Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
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Great Plains Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.189
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1052-5165 - ISSN (Online) 2334-2463
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Thirsting for Sustainability: Water Conservation in a Great Plains City

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      Abstract: In semiarid Great Plains communities, periodic droughts have historically induced episodes of water insecurity and increased reliance on groundwater mining for consistent access to freshwater for agricultural operations (Peterson, Marsh, and Williams 2003). Recently, evidence documenting the depletion of the Ogallala aquifer, which stretches across the Great Plains from South Dakota to Texas, has heightened the urgency of implementing soil and water conservation practices in the region (Steward and Allen 2016). Many conservation efforts currently target increasing the efficiency of water use in agricultural irrigation systems. However, municipal water districts in small cities and towns across the Great Plains are ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Introduced Tree, Black Locust, and Its Non-Native Treehoppers Augment
           Nebraska’s Biodiversity

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      Abstract: We live in the Holocene Epoch, the geological time after the last ice age. The epoch also is known as the Anthropocene (Crutzen 2002), coined to emphasize humans as the principal driver of evolutionary changes (Wilson 1992; Mack and Lonsdale 2001; Palumbi 2001). Earth’s modification emanates from “human enterprise”: agriculture, economic development, modern technology, and population growth (Vitousek et al. 1997). Anthropogenic influences reduce global biodiversity (Cardinale et al. 2012; Newbold et al. 2015), homogenize biota (McKinney and Lockwood 1999; Olden et al. 2004), and increase species extinction by 1,000-fold compared with normal background rates (Wilson 1992; De Vos et al. 2014). Intentional and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Advancing Underrepresented Preservation Webs: A Cross-Case Analysis for
           African American Historic Site Planning

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      Abstract: “A race without knowledge of its history is like a tree without roots” (Seifert 1983, 5). This metaphor is more important now than ever—for interpreting today’s realities of the Black experience in America and how it came to be as it is. To become like a tree that is not just connected but also fully aware of its connection to its roots, is to understand the value of places like Nicodemus, Kansas, and Colonel Allensworth, California (see map locations in Figs. 1, 2, and 3). Both towns were founded by African Americans who were previously enslaved and sought a new and prosperous life after experiencing the horrors of slavery (California Department of Parks and Recreation [Cal Parks] 2019a; NPS 2019). In 1877 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Surpassing the Wall of Nebraska Nice: Analysis of Immigration Rhetoric in
           Nebraska Journalism

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      Abstract: The 806-person town of Scribner, Nebraska, prides itself on its strong heritage and small community. While the town website offers that “Solid values and morals serve as the foundation for the quality of life evident in this family-centered community” (City of Scribner n.d.), recent events reveal tensions in this narrative. Like many rural towns in Nebraska, Scribner’s aging population creates labor shortages and economic decline. Yet when the 2018 opening of a chicken processing plant in nearby Fremont offered to bring development and young families to Scribner, the Scribner city council took a page from Fremont’s ongoing conversations about housing ordinances that require proof of legal residency in the United ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kill, Camp, and Repeat: Return to the Lindenmeier Folsom Site, Colorado

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      Abstract: The discovery and excavation (1926–1928) of the Folsom type-site in New Mexico was of monumental importance to the history of American archaeology and the emergence of Paleoindian studies (Figgins 1927; Roberts 1940; Wormington 1957; Hofman 2002; Meltzer 2006, 2015). The site represents a bison kill where hunters culled and minimally butchered several dozen bison, and then moved on from the scene, never to return. This view of widely roaming bison hunters continues to hold the imagination of the public and archaeologists alike, and with little surprise, the Folsom type-site continues to serve as the archetype of the Folsom archaeological culture (Wormington 1957). Therefore, it is particularly ironic that the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Toward a Rural Vision Zero: A Qualitative Exploration of Bicyclist and
           Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities in Small-Town and Rural Nebraska

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      Abstract: There is a growing epidemic of fatal car-on-bike and car-on-pedestrian crashes in the United States, but this epidemic is preventable. Bicyclists and pedestrians are vulnerable road users (VRUs) who lack many of the protections afforded to individuals in a car, and frequently lack access to adequate infrastructure to safely reach their destinations. Media coverage of crashes involving VRUs illustrates a societal bias against such users as unwelcome (at least) and at fault (at most) (Scheffels, Bond, and Monteagut 2019). Moreover, transportation professionals accept that our transportation system is inherently dangerous, and even in the best circumstances, some crashes are inevitable (Dumbaugh and Gattis 2005).In ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tracking Cumulative Cropland Expansion across the Great Plains: The
           Plowprint

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      Abstract: The plowprint dataset was initiated in 2014 as a metric to track cumulative loss of native grassland habitat in the Great Plains ecoregion of North America (Gage et al. 2016). At the onset, annually updated land cover data was available through the Agriculture and Agri-food Canada Annual Crop Inventory (ACI; 30 m resolution; AAFC 2009–2019) and United States Department of Agriculture Cropland Data Layer (CDL; 56 m resolution; USDA-NASS 2018) dating back to, respectively, 2009 and 2008 for the ecoregion. In subsequent years, classification accuracy was improved for both datasets, therefore decreasing error rates, and the resolution of the CDL increased to 30 m (beginning in 2010; USDA-NASS-RDD Spatial Analysis ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Canned: The Rise and Fall of Consumer Confidence in the American Food
           Industry by Anna Zeide (review)

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      Abstract: Anna Zeide has written an ambitious and detailed history of the American canning industry. It is easy to see why this book won a James Beard Award in 2019—it cuts across the development of multiple food systems yet still touches upon contemporary issues like food safety and consumer trust. Its contents should be of tremendous interest to culinary historians of all kinds.The work’s relevance to the history of the Great Plains is mostly indirect. Chapters focus on different kinds of canned food like olives and soup, but the closest it comes specifically to this region is a close examination of Wisconsin’s canned pea industry. There are, however, multiple issues related to canning that affected the history of crops. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Undocumented Everyday: Migrant Lives and the Politics of Visibility by
           Rebecca M. Schreiber (review)

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      Abstract: The early 21st century signals a political shift in immigration policy toward the configuration of migrant “illegality” and racialized criminalization, both of which emerged from the War on Terror and neoliberal economic contexts. The Undocumented Everyday: Migrant Lives and the Politics of Visibility deftly investigates and narrativizes the politics of “visuality” beginning in this post-9/11 moment up to 2012, when state surveillance and repression through immigration enforcement were targeting Mexican and Central American migrants.Schreiber examines a variety of documentary projects created by advocacy groups, social service organizations, filmmakers, artists, and activists focused on Mexican and Central ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Magic Bean: The Rise of Soy in America by Matthew Roth (review)

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      Abstract: I grew up in east-central Illinois within smelling distance of A. E. Staley’s and Archer-Daniels-Midland Company’s (ADM) soybean processing plants in Decatur. I received two academic degrees from the University of Illinois and spent 44 years as professor and extension soybean specialist in the Department of Crop and Soil Sciences at North Carolina State University. I grew up thinking that soybeans became a major crop in the United States in the 1930s. Prior to that, agricultural scientists knew that soybeans would grow in the Corn Belt, and that the equipment used to grow corn and wheat could probably be made to handle soybeans. The problem was that no viable market existed for soybeans that would warrant the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Water Rites: Reimagining Water in the West ed. by Jim Ellis (review)

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      Abstract: Water Rites is an insightful, moving, beautiful book. Merging the scholarly with the narrative and the artistic, the volume provides a unique contribution to the literature around water security and well-being.Ostensibly focused on water issues as they affect western Canada, the messaging reverberates beyond geographical location. Certainly, as the editor notes, “water issues are particularly acute in the west” (xv). And, in the words of Aboriginal law expert David Laidlaw, Canada’s western province of Alberta can expect “significant economic and environmental impacts” due to considerable projected climate warming. In that regard, “change to Alberta’s water allocation system is needed” (76).Nevertheless, the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • One Size Fits None: A Farm Girl’s Search for the Promise of Regenerative
           Agriculture by Stephanie Anderson (review)

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      Abstract: It is never too late to change. Such is the resounding argument of One Size Fits None: A Farm Girl’s Search for the Promise of Regenerative Agriculture. Stephanie Anderson features a range of distinct farmer perspectives and types of farms across the Great Plains and beyond in order to consider the best ways to use American farmland, which needs intervention. As she accumulates the personal narratives of five farmers (Ryan, Phil, Kevin, Fidel, and Gabe) from her inperson experiences with them, she gathers data about the decisions farmers make with their land and the various outcomes of these decisions. These interviews are complemented by Anderson’s thorough use of peerreviewed agricultural and environmental ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Many Nations under Many Gods: Public Land Management and American Indian
           Sacred Sites by Todd Allin Morman (review)

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      Abstract: Todd Allin Morman’s book, Many Nations Under Many Gods, provides an excellent overview of United States policies and procedures toward Native American sacred land. The book is a compilation of various case studies of sacred places throughout the American West, which are analyzed in terms of the administrative consultation with Native Americans required by law, critical analysis of judicial decisions, and a review of certain legislation. The author successfully intertwines legal theory with a finely detailed narrative. The book is approachable for both the novice and experienced researchers in similar fields.The strength of the work is the author’s unique perspective as a practicing attorney. Morman offers strong ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Great Vanishing Act: Blood Quantum and the Future of Native Nations
           ed. by Kathleen Ratteree and Norbert Hill Jr (review)

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      Abstract: The trust and enrollment committee of the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (OTIW) has organized this anthology by mainly Native writers and artists. Editor Kathleen Ratteree works for the OTIW committee, and her coeditor, Norbert Hill Jr., works as OTIW director of education. The editors begin their preface with the statement that “Blood Quantum imposed from within and without has shaped Native identity and has been the primary determinant of deciding ‘Who is an Indian’ [original italics] for more than a century.” The imposition from without came from federal officials making decisions about who was a tribal member, based on some fraction of descent. The imposition from within comes, since 1934, from tribal ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wild Migrations: Atlas of Wyoming’s Ungulates by Matthew J. Kauffman
           et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Movement ecology is a growing field within wildlife sciences and management. The focus on movement ecology, and its importance for sustaining populations, has been spurred on by our ability to monitor individual animals for long periods of time across their range via telemetry devices (as opposed to a capture-recapture study in which an area must be actively sampled). This book is focused specifically on the movement and migratory behavior of Wyoming ungulate species, and while the layout is attractive and informative and the content is interesting, the optimal audience is likely the biologist who is not a wildlife specialist.The book begins by describing the Wyoming landscape and the innate components that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Taco Truck: How Mexican Street Food Is Transforming the American City
           by Robert Lemon (review)

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      Abstract: Robert Lemon’s The Taco Truck: How Mexican Street Food Is Transforming the American City is a compelling examination of the taco truck’s role in shaping space and place in cities within the United States. Situated in urban studies scholarship with a nod toward food studies literature, Lemon’s work provides a much-needed scholarly overview of the proliferation of food trucks in the 21st century. Through a rich comparative analysis set in the Bay Area, Sacramento, and Columbus, Ohio, Lemon aptly unveils the ways in which taco truck vendors are simultaneously visible and invisible as they forge their own economic and cultural spaces and expose paradoxes within capitalist systems.In each chapter Lemon’s book rightfully ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chipped Stone Technological Organization: Central Place Foraging and
           Exchange on the Northern Great Plains by Craig M. Johnson (review)

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      Abstract: Craig Johnson’s book presents an extensive examination of prehistoric chipped stone technology from 169 archaeological sites along the Missouri River in South Dakota and North Dakota. Although this study includes PaleoIndian and Archaic sites, more attention is given to the lithic technology of late prehistoric and early historic horticultural Plains villages (AD 1000– 1886). Johnson suggests that chipped stone technology from this region has received less attention than subjects such as ceramics and architecture. Consequently, he examined flaked stone artifacts recovered by archaeologists since the mid-1950s. These stone artifacts are commonly referred to as arrow and “dart” points, hide scrapers, knives, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hidden Prairie: Photographing Life in One Square Meter by Chris Helzer
           (review)

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      Abstract: Chris Helzer is a talented photographer, and this book does not disappoint. I found the closeup photographs he took of the prairie flora and fauna that are included in the book to be very visually appealing.As impressive as the photographs are, I was equally impressed with the quality of Chris’s writing, and was especially drawn to the concept of documenting the life found over the course of a year in a square meter of Nebraska prairie. What a wonderful idea to focus on what happens in only a square meter! This concept could be applied to many types of habitats found throughout the Great Plains. I know that I often get caught up in seeking wide vistas and hiking to explore what is over the next hill or around the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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