researchers have become familiar with. These findings have broad implications for developing initiatives aimed at improving quality of life, and they draw attention to the need for more life course research on subjective well-being.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T00:52:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.06.002
      Issue No: Vol. 33 (2017)
       
  • Family Planning under Financial Constraints
    • Authors: Petra Buhr; Laura Castiglioni
      Pages: 12 - 20
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Petra Buhr, Laura Castiglioni
      International evidence shows that contraceptive behavior depends, among other things, on socio-economic factors such as income and education. The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between low-income status and contraceptive behavior in Germany in more detail. As an indicator of low income we use the receipt of a means-tested benefit called “Unemployment Benefit II” (UB II). We assume that the transition into this benefit program is related to a change in women's contraceptive choices, in favor of using unpaid methods or no contraceptives at all. Using data from the German Family Panel pairfam, we focused on the use of any contraceptive method which involves costs to the user, as opposed to the use of methods which do not incur monetary costs (e.g., natural contraception) or the disuse of any contraceptives. Our bivariate logistic model on the pooled dataset shows that women receiving UB II without the intent to have children in the next two years are less likely to use paid contraceptives than non-recipients. However, this appears to be a spurious correlation, as the longitudinal hybrid model shows no relation between intrapersonal changes regarding UB II and the use of contraceptives subject to cost. This model also provides evidence that women with a migration background and lower education are less likely to use paid contraceptives.

      PubDate: 2017-03-07T07:55:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 32 (2017)
       
  • Development is a life-long process
    • Authors: Laura Bernardi; Juho Härkönen
      Pages: 68 - 69
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 31
      Author(s): Laura Bernardi, Juho Härkönen


      PubDate: 2017-03-31T12:41:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 31 (2017)
       
  • Working, Parenting and Work-Home Spillover: Gender Differences in the
           Work-Home Interface across the Life Course
    • Authors: Katherine Y. Lin; Sarah A. Burgard
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Katherine Y. Lin, Sarah A. Burgard
      In this study, we bring a life course approach to work-family research and ask how work-home spillover changes as men and women move through different parenting stages. We use two waves of the Mid-Life in the United States Study (MIDUS I and II, 1996-2004, N = 1,319) and estimate change-score models to document the association between five parenting transitions (becoming a parent, starting to parent a school-aged child, an adolescent, young adult, or adult child) and changes in both positive and negative work-to-home (WHS) and home-to-work (HWS) spillover, testing for gender differences in these associations. We find that moving through parenting stages is related to within-person changes in reports of work-home spillover, and that mothers and fathers encounter changes in spillover at different points in the life course. Our findings detail how transitions through parenthood produce a gendered life course, and speaks to the need for policies to support working parents throughout the life course.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T20:57:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.12.003
       
  • The Class Attainment and the Career Mobility of Southern Italians in
           Northern Italy and in West Germany. A Comparison Between Internal and
           International Migrants.
    • Authors: Nazareno Panichella
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Nazareno Panichella
      This paper studies the class attainment of a single group of migrants, the Southern Italians, to two destinations: Northern Italy and West Germany. It analyses whether the labour market trajectories vary among institutional contexts or follow the same integration pathway across different receiving societies. In doing so, this study expands the literature in two directions. On the one hand, it stresses the importance of macro-features of the host society for studying migrants' integration processes. On the other hand, it highlights similarities and differences between internal and international migration. The paper reports empirical analyses based on the Longitudinal Survey on Italian Households (ILHS) and the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP). The results show that the inclusion of Southern migrants, both internal and international, took place at lower levels of the class structure. The greater rigidity and the strong emphasis on vocational training of the German labour market pushed Southern migrants into the unskilled urban working class. In Northern Italy, by contrast, the possibility of entering the public sector facilitated their inclusion in the middle classes. Despite those differences, in both destinations, Southern migrants had fewer opportunities of upward social mobility than the native population.

      PubDate: 2017-12-23T07:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.12.001
       
  • Precocious Life Course Transitions, Exits From, and Returns to the
           Parental Home
    • Authors: Cody Warner; Jason N. Houle
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Cody Warner, Jason N. Houle
      Residential independence has long been considered a core feature of the transition to adulthood in contemporary American society. But in recent years a growing share of young adults are living in their parents’ household, and many of these have returned home after a spell of residential independence. Recent research on exits and returns to the parental home has focused on the role of concurrent life-course transitions, young adult social and economic status, family background, and family connectivity. We know little, however, about how precocious, or early, life course transitions during adolescence affect leaving or returning home. We use longitudinal data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1997 Cohort) to examine the association between precocious transitions to adult roles during adolescence and home-leaving (n=8,865) and home-returning (n=7,704) in the United States. Some, but not all, precocious transitions are tied to residential transitions, and often in competing ways. Our findings contribute to growing research on young adults living in the parental home, and shows how adolescent experiences can contribute to inequality in the transition to adulthood.

      PubDate: 2017-12-03T03:47:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.11.001
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 34


      PubDate: 2017-11-22T02:54:17Z
       
  • Later-life employment trajectories and health
    • Authors: Peggy McDonough; Diana Worts; Laurie M. Corna; Anne McMunn; Amanda Sacker
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Peggy McDonough, Diana Worts, Laurie M. Corna, Anne McMunn, Amanda Sacker
      Background Despite the recent policy push to keep older adults in the labour force, we know almost nothing about the potential health consequences of working longer. Drawing on a life course approach that considers stability and change in employment patterns, this study examines the relationship between long-term labour market involvement in later life and self-rated health. Methods Our data are from the Health and Retirement Study (1992-2012) for the cohort born 1931-1941 (N=6,522). We used optimal matching analysis to map employment trajectories from ages 52-69, and then logistic regression to examine associations between these trajectories and self-rated health in the early 70s, net of socio-demographics, household resources and prior health. Findings Women prevail in groups characterized by a weak(er) attachment to the labour market and men, in groups signifying a strong(er) attachment. Men who downshifted from full-time to part-time work around age 65 were the least likely to report poor health in their early 70s.Women had the best health if they remained employed, either full-time or part-time. However, unlike men, they appeared to benefit most in health terms when part-time hours were part of a longer-term pattern. Conclusion While our study findings show that continuing to work in later life may be positively associated with health, they also suggest the need for flexible employment policies that foster opportunities to work part-time.

      PubDate: 2017-09-22T01:59:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.09.002
       
  • Wastage of Talent'
    • Authors: Bukodi Mollie; Bourne Bastian Betthaeuser
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Erzsébet Bukodi, Mollie Bourne, Bastian Betthaeuser
      The extent to which societies suffer ‘wastage of talent’ due to social inequalities in educational attainment is a longstanding issue. The present paper contributes to the relevant literature by examining how social origins and early-life cognitive ability are associated with educational success across three British birth cohorts. We address questions of over-time change, bringing current evidence up-to-date. Our findings reinforce the well-established trend that the importance of cognitive ability declined for cohorts born between 1958 and 1970, but we show that for a cohort born in the early 1990s this trend has reversed. We further show that the relative importance of family background has not seen a corresponding decline. In distinguishing between different components of social origins, we show that family economic resources have become somewhat less important for children’s educational success, while socio-cultural and educational resources have become more important. Even high ability children are unable to transcend the effects of their social origins. The problem of ‘wastage of talent’ remains; young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are still lacking the opportunity to fully realise their potential within the British educational system.

      PubDate: 2017-09-22T01:59:02Z
       
  • Intergenerational determinants of joint labor market and family formation
           pathways in early adulthood
    • Authors: Outi Sirniö; Timo M. Kauppinen; Pekka Martikainen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 September 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Outi Sirniö, Timo M. Kauppinen, Pekka Martikainen
      Early adulthood life courses have become diversified in recent decades, but little is known about how different dimensions of early life courses (i.e., education, labor market participation and family formation) co-evolve and are associated with parental background. This study describes the most typical joint labor market and family formation pathways of young adults and assesses whether belonging to these pathway groups is associated with parental origin. We use annually updated register-based data and analyze Finnish men and women born between 1972 and 1975 with follow-up until their mid-30s. By using multichannel sequence analyses, we identified six distinct pathway types to adulthood that are defined by educational attainment, labor market participation, and family formation, and demonstrate that these pathways are primarily dominated by the educational achievements of young adults. Educational choices and trajectories, thus, also strongly shape the patterns of other life paths and events in early adulthood. Gender differences were particularly evident for pathways characterized by low education, women entering pathways dominated by early partnership and motherhood, and men remaining without a partner or any children. We further show that parental resources – particularly parental income – predict the paths upon which the young adults embark. Parental resources in particular are most strongly linked with the educational differentiation between the paths.

      PubDate: 2017-09-17T01:39:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.09.001
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 33


      PubDate: 2017-09-17T01:39:39Z
       
  • Education delayed but not denied: The Chinese Cultural Revolution cohort
           returning to school
    • Authors: Wen Fan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Wen Fan
      Schooling decisions made in later life tend to be overlooked in conventional studies of educational attainment. Even when they are examined, too often focus is placed on individual biographies, while the roles of historical timing and the state are neglected. This paper adds to the literature by investigating to what extent cohort membership is directly associated with returning to school and intersects with social origins, gender, and political credentials to shape one’s returning-to-school decision. I compare three Chinese cohorts who turned age 19 in different historical periods. Coming of age during the turbulent decade of the Culture Revolution (1966–76, CR), members of the CR cohort lost the chance to receive a higher education “on time” and were subject to a state intervention that deliberately demolished early-life advantages conferred by families, whereas adjacent cohorts (pre-CR and post-CR cohort) were largely able to climb the educational ladder “on time.” Drawing on detailed life history data from the 2003 Chinese General Social Survey, Cox proportional hazards models show that members of the CR cohort are more likely to return to school from their mid-20s on compared with adjacent cohorts, thereby narrowing but not closing their educational gap. Cohort membership is also a contingency factor. Parental education does not predict college reentry rates for members of the pre- and post-CR cohorts, but does for members of the Cultural Revolution cohort, reflecting their early-life discrimination during the Cultural Revolution and their regained resources following it. Women are less likely to return compared with men, and the gender gap is particularly large for the CR cohort at the associate college level. Party members are more apt to return, suggesting party-sponsored patronage, and their advantages are most pronounced among members of the CR and post-CR cohorts. Taken together, this study highlights the roles of the state and historical timing in the shaping of decisions around returning to school.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T01:22:11Z
       
  • First a job, then a child' Subgroup variation in women’s
           employment-fertility link
    • Authors: Jonas Wood; Karel Neels
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jonas Wood, Karel Neels
      Both macro and micro level research exhibits signs of a turnaround in the relation between female labour force participation and fertility. However, it can be expected that this association varies considerably between population subgroups. Drawing on 2001 Belgian census data combined with birth registers for first, second and third births for the period 2002–2005, we assess within-state differences in the female employment-fertility link by education and ethnic origin. In line with the theory of the value of children, our results indicate that groups with limited labour market opportunities are more likely to have a child in response to unemployment or inactivity. Women with low education or a migrant background are more likely to adopt childbearing strategies as an alternative to labour market participation, whereas for Belgian women or highly educated women labour market participation is more positively related to childbearing.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T01:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.09.003
       
  • His way, her way: Retirement timing among dual-earner couples
    • Authors: Jonathan Jackson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 September 2016
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Jonathan Jackson
      This article examines how the retirement timing of husbands and wives has evolved in the face of women’s rising economic resources. Using 11 waves of data from the Health and Retirement Study, I trace individuals into retirement, examining how spousal employment characteristics may facilitate or hinder one’s own ability to retire and if such spousal influences have changed across cohorts. Results from event history models indicate that the retirement trajectories have changed for the leading baby boom cohort, as evidence implies they are delaying retirement longer than previous cohorts. Despite women’s rising labor force attachment, the findings do not generally support the notion that wives are influencing their husbands’ retirement timing more or that the influence of husbands on wives’ retirement timing has declined across cohorts.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T01:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2016.09.002
       
  • Cross-sibling effects on divorce in the Netherlands
    • Authors: Elise de Vuijst; Anne-Rigt Poortman; Marjolijn Das; Ruben van Gaalen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 August 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Elise de Vuijst, Anne-Rigt Poortman, Marjolijn Das, Ruben van Gaalen
      Parental divorce has repeatedly been shown to increase the risk of divorce for offspring, but research on the influence of other social ties is scarce. This study examines the association of divorce between siblings and whether such an association varies under specific sibship characteristics. Hypotheses were tested using event history models on five complete Dutch birth cohorts (1970–1974), derived from register data. Married individuals (N=64677) and their sibling were followed from 2000 up to 2012. Results show that individuals with a divorced sibling had a higher risk of divorce even after correcting for a number of shared background factors, including parental divorce. The divorce of a younger sibling had a weaker association with an individual’s divorce risk than the divorce of an older sibling, and the effect of sibling divorce weakened over time.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T00:52:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.06.003
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 32


      PubDate: 2017-06-04T08:10:28Z
       
  • IFC. Editorial Board / Aims and Scope
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research, Volume 31


      PubDate: 2017-03-31T12:41:42Z
       
  • The transition to adulthood and pathways out of the parental home: A
           cross-national analysis
    • Authors: Katrin Schwanitz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2017
      Source:Advances in Life Course Research
      Author(s): Katrin Schwanitz
      This study uses the second Wave of the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) to examine young adults’ transition to adulthood in eight European countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Hungary, Lithuania, and the Netherlands). I use reconstructed life courses from age 18 to 34 (N=21,696) to simultaneously study key life course trajectories employing multichannel sequence analysis. In doing so, I adopt a comparative framework which specifically addresses cross-national differences in young adults’ life course trajectories and cross-national differences in the educational gradient of life course trajectories. The aim of this paper is to provide a holistic picture of young adults’ different pathways out of the parental home and their transition to adulthood in contemporary Europe. The main results indicate that young adults’ life course trajectories differ by education, country and sex, but also that the educational gradient is highly context-specific across European countries.

      PubDate: 2017-03-25T12:09:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.alcr.2017.03.001
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.198.78.121
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-