Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
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Middle West Review
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2372-5664 - ISSN (Online) 2372-5672
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Introduction: Middle West Review and the Middle Ground

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      Abstract: Much of this issue of Middle West Review was assembled and edited during the early and intense months of the great pandemic of 2020, a moment that has greatly elevated the instabilities and unknowns and general anxieties in all our lives. At the same time protests broke out in various parts of the country because of the George Floyd case in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Concurrently, concerns mounted about the commitment to free speech and open debate in our country and the health and thoughtfulness of our political and cultural discourse. All of these events and worries reinforce the importance of our mission at Middle West Review.In a time of turmoil and doubt, it is important to remember our prime directive as a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Midwestern Regionalism: Place, Time, and Perspective

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      Abstract: New regional studies and histories—as Homer might well say—come and go like leaves in the forest. Responding to scholarly trends, midwestern regionalism, much like the glaciers that shaped the midwestern landscape, has advanced and retreated numerous times. Whether it was the "new regionalism" of the 1920s assessed in Carey McWilliams's The New Regionalism in American Literature (1930), Howard W. Odum and Harry Estill Moore's classic American Regionalism (1938), Merrill Jensen's Regionalism in America (1951), Charles Reagan Wilson's The New Regionalism: Essays and Commentaries (1998), or the current reawakening regarding midwestern history stemming from the numerous writings of Jon K. Lauck, regionalism in American ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Midwest and the Rise of American Regionalism, 1890–1915

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      Abstract: The idea of regionalism in America was first discussed in the United States among a number of intellectuals, artists, and writers in the youthful Midwest in the 1890s. Emerging as a formal concept several decades after the Civil War, regionalism in a variety of forms, came to signify an organic harmony of loyalties—to locality, region, and nation—and it served as an antidote to the divisive force of sectionalism that demanded absolute loyalty to a particular place. The specter of civil war haunted the opening decades of regional thought as early regionalists rejected the fractious sectionalism that had preceded them.1In its largest meaning, regionalism includes both the study of spatial variations within a culture ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Imagined Midwest

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      Abstract: My contribution to this symposium on midwestern identity comes from the perspective of a scholar who works on regional writing and the human orientation to place in general—not specifically on the Midwest. But the challenge of understanding midwestern identity is an urgent one for me. I am (mostly) a Midwesterner. Location matters, and I live in and think things through from Michigan.I do, of course, have connections to other places. I was born in California, I have close family members across twelve time zones, I travel (at least—writing under a stay-at-home-order in April 2020—I did until recently). And, of course, what I do and think is constantly shaped by the constant circulation of matter and ideas through ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making Midwestern Art History: Oskar Hagen and James Watrous

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      Abstract: Nine Springs Creek provided the ideal environment to begin the study of European Renaissance ink drawings for University of Wisconsin–Madison art history professor James Watrous. after gathering reeds from the creek that runs about five miles south of the university, Watrous's students turned those reeds into pens and drew with inks they had also made. Watrous advised scraping chimneys in which only wood had been burned to produce bistre ink and recalled discovering rare natural earths (the red chalks Michelangelo used) on field trips with his students to iron mining sites in upper Michigan.1 We do not oft en think of midwestern creek sides, fireplaces, and ore fields as spaces for art history. Stereotypes of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "The Brightest Star under the Blue Dome of Heaven": Civil Rights and
           Midwestern Black Identity in Iowa, 1839–1900

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      Abstract: In 1868, Ulysses S. Grant referred to Iowa as a "bright radical star" that could lead the country in granting voting rights to black men.1 This phrase was warmly embraced by the Hawkeye State, becoming the title of a leading book on black Iowan history and even showing up on T-shirts. Three decades after Grant's letter, the black journalist John Lay Thompson offered similar but retrospective sentiments in the Iowa State Bystander newspaper, calling Iowa "the brightest star under the blue dome of heaven; the first state to wipe the black laws from her statute books."2 Thompson's words have never been as well-known as Grant's, just as African Americans have never been well known in Iowa, and yet this state and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • African American, African Indian, and Midwestern

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      Abstract: First cabin, first farm, first judge to preside, first white man to arrive. So goes nineteenth-century histories' founding formula for rural midwestern settlements.1 Pioneers' memoirs spun similar tales. Effi e Revels Delaney recalled, in 1908, her parents' homesteading, forty-six years earlier, on land she called the "roughest that part knows of," where steep ridges and plunging valleys challenged farmers' fortitude.2 Common and expected as such narratives are to the identity Midwesterners assumed, complexities and surprises lurk between the lines. Race and people belonging to a rich African diaspora were everywhere and nowhere.The scholarship on race in the Midwest is flowering, and that African American rural ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reading Regionalism in the Midwest: Evidence from "What Middletown Read"
           Data

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      Abstract: Regionalist fiction flourished in the United States between 1870 and 1910. Described as "local-color stories" by midwestern writer Hamlin Garland, a prominent practitioner of the genre, these stories featured vernacular dialect, rural settings, and folk customs. For Garland, the local-color novel had "such quality of texture and background that it could not have been written in any other place or by anyone else than a native."1 These tales occupied a critical and commercial middle ground between the highbrow realism that emerged during the late nineteenth century and the popular romances and sentimental stories that dominated the era's fiction. In Mark Storey's words, regionalism was a "'compromise' between a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • It is Time to Rethink Regionalism in Midwestern Life: How Two National
           Magazines Caricatured a Midwestern Art Movement and Hid Its Critical and
           Community-Engaged Edge

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      Abstract: If the regionalist visual art of the 1930s is embedded in American cultural consciousness today, it is likely thanks to the most parodied painting of all time, Grant Wood's American Gothic of 1930.1 The regionalist movement—known for its innumerable farmscapes—was anchored on the creative communities that surrounded a "triumvirate" of Midwesterners: Grant Wood of Iowa, John Steuart Curry of Kansas, and Thomas Hart Benton of Missouri. The people of the Midwest took great pride in the fact that their painters were celebrated in nationally distributed magazines, such as Time and Life.2 One may erroneously think that the movement is well understood within intellectual culture, but in this essay I argue the opposite. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Splendid and Remarkable Progress" in the Midwest: Assessing the Emergence
           and Social Impact of Regional Art Museums, 1875–1925

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      Abstract: In the late afternoon on June 6, 1916, a large group assembled in the lecture hall at the new Cleveland Museum of Art, in Cleveland, Ohio. The atmosphere was festive; this was, after all, a celebration of the completion of Cleveland's new art museum. Judge William B. Sanders, president of the museum, served as the museum's inauguration offi ciant. after thanking the local notables whose donations made construction of the museum possible, Sanders reflected upon the mission of Cleveland's Museum of Art, stating that while the museum was "founded by private beneficence, it is, in a literal sense a public undertaking, to be forever maintained for the benefit of the public."1 The museum should thus serve the public ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Regional Identity, Immigration, and Religious Community in the Nineteenth
           Century: Dutch Colonies, Church Conflicts, and Religious Influences on
           Regional Consciousness

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      Abstract: On May 15, 1888, John H. Karsten addressed a gathering of the Western Social Conference of the Reformed Church in America (RCA) in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The soon-to-be editor of the Holland, Michigan, religious weekly, De Hope, presented a talk entitled "Our Educational Institutions." In his address, he tried to inspire the continued development of flourishing Dutch Reformed colonies in Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Illinois. Karsten ended his remarks with a full-throated religious appeal: "the establishment of educational centers in the Western States has for its final object the redemption of men from obedience to self to obedience to their creator … Colonization, without college, seminary and academy would ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Charlotte Ouisconsin Van Cleve and Telling Midwestern Regional Stories

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      Abstract: In May 1877, fift y- seven- year- old Charlotte Ouisconsin1 Van Cleve took the stand in defense of accused murderer Kate Noonan. Van Cleve spoke glowingly about her former cook, an uneducated Irish immigrant, explaining that Noonan was "beloved … in her household" and "respected and cared for wherever she had lived."2 She did not dispute the charge that Noonan had shot and killed William Sidle, a prominent banker's son. Instead, she pleaded with the jury to save Noonan, a "fallen girl" preyed upon by Sidle. Though the judge ridiculed Van Cleve, calling her "vanity in gray curls,"3 his insult failed to impress the jury—who ultimately could not reach a verdict—and even provoked one of the lawyers for the prosecution ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Monolith: Thoughts on Growing up Jewtheran in the Rural Midwest

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      Abstract: You didn't start mad, but you all became mad in one way or another.Beer kegs in garages. In cornfields. In county parks. Here come the cops again.These were the good times, late in the twentieth century.Where were you, exactly' Surrounded by miles and miles of miles and miles, ridges and valleys, the rocky bluffs, the rolling meadows, the corn and the cows, somewhere between the Mississippi River and Madison, Wisconsin.You could set off the alarms at the County Seedmen Feed Store just by screaming out your car window as you drove by the place. And so, you drove by the County Seedmen ten or fift een times every Friday night. There were other kids in your car. You were never a solo perp. You were a pack, a tribe, a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • If You Believe You Exist: On Bon Iver, Midwestern Literature and Art, and
           a Tradition, of Sorts

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      Abstract: The snow fell steadily while we slept, all night long, and in the morning, the forests and fields were well and truly swaddled in white. If you have lived at a northern latitude, then perhaps you can imagine the particular quiet that ensued. As if sound were an impossibility. The world was muffl ed by snow, and the quiet intensified, especially as snow continued to fall from the sky, making every soundscape dense. I think now of my friend, the music producer Brian Joseph who says the key to good acoustics is filling a room. The room, that morning, was steadily filling with snow.My best friend, Josh Swan (a wooden-boat builder now based in Washburn, Wisconsin), and I left his father's lakeside cabin, a Thermos hot ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Holding the Soil: A Note on the Conservation of Midwesternness

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      Abstract: In August 1938, the United States Department of Agriculture published a call to arms against soil erosion, To Hold This Soil.1 Authored by government conservationist and agrarian writer Russell Lord, the text identifies soil as the foundation of national life, decries its rapid depletion at human hands, and pleads for a vigorous embrace of conservation efforts. Equal parts paean, elegy, and call to action, Lord's prose blends the technical language of modern soil science with a passionate cultural narrative of rootedness in the soil. This was no accident. By channeling what was arguably the best feature of the New Deal philosophy of governance—its sensitivity to both innovation and tradition—Lord envisions for his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Were They Really Pioneers'

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      Abstract: David McCullough at the National Portrait Gallery, in Washington, DC. Image: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin.In a publicity photo for his latest book, The Pioneers, two-time Pulitzer Prize winning author, David McCullough, sits surrounded by George Catlin's well-known Indian portraits. It seems ironic that in McCullough's latest book about the Ohio Country, Indigenous people appear as little more than a rapidly disappearing "Indian menace." His focus is on those sturdy pioneers terrorized by "wolves, bears, wild boars, panthers, rattlesnakes" who brought civilization to a land where there were "no roads, no towns, no stores, and no wayside taverns."1 For David McCullough and his avid readers, the settling of the Ohio ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Wrong History for Our Time: An Analysis of David McCullough's The
           Pioneers

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      Abstract: David McCullough's new book, The Pioneers, provides a sweeping narrative history of the Ohio Company and the men who settled what became Marietta, Ohio, at the confluence of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers. Manasseh Cutler, his son, Ephraim, and other colleagues from Massachusetts, including Rufus Putnam and Joseph Barker, formed a company to speculate in land that had not yet been ceded to the United States by the Native nations who called the region home. Though firmly opposed to slavery and strictly Congregationalist, these New England settlers held little sympathy for Native Americans when they established a beachhead on Native land. In 1787, the Ohio Company paid $3.5 million to the United States for five ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Public's Historian

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      Abstract: The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West is the latest book by the distinguished American historian David McCullough. The book's title belies its midwestern focus and spotlights what Simon and Schuster probably deemed more marketable, mythic western frontier themes.McCullough is a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning author. He is also a PBS icon, known for his resonant narrations of The American Experience and Ken Burns's acclaimed documentary The Civil War (1990). McCullough grew up in Pittsburgh and has long been drawn to the midwestern stories, as seen in his books The Johnstown Flood (1968), Truman (1992), and The Wright Brothers (2015). In The Pioneers, he ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • McCullough's Critics Offer a Narrow View of History

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      Abstract: The formation in March 1786 of the Ohio Company by a band of New England land speculators sets the stage for David McCullough's The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West. And their provenance was key: that the speculators hoping to settle the Ohio Country were from New England rather than Virginia made all the difference. Settlers from slaveholding states would follow, but Puritan values, rather than proslavery ones, would guide development of the new land.In The Pioneers, McCullough celebrates the difference. McCullough's critics do not.Reading the critiques of historians and journalists commenting on The Pioneers, one might assume there was no difference at all between the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Gentle Remembering: David McCullough's The Pioneers

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      Abstract: Years ago, I visited the historic district of Vincennes, Indiana. I had come to Vincennes to see the governor's mansion where Tecumseh had confronted William Henry Harrison on the lawn in front of the house. Before returning home to Ohio, I wanted to visit Saint Francis Xavier Church, built by French Jesuits in 1734, and then go to the George Rogers Clark Memorial, a circular monument surrounded by columns, which sits along the Wabash near the bridge to Illinois. Although I had seen pictures of the monument, it never crossed my mind that there was a beautiful space inside it. Upon entering the monument, I saw the statue of Clark, larger than life and right in the middle of the place with his head held high, his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • America's Republican Refounding: David McCullough's Paean to Pioneers in
           the Old Northwest

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      Abstract: The first half of 2020 will surely go down as one of the more dramatic six months in American history. Three years to the day after Donald Trump was inaugurated—and one month after the President was impeached—the U.S. recorded its first COVID-19 case. There ensued a pandemic; an unprecedented state-by-state lockdown; an equally unprecedented governmentinduced economic depression that left almost 15 percent of the workforce unemployed; a nationwide conflagration sparked by a black man's murder on a Minneapolis street; widespread calls to defund the police; peaceful protests in more than two thousand communities, anarchic riots in threedozen cities; and soul-searing debates over which historic figures and symbols ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "From Such Beginnings, Much May Be Expected"

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      Abstract: In The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West, David McCullough provides his version of how the West was won. He starts with a group of Revolutionary War veterans from New England led by Rufus Putnam, Manasseh Cutler, and Benjamin Tupper who founded the Ohio Company of Associates to secure land purchases in the Northwest Territory. Like all pioneer stories, their story was not an easy one. This was late eighteenth-century America where the advancing line of Euro-American settlement barely crossed the Appalachian Mountains. Compared to the thriving and well-developed eastern seaboard, the backcountry had "no roads. … no bridges, no towns, churches, schools, stores, or way-side ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mid-Michigan Modern: From Frank Lloyd Wright to Googie by Susan J. Bandes
           (review)

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      Abstract: Mid-century modern design is trendy. You can see it everywhere in mass culture, whether associated with the fictional world (the Mad Men series) or the real (the Design Within Reach retail chain). With the growing popular enthusiasm for all things mid-century, art and architectural historians have begun to realize that scholarship on this recent past is rather thin compared to other, more distant time periods. The list of mid-century scholars is growing, and more monographs are appearing on architecture and design "giants" like Eero Saarinen, George Nelson, and Alexander Girard. But beyond the many studies of suburban history and the development of ranch houses, we do not know enough about the everyday modernism ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century: A Social and Cultural
           History by Richard Lyman Bushman (review)

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      Abstract: Richard Lyman's Bushman's The American Farmer in the Eighteenth Century is a comprehensive study of the farmer and farming as omnipresent parts of early American culture and society. Bushman, a historian of United States cultural and social history, is best known for his scholarship on Mormonism and, more broadly, religion in America. But American Farmer, based upon two decades of primary source research set forth in captivating, forceful writing, offers a new history far more interesting than its title may imply. Its pages provide readers of all backgrounds points of interest. Indeed, rather than a tome intended for specialists and agricultural enthusiasts, Bushman's is an accessible book that avoids jargon. It ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Crusader for Democracy: The Political Life of William Allen White by
           Charles Delgadillo (review)

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      Abstract: William Allen White's name is almost certainly unfamiliar to Americans today, unless they live in Emporia, Kansas. But from the mid-1890s through the 1940s, he was a household name. How did White (1868–1944) rise from the obscurity of editing a small-town newspaper, the Emporia Gazette, to become the guest and confidant of senators and presidents' How did a man who never held public offi ce, and who ran for offi ce only once (as the anti-KKK candidate for governor of Kansas in 1924), become sought-after for his political views and become influential at important times' Charles Delgadillo does not raise or answer these questions directly in his clear, straightforward narrative, but he provides many ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hairs vs. Squares: The Mustache Gang, the Big Red Machine, and the
           Tumultuous Summer of '72 by Ed Gruver (review)

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      Abstract: Journalist Ed Gruver's Hairs vs. Squares chronicles the 1972 Major League Baseball season. In doing so, he provides a window for exploring broader tensions in national culture and identity in the United States following the turbulent 1960s. Gruver shows how the media framed the 1972 World Series matchup between the Cincinnati Reds and Oakland Athletics as a contest between conservative midwestern values and emerging liberal politics on the West Coast. Citing how the media portrayed differences in style, dress, and appearance, Gruver's book shows that by studying the Reds/A's series, we can trace the origins of contemporary debates over culture in public discourse.Each chapter moves the story forward ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Benevolence, Moral Reform, Equality: Women's Activism in Kansas City, 1870
           to 1940 by K. David Hanzlick (review)

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      Abstract: K. David Hanzlick examines how women in Kansas City claimed the public sphere and became political agents between 1870 and 1940 in his book Benevolence, Moral Reform, Equality. As the title suggests, these women did so by organizing for charity, agitating to combat evils in society, and campaigning for political rights like suffrage. While they approached this tripartite process in ways that resembled their eastern counterparts' strategies, Kansas City's women diverged in how they engaged in this activism. Hanzlick argues that Kansas City's location at the intersection of the Kansas and Missouri Rivers and along the border of one slave and one free state helped its development as a western commercial metropolis and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Unsettling the West: Violence and State Building in the Ohio Valley by Rob
           Harper (review)

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      Abstract: Unsettling the West is a thesis-driven book that alternates specific stories with reiterations of the big picture. The central argument that Ohio Valley violence was directly related to the extent of state support is important, overturning assumptions that frontier Indian hating was the culprit while governments east of the Appalachians tried to prevent bloodshed. The introduction uses accounts by David McClure and Nicholas Cresswell to evoke frontier life. It also discusses how Native American leaders, such as Guyasuta of the Seneca, vacillated between peace and war. Although mistrust and hatred were rampant between colonists and Indians, "the escalation and de-escalation of hostilities correlates closely with the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Heartland: An American History by Kristin L. Hoganson (review)

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      Abstract: The Midwest has received a lot of attention from coastal political pundits since November 2016, when states such as Michigan and Wisconsin helped to elect Donald Trump as president. Kristin Hoganson's Heartland is an attempt to help explain this region to an academic audience. In her introduction, she explains her surprise at how connected central Illinois was to the world. She arrived in the summer of 1999, moving to the area from the northeastern United States. This unexpected admission nicely sets up the themes of this timely and important book. Heartland's story focuses on Champaign County—home to the University of Illinois where Hoganson teaches—and its long-standing and unexpected connections to the world.She ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Fall of Wisconsin: The Conservative Conquest of a Progressive Bastion
           and the Future of American Politics by Dan Kaufman (review)

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      Abstract: Wisconsin has long been considered a bellwether of progressive politics. However, it is more rightly seen as a state balanced on a political teetertotter—one that historically has shift ed back and forth between progressivism and conservatism as the political context changes and as new leaders, circumstances, and institutional forces emerge. Written in the wake of the 2016 election, in which Wisconsin was one of several midwestern states that helped to propel Donald Trump narrowly into the White House, Dan Kaufman's highly readable book sets out to describe recent shift s in the state's political winds and to explain how a once-liberal bastion and laboratory for democracy has been converted into a testing ground ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Flames of Discontent: The 1916 Minnesota Iron Ore Strike by Gary Kaunonen
           (review)

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      Abstract: With a nod toward the "I.W.W. Songs to Fan the Flames of Discontent" (also known as the "Little Red Songbook") of the Industrial Workers of the World, Gary Kaunonen's Flames of Discontent is a history of labor organizing, immigrant solidarity, and the formation of a working-class consciousness in the Iron Range during the early part of the twentieth century. Drawing on an impressive array of archival materials, including personal journals and letters, Kaunonen provides a history of Iron Rangers that emphasizes the immigrant working-class laborers who are oft en left voiceless in historical narratives and contemporary politics. The book focuses primarily on the organizing efforts of the IWW—a radical and militant ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Big Sister: Feminism, Conservatism, and Conspiracy in the Heartland by
           Erin M. Kempker (review)

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      Abstract: Big Sister examines feminism and conservatism in Indiana and makes connections between Cold War anticommunism and the New Right. Drawing from the growing body of scholarship on such topics, Kempker's book places conservative Hoosier women as local actors who worked both with and independently of national organizations on the right. Hoosier feminists' and conservative women's voices are heard through Kempker's use of newspapers, letters, and manuscript collections.Kempker asserts that conservative women in Indiana believed that the international support of a feminist agenda made one-worldism—or one world government—a looming threat. The United Nations's declaration of 1975 as International Women's Year served as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reimagining Environmental History: Ecological Memory in the Wake of
           Landscape Change by Christian Knoeller (review)

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      Abstract: Despite its title promising some sort of historiographical intervention, Reimagining Environmental History is actually a work of literary eco-criticism, written by a professor of English, Christian Knoeller. Interdisciplinary in approach, the book also provides a useful intellectual history introduction to how ten writers, all connected in some way to the Midwest as a place, have imagined the environmental history of the landscapes with which they are intimate. Each of ten chapters focuses on a single writer and, in some cases, a single work by that author. The choice of writers is wide-ranging and inspired, including such notables as Theodore Roethke and John James Audubon, and it is most noteworthy for including ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Publisher for the Masses: Emanuel Haldeman-Julius by R. Alton Lee (review)

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      Abstract: In "View of the World from Ninth Avenue," Saul Steinberg's famed 1976 New Yorker cover, we are presented with a Manhattan-centered provincialism in which Middle America is a bit of empty space just beyond New Jersey. R. Alton Lee's Publisher for the Masses offers something close to the inverse, declaring tiny Girard, Kansas, to be "the literary and publishing Mecca of the United States, and thus the international center for Western civilization," between 1920 and 1950 (xi). His claim rests upon a thorough account of the life and work of Emanuel Haldeman-Julius, the socialist editor and publisher of the Little Blue Book series, a wildly popular collection of cheap, pocket-sized books. It is easy to be dismissive of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Hometown to Battlefield in the Civil War Era: Middle Class Life in
           Midwest America by Timothy R. Mahoney (review)

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      Abstract: For readers seeking a full portrayal of how the Civil War experience affected the towns, villages, and peoples of the Midwest, this book will likely not satisfy. As the third volume in the author's trilogy on the emergence and solidification of nineteenth-century middle-class society, Mahoney's book reads as such. The war, in fact, was simply another facet of hometownism.The main interpretive threads—first, that rapid town-building and intense boosterism were major formative influences in emerging urban middle-class culture and identity, and, second, that the Civil War was a watershed—read mostly here as a feedback loop to the previous books. Mahoney's principal motif for this redefinition of process and place—Main ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the
           Straits by Tiya Miles (review)

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      Abstract: With The Dawn of Detroit, Tiya Miles eloquently uncovers slavery's hidden traces in the Old Northwest. Miles depicts the Detroit River region from the late colonial era through the early republic as an important international, imperial, and cultural border, as well as a border between slavery and freedom. This book makes essential contributions to the study of slavery and race in the Midwest in lyrical prose. Through tireless research, Miles has located sources about early enslaved people in Detroit. This available documentation facilitates greater understanding about Black slavery there, even though the enslavement of Indigenous people was more common. The introduction sketches continuities between past and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hinterland: America's New Landscape of Class and Conflict by Phil A. Neel
           (review)

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      Abstract: Phil A. Neel's Hinterland examines American economic life through a geographic lens, focusing specifically on areas located some distance away from the major cities that are perceived to be the center of the global economy. Neel explores life in multiple U.S. regions, including the Midwest, Northwest, and Southwest. To do so, he anchors his analysis in the growth of white nationalist groups in the Southwest as well as his experience of populist uprisings in Ferguson, Missouri, and Seattle, Washington.Hinterland is not primarily a book about the Midwest, but Neel's focus on the economic struggle of the American countryside will feel familiar to scholars of the region. This is not least because he addresses many of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Latina/o Midwest Reader by Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez (review)

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      Abstract: Scholars, political pundits, and even some of its residents have long perceived the Midwest as representative of the "real America," creating a popular narrative that touts the region as the country's "heartland." It is oft en imagined as a white, rural, and largely conservative space. The Latina/o Midwest Reader provides 352 pages of evidence that a deeper look at the region is needed and that this examination can overturn such beliefs. This interdisciplinary reader offers historical and contemporary proof that Latinos have long inhabited the Midwest—not just the Southwest or the East Coast—and have practiced placemaking strategies that shaped the region according to their needs and desires. Leading scholars offer ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Remembering a Son of the Midwest: Ellis Hawley, 1929–2020

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      Abstract: Many scholars of the Midwest will be familiar with the work of the historian Ellis Wayne Hawley, who recently passed away at the age of 91 years. He was a man who graciously granted advice to many scholars who studied the Midwest and who did not shy away from studying midwestern figures and topics. From 1969–1994 Hawley was professor of history at the University of Iowa.Hawley was born near Cambridge, Kansas in June 1929. His parents, Winfield Scott Hawley and Maggie Logsdon, had earlier moved from West Virginia to South Dakota and then, in the 1890s, settled in Kansas. The wagon they traveled in is now located in the Grenola Grain Elevator Museum in Grenola, Kansas.1 Young Ellis left Cambridge to attend college ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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