Publisher: Allied Academies   (Total: 6 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

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Academy of Strategic Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38, SJR: 0.134, CiteScore: 0)
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Journal of Management Information and Decision Sciences
Number of Followers: 47  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1524-7252 - ISSN (Online) 1532-5806
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  • Art, affect, and art effects

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      Authors: Andrew B. Kipnis, Mariane C. Ferme, Luiz Costa, Raminder Kaur
      Pages: 895 - 900
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718316
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Introduction: The politics of negative affects in post-Reform China

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      Authors: Lisa Richaud
      Pages: 901 - 914
      Abstract: If there is such a thing as a dominant public sphere in post-reform China, its emotional tonality has often been described as overwhelmingly positive, as evidenced by the recent focus on “happiness” campaigns or state-promoted “positive energy.” This special section takes the prevalence of positivity as an invitation to investigate its opposites: what, in an authoritarian context, is the political work of negative affects such as bitterness, fear, shame, indifference, deflation, or trouble' Locating the articles within a broader literature on affect and emotion in anthropology and beyond, this introduction provides an overall framing for the collection. Based on the articles, it depicts the potential of negativity as both disruptive and generative, as affects work through their evaluative and propositional force which induces transformation while often evading repression.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717656
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Troubling emotions in China’s psy-boom

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      Authors: Barclay Bram
      Pages: 915 - 927
      Abstract: The rise of psychological counseling, 心理咨询, as part of China’s unfolding psy-boom has brought with it a new discourse of distress. In particular, this article will look at the concept of 心理困扰/困惑, which I translate as “psychological troubles.” By identifying psychological troubles the psy-boom is providing a discursive space for people in China to discuss issues that distress them which sits in between the medicalized realm of DSM-category illnesses like depression and the language of activism and social justice. This ethnography shows how psychological troubles are understood by some therapists as “blockages” to freely flowing emotions. Drawing on the scholarship of affective contagion, a link is drawn between the unsticking of emotions within persons and the inability of freely flowing emotions to “stick” to wider social issues due to the constraints placed on civil society and free speech by the Chinese Communist Party. The apolitical and nonmedicalized language of the psy-boom is, therefore, a reflection of the social function of this particular form of therapeutic care.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717183
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Shameless modernity: Reflexivity and social class in Chinese personal
           growth groups

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      Authors: Amir Hampel
      Pages: 928 - 941
      Abstract: Critical scholars suggest that self-help psychology discourages political activism and encourages entrepreneurship by promoting a “positive” attitude. This article complicates this finding, arguing that for Chinese youth, self-help groups reproduce class distinctions, expressed through leisure and perceived modernity, and that these groups mobilize negative affects, particularly shame. Drawing on extensive fieldwork, the article shows how Chinese youth recount shameful experiences in personal growth groups, reflecting on their perceived failures and committing to redefine themselves. Their shame induces reflexivity, or self-awareness; this reflexivity helps Chinese youth to position themselves in a highly stratified society. Furthermore, reflexive self-definition indexes social class and personal fulfillment. Youth use self-help groups as spaces in which to align their personal identity with local moral registers championing urban consumer lifestyles and modern values. Therefore, self-help practices channel negative affects into reproducing social class and into constructing an imagined national modernity.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717182
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Fluctuating affect: Purpose and deflation in paths of self-development

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      Authors: Gil Hizi
      Pages: 942 - 957
      Abstract: This article spotlights the role of affect in paths of “self-development,” focusing on young adults in China who engage in various training programs. Informed by market-driven expertise, individuals configure their feelings as central for their ability to execute their tasks and enhance their socioeconomic competence. Thus, they seek to induce and manage affect while combating the purposeless attitudes that they ascribe to Chinese everyday life. However, young adults are also frequently confronted with their inability to convert affect to palpable endpoints, leading them to frequent deflation and self-examination. Drawing on the works of Sara Ahmed and Lauren Berlant, I delineate this dialectic of high and low affect. I argue that rather than undermining productivity, low affect and its perceived negative valence are integral to a trajectory of self-development where individuals shift between projects and renew their commitment to an underlying ethos, notwithstanding the prevailing impasses of the Chinese socioeconomic landscape.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717568
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Affect, sociality, and the construction of paternalistic citizenship among
           family caregivers in China

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      Authors: Zhiying Ma
      Pages: 958 - 971
      Abstract: In recent years, the Chinese state has made family members care for and manage persons diagnosed with serious mental illnesses. Many of these caregivers are also former socialist workers to whom the state has broken its promise of paternalism. This article examines the affective experience, sociality, and citizenship claims of these caregivers. My fieldwork shows that, despite state agents’ attempts to depoliticize their feelings, caregivers construct narratives of suffering together, which allow them to make sense of their systemic marginalization and the state’s hypocrisy. They engage in complicit but righteous searches for welfare, healthcare, and leisure resources together, while also publicly demanding the state’s recognition of and support for themselves and their loved ones. I examine the promises and perils of this “paternalistic citizenship” as exemplified by caregivers, and consider the affective transformations it needs to open new political horizons.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717516
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • “Bureaucratic shiyuzheng”: Silence, affect, and the politics
           of voice in China

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      Authors: Jie Yang
      Pages: 972 - 985
      Abstract: In the Chinese bureaucracy, where political imperatives for maintaining harmony require people to restrain negative affects, officials often express anger and aggression through silence, apathy, and other flat affects. Other times, overly positive speech that conforms to dominant party ideologies overrides negative affects, flattening officials’ emotions and stifling their own voices. Drawing on ethnographic research in a city of Shandong province, this article studies both responses as “bureaucratic shiyuzheng.” I resist linking shiyuzheng primarily to biomedical explanations, or to the stress and depression triggered by anti-corruption campaigns, and instead treat this phenomenon as an embodied and affective practice that generates space for discourse, psychosocial imagination, and quiet critique. I demonstrate that bureaucratic shiyuzheng is the effect of double silencing, partly imposed by binding bureaucratic structures and the government’s increasing constraints on speech/voice, partly emerging from officials themselves, who seek self-preservation and optimization of resources. Rather than direct resistance to such silencing conditions, people cultivate shiyuzheng as an important mode of social critique.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717956
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Politics of indifference: Mourning Wang Yue in late-socialist China

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      Authors: Chun-Yi Sum
      Pages: 986 - 999
      Abstract: This article examines the changing sociological meaning of indifference in urban China after the tragic death of a two-year-old girl in a road accident in 2011. My analysis suggests that, in China where the political state had tried to claim credit for all altruistic behaviors, anxiety about indifference allowed citizens to sidestep socialist ethics in conversations about civic mobilization. University students used the language of feeling and mourning to reinvent the protagonist, culprit, and victim in the accident, thereby developing new rationales for committing good deeds without acknowledging the moral leadership of the state. As opposed to the standard association of indifference with civic disengagement and social disintegration, this article suggests that indifference has civic potential to connect. Like skepticism, cynicism, and disappointment that people might develop in response to the genre of socialist heroism, indifference could anchor civic articulation of alternative futures that were yet to take shape.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717569
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The affective life of the Nanjing Massacre: Reactivating historical trauma
           in governing contemporary China

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      Authors: Kailing Xie
      Pages: 1000 - 1015
      Abstract: Under the current Xi administration, China has marked December 13 as the national public Memorial Day for the Nanjing Massacre’s victims. The reaffirmation of this historical trauma under Xi continues the official narrative of the rejuvenation of a humiliated Chinese nation promoted in patriotic education of the 1990s. Simultaneously, there have been widespread state-promoted campaigns of “positivity,” with frequent announcements that China has entered “a New Era.” This article traces the representations of the Nanjing Massacre in different “contact zones” to reveal how certain negative emotions associated with the trauma are deliberately activated to serve instrumental purposes in China’s contemporary governance. It shows the party-state’s time-tested strategy of encouraging the public to internalize positive feelings of living in a great new era through comparison with past misery. It also demonstrates the extension of the party-state’s disciplinary power in the affective realm to inspire unity and legitimize its rule.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717688
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Between speaking and enduring: The ineffable life of bitterness among
           rural migrants in Shanghai

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      Authors: Xiao He
      Pages: 1016 - 1028
      Abstract: In the Maoist period, the Chinese socialist state encouraged the genre of “speaking bitterness” in order to give expression to past sufferings and cultivate a class consciousness. In the post-Mao era, scholars have noted how marginalized figures express discontent through public displays of bitterness and how state agents use “speaking bitterness” as a governing strategy for diffusing class antagonism and ensuring stability. The communication of bitterness, however, does not necessarily have an intrinsic or performative relationship with political action; it has a social life beyond political governance. Based on my ethnographic research with rural-urban migrants in Shanghai, this article explores the communication of bitterness as an affective and ethical force situated between speaking and enduring. The ineffable gap between speaking and enduring does not mark passivity, but decenters the speaking subject and opens up a social space for criticism, recognition and hope for a different future.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717327
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Developing indifference: Youth, place-making and belonging in a
           transforming urban China

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      Authors: Maria Nolan
      Pages: 1029 - 1044
      Abstract: This article examines the social impacts of urban change among a generation of people for whom it is the norm: youth in Beijing, where decades of redevelopment have led to large-scale demolition of older neighborhoods and a perpetually changing cityscape. Studies have shown that redevelopment has led to the breakdown of traditional social bonds in China’s cities, and that citizens relocated from older to newer neighborhoods may feel both a heightened sense of privacy and a greatly diminished sense of attachment to their surroundings. Today’s urban youth, however, were born into such rapidly evolving and increasingly privatized environments. Drawing from twelve months of ethnographic fieldwork, I explore the extent to which these youth, accustomed to privatized and digitalized home lifestyles, experience a lack of attachment to their urban environs, and illustrate how such feelings may be articulated. Ongoing urban redevelopment, taking place alongside shifts in social life facilitated by digital media, can, I argue, produce in young urban residents a sense of place characterized by learned indifference.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717515
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Raw fear in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Cho-kiu Li
      Pages: 1045 - 1059
      Abstract: This article rethinks the politics of fear through the researcher’s ethnography in Hong Kong. Fear is often explored as a tool of manipulation that disempowers people. In contrast, the bodies, subjectivities, and actions of the fearful people are rarely examined. This article discusses Hong Kong society’s fear through the lens of anthropological and cultural studies of affect, especially through the concept of “raw fear” proposed by David Parkin. It also investigates how fear emerges in everyday life through the researcher’s self-reflections and his conversations with other people.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717556
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Anthro-artists: Anthropologists as makers and creatives

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      Authors: Mariane C. Ferme
      Pages: 1060 - 1064
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718325
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • “By name and no other”: The COVID masks portrait project

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      Authors: Danny Hoffman
      Pages: 1065 - 1069
      Abstract: “‘By Name and No Other’: The COVID masks portrait project” is a series of images of the photographer’s family made in the early days of the COVID-19 quarantines in Seattle. These portraits document an uncertain moment, creating both a visual archive of an unfolding event and the occasion for reflection on how portraiture works as an ethnographic tool.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718317
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • An exhibition in fieldwork form

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      Authors: Susan Marie Ossman
      Pages: 1070 - 1084
      Abstract: This is an exhibition of fieldwork art adapted to the page. It is set out following the typical stages of an anthropological research project and presents works that were both made through fieldwork and exhibited as art. The strategy is one of “blending” and playful displacement by way of objects that highlight the dual identity and practice of the anthropologist/artist. Working with artworks that were made with spoken, written, or printed words and texts extends this approach of practical rapprochement between the fields to explore how decisions about genre and material are related to the variable configurations of the field of publics and of the two spheres of activity.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718335
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Meeting grounds: Art and anthropology in the Everglades

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      Authors: Carol Hendrickson
      Pages: 1085 - 1100
      Abstract: This article considers issues raised while working at the intersection of anthropology and visual art in Everglades National Park and during the months that followed. Based on a May 2019 residency as an AIRIE (Artist in Residence in Everglades) fellow, the material expression of my efforts consists of volumes of visual fieldnotes and what I call anthro-artists’ books. For this article I take an intimate route, one that foregrounds the experience of being in a place and attempting work at disciplinary intersections. Set against a backdrop of theoretical issues in both anthropology and art as well as overarching social, cultural, ecological, and political concerns of the region, the resulting journals and handmade books are meant to create an emotional, emplaced, and bodily experience for the people who engage with them.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718320
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Pauses and flow in art making and ethnographic research

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      Authors: Lydia Nakashima Degarrod
      Pages: 1101 - 1115
      Abstract: I examine my dual role as artist and ethnographer in the creation of artworks including mixed-media paintings and installations. Drawing from four works that combine art making and anthropological research, I present, from the perspective of anthropology, the process of the creation of artworks as dynamic sites for creating and observing the emergence of knowledge, as well as the development of empathy between researcher/artist and participants. Art making provided the tools to unveil ephemeral subjects such as the internal images of exile, the traces of memorable dreams in cities, and the memories and legacy of World War II among Japanese Latin Americans. Art making was possible by using approaches from anthropology that emphasize the senses as a means of both acquiring and expressing knowledge, the view of the anthropologist as a conductor of experiences and events, and multimodal anthropology.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718376
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The performative photograph: A poietic approach to visual ethnography in a
           French banlieue

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      Authors: Camilo Leon-Quijano
      Pages: 1116 - 1135
      Abstract: By reexamining the empirical relationship between ethnography and photography, this article explores the phenomenology of photographic experiences in a French banlieue. Photography may be a powerful practice to critically depict social phenomena in the field. Taking into account the basic assumption that photography is more than visual evidence of observed realities, I analyze the creative and nonindexical dimensions of visual experiences. Based on collaborative, sensorial, and pragmatic practices, I discuss the politics of visual representation in marginalized and racialized urban spaces from an intersectional point of view. The analysis developed here contributes to the definition of a creative and critically self-reflexive approach to the depiction of ethnographic experiences. In doing so, this article explores the plastic, poietic, and performative dimensions of photographic narratives in visual ethnography.Figure 1. (Author, 2017)
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718000
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Body art: Living in and leaving the body behind

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      Authors: Maja Jerrentrup
      Pages: 1136 - 1152
      Abstract: Body painting uses a three-dimensional living canvas. While a widespread activity that can be characterized as a creative cultural scene, it has not yet merited anthropological attention. Even though body painting is closely related to the body, it is ultimately often about overcoming this very body. This process already takes place during the creation of the painting, when the model’s body is transformed into someone or something else, but even more so when it comes to the resulting visual representations, the photographs, in which the person’s body recedes into the background in favor of the overall picture, the artwork. The twofold staging—becoming a three-dimensional work of art and then being staged for a two-dimensional photograph—gradually distances the body from the model and gives them the chance to appreciate the photograph of their painted body in a different light. While physically and emotionally challenging for the model, body painting is also experienced as psychologically beneficial. Such research findings open up new possibilities for art therapy.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718319
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Strategic commodification: The object biography of Tibetan thangka
           paintings in contemporary China

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      Authors: Ming Xue
      Pages: 1153 - 1167
      Abstract: This article focuses on Tibetan thangka and thangka painters in Amdo Rebgong (Qinghai, China), who are caught between a state-fostered tourist market promoting Tibetan thangkas as folk art and an intermediate market where clients pursue the religious authenticity and efficacy of thangka paintings. My study rejects any simple dichotomy of sacred object and commodity and views the object biography of Tibetan thangkas as contingent on the sites of thangka within the complex structure of the art market, the context of the actual exchanges, and the specific relationships forged between painters and their clients, an important narrative that has been missing in previous studies of Rebgong thangka art and its commodification. I argue that commodification should be understood as a strategic process where some Rebgong painters tactically participate in the market in order to authenticate their religious identity, preserve a cultural tradition, or establish artistic authority within and beyond Tibetan communities.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717955
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Relational beings modeled in clay within the depths of the Sierra Mixe of
           Oaxaca, Mexico: Bridging Indigenous knowledge and archaeology

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      Authors: Leslie F. Zubieta
      Pages: 1168 - 1190
      Abstract: This article examines the possible roles of exceptionally preserved clay reliefs and sculptures within a cave in the Mixe (Ayuujk) territory of Oaxaca, Mexico, a region where early researchers proposed that no art existed. Deploying conceptual tools offered by the reactivation of ontological studies, it is suggested here that these multilayered things acted as a dynamic relational web between beings co-responsible for the world’s prosperity, social reproduction, and the fertility of the land. Early ethnographic accounts, anthropological work, historical documents, and first-hand interviews with Indigenous people provide an initial explanatory platform for investigating those figures’ functions in the past while also understanding their agentive nature, thus enriching our current knowledge of Ayuujk worldview and rituals. Ayuujk’s participation and collaboration in this research offers a glimpse into their values, culture, and practices today, and an opportunity to give members of the descendant community a voice in this archaeological inquiry.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718085
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The folds of the world: An essay on Mesoamerican textile topology

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      Authors: Pedro Pitarch
      Pages: 1191 - 1205
      Abstract: This article explores a Mesoamerican topology based on the figure of the fold. It argues that the operation of folding represents a crucial concept for understanding indigenous cosmology and ontology. The fold is what allows the separation and articulation of the two domains into which the indigenous cosmos is divided: the solar state, extensive and discrete, which humans and other ordinary beings inhabit, and the intensive, virtual sphere, where spirits dwell. In turn, the fold refers to textiles, which likely represent a basic model for invention and transformation in Mesoamerican cultures. The article examines certain classical themes in Mesoamerican anthropology in light of this topology: a human being’s make-up, ritual operations, folding of the body, the sacred bundles, and the substance of time. At a more general level, this work is an attempt to contribute to what could be called an Amerindian transformational topology, a kind of imagination where certain “forms” or “figures” reappear in different domains of the world as transformations one of another.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717128
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Rawa-Nore gifting

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      Authors: Doug Dalton
      Pages: 1206 - 1222
      Abstract: This article comprises a rethinking of Mauss’s The gift, reciprocity, and exchange theory in anthropology, using theories of chaos and complexity to make sense of the author’s ethnographic data from Papua New Guinea. The article begins with an explanation of chaos and complexity, proceeds with an ethnographic demonstration focusing on pig feasts, marriage exchange, and exchanges within households, and concludes with a consideration of the implications of this analysis for Mauss’s legacy.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718047
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • But is it art'

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      Authors: Philippe Erikson
      Pages: 1223 - 1226
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717343
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Frequency, modulation, and time in Amerindian art

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      Authors: Paolo Fortis
      Pages: 1227 - 1230
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717689
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Action and seduction

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      Authors: Pedro Pitarch
      Pages: 1231 - 1234
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717488
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • A global rethinking of the attribution of agency to images

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      Authors: Caroline van Eck
      Pages: 1235 - 1237
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718029
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Objects and images: A medievalist’s response to Carlos
           Fausto’s Art effects

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      Authors: Caroline Walker Bynum
      Pages: 1238 - 1243
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/718318
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The ruses of Amerindian art: A reply

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      Authors: Carlos Fausto
      Pages: 1244 - 1253
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1086/717557
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
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