Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Nineteenth-Century French Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0146-7891 - ISSN (Online) 1536-0172
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Incipit: On Poetry and Crisis

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      Abstract: For the next installment of this dialogic series, the journal asked Thomas C. Connolly (Yale University) and Liesl Yamaguchi (Boston College) to reflect on Stéphane Mallarmé's fleeting glimpse of a world without poetry, offering the following citation from "Crise de vers" (1897) as a prompt: "Seulement, sachons n'existerait pas le vers: lui, philosophiquement rémunère le défaut des langues, complément supérieur." They composed their initial essays without knowing the content of their interlocutor's essay; the ensuing exchange, by e-mail, took place in the order presented below.If, in his earlier writings, Mallarmé often turns to the preposition "après," his later writings are frequently inflected by the modifier ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Jeune fille qui ne pleure pas son oiseau mort": Female Puberty in
           Stendhal's Lamiel

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      Abstract: At the midway point of the version of Stendhal's Lamiel, written in October–December 1840, after the eponymous heroine has begun working in the Duchesse de Miossen's castle, Doctor Sansfin makes a remarkable proposal. Once a week he will behead a small bird and soak a sponge with its blood for Lamiel to use to simulate haemoptysis, the coughing up of bloodied sputum synonymous with tuberculosis, an illness from which Lamiel suffers only slightly. The doctor's unorthodox approach, his proposed "meurtre horrible" (1013) points towards the peculiar metaphoric signification of the scene, of which this article will carry out a sustained close reading, drawing on a range of intertexts from the eighteenth and nineteenth ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Romanesque Commitments: Amélie Bosquet Between Popular Aesthetics and
           Novel(la) Theory

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      Abstract: In September 1856, the writer and editor Maxime Du Camp opted to rearrange the upcoming issues of his Revue de Paris. For the October volume, he had initially planned to publish a novella by a provincial writer, Amélie Bosquet. Born in Rouen in 1815 as the illegitimate daughter of a textile worker, later adopted by a stepfather and absorbed into the petty bourgeoisie, Bosquet would eventually gain recognition in her native city. Beginning in the 1830s, Bosquet helped to launch the republican Revue de Rouen, wrote several works of fiction, and edited a volume of proletarian poetry; in 1845, she compiled and annotated La Normandie romanesque et merveilleuse, a collection of fairy tales, legends, and myths. The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Baudelaire, Vischer, and Self-Transforming Empathy

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      Abstract: It has been argued in recent years that the philosophical and cultural turn away from Romantic sympathy towards Modernist empathy in the latter part of the nineteenth century ushered in a new way of configuring the relationship between subject and world.1 Where then does the work of the poet Charles Baudelaire, a key transitional figure between Romanticism and Modernism, sit within this sympathy/empathy paradigm' In other words, how does Baudelaire's writing configure the human subject's connections with non-human objects'The treatment of empathy in Baudelaire's work has often been written about in the context of relations with other people, where it appears to mean different things to different commentators: ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "C'est le pays de la toilette": Fashion and Space in Flaubert's Le
           Château des cœurs

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      Abstract: Emma Bovary, the eponymous protagonist of Gustave Flaubert's 1856 novel Madame Bovary, desperately yearns to be in Paris. Unable to visit the French capital, she must instead settle for an imaginary experience of the city while remaining in her Norman town of Yonville. With the aid of a newly purchased map and her knowledge of Parisian fashion journals, Emma pieces together a fictional encounter with the city:du bout de son doigt, sur la carte, elle faisait des courses dans la capitale. Elle remontait les boulevards, s'arrêtant à chaque angle, entre les lignes des rues, devant les carrés blancs qui figurent les maisons. Les yeux fatigués à la fin, elle fermait ses paupières, et elle voyait dans les ténèbres se ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Novel in a Corset: Maupassant, Monsters, and the Short Story

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      Abstract: The debate about Guy de Maupassant in the early 1880s revolved around questions of talent and taste. Maupassant had been taken to task by high-profile literati like Albert Wolff, who claimed that his short stories, despite their virtuosity, degraded literary culture with crude tales of prostitution and alcoholism. In a column in Le Figaro, Wolff considers Maupassant's literary output since the 1880 publication of Boule de suif, the masterpiece novella that provided Maupassant the publishing opportunities and financial means he needed to devote himself entirely to writing. While he expresses reservations about the suitability of the tale for young readers, Wolff nevertheless acknowledges the literary merit of Boule ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • La concision exemplaire de la nouvelle' Réflexions sur l'art du
           récit bref chez Maupassant

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      Abstract: La présence du point d'interrogation à la fin du titre de cette étude pourrait étonner plus d'un lecteur. Le genre de la nouvelle semble par définition conditionner une certaine économie du récit, circonstance qui semble parfaitement applicable à Maupassant: la composition de "Boule de suif" témoignerait ainsi selon Fonyi de cette "concision exemplaire." De plus, Maupassant pratique avant tout la variante brève du genre.1 Dans l'édition de la Pléiade, sur les quelque trois cents récits de sa plume, seule une quarantaine dépasse les dix pages; la nouvelle-type n'y occupe que six ou sept pages, ce qui équivaut à seulement 2000 mots environ.2 En outre, par son art nouvellistique, Maupassant joue fréquemment sur ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-10-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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