Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
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Western American Literature
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.114
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0043-3462 - ISSN (Online) 1948-7142
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Staying with the White Trouble of Recent Feminist Westerns

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      Abstract: In the turbulent summer of 2020—amidst an uncontrolled pandemic and massive protests against police brutality on US streets—op-ed writers reported a "great white awakening on racism," an assault on white innocence without the typical hem and haw, the fragility or defenses of white guilt (Thornton). Springing up in geographies not on anyone's antiracist map of America, the first draft of a new history of race relations in this country seemed to be in process. Older white people stood with signs on unlikely suburban street corners. Throngs of multiracial young folks were getting in front of tear gas, putting their bodies on the line. Terms like "systemic racism" and "white supremacy" circulated in public discourse ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Text, Encounter, Genre: Returning (Again) to Black Elk Speaks

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      Abstract: This article was written on land historically inhabited by the Karankawa and Atakapa peoples, land given the name "Houston" by European settler colonists. I am a descendent of such colonists."The Book that Would Not Die": so John Neihardt titled his 1972 assessment of Black Elk Speaks, a book he had authored, four decades prior, together with the Oglala Lakota man who would come to be known widely by the name Black Elk. Appearing in the pages of this journal, the assessment, or reassessment, had originally served as an introduction to a new paperback edition of the book, where it mostly recapitulated the effort of Neihardt's original 1932 preface, setting the stage: the stage of an encounter and of a scene of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Simons Town as Heterotopia: The Dynamic Interplay of Barrioization and
           Barriology in The Brick People

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      Abstract: The Brick People, based on the lives of Alejandro Morales's parents, is a historical novel that is constructed mainly around the Simons and Revueltas families. The novel narrates the vicissitudes of Simons Town and depicts the living situations of Mexican workers there in the early part of the twentieth century. Through his depiction Morales not only implies that Mexican laborers "laid the foundations for the actual development and construction of modern California" (Garza 221) but also reveals the fact that Simons Town is "one of the most severe cases of planned segregation in the state of California" (Morales, "Dynamic Identities" 21). As the central locale in the novel, Simons Town, away from the city of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Carry: A Memoir of Survival on Stolen Land by Toni Jensen (review)

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      Abstract: Childhood trauma, racism, family and workplace violence, mass shootings: these are not generally the stuff of uplifting nonfiction. Toni Jensen's memoir, however, is a work that is hauntingly beautiful and also intellectually and morally challenging.As its subtitle suggests, this memoir-in-essays confronts the displacement of North America's Indigenous people and the many ways that displacement continues to reverberate in our society—particularly as one of the roots of violence in the United States. Jensen, who is Métis, seeks to shine a light on crimes and threats against Indigenous women and other women of color. But in a broader sense, she is concerned with the ways violence permeates all of American life ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Weird Westerns: Race, Gender, Genre ed. by Kerry Fine et al. (review)

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      Abstract: According to coeditors Kerry Fine, Michael K. Johnson, Rebecca M. Lush, and Sara L. Spurgeon, weird Westerns "utilize a hybrid genre format, blending canonical elements of the western with either science fiction, fantasy, horror, or some other component of speculative literature" (2). As the subtitle suggests, Weird Westerns: Race, Gender, Genre is primarily concerned with the archetypal western figure—a straight white man—violently displacing or erasing minoritized groups, particularly women, Natives, and Blacks. Yet Weird Westerns convincingly demonstrates that, for all of the ways that its traditional conventions persist (many of which are problematic) the Western is also remarkably adaptable. (It should be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Querencia: Reflections on the New Mexico Homeland ed. by Vanessa
           Fonseca-Chávez et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Querencia: Reflections on the New Mexico Homeland is a multigenre contribution by New Mexican Indigenous, Chicano, Genízaro, and Anglo scholars and activists on articulations of cultural identity and its connection to land. Of note is how the relationship between identity and land can change across groups, and often does, due to contentious relationships among them. The book follows the work of Juan Estevan Arellano, who argued that querencia "is that which gives us a sense of place, and that which anchors us to the land, that which makes us a unique people, for it implies a deeply rooted knowledge of place, and for that reason we respect it as our home" (50). The essays offer a variety of inflections (feminist ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Little Art Colony and US Modernism: Carmel, Provincetown, Taos by
           Geneva M. Gano (review)

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      Abstract: Toward the end of "Tom Outland's Story," the second book in Willa Cather's The Professor's House (1925), Outland and Roddy Blake argue over Blake's sale, to a German collector, of the Native American "relics" they had together discovered on the Blue Mesa. Blake made the sale without Outland's knowledge, while the latter was away in Washington trying, unsuccessfully, to interest officials at the Smithsonian in them. They argue, Blake leaves Outland alone on the mesa, and he is never seen again despite Tom's persistent search efforts. Before he goes, Blake says that he assumed that Outland "meant to 'realize'" on the relics "and that it would all come to money in the end. 'Everything does,' he added" (243). Just as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Political Arrays of American Indian Literary History by James H. Cox
           (review)

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      Abstract: In The Political Arrays of American Indian Literary History James H. Cox introduces exciting new methodologies for reading and recognizing the wide range of political thought, expression, and activism of Native American authors from the early twentieth century to the present. Challenging the "perception of the Native American Renaissance as a rupture," Cox powerfully recasts the Red Power era as part of a vibrant and, at times, vexed lineage of Native writing and political action (13). In his efforts to "foreground continuities" between and across generations of Native writers and intellectuals, Cox continues his broader work to re-recognize the contributions of early- and mid-twentieth-century Native writers, such ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Teaching Western American Literature ed. by Brady Harrison and Randi Lynn
           Tanglen (review)

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      Abstract: Bringing together thirteen timely and engaging essays that address innovative approaches to teaching western American literature, editors Brady Harrison and Randi Lynn Tanglen offer a well-designed guide for scholar-teachers interested in the "vitality and range of western writing" (1). Aimed at reaching diverse student populations in a variety of college settings, the volume provides valuable ideas for designing state-of-the-art syllabi. In addition to including suggestions for reading lists and assignments, the authors explain the theoretical and pedagogical foundations guiding their choices, situating their work in critical regionalism and affect theory, African American studies and borderlands theory ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From the Editors

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      Abstract: This issue of Western American Literature marks the first published issue under our care as the new Editor and Book Review Editor. We would like to begin by thanking our immediate predecessors, Tom Lynch and George Wolf, for their work steering the journal for the past seven years and their guidance in helping us make the editorial transition. Their predecessors, too, deserve our deep gratitude in developing a journal that shapes and reflects the exciting and ever-evolving work of western American literary and cultural studies. And, as always, our unending thanks to the incomparable WLA Director of Operations Sabine Barcatta for being the memory and voice of reason for WLA and WAL. We would also like to thank the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • We Who Work the West: Class, Labor, and Space in Western American
           Literature by Kiara Kharpertian (review)

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      Abstract: Grounded in a winning insistence that "belonging can become a force available to all of us and that literature provides a laboratory in which to test its properties and potentialities," Kharpertian's book grapples with the complex interrelations of labor, class, and space while providing a tour of some of western literature's more down-and-out corners (xxii). In doing so, Kharpertian analyzes the West's "deep scars of repeated and lasting displacements, deterritorializations, and dispossessions," from California to Texas (xxii). She argues that class-steeped stories of a purportedly authentic West reflect the contradictions—not just regional but national—that emerge as space and identity are differentially shaped ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Great Medicine Road: Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon
           Trails, Part 4: 1856–1869 ed. by Michael L. Tate (review)

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      Abstract: The Great Medicine Road: Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, Part 4: 1856–1869, the final volume of an ambitious series, covers the last years of emigrant travel over the Oregon–California trails. Each chapter presents a diary, a reminiscence (published and unpublished), an interview, or an official report of individuals who followed the trails from Nebraska to California and Oregon. The reader will come away with a picture of the trials and tribulations faced by the emigrants. Both hot and freezing weather, dust, and mosquitos bedeviled the travelers. Sandy and rocky roads, steep ascents and descents, and dangerous river crossings were routine, and the desert crossings were exhausting. The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wrenched from the Land: Activists Inspired by Edward Abbey ed. by ML
           Lincoln and Diane Sward Rapaport (review)

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      Abstract: Correction 08.17.21: In the second paragraph masculine pronouns were mistakenly used. The online version of the article has been updated.This is a marvelous book. These words are perhaps inappropriate to open a review in an academic journal. But Wrenched from the Land not only presents valuable academic source materials for understanding the evolution of American environmental activism, it also offers delightful personal perspectives on Edward Abbey and how his words touched and impassioned important voices protecting the American West—and the whole earth.The range of voices, one of the book's great assets, comes from its provenance: thousands of pages of interviews ML Lincoln had amassed while preparing her ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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