Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Studies in American Naturalism
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1931-2555 - ISSN (Online) 1944-6519
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • “A Good and Noble Nature”: Naturalism, Populism, and Ignatius
           Donnelly’s Caesar’s Column

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: At the heart of American literary naturalism lies a paradox. On the one hand, the literary naturalists of the late nineteenth century were among those most influenced by the philosophical naturalism that had come to define the spirit of their age. This philosophical naturalism conceived of the world as “a mechanistic reality that functions in terms of causality” and that consists of “matter in motion subject to physical laws” (Lehan, “Naturalism” 15). Nature, in this view, is a closed, deterministic system of matter encompassing the whole of reality without remainder. Any observable phenomena therefore must be explicable in terms of material causes immanent to the order of nature. Human nature is not exempt from ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Oh, come out here and see the fire, will you'”: U.S. Disaster
           Culture and Vandover and the Brute

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Frank Norris’s Vandover and the Brute, completed by 1898, but published posthumously in 1914, examines its eponymous protagonist’s degeneration in turn-of-the-century California. Vandover’s devolution has been central to scholarship on the novel, and rightly so, as the Darwinian logics influencing the ne’er-do-well aesthete’s derangement into a crazed alcoholic lycanthrope are hard to ignore.1 But Vandover also coincides with the advent of yellow journalism and an advancing consumer culture, and as much as Vandover portrays an evolutionist tragedy, the novel also elicits questions about sensational journalism and the ways mass-mediated disasters influence social experience. What is of particular interest to this ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Eternal symbols of a dream”: Upton Sinclair, Sacco and Vanzetti, and
           the Meaning of Anarchism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Not long after Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were executed in August 1927, Edna St. Vincent Millay published “Fear,” an attack on those in the United States who allowed them to die: “you do not at all know what an Anarchist is. . . . An anarchist, you insist, is a man who makes bombs and puts them under the State House” (5). Chastising the conservative and complacent masses, Millay defended Sacco and Vanzetti by stripping them of the capacity for violence— they simply “believ[ed] that human beings are naturally good” (5). “Fear” appeared in The Outlook and in a pamphlet printed by the Sacco-Vanzetti Defense Committee (SVDC). In her open letter, Millay repeated the theme seen in numerous SVDC publications ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • American Tragedies: Dreiser and Faulkner

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: When commenting on his prospects of receiving the Nobel Prize, William Faulkner would habitually remark that he would rather be associated with Theodore Dreiser and Sherwood Anderson, who never received the prize, than with Sinclair Lewis and Pearl Buck, who did (for example, see Selected Letters 299). He maintained this opinion— with reference to the same writers— even after hearing that he had won the award (Blotner 525). And when an interviewer asked Faulkner whom he considered to be the “greatest American novelists up to the end of the 19th century,” he named three: Twain, Melville, and Dreiser (Lion 167). Putting aside any chronological quibbles, Faulkner thereby places Dreiser in estimable literary company. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “You make yourself into a monster so you no longer bear responsibility
           for what you do”: Dexter, Naturalism, and Neoliberal Crime Discourse

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Showtime’s popular crime series Dexter (2006–13) draws on a range of themes, aesthetics, and ideas typically associated with naturalism, and the relationship between the program’s naturalist attributes, gender-based violence, and neoliberal crime discourse is particularly striking. Reflecting a broader twenty-first-century resurgence in contemporary American culture, naturalism is clearly a key component of Dexter, which is based on a series of novels by Jeff Lindsay. This is the case even as central components of naturalism— notably determinism— are inconsistently integrated into the program’s narrative structure and thematic concerns. The show’s protagonist, Dexter Morgan (Michael C. Hall), works by day as a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • American Literary Naturalism: Late Essays by Donald Pizer (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Donald Pizer’s most recent collection of writings, American Literary Naturalism: Late Essays, has appeared from Anthem Press. The volume includes ten pieces. Two are general essays about the characteristics of American naturalism, six are essays on individual authors, and two are statements by Pizer about his own work. All of this material has been published earlier: four of the items have appeared as contributions to books, the other six in academic journals. Pizer tells us in a preface that he has not significantly revised these texts; they are presented as they originally appeared. The result is a volume of strong, thoughtful writing about the writers and the issues that have concerned Pizer throughout his long ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Oxford Handbook of American Literary Realism ed. by Keith Newlin
           (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: In editor Keith Newlin’s introduction to The Oxford Handbook of American Literary Realism he makes clear that this volume’s project is to help readers think about realism now. This editorial decision is reflected in the centering of women writers in the “Contexts” section, with chapters by Donna Campbell and Sophia Forster, as well as the focus on the realisms of immigrant writers and authors of color in chapters by Ramón J. Guerra, Jean Lee Cole, and Jolie A. Sheffer. Many of these chapters, which feature authors such as María Amparo Ruiz de Burton and Mourning Dove (Christine Quintasket/Humishuma), look at the way authors previously marginalized by literary canon formation strategically or partially took up ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Charmian Kittredge London: Trailblazer, Author, Adventurer by Iris Jamahl
           Dunkle (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Iris Dunkle’s new biography of Charmian Kittredge London is a significant, accessible, and much-needed work of scholarship on a hitherto neglected literary figure. Though best known in her own time and since as the second wife of Jack London, Charmian London was an author in her own right— she published several books, including The Log of the Snark (1915), Our Hawaii (1917), and the two-volume biographical Book of Jack London (1921)— and an enterprising woman whose marriage gave her unusual scope for personal experience while also often limiting her to the role she assumed as “Mate-Woman” of a famous man. To date, Charmian figures importantly only in a few works, most notably Clarice Stasz’s Jack London’s Women ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Working Women in American Literature, 1865–1950 ed. by Miriam S.
           Gogol (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Working women has remained a topic of debate and controversy in both American literature and American society since the mid-twentieth century. The end of the Civil War provided the much needed labor force for industrial expansion and boosted the industrialization and urbanization process. Meanwhile, American society witnessed the entrance of working women into an unprecedented number of fields amid diverse public opinions. The fact that women expanding their job possibilities coincided with the rise of American realism and naturalism points to the natural affinity between working women as a subject matter and American realism and naturalism as literary genres. However, as Miriam S. Gogol observes in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Television and Precarity: Naturalist Narratives of Poor America by Jasmin
           Humburg (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Critical studies of American naturalism often trace naturalist storylines through twenty-first century culture and examine contemporary narratives of hardship and poverty. Some of the most exciting and groundbreaking recent work in the field (such as that of Klaus H. Schmidt) focuses on revealing the roots of naturalism within popular culture and teasing out naturalist iconography in contemporary film and television. In this spirit, utilizing Donna Campbell’s, Donald Pizer’s, and Eric Carl Link’s capacious definitions of naturalism, Jasmin Humburg continues this trend of critical expansion in her new study on popular television series. Therein, she explores a contemporary American application of past naturalist ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Figures of the World: The Naturalist Novel and Transnational Form by
           Christopher Laing Hill (review)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: While scholars of American literary naturalism acknowledge the precedent of French naturalists, especially Émile Zola, they also differentiate American naturalists from their French forebears. Christopher Laing Hill contributes to this distancing work in his comparative literature study of naturalism, Figures of the World, by arguing that literary “genealogy does not equal servility” (xx). Hill’s study uncouples naturalism from Zola as it expands the field by suggesting that the transnational history of naturalism is one of proliferation into naturalisms in the many parts of the world that adapted it, instead of adopting it wholesale after its inception in 1860s France.Hill’s first chapter charts the transnational ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 35.175.107.77
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-