Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles √Čtudes Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
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Resilience : A Journal of the Environmental Humanities
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Online) 2330-8117
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Introduction

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      Abstract: In 2017 I organized a roundtable discussion format on teaching, climate justice, and affect for the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) conference in Detroit. The participants agreed that the positive response to the roundtable warranted publishing the conversation in this special issue of Resilience, in order to archive the event and to open the conversation more broadly.What follows are the contributions to the roundtable by a range of educators and one student, all asked to speak to the question, How do we deal with students' emotional responses to our classes on climate justice' Faculty from a variety of educational contexts—ethnic studies, English, composition, environmental ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Climate Justice Pedagogy: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Proximity and
           Empathy in Contexts of Privilege

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      Abstract: Over the last decade and a half of teaching environmental literature and cultural studies courses, first at the University of Washington and now at the New England Conservatory of Music, I have observed a shiftfrom students' debating whether environmental problems matter and whether they qualify as social issues to their avowing that these concerns do matter ecologically and culturally. Alongside this recognition, however, students often express resignation, compartmentalization, apathy, or feelings of powerlessness. Recently, my students have tended toward a consensus that they and their communities will do little to address climate change until it begins to affect their everyday lives more dramatically. As I ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Climate Justice Pedagogies: Affect, Empathy, and Scale in the Anthropocene

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      Abstract: In what follows, I take each key word in my title separately, lay out a proposition (or provocation), and pose what I think are some of the most pressing questions related to each. My overall argument is that a clearer understanding of how affect works in our classrooms and how it is transmitted across scales—as well as a more targeted exploration of empathy and compassion across scalar, species, and temporal boundaries—might enable environmental humanities scholars and teachers to grasp the affective dimensions of the Anthropocene and facilitate more justice-oriented pedagogy and politics.Affect in the classroom needs more attention, both in terms of what our pedagogical goals are—that is, what we hope students ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reimagining Communities as Sustainable Means to a More Environmentally and
           Socially Just World

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      Abstract: My addition to the round table comes from my involvement in activism both inside and outside the classroom on social and environmental issues. I have learned to maneuver spaces such as the hard sciences and humanities but also those of the academic ivory tower and the larger communities that I am a part of. I also want to acknowledge my undergrad experience as a queer person of color in an "ecogroovy" institution that is mainly white and middle-class. My analysis stems from my environmental studies lens and also from similar experiences I have shared with many other students of color and activists whom I have organized with and worked alongside on the Humboldt State University campus and in the greater Humboldt ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Teaching the Anthropocene: Technology and Environmental Justice

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      Abstract: What does it mean to say we are in the Anthropocene' How might such a term affect the ways in which we imagine and interact with the environments and technologies surrounding us' These are the questions I asked students in the composition and communications classes I taught with an Anthropocene theme. And these questions, I told students, were ones that we (groups without stratigraphers or climate scientists among us) could consider ourselves qualified to debate. I taught these classes in 2015 and 2016, while the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) discussed whether to vote on the Anthropocene as a new geological epoch.1 As an intro-level humanities class, we lacked the expertise to evaluate the term's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Performative Pedagogy: Modeling Affect and Action in Climate Change
           Courses

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      Abstract: Given the widespread uncertainty about how we ought to respond to climate change, instructors inevitably serve as models for their students. The scope of this modeling is greater than we tend to admit, extending from framing to behavior to affect. If this is the case—if all pedagogy is performative and affect is always a component of learning—then climate change instructors in the humanities (and beyond) ought to model more consciously by demonstrating alternative environmental affects in response to our charged subject matter.This essay draws on my experience teaching a course called Energy Humanities at Yale-NUS College, in Singapore, and contrasts it with a previous iteration of the same class, taught at Rice ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reconfiguring Temporality in the Anthropocene: Coloniality and the
           Political Ecocrisis

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      Abstract: In this article, I will argue for the need of a new form of history writing that takes into full account the environmental impacts of human history over the past five centuries. The purpose of this is to contribute to substantiating the Anthropocene as a new temporal unit beyond its origin in the geological sciences. I call this history writing attuned to human impact on the planet Anthropocene historiography. Such history could also be useful in response to the need to historicize the present ecocrisis, acknowledging that it did not emerge overnight or even just in the past two centuries but appeared as a new world order in the sixteenth century and to a large extent followed on the mutual developments of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Master Metaphor": Environmental Apocalypse and the Settler States of
           Emergency

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      Abstract: On October 27, 2016, Ammon Bundy and other members of the Citizens for Constitutional Freedom (CCF) were acquitted of all charges stemming from their armed takeover of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon. While at Malheur, CCF's occupiers declared the rule of law unconstitutional, a state-of-emergency summons supported by right-wing militia groups invoking apocalyptic fears of white genocide.1 In contrast, on the same day of the acquittal verdict and with the visual drama of an apocalyptic dystopian film, a militarized police force arrested 141 water protectors in Standing Rock, North Dakota—an area secured by the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty and by the state of emergency that the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How Does It Feel to Be an Oil Spill'

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      Abstract: Oil, coal and gas are the by-products of the tears of dead forests.The recent designation of our epoch as the Anthropocene comes out of a desire to acknowledge the effects of human industry on the earth's ecosystem. The concept of the Anthropocene, initially proposed by the atmospheric chemist Paul J. Crutzen and marine biologist Eugene Stoermer, holds that collective human industry on the planet must be recognized as having a lasting geological effect. As Dipesh Chakrabarty explains it, "Now that humans—thanks to our numbers, the burning of fossil fuels, and other related activities—have become a geological agent on the planet, some scientists have proposed that we recognize the beginning of a new geological era ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ecotopian Narratives as Social Change Strategy: From Lord Byron to Rob
           Hopkins

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      Abstract: The ways in which we tell the story of our reality shapes that reality: the manner of telling makes the world.Current leaders of the sustainable society movement, from Naomi Klein to Rob Hopkins, have incorporated ecotopian narrative into their social change strategy. Rob Hopkins's Transition Initiative, for example, trains activists to use ecotopian narrative to imagine a better, sustainable life for their communities. The narrative process they employ sketches not only the goal but also the steps for achieving the goal. The future these communities envision have their roots in a literary imagination.It is no accident that these social change movements would employ ecotopian narrative to inspire change. A review ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Competing Ecourban Futures in Taipei

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      Abstract: Garden centers must become the Jacobin Clubs of the new Revolution.Even before being designated a World Design Capital in 2016, the municipal government of Taipei had already begun investing in sustainable green urbanism initiatives.2 A massive bike-share program, called YouBike, added millions of bicycles to the city's roads and complemented upgrades to Taipei's metro system.3 The city also invested in large public works designed to transform Taipei into a "sponge city" that would replace impermeable concrete surfaces with permeable ones—providing for enhanced flood control and water filtration.4 It was in a series of new high-profile building projects, however, that Taipei's drive to become a hub for sustainable ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • On Dismantling: A Report from Michigan

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      Abstract: I used to moonlight as an energy humanist. I didn't know it at the time. In fact, I didn't even know the energy humanities—the study, across humanistic disciplines, of the social, historical, and cultural implications of our modern dependence on fossil fuels—were a thing. I didn't know, that is, until some time in late 2013 when I happened upon an advance notice of Stephanie LeMenager's then-soon-to-be-published book Living Oil: Petroleum Culture in the American Century. It felt, at the time, as if that book had been written just for me, a teacher and scholar of nineteenth-century American literature unexpectedly absorbed by "petroleum culture," a casualty of "tough oil," practicing a kind of amateur "commodity ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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