Publisher: ACS   (Total: 68 journals)   [Sort alphabetically]

Showing 1 - 68 of 68 Journals sorted by number of followers
Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 484, SJR: 1.685, CiteScore: 3)
J. of the American Chemical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 465, SJR: 8.127, CiteScore: 14)
ACS Chemical Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 451, SJR: 2.57, CiteScore: 5)
ACS Nano     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 448, SJR: 7.203, CiteScore: 14)
Analytical Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 351, SJR: 2.362, CiteScore: 6)
Environmental Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347, SJR: 2.535, CiteScore: 7)
Chemistry of Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 336, SJR: 4.675, CiteScore: 10)
Chemical Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 265, SJR: 23.414, CiteScore: 51)
The J. of Organic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247, SJR: 1.846, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 223, SJR: 2.567, CiteScore: 6)
Accounts of Chemical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 222, SJR: 11.139, CiteScore: 21)
Organic Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 210, SJR: 2.853, CiteScore: 6)
Nano Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76, SJR: 7.447, CiteScore: 13)
ACS Catalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76, SJR: 4.921, CiteScore: 11)
Langmuir     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66, SJR: 1.479, CiteScore: 4)
Macromolecules     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56, SJR: 2.419, CiteScore: 6)
J. of Physical Chemistry B     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51, SJR: 1.331, CiteScore: 3)
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49, SJR: 1.388, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Physical Chemistry C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45, SJR: 2.135, CiteScore: 5)
ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44, SJR: 2.784, CiteScore: 8)
Organic Process Research & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43, SJR: 1.405, CiteScore: 3)
ACS Synthetic Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40, SJR: 2.625, CiteScore: 5)
Inorganic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39, SJR: 1.892, CiteScore: 5)
Energy & Fuels     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.159, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Physical Chemistry A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37, SJR: 1.17, CiteScore: 3)
J. of Physical Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35, SJR: 4.667, CiteScore: 8)
ACS Macro Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34, SJR: 2.486, CiteScore: 6)
Bioconjugate Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 1.801, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Chemical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28, SJR: 0.466, CiteScore: 2)
Biomacromolecules     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27, SJR: 1.95, CiteScore: 6)
Chemical Research in Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.187, CiteScore: 4)
ACS Chemical Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.442, CiteScore: 4)
ACS Combinatorial Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25, SJR: 1.049, CiteScore: 3)
Chemical and Engineering News     Free   (Followers: 25, SJR: 0.145, CiteScore: 0)
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24, SJR: 0.978, CiteScore: 3)
Organometallics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22, SJR: 1.652, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Natural Products     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21, SJR: 1.368, CiteScore: 4)
Molecular Pharmaceutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.572, CiteScore: 5)
J. of Chemical Information and Modeling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20, SJR: 1.349, CiteScore: 4)
Crystal Growth & Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 1.154, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Chemical Theory and Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 2.497, CiteScore: 5)
ACS Photonics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19, SJR: 3.376, CiteScore: 7)
J. of Agricultural and Food Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.269, CiteScore: 4)
J. of Proteome Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14, SJR: 1.818, CiteScore: 4)
ACS Central Science     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 5.022, CiteScore: 7)
ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
ACS Applied Polymer Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Industrial & Engineering Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
J. of Chemical & Engineering Data     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.925, CiteScore: 2)
ACS ES&T Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ACS Applied Nano Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ACS Energy Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9, SJR: 1.657, CiteScore: 6)
ACS Earth and Space Chemistry     Free   (Followers: 8)
Environmental Science & Technology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
ACS infectious diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7, SJR: 1.618, CiteScore: 4)
ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
ACS ES&T Water     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Energy Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ACS Omega     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ACS Chemical Health & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.207, CiteScore: 0)
ACS Sensors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Rubber Chemistry and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.315, CiteScore: 1)
ACS Materials Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Accounts of Materials Research     Hybrid Journal  
JACS Au     Open Access  
C&EN Global Enterprise     Full-text available via subscription  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Rubber Chemistry and Technology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.315
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0035-9475
Published by ACS Homepage  [68 journals]
  • INTRODUCING BIOBASED NONPOLAR BOTTLEBRUSH β-MYRCENE SEGMENTS TO IMPROVE
           SILICA DISPERSION FOR SUSTAINABLE SSBR/SILICA NANOCOMPOSITES

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      Authors: Zhang J; Lu J, Wang D, et al.
      Pages: 213 - 233
      Abstract: ABSTRACTTo overcome the problem of fossil fuel depletion and associated environmental issues arising from the use of tire tread elastomers, a convenient, environmentally friendly, and highly efficient strategy was developed to prepare high-performance green solution polymerized styrene–butadiene rubber (SSBR)/silica nanocomposites by improving silica dispersion in the nonpolar polymer matrix via the introduction of a biobased nonpolar bottlebrush segment with two double bonds. Various elastomers containing biobased nonpolar bottlebrush β-myrcene segments were synthesized using an industrially robust anionic polymerization method. Results of rubber process analysis, small-angle X-ray scattering, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy revealed that rubber with myrcene could significantly improve silica dispersibility and inhibit the strong filler–filler interactions, which are due to the formation of hydrogen bonding between the double bonds in the myrcene block and silanol groups on the silica surface and possibly to the spreading or infiltrating of myrcene bottlebrush segments onto silica. Furthermore, for the modified rubber, rolling resistance decreased by 41.7%, tear strength increased by 20.78%, and tensile strength increased by 77.8% with the elongation at break remained practically unchanged as compared with the unmodified silica/SSBR composite. On the basis of aforementioned assessment, we believe that silica-reinforced β-myrcene–based styrene–butadiene integrated rubber is a versatile and promising candidate for future tire tread elastomers.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.21.79959
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • WASTE MORINGA OLEIFERA GUM AS A MULTIFUNCTIONAL ADDITIVE FOR UNFILLED SBR
           COMPOUND

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      Authors: Koley R; Kasilingam R, Sahoo S, et al.
      Pages: 248 - 267
      Abstract: ABSTRACTA natural waste (gum) of the drumstick tree, Moringa oleifera, was used for the first time as a sustainable multifunctional additive in an SBR compound. Improved cure rate with lower optimum cure time was obtained by using the gum as an accelerator activator. Tack strength of the M. oleifera gum–SBR compound was superior to both the control and the compound containing commercial phenol–formaldehyde resin at 5 parts per hundred of rubber loading. At different loadings, the gum acted as a plasticizer for the rubber and augmented processing by reducing the viscosity of the compound. The glass transition temperature of the compounds decreased by 2 °C compared with the pristine SBR. Moringa oleifera gum at any loading reduced the die swell of SBR. This study has relevance because the rubber industry is looking for feasible sustainable additives as alternatives to existing petroleum-based compounding ingredients.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.21.79998
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • HEAT AGING OF A BROMOBUTYL TIRE INNER LINER UNDER AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC
           CONDITIONS

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      Authors: Yerxa MM; Porter CC, Pazur RJ.
      Pages: 268 - 287
      Abstract: ABSTRACTA bromobutyl tire inner liner compound was prepared and subjected to aerobic and anaerobic heat aging at a temperature of 100 °C for seven aging times up to 8 weeks. Hardness and mechanical properties were monitored, and the evolution of the crosslink density was followed using equilibrium solvent swell and low field double quantum (DQ) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The hardness and the 300% tensile stress increased with heat aging, while both tensile strength and elongation at break dropped. Both chain scission and crosslinking reactions were taking place. Equilibrium swelling and DQ NMR results confirmed that a larger crosslink density increase was seen under aerobic versus anaerobic aging conditions. The network distribution consisting of a dominant low crosslinking zone and small areas of higher crosslinking slowly broadened and shifted toward higher crosslink densities upon heat aging. The compounds aged heterogeneously. Attenuated total reflectance–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of an oxidized surface layer, and therefore diffusion-limited oxidation effects, but only under aerobic aging conditions. Reaction mechanisms are proposed to explain the net crosslink rise with heat aging.
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.21.79941
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • RECYCLING BEHAVIOR OF THERMOREVERSIBLY DIELS–ALDER CROSSLINKED EPM

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      Authors: Zdvizhkov AT; Van Duin M, Picchioni F.
      Pages: 288 - 297
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe recyclability of thermoreversibly Diels–Alder (DA) crosslinked EPM has been studied. The retro DA reaction dominates over the dehydration–aromatization process of the DA adduct. Moreover, a negative influence of air occurred as a result of a crosslinking in air flow. Nevertheless, rubber compounds prepared from EPM-g-furan and carbon black can be recycled several times without losing mechanical strength, a feature attributed to a strong antioxidant effect of the carbon black.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.21.79971
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • THIXOTROPIC FLOCCULATION EFFECTS IN CARBON BLACK–REINFORCED RUBBER:
           KINETICS AND THERMAL ACTIVATION

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      Authors: Tunnicliffe LB.
      Pages: 298 - 323
      Abstract: ABSTRACTA new rheological methodology is used to quantify the kinetics and thermal activation of thixotropic recovery (flocculation) of uncrosslinked carbon black–reinforced emulsion SBR following high shears and over a range of annealing temperatures. A wide range of carbon black types are examined to determine the influence of aggregate morphology and surface area on compound flocculation. Several kinetic parameters are correlated with the carbon black aggregate structure and surface area, the results of which imply a transition in mechanisms controlling modulus recovery between shorter and longer recovery time scales. Thermal activation of flocculation is found to scale to the surface area and to the mean aggregate diameter of the carbon blacks following power law relationships. The thermal activation data for a subset of compounds with different carbon blacks prepared at different loadings collapses onto a single master line by rescaling the data to a parameter that is proportional to the theoretical interparticle force calculated for the idealized situation of two spherical particles in proximity. Three different van der Waals force models are evaluated, and in each case, an effective superposition of the thermal activation data is achieved. This indicates that the attractive force between aggregates plays a key role in the flocculation of carbon black in rubber, and this force can be traced back to the aggregate and primary particle sizes, interaggregate distances, and effective volume fractions. The activation energy for the viscosity of the unfilled, uncrosslinked SBR is similar to analogous values calculated for the thermal activation of flocculation. This coupling of energetics may be the result of creep/flow of rubber out of gaps between aggregates resulting from interaggregate attractive forces and any potential diffusive motion of the aggregates. Bound rubber data appear to contain information relating to aggregate packing, which could be exploited in future work to further explore the mechanism of flocculation.
      PubDate: Mon, 10 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.21.79896
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • MACRO- AND MICRO-DISPERSION OF SILICA IN TIRE TREAD COMPOUNDS: ARE THEY
           RELATED'

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      Authors: Jin JJ; Kaewsakul WW, Noordermeer JM, et al.
      Pages: 355 - 375
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe dispersion of rubber fillers, such as silica, can be divided into two categories: macro- and micro-dispersion. Both dispersions are important; however, to achieve the best reinforcement of rubber, micro-dispersion of silica is crucial. The common view is that these filler dispersions are strongly related. The micro-dispersion is understood as the consequence of the continuous breakdown of filler clusters from macro-dispersion. Yet, a large problem is that an objective unequivocal direct measurement method for micro-dispersion is not available. In this study, a set of parameters is defined that are anticipated to have an influence on the micro- as well as the macro-dispersion. Mixing trials are performed with varying silanization temperature and time, different amounts of silane coupling agent, and by using silicas with different structures and specific surface areas. The degrees of micro- and macro-dispersion are evaluated by measuring the Payne effect as an indirect method for micro-dispersion and using a dispergrader for quantitative measurement of macro-dispersion. The results show that the filler dispersion processes happen simultaneously but independently. These results are supported by earlier work of Blume and Uhrlandt, who stated as well that micro- and macro-dispersion are independent. The major influencing factors on micro- and macro-dispersion of silica are also identified.
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.20.80365
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE IDENTIFIABILITY OF ELASTOMER MECHANICAL
           PROPERTIES BY NANO-INDENTATION AND SHAPE-MANIFOLD APPROACH

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      Authors: Ezzaamari O; Le Quilliec G, Lacroix F, et al.
      Pages: 376 - 392
      Abstract: ABSTRACTVarious research is covering instrumented nano-indentation in the literature. However, studies on this characterization test remain limited when it comes to the local mechanical behavior of elastomeric materials. The application of nano-indentation on these materials is a difficult task given their complex mechanical and structural characteristics. We try to overcome these experimental limitations and find an effective numerical approach for local mechanical characterization of hyper-elastic materials. For such needs, we carried out a numerical study based on model reduction and shape manifold approach to investigate the parameters identification of different hyper-elastic constitutive laws by using instrumented indentation. Similarly, we studied the influence of the indenter geometry, the friction coefficient variation, and finally the indented material height effect. To this end, we constructed a reduced order model through a design of experiments by proper orthogonal decomposition combined with the kriging interpolation method.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Mar 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.21.79993
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2021)
       
  • DERIVATIZATION OF SOYBEAN OIL TO ENHANCE PERFORMANCE AS A PROCESSING OIL
           IN SBR-BASED RUBBER COMPOUNDS

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      Authors: Shafranska O; Chernykh A, Chisholm BJ, et al.
      Pages: 234 - 247
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAlthough soybean oil (SBO) has been used as a bio-based processing oil (PO) for rubber compounds, direct replacement of a conventional petroleum-based PO with SBO often results in a reduction of some important properties. As a result, it was of interest to investigate two higher molecular weight SBO-derived materials as POs, namely, sucrose octasoyate (SS) and poly(2-vinyloxyethyl)soyate (P2VOES). When these compounds were used in carbon black (CB)-filled SBR, mechanical properties were significantly improved. This result was mainly attributed to higher crosslink densities resulting from their higher degree of unsaturation per molecule as compared with SBO. Higher unsaturation per molecule increases the probability that the PO will be incorporated into the crosslinked network as elastically effective crosslinks as opposed to dangling chain ends. With regard to tire tread performance, both SS and P2VOES-based vulcanizates showed a lower predicted rolling resistance than the SBO-based control, and the P2VOES vulcanizate showed a better balance between rolling resistance and wet traction. Vulcanizates derived from SS and P2VOES showed a small tangent delta peak between −13 and 35 °C that might be associated with relatively highly crosslinked domains rich in SS or P2VOES.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.20.79990
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • ENTANGLED NETWORK INFLUENCED BY CARBON BLACK IN SOLUTION SBR VULCANIZATES
           REVEALED BY THEORY AND EXPERIMENT

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      Authors: Kumar A; Dalmiya M, Goswami M, et al.
      Pages: 324 - 338
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe contribution of carbon black (CB) on changes in cross-link density (n) and physical entanglement has been quantified by swelling and uniaxial stress–strain measurements considering Mooney–Rivlin parameters. Solution SBR (SSBR) vulcanizates with varying content of high abrasion furnace (HAF) CB were studied. Rubber–filler networks increase the n values, which were determined by using Flory–Rehner and modified Guth–Gold equations by equilibrium swelling study. The Mooney–Rivlin parameter C1 was quantified using n, whereas parameter C2, representing physical entanglement, was determined for filled rubber by correlating with tensile results. The parameter C2 is monitored to be decreased with increasing CB (HAF) loading. A simple parabolic trend for physical entanglement parameter with increasing CB loading is proposed, and it shows a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.99595. Atomic force microscopy study confirms the generation of filler networking in the rubber matrix. The current findings elucidate a way for quantifying physical network changes due to fillers in an unfilled rubber system.
      PubDate: Wed, 27 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.20.80374
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • VULCANIZATE STRUCTURES AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF RUBBER COMPOUNDS WITH
           SILICA AND CARBON BLACK BINARY FILLER SYSTEMS

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      Authors: Kim I; Ahn B, Kim D, et al.
      Pages: 339 - 354
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe physical properties of rubber compounds are mainly determined by the filler dispersion within the rubber matrix, filler–rubber interaction, and chemical crosslink structure caused by sulfur. Carbon black or silica is typically used as a reinforcing filler in tire tread compounds; however, binary filler systems comprising the two types of filler are also currently being used to complement each other. This study used binary filler systems to manufacture vulcanizates and classified the vulcanizate structures as chemical crosslinks caused by sulfur, physical crosslinks caused by carbon black (carbon black–bound rubber), and silica–silane–rubber networks caused by silica and silane. The effect of each vulcanizate structure on the physical properties was also calculated. In the proposed binary filler system, silica chemically bonds with rubber molecules, unlike carbon black. Therefore, the crosslink density per unit of silica content was 19% higher than that of carbon black, in which rubber molecules were physically adsorbed on the surface. Tensile properties affected by 1 unit of crosslinking density for each filler were calculated, and silica was found to contribute more in the low-elongation range, whereas carbon black contributed more in the high-elongation range. Regarding tan δ at 60 °C and abrasion resistance per unit crosslink density of filler, carbon black made a greater contribution than silica, whereas silica had a greater contribution to wet traction and snow traction.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.5254/rct.20.80368
      Issue No: Vol. 94, No. 2 (2020)
       
 
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