Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
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Great Plains Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.142
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0275-7664 - ISSN (Online) 2333-5092
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Pioneer Mother Monuments: Constructing Cultural Memory by Cynthia Culver
           Prescott (review)

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      Abstract: Pioneer Mother Monuments: Constructing Cultural Memory is an important addition to the literature on the history of monuments commemorating racial violence, and the first book-length study to relate this specifically to pioneer monuments. In her comparison of pioneer mother monuments constructed in the United States from 1890 to the present, Prescott argues that while opponents are quick to tear down Confederate monuments in the South, pioneer commemoration also "enshrine[s] white supremacy" (282) and "ignores the conquest of indigenous peoples, the meeting of diverse cultures in the region, and women as agents rather than just symbols of white civilization" (10). These monuments allow particular regions to feel ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Self-Reliance and Modern Illusion: O. E. Rölvaag's Giants in the
           Earth

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      Abstract: When O. E. Rölvaag published Giants in the Earth in 1927, he was contributing to an established conversation about the frontier and self-reliance. The frontier had been nationally popularized by historians like Frederick Jackson Turner, who promoted it as a space with a special claim to self-reliance. In Turner's essays, the frontier's undeveloped landscape required ambition and adaptation, an experience which forged from its diverse inhabitants a collective national consciousness. This American spirit, captured in Turner's essays as the figure of the pioneer, honors autonomy and surmounts limits. In elevating the pioneer as the ideal self, Turner's thesis represents a trajectory of texts like Ralph Waldo Emerson's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mapping Home: Placing the Past and Building a Community—Local Maps by
           School Pupils during the Progressive Era in Kansas

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      Abstract: "I cannot understand why you should wish to leave this beautiful country and go back to the dry, gray place you call Kansas." "That is because you have no brains," answered the girl. "No matter how dreary and gray our homes are, we people of flesh and blood would rather live there than in any other country, be it ever so beautiful. There is no place like home."In the 1900s, before the catchphrase "there is no place like home" became an overused cliché for the Sunflower State,1 some schoolchildren were asked to draw maps of the Kansan piece of earth they were calling home. Adults placed blank surveyor township maps in the hands of the pupils and directed them to place on them what they perceived as key features of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "In Union There Is Strength": Claim Clubs, the Law, and the First Murder
           Case Brought to Court in the Nebraska Territory

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      Abstract: On April 3, 1855, twenty-nine-year-old George W. Hollister and four other men were surveying a claim on Papillion Creek, not far from Bellevue, Nebraska. Sometime around 3:00 p.m., while one of the men left to fetch some water from the creek, the remaining members of the group sat for a rest a half-mile northeast from Dr. Charles Butterfield's claim. As the party waited, they saw two figures appear on a nearby ridge, only to quickly vanish. A few minutes later, Dr. Butterfield and a companion, twenty-five-year-old Charles A. Henry, reappeared on the ridge and began to approach the group. As the two men came more clearly in view, some sort of club or stick could be seen in Butterfield's hands. Henry clutched a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Preserving German Texan Identity: Reminiscences of William A. Trenckmann,
           1859–1935 ed. by Walter L. Buenger and Walter D. Kamphoefner (review)

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      Abstract: Memoirs are often terrific sources for scholars examining historical events and patterns, especially when presented by skilled editors. In Preserving German Texan Identity: Reminiscences of William A. Trenckmann, 1859–1935 (hereafter Preserving German Texan Identity), historians Walter Buenger and Walter Kamphoefner display how editors can make memoirs more accessible. Focused on the Gulf Coastal Plains of southeastern Texas, Trenckmann's memoir documents German Texan experiences of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.Preserving German Texan Identity opens with a preface and introduction that explains the process of editing the memoir and offers an overview of Trenckmann's life. The editors draw on ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dakota in Exile: The Untold Stories of Captives in the Aftermath of the
           U.S.-Dakota War by Linda M. Clemmons (review)

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      Abstract: For most of the twentieth century, scholars of the US-Dakota War routinely followed a recurring stream of historical inquiry: the sixweek- long conflict in south-central Minnesota, rooted from failed annuity payments and periods of Dakota starvation, wrought havoc and death within white settler communities and ended with Lincoln's order to hang thirtyeight Dakota men—the largest mass execution in US history. The US-Dakota War has since garnered renewed scholarly attention to extend the temporal and geographical meanings and histories of that conflict. Steering away from these traditional studies, Linda M. Clemmons's book, Dakota in Exile: The Untold Stories of Captives in the Aftermath of the U.S.-Dakota War ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Frontier Army: Episodes from Dakota and the West by R. Eli Paul
           (review)

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      Abstract: R. Eli Paul has assembled seven essays that focus on the role of the frontier army and the Indian wars of the Great Plains and beyond. The authors are respected scholars whose research included significant primary sources such as official correspondence, personal letters, and family papers. The essays' main time frame ranges from the 1854 Grattan fight to the 1890 Wounded Knee massacre and includes a variety of related events, individuals, and topics.The increasing availability of personal accounts has added a new dimension to the official military records that are usually used for this type of book. For example, in chapter 1, Paul includes a letter written by Marshall T. Polk II, who served as Colonel William ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Interior Borderlands: Regional Identity in the Midwest and Great
           Plains ed. by Jon K. Lauck (review)

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      Abstract: This is a rewarding collection of twenty chapters that explore regional identities and contrasts between the Great Plains and Midwest, with several attempts to identify the borderlands that separate the two regions. On the opening page of the first chapter, Christopher Laingen alerts readers that if they are seeking a definitive answer as to an exact dividing line between the Great Plains and Midwest from this book, they should "prepare for disappointment." While there is no consensus offered on a precise line separating the two regions, this volume is anything but disappointing. The approaches from disciplines including American studies, English, geography, geology, history, journalism, library science, mass ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reproduction on the Reservation: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Colonization
           in the Long Twentieth Century by Brianna Theobald (review)

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      Abstract: Historian Brianna Theobald's well-researched Reproduction on the Reservation demonstrates how Native women negotiated and challenged the United States government's interference, surveillance, and regulation of their reproductive experiences. She examines the lived experience of these imperialist policies through the almost 100-year history of Elizabeth (Lizzie) Shane Yellowtail's family on the Crow Reservation in southern Montana. Through oral histories, ethnographies, and archival research, Theobald compellingly argues America's settler "colonial politics have always been reproductive politics" (4).The book's six chapters alternate between detailing larger US policies regulating reservation life in the Midwest and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Banker and the Blackfoot: An Untold Story of Friendship, Trust, and
           Broken Promises in the Old West by Edward Chamberlin (review)

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      Abstract: J. Edward Chamberlin, professor emeritus of English and comparative literature at the University of Toronto, recounts the friendship between Jack Cowdry and Crop Eared Wolf in order to tell the story of Fort Macleod, Alberta, and the High Plains borderlands between 1885 and 1905. The friendship at the heart of this study began one spring day in 1885 on the town's main street with their conversation about horses and what brought Cowdry to Blackfoot territory. Cowdry had come to Fort Macleod with hopes, but no specific plans. Inspired by a rancher friend's stories about his 300-mile journey to Helena, Montana, to go to a bank, Cowdry started Fort Macleod's first bank and thus became important to the region's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Warrior Images and Peacemaking Traditions: Strategies for Survival among
           the Southern Siouan Tribal Nations

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      Abstract: Given America's obsession with warriors and veterans, it was perhaps inevitable that we admired defeated tribes and great Indian warriors after they were no longer a threat to the emerging American nation. In colonial times, a description of Indian tribal communities noted a total population along with the number of warriors each could muster. America's love affair with warriors led to stereotypes of Native people as eagle-feathered bonneted warriors riding horses on the Great Plains. Even today, students who are asked to draw an Indian and a house that an Indian might live in, invariably draw a man with an eaglefeathered bonneted headdress standing beside a tipi. Organized sports teams also chose images of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Late Westerns: The Persistence of a Genre by Lee Clark Mitchell (review)

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      Abstract: The Western is a genre that has been declared dead, revived, given its postmortem yet again, and made a comeback countless times since early cinema. Part of this journey has included considering the "post" Western, to explain how the genre has evolved from its so-called classical form. But genres are always unstable categories, and as Lee Clark Mitchell writes in Late Westerns: The Persistence of a Genre, "examples from any period in the past are as incompatible, sometimes irreconcilable and chaotic, as more recent examples brought together to justify a presumed generic claim" (5). As such, Mitchell considers the Western as always being "post," drawing instead on the classification of "late Westerns" to examine the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Life on Muskrat Creek: A Homestead Family in Wyoming by Ethel Waxham Love
           and J. David Love (review)

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      Abstract: Amid hardship, heartache, and survival against all odds, the story of Ethel and John Love's proving up on a homestead in westcentral Wyoming is retold in rich detail in Life on Muskrat Creek: A Homestead Family in Wyoming. The stories told here are primarily gathered from a collection of writings by Ethel Love and her son, David. The book interweaves Ethel's reminisces with those of David, which provides clarity to events that would otherwise lay shrouded in mystery. It is also an intergenerational approach that provides varying perspectives on a similar event.It takes some time to get used to the format devised by the editors to transition from various narratives. The editors' remarks are italicized and introduce ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Changed Forever: American Indian Boarding-School Literature by Arnold
           Krupat (review)

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      Abstract: Readers of this journal will be eagerly anticipating the forthcoming second volume in Arnold Krupat's ambitious project, Changed Forever, since that collection will examine Lakota boarding-school life writing. However, the first volume, focusing on the Southwest and, more specifically, life writing by students from the Hopi, Navajo, and Apache communities, already has much to offer studies of Great Plains cultures. For one thing, Plains-based sites such as Haskell receive some treatment here. For instance, Krupat's presentation of material from A Voice in Her Tribe includes coverage of Irene Stewart's days at the Kansas institution after earlier attending Phoenix Indian School. More broadly, Krupat's overview of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Metis Pioneers: Marie Rose Delorme Smith and Isabella Clark Hardisty
           Lougheed by Doris Jeanne Mackinnon (review)

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      Abstract: In Metis Pioneers, Doris Jeanne Mackinnon details the role two particular Metis women played in western Canada's transitional period from the fur trade economy to sedentary agriculture and industrial capitalism during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Marie Rose Delorme Smith and Isabella Clark Hardisty Lougheed were both born in 1861 to Metis and Euro-American parents who occupied influential positions in the fur trade. Mackinnon argues that Smith and Lougheed adapted the skills and kinship connections rooted in the fur trade to navigate the transition to new economies. While both women publicly fashioned themselves as Euro-American "pioneers," Mackinnon argues, Smith and Lougheed retained ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Being and Becoming Ute: The Story of an American Indian People by Sondra
           G. Jones (review)

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      Abstract: Being and Becoming Ute is a "cultural biography" beginning with Ute origins "at an arbitrary point in time" and ending with the rise of modern-day Ute nations (8). Furthermore, the Ute diaspora is chronicled through the experiences of Ute bands with other Native peoples and Spanish and Euro-American colonizers. Through it all, Jones uses cultural identity as the primary lens of analysis in order to understand how Ute peoples negotiated the world around them while maintaining their social and political identities.The monograph draws upon a diversity of source materials, and the photographs throughout are particularly invaluable. Each chapter is organized both chronologically and thematically. For example, chapter 2 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Texas Women and Ranching: On the Range, at the Rodeo, and in Their
           Communities ed. by Deborah M. Liles and Cecilia Gutierrez Venable (review)
           

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      Abstract: Texas Women and Ranching is an edited collection that came out of a series of conferences and academic conversations centered on the long role that women have played in the Texas ranching industry. The book brings together scholars and writers from various disciplines, but most are historians from Texas. The introduction explains that it has been difficult in Texas to overcome the continued focus on men, not women, in ranching histories. The masculine nature of much of Texas history is true, and this book does not stand alone in its endeavor. It joins other recent work by Sara Massey, Jane Clements Monday, Carmen Goldthwaite, and Rhonda Lashley Lopez.The nine chapters highlight different women, ranching regions ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-18T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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