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International Journal of Playwork Practice
Number of Followers: 1  
 
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ISSN (Print) 2689-9124
Published by Bowling Green State University Homepage  [5 journals]
  • The Play Workforce in Wales – Perceptions from Local Authority Play
           Sufficiency Lead Officers

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      Authors: Pete King et al.
      Abstract: As part of the Welsh Play Workforce Study, seven lead local authority officers responsible for facilitating the three-year Play Sufficiency Assessment (PSA) were interviewed in respect of Matter G: Securing and developing the play workforce development. Thematic analysis constructed three themes from the findings: play profile, collaboration and funding. Although each lead officer was passionate about the importance of play, their play profile differed concerning their play and playwork experience, knowledge and qualifications. The study indicates the importance of collaborative and partnership working both within and external to the local authority, especially with the ever-changing play-related policy and potential funding streams. However, the unpredictable nature of funding for developing a play workforce is reflected in different local authority priorities where some have or support an established play workforce, whilst others have a sparse or no play workforce at all. What the PSA and the role of the lead officer does enable is a link between statutory legislation and the play workforce on the ground which is unique to Wales.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Jun 2022 02:30:16 PDT
       
  • A Playworker’s Musings on the Perceptions and Importance of ’Mess’
           in a Play Space.

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      Authors: Angus Ian Gorrie
      Abstract: The aesthetics of any given play environment is often subject to immense scrutiny, often at the behest of adult agendas. This paper will, from a playwork practitioner’s perspective, discuss how aspects of perceptive mess in a play space positively affect play, the physical opportunities for children, their wellbeing, sense of belonging and their ability to create a sense of order as they see it. This will be juxtaposed against the situations in which children find themselves, by adult design, that paradoxically have the opposite effect. The author has drawn heavily from aspects of playwork theory and practice in the development of and discussion of these ideas with the goal of giving motivation to adults to revise their perspectives and perceptions of space and opportunity.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Mar 2022 07:15:14 PST
       
  • Animal-Assisted Play: A Strategy for Promoting Children’s Physical
           Activity Play

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      Authors: Jennifer A. Boisvert et al.
      Abstract: This article explores how animal-assisted play might be used as a strategy in playwork to support children’s right to play, enrich their play experiences, encourage their physical activity play and better their health and life quality. Children’s interactions with pets or companion animals in free play or animal-assisted activities (AAA) can yield therapeutic benefits by increasing physical and mental health and well-being and also offer possibilities for more outdoor play, agency, risk-taking, fun and enjoyment, as well as high-quality play experiences. We invite playwork practitioners to consider the important role of animals in children’s lives and the potential value of animal-assisted play in creating opportunities for enriching children’s play and life quality.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Sep 2021 08:05:27 PDT
       
  • How have adventure playgrounds in the United Kingdom adapted post-March
           Lockdown in 2020'

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      Authors: Pete King
      Abstract: Adventure playgrounds have been a feature in the United Kingdom since the 1950s. Their growth and development was underpinned by ‘thinking together’, a concept in the Communities of Practice (CoP) approach. In March 2020, the United Kingdom (UK) went into lockdown. This study aimed to find out how adventure playgrounds responded to the Covid-19 situation when they reopened in July 2020. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 adventure playground staff from 14 adventure playgrounds. Thematic analysis of the data constructed themes and sub-themes within four main headings: preparation for opening; reduction; targeted service and play behaviour. The results showed how the adventure playgrounds had to re-organise the provision with a reduction in the number of children and young people attending, moving to a more closed-access bookable provision and implementing new policies and procedures to meet the demands of social distancing. This paper reports on the findings of this study and reflects on how the CoP approach has been a feature of the post Covid response of these adventure playgrounds.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Sep 2021 06:55:27 PDT
       
  • Child Development Just Outside the Front Door: Neighbourhood Play Project

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      Authors: Hyahno Moser
      Abstract: This project examines the nature of contemporary childhood with a focus on changing rates of play in Queensland’s urban neighbourhoods. The Neighbourhood Play Project is a pilot project funded by the Queensland Government Department of Sport & Recreation. The purpose of the project was to examine and record the prevalence of local children’s existing play networks in urban Queensland neighbourhoods and to quantify their influence on children's physical activity and outdoor play levels. The recorded decline of Queensland children’s activity levels and physical literacy over the last 30 years – and its direct negative correlation with children’s increasing screen usage over the same time period (Active Healthy Kids Australia (2016) – necessitated a focused study on the possible causes of these changes to Queensland childhood. At the outset of the project it was hypothesised that supporting the creation and growth of local play networks would see a corresponding growth in the healthy play habits and physical activity of the children immediately involved in the project, and subsequently of other children living in the local area. A collaborative approach was employed whereby the playwork practitioners leading the project facilitated the creation and development of local neighbourhood play networks. Additionally, they talked with parents about their understanding of and engagement with neighbourhood play at the outset and throughout the project.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Sep 2021 06:55:23 PDT
       
  • A Curiosity About Links Between Adventure Playgrounds, Loose Parts,
           Playwork Approach, a State of "Flow" and Children’s Wellbeing

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      Authors: Angus Ian Gorrie
      Abstract: Over the past century there has been a documented rise in childhood anxiety and depression (Gray, 2011; Twenge, 2001). This increase largely correlates to the significant decrease in the amount of time children have to play freely (Gray, 2013). The suggested reason for this is a decrease in free time and play creating a strong external locus of control, the result of which has been shown to cause increases in childhood anxiety and depression (April, Dharani, & Peter, 2012; Gray, 2013). This paper records a practitioner’s musings on the links between aspects of playwork practice and children’s wellbeing. It considers Csikszentmihalyi (2008) concept of a state of flow and the development of an internal locus of control and the opportunities afforded children in an adventure playground wedded to playwork theory and practice.
      PubDate: Fri, 26 Mar 2021 07:45:13 PDT
       
  • Can Playwork Have a Key Working Role'

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      Authors: Pete King
      Abstract: This study interviewed 23 people currently involved in playwork which included face-to-face playwork practitioners, playworkers who are more involved in the development and management of specific projects or settings, playwork traininers and those working more at strategic director-level. All participants were asked to consider if playwork can have a key working role and how it will operate once the lockdown from COVID-19 has been relaxed. Analysing the 23 interviews through thematic analysis, the understanding of key working fell into three groups: 1) UK Government Response to the current COVID-19 pandemic; 2) health and well-being of people; and 3) supporting individual people. In relation to whether playwork has a key work role, most repondents beliefs fall into three categories: 1) supporting the Government Key Workers in the current situation by providing childcare; 2) using a distinct playwork approach to play; and 3) developing positive relationships with children, young people and families in the communities where the playwork provision is served. The aspects of a Playwork Approach and Developing Relationships reflect the concerns that when lockdown is reduced, playwork and playworkers will need to develop their therapeutic skills when supporting children’s play and adapt their playwork approach to both their own provision and potentially to support other provisions such as schools.
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Jul 2020 09:50:08 PDT
       
  • What do children need from playwork in the time of COVID-19' A
           reflection on playwork practice in a pandemic.

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      Authors: Freya H. Howard
      Abstract: This article explores the child’s need for play especially at the time of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in terms of the child’s welfare and rights, playfulness and their wellbeing. It reflects on previously learnt lessons with regards to virus outbreaks and the production of activity packs as a means of playwork in the pandemic context.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jul 2020 04:00:15 PDT
       
  • What if and What More: disturbing habits of thought about playwork
           ‘re-search’

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      Authors: Wendy K. Russell et al.
      Abstract: This short article reports on a presentation given at an International Journal of Playwork Practice seminar in 2018. It describes an approach to evaluating the work of an adventure playground using Participative Action Research and a critical cartographic method for producing documentation that shows the unique nature of playwork.
      PubDate: Thu, 09 Jul 2020 06:35:11 PDT
       
  • Play Spaces as Heterotopia: Seeking New Ways to Trouble the Discourses and
           Enactments of Playwork

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      Authors: Linda J. Shaw
      Abstract: In 1966 Foucault broadcasted a talk on French radio about “heterotopia.” These, he claimed, were institutional spaces that could be identified as being part of society, but at the same time outside contemporary social and political norms in their structure, discourses and iconography. The discourses and enactments of playwork frequently occur in shared spaces, in which they come up against powerful counter-discourses, particularly those generated by educational institutions. A (re)turning to data collected in three primary schools, their partner nursery and out-of-school provision revealed tensions and opportunities for playwork and playworkers during school play times and before and after school activities.
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jun 2020 05:35:06 PDT
       
  • Book Review: Playing practices in school-age childcare by Eva Kane

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      Authors: Gillian Vickers
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jun 2020 05:20:08 PDT
       
  • The Play Cycle Observation Method (PCOM): A Pilot Study

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      Authors: Pete King
      Abstract: This pilot study of the Play Cycle Observation Method (PCOM) provides a method to record the process of play as outlined by Sturrock & Else (1998) Play Cycle. Using a single 4 minute video, 5 participants mapped the Play Cycles of a boy (aged 5-6 years) and a girl (aged 9-10 years) and recorded quantitative data in relation to recording play cues prior to and then within established Play Cycles, number of Play Cycles and how long they last. In addition, more qualitative data can be recorded with respect to the nature of the play cues, play frames, annihilation (how the Play Cycle ends) and the adult role in the Play Cycle. Results from this pilot study indicates that the PCOM can provide a consistent way of recording Play Cycles which can have a benefit for both playwork practice, playwork qualifications and playwork training
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jun 2020 05:10:09 PDT
       
  • How does a Level 2 Rights Respecting School facilitate play for children
           with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND)'

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      Authors: Francesca Woods et al.
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Jun 2020 04:40:07 PDT
       
 
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