Publisher: CCSE   (Total: 43 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 40 of 40 Journals sorted alphabetically
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Asian Culture and History     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cancer and Clinical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Computer and Information Science     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Earth Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Energy and Environment Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Engineering Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
English Language and Literature Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
English Language Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Environment and Natural Resources Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environment and Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Global J. of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Intl. Business Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of English Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Intl. J. of Marketing Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Psychological Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Statistics and Probability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Law Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Educational and Developmental Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
J. of Food Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Geography and Geology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
J. of Materials Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
J. of Mathematics Research     Open Access  
J. of Molecular Biology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
J. of Plant Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Politics and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
J. of Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Mechanical Engineering Research     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Modern Applied Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Network and Communication Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Administration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
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Journal of Agricultural Science
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1916-9752 - ISSN (Online) 1916-9760
Published by CCSE Homepage  [43 journals]
  • Potential of Neem (Azadirachta indica) Extract in Managing Fall Armyworm
           on Maize

    • Abstract: This research assessed the effect of neem leaf extract on the larval population of the fall armyworm and the level of damage, growth, and yield of maize. A Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four treatments (Control, 50 g per L, 100 g per L and 200 g per L of neem leaf extract) applied within the two seasons of 2022A and 2022B. The findings showed that a higher concentration (200 g per L) of neem leaf extract-treated maize plants registered the least leaf damage (0.15), severity (0.15), and larvae population (0.1). This effect was most attained during the 1st season of maize production and at the earliest vegetative weeks of maize growth (3 WAP to 5 WAP, i.e., weeks after planting). The higher neem leaf extract concentration of 200 g per L produced the most significant (p < 0.001) effect on maize growth traits. A higher plant height (162.51 cm), longer leaf length (112.5 cm), wider leaf width (11.7 cm), and broader stem girth (11.91 cm) were attained under 200 g per L of neem leaf extract treated plots during the 1st season of maize production and 11 WAP. The findings of this showed that a relatively high concentration of neem leaf extract produced a higher cob weight (200 g per L = 180.1 g) followed by 100 g per L (174.1 g), 50 g per L (140.9 g) and control (139 g). The weight was optimised during the 1st season of maize production (163.8 g). The grain yield was higher under 200 g per L (153.7 g) of neem extract. The above findings demonstrated that a high concentration of neem leaf extract reduced fall armyworm infestation and increased maize plant growth and yield. Farmers should, therefore, be encouraged to apply 200 g per L of neem leaf extract in the management of fall armyworms and improve plant growth and yield because it contains antifeedant and insecticidal properties against the fall armyworm.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 02:23:29 +000
       
  • Reviewer Acknowledgements for Journal of Agricultural Science, Vol. 16,
           No. 7

    • Abstract: Reviewer acknowledgements for Journal of Agricultural Science, Vol. 16, No. 6, 2024.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 02:01:21 +000
       
  • Genetic Response of Selected Maize Genotypes to Gray Leaf Spot (Cercospora
           zeina L.) Infestation

    • Abstract: Gray leaf spot (GLS) caused by Cercospora zea-maydis and Cercospora zeina is one of the most yield limiting diseases of maize globally. Yield losses of up to 60 percent in susceptible genotypes are not uncommon. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the response of diverse maize genotypes to Gray leafspot infestation in western Kenya; determine the genetics of GLS resistance in maize inbred lines CML312, CML389 and to evaluate the relationship between GLS assessment methods, severity and lesion length. 13 maize inbred lines, 2F1 hybrids, and F2 populations of crosses MSN21 and CML389 or CML312 were evaluated under artificial GLS infestation during the 2007/08 seasons at Maseno university. Among the inbred lines, MSN21 was the most susceptible to GLS and had the highest disease severity rating. The inbred line CML389 and their F1 hybrids showed high levels of GLS resistance. CML312 and CML384 showed tolerance to GLS. Correlation between the lesion length and severity ratings was positive and highly significant (r = 0.9; P < 0.001), suggesting that both could be used in disease damage assessment. The frequency distribution of severity data for the F2 population of a cross between MSN21 and CML312 was continuous, suggesting that GLS tolerance is influenced by quantitative genes. A similar frequency distribution data for F2 population of a cross between MSN21 and CML389, showed 2 distinct peaks, and the genotypes within the 2 classes fitted a 9 to 7 ratio. This suggests that the resistance to GLS in CML389 may be conditioned by at least 2 major genes, with complementary epistatic interactions.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:59:30 +000
       
  • Effect of Some Technological Factors of Extraction on Total Lentinan
           Content in Sapa Shiitake Mushroom Extract

    • Abstract: In Vietnam, the source of shiitake mushroom is very abundant and grown in many provinces/cities, the total yield reaches hundreds of thousands of tons/per year, mainly serving the demand of domestic food processing, and did not develop into medicinal mushrooms yet. Among them, Sapa shiitake mushroom is being widely cultivated in Sapa-Vietnam, and is a raw material with great potential for lentinan exploitation. Until now, researches on extracting and obtaining lentinan in Vietnam are still limited. Those are reasons to carry out this research. The effects of solvent in combination with assistance of ultrasound wave in lentinan extracting capability in Sapa shiitake mushroom were studied. Before carrying out extracting of lentinan; The dried fruit bodies of Sapa shiitake mushroom was crushed in to 1mm. Five extracting parameters include concentration of Na0H solvent (%), proportion of Na0H solvent and raw material (v:w), extracting temperature, ultrasound time and ultrasound intensity were carried out. An extraction without the use of ultrasound for 180 min was control sample. Total lentinan content was obtained during the extracting process. The results indicated that shiitake mushrooms were extracted by using 0.35% Na0H solvent, the rate of Na0H solvent and mushrooms was 12:1 (v:w), intensity of ultrasound was 58 W/cm2, frequency was 20 kHz, extracting temperature was 65 °C, time of extraction was 6 min gave total lentinan content 1.63 times higher than the control.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:52:37 +000
       
  • Using PCR and RCA Techniques to Investigate the Variants of Cassava Mosaic
           Virus and Their Distribution in Ghana

    • Abstract: Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava begomoviruses is the major constraint to cassava production in Ghana. The disease is known to cause reduction in root yield. To ascertain the distribution of viruses causing CMD, 95 diseased cassava samples were collected in two agroecological zones of Ghana-Deciduous Forest zone and the Transitional zone. On a scale of 1-5, CMD severity was scored. Mean CMD severity score was 2.9, however there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the zones. Averagely, CMD score of> 2.8 in 71% of farms visited was recorded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and rolling circle amplification (RCA) were employed for virus identification. PCR revealed that African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV), East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV) and mixed infections were prevalent in both zones. EACMV-Cameroon strain was also identified to be common within these zones. The transitional zone had the highest percentage of CMD infection. Unamplified samples from PCR were amplified using rolling circle amplification (RCA) technique. Amplification and characterisation of complete genome sequences of two isolates were carried out. The complete genome of 2780 nucleotides from samples showed a high similarity to African cassava mosaic virus-Ghana (ACMV-GH). Sequences clustered with ACMV-Ivory Coast, ACMV Nigeria-Ogo, ACMV-BF, ACMV-UG having> 96% identity. This shows the close relation that exists amongst the ACMV strains in Africa. These findings highlight the need for a continuous survey of CMD to help manage the disease in the country.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:46:55 +000
       
  • Sweet Potato Virus Disease and Its Associated Vectors: Farmers’
           Knowledge and Management Practices in Uganda

    • Abstract: Effective management of sweet potato diseases such as sweet potato virus disease (SPVD) depends to a large extent on farmers’ knowledge of the disease as well as on the integration of recommended management methods in their farming practices. SPVD has continued to be the most important disease constraining sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) production in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Inadequate information about farmers’ perception, knowledge and practices are the major impediments in developing countries and has hindered development of effective management of SPVD. This paper addresses the gap by (i) Understanding the socioeconomic characteristics of sweet potato farmers. (ii) Assessing knowledge level of the farmers about SPVD, SPVD vectors and management methods. (iii) Examining the relationship between farmers’ coping strategies to control SPVD and knowledge. To achieve the study objectives, a cross sectional survey was carried out among 95 sweet potato growing households in central, eastern and western regions of Uganda during 2017. Results showed that sweet potato is valued as the second most important subsistence crop among smallholder farmers. The female farmers (54.7%) were more involved in production than their male counterpart. SPVD was perceived by the majority of farmers (63.6%) as the most important disease and a total of 70.5% of these farmers had experienced the disease in their fields. Despite of SPVD prevalence as perceived by the farmers, close to half (48.4%) of these farmers did not have good knowledge of the SPVD, 67.4% were ignorant about SPVD vectors, 85.8% did not know management methods and hence 68.4% did not use any management method. These knowledge gaps down play stability of the farmers to effectively manage the disease. Nevertheless, it was revealed that the ability to identify SPVD, month of occurrence and education level improves its management. This paper recommends gender tailed support to sweet potato farming, increased awareness and training of farmers to improve their knowledge of SPVD, and development of effective control strategies for SPVD.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:43:56 +000
       
  • Contribution of Agroecological Practices to Household Food Availability: A
           Case Study of Singida District

    • Abstract: Globally, there are urgent calls for transformation of agriculture and food systems to address food unavailability, food insecurity and environmental challenges. Agroecological practices have been promoted as one of the solutions, which have potential to address these challenges. Nonetheless, there is limited evidence regarding the question whether agroecology can indeed enhance food availability among smallholder farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania inclusive. Thus, the study was conducted to examines how the implementation of agroecological practices contribute to achieving food availability at household level by comparing between farmers who are members of Farmer Research Network (FRN) (implementers) and non-FRN farmers (non-implementers) using a case of Singida district. The study employed a cross-sectional research design, and an integration of both quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis methods. Interviews involved a total of 160 respondents who were randomly selected from household sampling frameworks. Focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews were conducted to gather complementary data. On one hand, quantitative data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software whereby descriptive statistics and an inferential statistic (multiple linear regression) were determined. On the other hand, qualitative data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The findings revealed, more than half (68%) and 15% of FRN farmers were in the medium and high categories of implementation of agroecological practices, contrary to non-FRN farmers, the majority (76%) were in low and none in high categories respectively. Based on alaysed data, the most common applied practices by both FRN and non-FRN farmers were: (i) the use of organic fertilizers (farm yard manure and compost manure (96%); (ii) intercropping (88%); (iii) crop rotation (82%); and integration of crop and livestock (79%). In addition, results indicate a significant association between the level of implementation of agroecological practices and food availability (p-value = 0.000). FRNs’ farmers were food secure as compared to non-FRN farmers just due to campaign and capacity building training offered to them. There is a need for a capacity development program to speed up agroecological intensification for sustainable food systems. Thus, it is very essential for public and private organizations to develop capacity building strategies or programmes to impart farmers with knowledge and skills on agroecological revolution.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:40:42 +000
       
  • Soil Chemical Properties and Production of Physic Nut Intercropped With
           Forage Plants and Grain Crops

    • Abstract: Intercropping cover plants with physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) may be a viable strategy for improving soil quality and sustaining the yield of this oilseed crop. However, one of the main challenges facing prolonged cropping of physic nut is the lack of information regarding the agronomic practices of the crop in intercropping systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cropping systems with cover plants and grain crops on the soil chemical properties and cumulative production of physic nut grain and oil. Eleven cropping systems and two evaluations were conducted in a split-plot arrangement on a dystrophic red latosol (Latossolo Vermelho Distrófico) in the municipality of Dourados. Growing cover plants or grain crops between the rows of physic nut did not provide significant increases in the cumulative production of grain and of oil over growing physic nut alone. There was reduction in the availability of nutrients, especially P and K, through growing Campo Grande Stylosanthes, U. humidicola, and Crotalaria. However, the beneficial effects of intercropping related to maintaining soil cover and the possibility of increasing the profitability of cropping physic nut from the production of forage crops and grains should be considered. Although the results did not show a significant increase in physic nut production in intercropping systems, the approach still offers opportunities to improve agricultural sustainability, crop diversification, and long-term profitability.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:36:16 +000
       
  • Effect of Asystasia spp. Management on the O×G Hybrid (Elaeis oleifera ×
           Elaeis guineensis) of Oil Palm at the Adult Stage

    • Abstract: The proper management of weeds plays an important role in nutrition and health and, therefore, in the yield and sustainability of the oil palm crop. To evaluate the effect of Asystasia spp. management as a cover species in the interspecific hybrid O×G oil palm at the adult stage, a trial was established in the Luker Agrícola plantation (Casanare, Colombia). The treatments evaluated corresponded to four types of management of Asystasia spp. with different control radii concerning the stipe (drip line) (1, 3, and 4.5 m on three occasions during the year) on an O×G Coari × La Mé cultivar at the adult stage (2011 planting). The treatments were established under a randomized complete block design with four replications. The analysis of the results obtained after four years of evaluation indicated that there are no significant differences between the treatments evaluated in terms of soil chemistry, nutrition, growth, and crop yield by analysis of variance. Nonetheless, significant differences were observed in soil cover variables and biomass and nutrient accumulation according to Tukey’s test at 5%. According to the results obtained, the management of Asystasia spp. should be focused on the conservation and efficient use of resources. It should be adapted according to the most appropriate management conditions in each case (age of the crop, weeds desired by the plantation, pests, nutrient recycling, soil moisture conservation, among others).
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:33:46 +000
       
  • New Leafy Greens—Plant Age Effects on Perilla Leaves

    • Abstract: Given that, not much is known about potential yields and nutritional quality of perilla [Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton, Lamiaceae] for production in eastern USA as food, we evaluated fresh leaves of five accessions during 2021. The seeds were germinated in a greenhouse and about 15-day old seedlings were transplanted to the field on black-plastic covered raised beds. Leaves were harvested for analyses at 69 and 85 days after transplanting. Four accessions with green-colored leaves performed better than one with purple leaves. Leaf fresh weights varied from 105 to 279 g per plant whereas number of leaves per plant varied from 368 to 465. Concentrations (g/100 g) of protein, fat, fiber, Ca, P, K, Mg, and S in fresh perilla leaves produced in Virginia contained 17.9, 4.2, 7.3, 1.3, 0.39, 2.0, 0.40, and 0.17, respectively whereas mean values (mg kg-1) for Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn were 291, 19.9, 40.5, and 56.2. Leaves of perilla produced in Virginia contained considerable more protein (about 4 times more), fiber and fat than literature values demonstrating location differences. Effects of plant age were significant on all plant and leaf physical traits—values from 85 day old plants were significantly higher than those from 69 day old plants. Based on our preliminary results, we have identified PI481701 as the optimal accession. We concluded that perilla is a potential niche crop for Virginia farmers.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:31:26 +000
       
  • Diversity and Genetic Structure of a Natural Population of Mauritia
           flexuosa L. f. in APA-Pandeiros, Using Microsatellite Markers

    • Abstract: Genetic diversity is essential to ensure that species maintain high adaptive evolutionary potential to resist environmental stochasticity. Thus, this research aimed to estimate the genetic diversity and structure of a natural population of Mauritia flexuosa and its stages, using five microsatellite primers. DNA was extracted from leaves collected from individuals of the three classes (G1-adult, G2-juvenile and G3-regenerant). Genetic diversity estimates indicated an average of 7.8 alleles/locus and lower observed heterozygosity (Ho) than expected heterozygosity (He) in the population (0.272-0.395 and 0.275-0.401, respectively). The Shannon Index (I) indicated moderate genotypic diversity and richness in the analyzed population, and exclusive alleles were found at the different stages. Also found were a lower population index (FST = 0.019) and a higher individual fixation index (FIS = 0.169). Classes G1 and G2 exhibited greater genetic similarity to each other than to G3, which had more distant genetic characteristics. These results revealed lower genetic diversity among regenerating (G3) individuals and greater genetic diversity among adults (G1). Immediate strategies for in situ and ex situ genetic conservation of M. flexuosa are essential to preserve its genetic variability and assist future programs for the improvement.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:30:01 +000
       
  • Women-Led Pulse Agriculture for Enhanced Household Nutrition Security in
           East African Countries

    • Abstract: Pulse crops are significant sources of starch, fiber, protein and micronutrients for the human population. Four East African countries (Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, and Rwanda) have huge potential of pulse production but are constrained by several challenges in the production-consumption chain. This scoping review has assessed the challenges and opportunities related to women-led, nutrition-sensitive pulse agriculture in the four East African countries. This scoping review is based on data from major scientific databases, such as PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science, which are commonly used for research purposes, as well as grey literature. The criteria used were studies conducted in Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, or Rwanda; grey literature which includes reports, theses, and other unpublished materials that may be relevant to a particular topic (years 2010 to 2023); observational studies, including case-control, cohort, and cross-sectional studies that assessed pulse crop production and consumption; and those published in English. Evidence from these countries shows that the historical gender gap and low level of participation by women in the sector have had adverse effects on the production of pulses. There are also social and cultural barriers that severely constrain women’s role in pulse agriculture, such as poor knowledge of the benefits of pulses, constraining cultural practice and gender-based norms in the pulse sector, limited access to market, land and finance, underdeveloped delivery/supply chain and extension services, less developed value addition culture, and the stigma of pulse consumption. This study identifies multiple avenues to ameliorate the identified socioeconomic, cultural and policy constraints, including promoting women-led pulse production through increasing access to financing for small-scale pulse crop farmers, improving market access through better marketing and distribution networks, and investing in infrastructure to support pulse production and consumption.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:27:08 +000
       
  • The Recognition of Carbon Capture and Storage by Plants

    • Abstract: The postulate that CO2 is responsible for global warming is accepted by most governments which put in place restrictions and compensation for emissions of this gas. This resulted in the development of a carbon market and of the practice of carbon capture and storage (CCS), mainly by geological burying. CCS by plants, which allows the return of CO2 to the atmosphere, should be preferred to CCS by burying which contributes to its lithification. Plant production captures this gas directly from the atmosphere using solar energy and stores it for a few months to a few centuries. Plant CCS figures are calculated for the world, the United States, Europe, France and Kenya, then compared to CCS ambitions. They show that agriculture and forestry absorb 21GtCO2/year, more than half of global emissions by combustion of fossil hydrocarbons. This CCS function devolved to the peasantry complements that of supplying humanity with essential foodstuffs and should constitute a new source of remuneration for professions which often struggle to transmit, invest and innovate to ensure their future.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Jun 2024 01:23:14 +000
       
 
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Publisher: CCSE   (Total: 43 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 40 of 40 Journals sorted alphabetically
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Asian Culture and History     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Asian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cancer and Clinical Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Computer and Information Science     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Earth Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Energy and Environment Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Engineering Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
English Language and Literature Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
English Language Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Environment and Natural Resources Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Environment and Pollution     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Global J. of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Higher Education Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 68)
Intl. Business Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intl. J. of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of English Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Intl. J. of Marketing Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Psychological Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Statistics and Probability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. Law Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Educational and Developmental Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
J. of Food Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Geography and Geology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
J. of Materials Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
J. of Mathematics Research     Open Access  
J. of Molecular Biology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
J. of Plant Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Politics and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
J. of Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Mechanical Engineering Research     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Modern Applied Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Network and Communication Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Administration Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
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Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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