Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Studies in American Indian Literatures
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.14
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0730-3238 - ISSN (Online) 1548-9590
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • From the Editors

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      Abstract: tawow, welcome! Special sections and special issues are proving to be a vital way for Studies in American Indian Literatures to engage scholars and readers within our field, and to produce vibrant new knowledge about Indigenous writing. We’ve had dynamic special issues on Water (Fall/Winter 2018, guest edited by Christina Boyles and Hilary Wyss) and, earlier this year, on Indigenous Literatures from Canada (guest edited by Michelle Coupal, Aubrey Hanson, and Sarah Henzi). These issues have had enormous appeal for readers and have helped to build and reinforce community within Indigenous literary studies. Keep the proposals coming!In the issue at hand, we are pleased to present a special section devoted entirely to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reimagining Native California with Deborah Miranda’s Bad Indians: A
           Tribal Memoir

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      Abstract: no sainthood for father serrathe pope values slavery, rape, murderjesus forgave killers he didn’t make them saintsreturn the presidio to the muwekma ohlone nationOn a sunny September afternoon in 2015, members of the Muwekma Ohlone Nation and their allies gathered outside Mission Dolores in San Francisco, California, to protest Pope Francis’s canonization of the eighteenth-century Spanish priest, Father Junípero Serra. The epigraphs that open this introduction are reproduced from several of the protest signs on display at the demonstration, signaling that for the Muwekma Ohlone Nation, Father Serra’s legacy for missionized California Indian communities is one of death, violence, and cultural destruction. In 1769 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Surviving Catastrophe: Traveling with Coyote in Bad Indians: A Tribal
           Memoir

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      Abstract: In her formally compelling and complex book, Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir (2013), Esselen and Chumash writer Deborah Miranda negotiates centuries of violent colonial entanglements in the space we now know as California and reimagines dominant narratives of California Indian erasure to assert their (and her) survival. This work is daunting: California histories refuse easy consumption, and thus the forms and storytelling modes required to map the landscape of colonial aftermath, as well as Indigenous resurgence, are varied and shifting. As readers entering into this kind of formal, historical, and emotional complexity, it can be helpful to have a guide. One possible way to navigate Bad Indians is to follow one of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Archives of Deborah Miranda’s Bad Indians

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      Abstract: In the poem “Lies My Ancestors Told for Me,” Deborah Miranda (Ohlone-Costanoan Esselen and Chumash) evokes the colonial archive, the collection of historical documents and materials that informs her 2013 memoir, Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir, of which this poem is part. Significantly, Miranda suggests here that “truth” can be found in institutional archives, among the “lies” told in the interest of survival: “and when you tell that lie/tell it in Spanish,” “Give your children/Spanish names,” “Don’t tell them/you still speak Chumash/with their mother” (40). Throughout this complex memoir, Miranda demonstrates the need to look to many sources—and to read them critically—to find these “clues” that help her reconstruct ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Erasure Is a Bitch, Isn’t It'”: Deborah Miranda’s Feminist
           Geographies and Native Women’s Life Writing

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      Abstract: I woke up today, confused, inside of something feminine and ancestral in its misery. I woke up as the bones of my ancestors locked in government storage.The horse knows and reveals the truth of broken land, the unbearable histories and geographies that are far from invisible.“I was the third generation of the things we didn’t talk about” (110), writes Terese Marie Mailhot (Seabird Island Band) of gendered violence in her memoir Heart Berries (2018). As she explores her emotional state more thoroughly, she muses, “I think I have the blood memory of my neurotic ancestors and their vices” (32). In her memoir Crazy Brave (2012), Joy Harjo (Mvskoke/Creek) tells the story of a community of Native women who gathered ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Deborah Miranda, Natalie Diaz, Tommy Pico, and Metaphors of Representation

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      Abstract: In the spring of 2018, two Mohawk brothers, seventeen-year-old Lloyd Skanahwati Gray and nineteen-year-old Thomas Kanewakeron Gray, joined a campus tour at Colorado State University. According to news reports, a woman on the tour called campus police officers on the teens, reporting them as suspicious and “creepy.” Police arrived, removed the brothers from the group, and subjected them to questioning before determining that they had done nothing wrong. Close attention to the woman’s police report reveals it was not only the teens’ presence on the tour that she found upsetting, but their quiet withholding of the information she demanded. According to reporter Mary Hudetz (Apsaalooké/Crow), the woman was immediately ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • When Coyote Knocks on the Door: Documenting Chaos, Archiving Resilience

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      Abstract: I came into this world already scarred by loss on both sides of my family. My Indigenous side; my European side. My father and my mother were the kind of damaged people who should never have had children. But of course, they had me, and so my first language was loss.*In the eight years since Bad Indians was published—and subsequent essays about my Indigenous Californian Ancestors—I’ve been asked countless times, how long did it take' And, why did you decide to research your own family'First answer: It really depends on how far back you want to go.How far back does this story go' Too far.*Second answer: Sometimes you lose something so big, so immeasurable, that bearing your grief requires an act just as complicated ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Plant Life in Louise Erdrich’s The Beet Queen

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      Abstract: How firm we stand and plant our feet upon the land determines the strength of our children’s heartbeat."Critics of Louise Erdrich’s The Beet Queen (1986) have debated fervently over the Indianness of the novel, a discussion that reached its peak during the Silko-Erdrich controversy. In Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Here’s an Odd Artifact for the Fairy Tale Shelf: Review of The Beet Queen,” Silko accuses Erdrich of “self-referential writing” that glosses over the harsh political realities of Native American life and scathingly remarks that the book has “shimmering beauty because no history or politics intrudes to muddy the well of pure necessity contained within language itself ” (10). The novel, in fact, features mainly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • “Americanism for Indians”: Carlos Montezuma’s “Immigrant
           Problem,” Wassaja, and the Limits of Native Activism

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      Abstract: The Indian problem is a problem because the country has taken it and nursed it as a problem; otherwise it is not a problem at all.I am speaking for these people because they cannot speak for themselves.Of the Native intellectuals of the Progressive Era, Yavapai medical doctor, activist, and writer Carlos Montezuma (ca. 1866–1923) was one of the best-known Native Americans in the United States in the first decades of the twentieth century. Recent scholarship has positioned Montezuma’s cultural and political work around the Society of American Indians, Richard H. Pratt and the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, and the legacy of his work for the Fort McDowell community in Arizona. Literary scholars have also started ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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