Publisher: American Association for Respiratory Care (Total: 1 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 1 of 1 Journals sorted alphabetically
Respiratory Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.971, CiteScore: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Respiratory Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.971
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0020-1324 - ISSN (Online) 1943-3654
Published by American Association for Respiratory Care Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Editor’s Commentary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Patient-Ventilator Synchrony in Neurally-Adjusted Ventilatory Assist and
           Variable Pressure Support Ventilation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maria Vargas; Pasquale Buonanno, Andrea Sica, Lorenzo Ball, Carmine Iacovazzo, Annachiara Marra, Paolo Pelosi, Giuseppe Servillo
      Pages: 503 - 509
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:Neurally-adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA) improves patient-ventilator synchrony and reduces the risk of respiratory over-assistance. Variable pressure support ventilation (PSV) is a recently introduced mode of assisted ventilation that has also shown reduction in patient-ventilator asynchronies. We hypothesized that NAVA would reduce patient-ventilator asynchronies and inspiratory effort compared to variable PSV because breathing variability was intrinsically determined by the patient and not by the ventilator. This study aimed to evaluate patient-ventilator asynchronies and inspiratory effort pressure-time product (PTP) between NAVA and variable PSV in subjects with mild ARDS.METHODS:After 24 h of controlled mechanical ventilation, subjects (PaO2/FIO2 200–300 and PEEP level < 10 cm H2O) were randomized in sequence 1:1 by using a web-based encrypted platform and assigned to NAVA or variable PSV groups. Both modes of ventilation were consecutively kept for 24 h unless there were clinical changes. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate differences in asynchrony index (AI) between variable PSV and NAVA. Our secondary aims were to evaluate the coefficient of variation (CV) of breathing patterns and inspiratory effort between the groups.RESULTS:Thirteen subjects were randomized in the NAVA group and 13 subjects in the variable PSV group. AI over time and minute PTP (PTPmin) were not different between NAVA and variable PSV groups (AI t0 P = .52, AI t12 P = .27, AI t24 P = .12; and PTPmin-t0 P = .60, PTPmin-t12 P = .57, PTPmin-t24 P = .85, respectively). CV for tidal volume (VT) and pressure support (PS) was lower in variable PSV group over time compared with NAVA group (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS:In this randomized controlled trial including subjects with mild ARDS, NAVA and variable PSV had comparable effects on patient-ventilator synchronies and PTP. However, variable PSV reduced the variability of VT and PS when compared with NAVA.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.08921
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Heliox Prescribing Trends for Pediatric Critical Asthma

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alicia Lew; John M Morrison, Ernest K Amankwah, Anthony A Sochet
      Pages: 510 - 519
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:Children with asthma exacerbations requiring pediatric ICU (PICU) admission, known as critical asthma (CA), are prescribed a variety of therapeutic interventions including heliox. Delivered invasively and noninvasively, heliox is employed to enhance deposition of aerosolized medications, improve obstructive pulmonary pathophysiology, and avoid complications associated with invasive mechanical ventilation. We used the Virtual Pediatric Systems database to update estimates of heliox prescription and explore for relationships between heliox and mechanical ventilation frequency and duration.METHODS:We performed a retrospective cohort study using data from 97 PICUs among children 3–17 y of age admitted for CA from 2013–2019. The primary outcome was heliox prescribing rates and trends. Subgroup analyses assessed mechanical ventilation rates and duration by heliox exposure.RESULTS:Of 43,238 subjects studied, 1,070 (2.5%) were prescribed heliox. Mean heliox prescribing rates fell from 4.11% in 2013 to 2.37% in 2019. Heliox use was greater from centers in the South (2.6%) and Midwest (3.3%) as compared to the West (1.6%) and Northeast United States (1.6%, P < .001). In the subgroup assessing mechanical ventilation frequency, mechanical ventilation rates were 273/39,739 (0.7%) and greater for those provided heliox (1.9% vs 0.7%, P < .001). In the subgroup assessing mechanical ventilation duration, no differences in median mechanical ventilation duration were observed (4.94 [interquartile range [IQR] 3.04–6.36] vs 4.63 [IQR 3.11–7.30] d; P = .35) for those with and without heliox. In exploratory adjusted models, noninvasive heliox was not associated with mechanical ventilation. Mortality was rare (206/43,238 [0.47%]) and predominantly among subjects intubated prehospitalization (188/206 [91.3%]).CONCLUSIONS:Heliox as adjunctive therapy for children with CA is uncommon (2.5%) and not associated with mechanical ventilation or decreased mechanical ventilation duration in adjusted models. Updated estimates provided herein inform prospective controlled trial development to better define the role of heliox for CA.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09385
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Utility of Rectus Abdominis Ultrasound as a Respiratory Function Test for
           Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rina Ando; Yuki Yamanishi, Satoshi Tada, Noriyuki Miyaue, Mohammed Emamussalehin Choudhury, Masahiro Nagai
      Pages: 520 - 525
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes deterioration of respiratory function. Muscle weakness of the orbicularis oris interferes with the accurate assessment of respiratory function using spirometry. Reduced forced vital capacity (FVC) is an indicator that helps determine the appropriate timing to provide noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for the survival of ALS patients. We employed ultrasonography to evaluate changes in respiratory function by measuring the thickness of the rectus abdominis (RA) muscle as a possible alternative to spirometry.METHODS:Sixteen subjects with ALS were included in this study. The thickness of RA muscles was measured using ultrasonography, and respiratory fluctuations, such as vital capacity (VC), FVC, FEV1, percentage of predicted VC (%VC), percentage of predicted FVC (%FVC), percentage of predicted FEV1 (%FEV1), and FEV1/FVC, were evaluated using spirometry.RESULTS:Sixteen subjects underwent assessment by ultrasonography. A positive correlation was observed between the percent change in RA muscle thickness evaluated from maximal expiration to maximal inspiration and %VC (P = .001), %FVC (P = .001), FEV1 (P = .009), and %FEV1 (P = .02).CONCLUSIONS:RA ultrasonography was useful for predicting a reduction in VC in subjects with ALS and may help determine the best timing for introducing NIV.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09317
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Respiratory Muscle Endurance in Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elif Sena Dusgun; Goksen Kuran Aslan, Ebru Seker Abanoz, Esen Kiyan
      Pages: 526 - 533
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:An increase in respiratory work load and resistance to respiration cause a decrease in respiratory muscle endurance (RME) in patients with obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS). We aimed to evaluate and compare RME in subjects with OHS and a control group using an incremental load test and compare the RME of subjects with OHS in whom noninvasive ventilation (NIV) was and was not used.METHODS:Forty subjects with OHS (divided according to body mass index [BMI] as group I: 30–40 kg/m2; and group II: ≥ 40 kg/m2) and 20 subjects with obesity (control group: 30–40 kg/m2) were included in the study. RME was evaluated using the incremental load test, and respiratory muscle strength (RMS) was evaluated using mouth pressure measurements. The 6-min walk test, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), EQ-5D Health-Related Quality of Life Questionnaire (EQ-5D), and the Obesity and Weight-Loss Quality of Life Instrument (OWLQOL) were performed.RESULTS:RME and RMS (%) in group I were lower than the control group (P = .001, P = .005, and P = .001, respectively). No significant difference was found between the 3 groups in terms of 6-min walk distance (6MWD) percentage predicted values (P = .98). RME in the NIV user group was higher than the non-user group (P = .006). ESS, total PSQI, and FSS scores in the control group were less than group I (P = .01, P = .009, and P = .005, respectively) and group II (P = .01, P < .001, and P < .001, respectively). The EQ-5D scores of the control group were higher than group II only (P = .005 and P = .005, respectively). There were no differences in OWLQOL between the groups (P = .053).CONCLUSIONS:RME was low in subjects with OHS but higher in those who used NIV. The incremental load test could be performed easily and safely in a clinic setting.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09338
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Evaluation of YouTube Videos as a Source of Information on Pulmonary
           Rehabilitation for COPD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Myungeun Yoo; Myeong Hwan Bang, Chan Woong Jang
      Pages: 534 - 542
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:The use of YouTube for providing medical information is increasing, and patients with COPD are likely to use digital media to obtain information for their conditions. This study aimed to analyze the reliability and quality of the videos that were most frequently viewed by patients with COPD who searched YouTube for information on pulmonary rehabilitation.METHODS:A YouTube search was conducted by using the keyword “pulmonary rehabilitation.” All the videos were categorized into 2 groups according to source and purpose. For evaluating the reliability and quality, the modified DISCERN score and the pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD-specific score (PRSS) were used, respectively. Differences of the variables between the groups and associations across the groups were examined. The influence of the variables of the videos on the engagement of viewers and viewership was analyzed.RESULTS:In total, 62 videos were analyzed. Most of the videos (54/62 [87%]) were uploaded by professionals and the remainder (8/62 [13%] by non-professionals. According to their purposes, 35 of 62 (56%) were informational and 27 of 62 (44%) were non-informational. The mean ± SD modified DISCERN score and the mean ± SD total the PRSS were 3.76 ± 1.04 and 4.13 ± 3.73, respectively. When comparing the videos according to professionalism, significant differences only in the modified DISCERN scores were observed. The engagement of viewers, viewership, mean modified DISCERN, mean total of the PRSS were significantly higher in the informational group than in the non-informational group. Video duration was positively correlated with engagement of viewers and viewership.CONCLUSIONS:Popular YouTube videos on pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD were reliable; however, they were biased and of low quality in terms of providing content. Given YouTube’s advantage of easy accessibility and disadvantage of vulnerability to poor-quality information, professionals should pay more attention to uploading comprehensive high-quality videos for informational purposes.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09651
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Perceptions of Noninvasive Ventilation During Exercise in Noninvasive
           Ventilation-Naive Patients With COPD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clancy J Dennis; Collette Menadue, Tessa Schneeberger, Daniela Leitl, Ursula Schoenheit-Kenn, Alison R Harmer, David J Barnes, Andreas R Koczulla, Klaus Kenn, Jennifer A Alison
      Pages: 543 - 552
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:The perceptions of using noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during exercise in patients with COPD who are naïve to NIV is unknown. The present study aimed to examine the perceptions of using NIV during exercise in people with COPD and to determine the relationship between patient perceptions with both baseline patient characteristics and exercise outcomes.METHODS:During a trial examining the effect of NIV during exercise on dynamic hyperinflation in people with COPD who were naïve to NIV, participants completed a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire (scored strongly disagree −2 to strongly agree +2) before and after using NIV during exercise and a semi-structured interview after using NIV during exercise.RESULTS:Eighteen participants, mean age (SD) 69 (7) y, FEV1/FVC 0.44 (0.08), FEV1 39 (7)% predicted, completed the study. Prior to exercise with NIV, participants were neutral about NIV, (mean [SD]) (0.67[0.84]). After exercise with NIV, participants felt that NIV made breathing easier (1.00 [0.77]) and that it helped exercise (1.06 [0.64]). There were moderate correlations between feeling that NIV was comfortable or effective and a change in exercise endurance time (ρ = − 0.588, P = .02), isotime inspiratory capacity (ρ = 0.488, P = .03), and measures of resting hyperinflation (ρ = 0.603, \P = .02). Interviews revealed that despite feeling comfortable using NIV during exercise, NIV might be too complicated for patients to manage outside a supervised environment.CONCLUSIONS:Individuals with COPD, naïve to NIV, and using NIV during exercise for the first time reported a positive effect of NIV on breathlessness and exercise performance. Participants’ perceived benefit of NIV correlated moderately with increased endurance time and resting hyperinflation and with a reduction in dynamic hyperinflation during exercise, suggesting that patient reports could also aid selection of those who will benefit from NIV during exercise.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09657
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Modification of the ALSFRS-R for Utilization in Individuals Not Using
           Noninvasive Ventilation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Louis Vlok; Laura Rossouw, Franclo Henning
      Pages: 553 - 561
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:The Revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) is widely employed in assessing functional decline in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A limitation of the scale is that item 12 does not directly evaluate worsening respiratory failure in ALS but rather the management thereof as a surrogate marker. We propose an alternative scale to assess respiratory function in ALS individuals who do not use noninvasive ventilation (NIV).METHODS:85 participants were included in the study. ALSFRS-R scores were calculated and FVC measured at each clinic visit. Additional questions were asked regarding the presence of nocturnal hypoventilation symptoms, including (1) early-morning headaches, (2) excessive daytime somnolence, (3) poor concentration, and (4) decrease in appetite. A nocturnal hypoventilation item was developed using these questions in participants not using NIV. Internal consistency and validity were calculated using the nocturnal hypoventilation item as substitute for the existing item 12. The ALSFRS-R was modified by adding the alternative item 12 and named ALSFRS-Revised Modified (ALSFRS-RM).RESULTS:The ALSFRS-RM has a strong internal consistency and validity, which was calculated using Cronbach alpha and factor analysis. A Spearman correlation of 0.34 was calculated between the measured FVC and the nocturnal hypoventilation item score. In addition, a nocturnal hypoventilation item score of ≤ 3 corresponds to an FVC of ≤ 65%, with the upper 95% CI < 80%.CONCLUSIONS:Our results suggest that the addition of an alternative item 12 to the existing ALSFRS-R may be a viable option for use in individuals not receiving ventilatory support. The new nocturnal hypoventilation item may also be a reliable indicator of respiratory decline that may remove the need for FVC measurement prior to introducing NIV.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09452
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Rapid Shallow Breathing Index as a Predictor for Intubation and Mortality
           in Acute Respiratory Failure

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Huseyin Acar; Adnan Yamanoglu
      Pages: 562 - 571
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is one of the most important therapeutic tools in patients with acute respiratory failure. However, in case of incorrect patient selection it can delay necessary intubation and is associated with complications and even mortality. Patient selection, therefore, plays a key role in therapeutic success. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) in predicting the failure of NIV.METHODS:This prospective observational study was conducted in the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary hospital. Adults presenting to the ED with acute respiratory failure were included in the study. The success of RSBI values measured initially (RSBI 1) and at 30 min (RSBI 2) and the difference between these 2 values (Δ RSBI) in predicting subjects’ intubation requirement and survival was tested using multivariate logistic regression analysis.RESULTS:Two hundred sixty-seven subjects were included in the study. RSBI 1, RSBI 2, and Δ RSBI values differed significantly between the intubated and non-intubated subjects. According to the multivariate model, RSBI 1 and RSBI 2> 105, Δ RSBI < 19, heart rate> 100 beats/min, and SpO2 < 92% were significantly associated with intubation requirement. RSBI 1, RSBI 2, and Δ RSBI values also differed significantly between subjects with a fatal course and surviving individuals. According to the multivariate model, RSBI 2> 105, Δ RSBI < 19, heart rate> 100, and increasing age were associated with in-hospital mortality.CONCLUSIONS:RSBI can be a successful marker in predicting the failure of NIV and predicting in-hospital mortality in patients admitted to the ED with acute respiratory failure.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09525
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Effect of Mask Selection on the Leak Test in Ventilators Designed for
           Noninvasive Ventilation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wei Tan; Hai-Jia Hou, Chang-Ling Lu, Bing Dai, Hong-Wen Zhao, Wei Wang, Jian Kang
      Pages: 572 - 578
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:The mask leak test used for modern noninvasive ventilators can detect the leak characteristics of masks that are not recommended by the manufacturer, but it has not yet been determined whether this method is acceptable.METHODS:A noninvasive ventilator equipped with a single-limb circuit and an oronasal mask was connected to a lung simulator. The ventilator was set to S/T mode, and inspiratory positive airway pressure/expiratory positive airway pressure was set to 10/5, 15/5, and 20/5 cm H2O, respectively. Eight nonmanufacturer-recommended oronasal masks were connected to the ventilator. The lung simulator was used to simulate COPD, restrictive disease, and normal lung, respectively. When switching between masks, the mask leak test was set to “Cancel” or “Start Test” in the noninvasive ventilator. The parameters displayed on the lung simulator and ventilator were recorded before and after the mask leak test.RESULTS:There were no significant difference before versus after the mask leak test for any lung simulator parameter, including trigger performance (ie, time from the beginning of the simulated inspiratory effort to the lowest value of airway pressure needed to trigger the ventilator, the magnitude of airway pressure drop needed to trigger, and time to trigger), inspiratory pressure delivery, PEEP, tidal volume, and displayed peak inspiratory pressure (all differences < 10%). At different noninvasive ventilation settings, tidal volumes displayed on the ventilator of the 3 masks were significantly different before and after mask leak test (all P < .05, and difference rate> 10%).CONCLUSIONS:The mask leak test had no effect on the ventilator performance when masks not recommended by the manufacturer were used, but tidal volume monitoring may be more accurate when some masks were used.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.08299
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Community-Based Pulmonary Rehabilitation Programs in Individuals With COPD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marisela Barbosa; Renato Andrade, Cristina Argel de Melo, Rui Torres
      Pages: 579 - 593
      Abstract: BACKGROUND:Community-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programs can be offered to patients with COPD, but the literature on its effects is still not well summarized. Our purpose was to investigate the health-, physical-, and respiratory-related effects of community-based PR in individuals with COPD as compared to control groups.METHODS:The PubMed and Embase databases were searched up to May 17, 2021. We included randomized control trials that compared the effects of community-based PR as compared to control groups in individuals with COPD. The risk of bias was judged using the Cochrane Risk of Bias 2 (RoB2). Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model to estimate the standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% CI of the mean changes from baseline between groups. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation was used to interpret certainty of results.RESULTS:We included 10 randomized control studies comprising a total of 9,350 participants with weighted mean age of 62.3 ± 2.38 y. The community-based interventions were based on exercise programs (resistance and/or endurance). All studies were judged as high risk and/or some concerns in one or more domains the risk of bias. All meta-analyses displayed very low certainty of evidence. The community-based PR interventions were significantly superior to control interventions in improving the St. George Respiratory Questionnaire Activity subscore (−0.40 [95% CI −0.72 to −0.08]; k = 5, n = 382) and total score (−0.73 [95% CI −1.29 to −0.18]; k = 4, n = 268) and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire dyspnea subscore (0.36 [95% CI 0.03–0.69]; k = 6, n = 550). The mean changes from baseline were not different between the groups for all other outcomes.CONCLUSIONS:Community-based PR tended to result in superior health-related quality of life and symptoms than control interventions, but the findings were inconsistent across outcomes and with very low certainty of evidence. Further studies are warranted for stronger conclusions.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09627
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Definitive Closure of the Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants and
           Subsequent Short-Term Respiratory Outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Craig R Wheeler; Elizabeth R Vogel, Michael A Cusano, Kevin G Friedman, Ryan Callahan, Diego Porras, Juan C Ibla, Philip T Levy
      Pages: 594 - 606
      Abstract: A persistent patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) can have significant clinical consequences in preterm infants, depending on the degree of left-to-right shunting, its impact on cardiac performance, and associated perinatal risk factors that can mitigate or exacerbate the shunt. Although the best management strategy remains contentious, PDAs that have contraindications to, or have failed medical management have historically undergone surgical ligation. Recently smaller occluder devices and delivery systems have allowed for minimally invasive closure in the catheterization laboratory even in extremely premature infants. The present review summarizes the pathophysiologic manifestations, treatment options and management of hemodynamically significant PDA in preterm infants. Additionally, we review the available literature surrounding the respiratory support and outcomes of preterm infants following definitive PDA closure.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09489
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Portable Handheld Point-of-Care Ultrasound for Detecting Unrecognized
           Esophageal Intubations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gabrielle A White-Dzuro; Lauren E Gibson, Lorenzo Berra, Edward A Bittner, Marvin G Chang
      Pages: 607 - 612
      Abstract: Esophageal intubations are not an uncommon occurrence in prehospital settings, occurring as high as 17%. These “never events” are associated with significant morbidity and mortality especially when unrecognized or when there is delayed recognition. Here, we review the currently available techniques for confirming endotracheal tube intubation and their limitations, and present the case for the application of portable handheld point-of-care ultrasound as an emerging technology for detection of potentially unrecognized esophageal intubations such as during cardiac arrest. We also provide algorithms for confirmation of tracheal intubation.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09239
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Prehospital Ultrasound for Endotracheal Tube Confirmation: Better
           Alternatives Exist

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James Li; Jason T McMullan
      Pages: 613 - 615
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09702
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Rebuttal to Pro

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James Li; Jason T McMullan
      Pages: 616 - 617
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09897
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Rebuttal to Con

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gabrielle A White-Dzuro; Lauren E Gibson, Lorenzo Berra, Edward A Bittner, Marvin G Chang
      Pages: 618 - 619
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09914
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Classification and Quantification of Patient-Ventilator Interactions: We
           Need Consensus!

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eduardo Mireles-Cabodevila; Marcelo Gama de Abreu
      Pages: 620 - 623
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.10114
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Heliox as Adjunctive Therapy for Pediatric Critical Asthma: Time to
           Question Its Role'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Awni M Al-Subu; Kyle J Rehder
      Pages: 624 - 626
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.10097
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Target Oxygenation Ranges for ARDS and Hospitalized Patients With COPD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Umur Ş Hatipoğlu
      Pages: 627 - 629
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.09972
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Reply to Dr. Hatipo─člu: Target Oxygenation Ranges for ARDS and
           Hospitalized Patients With COPD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas Piraino; Maria Madden, Karsten J Roberts, James Lamberti, Emily Ginier, Shawna L Strickland
      Pages: 628 - 628
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.10064
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
  • Impact of Timing of Tocilizumab Use in Hospitalized Patients With
           SARS-CoV-2 Infection

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Akhilesh Mahajan; Jonathan Moore, Anup K Singh, Margarita Oks
      Pages: 629 - 630
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T19:23:35-07:00
      DOI: 10.4187/respcare.10067
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 5 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 34.231.247.88
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-