Publisher: U of Nebraska   (Total: 32 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 32 of 32 Journals sorted alphabetically
American Indian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anthropological Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18, SJR: 0.177, CiteScore: 0)
Collaborative Anthropologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
French Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Frontiers : A J. of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gettysburg Magazine     Full-text available via subscription  
Great Plains Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Great Plains Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.189, CiteScore: 0)
J. of Austrian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Black Sexuality and Relationships     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
J. of Literature and Trauma Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
J. of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
J. of Women in Educational Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Legacy : A J. of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.128, CiteScore: 0)
MANTER : J. of Parasite Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle West Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Native South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NINE : A J. of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nineteenth-Century French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Nouvelles Études Francophones     Full-text available via subscription  
Prairie Schooner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Qui Parle : Critical Humanities and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Resilience : A J. of the Environmental Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
StoryWorlds : A J. of Narrative Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in American Indian Literatures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.14, CiteScore: 0)
Studies in American Naturalism     Full-text available via subscription  
symploke     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Undecidable Unconscious : A J. of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Western American Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.114, CiteScore: 0)
Women and Music: A J. of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Similar Journals
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Legacy : A Journal of American Women Writers
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.128
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0748-4321 - ISSN (Online) 1534-0643
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • Freeman's Object Lessons

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      Abstract: Weep for what little things could make them glad.In Mary Wilkins Freeman's "A New England Nun" (1891), the story of a woman who might get married but does not, narrative progress is all but absent.1 Instead, it is a text devoted to explaining, laboriously and in advance, how the reader should understand the one turn it eventually takes. Faced at last with the real prospect of marriage, Louisa Ellis cannot bring herself to abandon her independent domestic routine; during the many years apart from her fiancé, Joe Daggett, "Louisa's feet had turned into a path . . . so straight and unswerving that it could only meet a check at the grave, and so narrow that there was no room for any one at her side" (26). Freeman ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Iola Leroy's "Long, Long Ago" Song

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      Abstract: Black literature has long been burdened with an evidentiary task: How should Black people and Black life be portrayed' This concern is born of a historical problem. The idea that "the command of written English virtually separated the African from the Afro-American, the slave from the ex-slave, titled property from fledgling human being" influenced the liberatory urgency of nineteenth-century African American writing emerging amidst and in the wake of American chattel slavery (Gates 4).1Black writers faced tremendous pressure. As Henry Louis Gates Jr. writes, "If blacks were to signify as full members of the Western human community, they would have to do so in their writings" (6). Literacy was both a technology and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A Queer Semblance of a Baby": Alice Dunbar-Nelson's Queer Futurity

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      Abstract: In Alice Dunbar-Nelson's short story "His Heart's Desire," Andy is a five-year-old boy. The narrator explains that "boys don't tell their hearts out, and he would have died rather than confess his weakness for the world to laugh at and jibe and jeer. For Andy wanted a doll" (416). Because he will not ask for one, Andy makes a rag doll instead. We read that he "had gathered together material . . . had fashioned it into a queer semblance of a baby" (416). Dunbar-Nelson's short manuscript story (composed around 1900 and first published in a 2016 issue of Legacy) is a story about childhood, doll play, and racialized desire. Here we see a young boy who wants a doll but understands the cultural norms that would prevent ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Queering the Marriage Plot: Gale Wilhelm's Middlebrow Modernism

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      Abstract: Most readers of this essay will likely not have heard of Gale Wilhelm. Those who have will likely have heard something like this: Wilhelm wrote two important and distinctly modernist novels that unapologetically presented lesbian sexuality as both natural and good and then followed those with other, non-lesbian novels that were disappointing.1 Most discussions of Wilhelm omit her late novels entirely.2 A few emphasize that disappointment, as Harriette Andreadis does in her entry on Wilhelm in Gay and Lesbian Literary Heritage: Wilhelm's "final three books abandon the subject of lesbian sexuality," Andreadis explains, and "have been described as mannered and precious"; making her own position evident, she adds that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Adelaide Brent Letters: Queer Care in Medical Correspondence

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      Abstract: Nine years before the publication of Thomas DeQuincy's Confessions of an English Opium Eater (1821), a young woman named Adelaide Brent wrote a letter about her opium habit. The letter, dated 1 December and likely composed in Washington, DC, in 1812, was meant for Dr. Benjamin Rush, the most famous physician in the early United States. Brent's family and physicians had written to Rush detailing her opium use and questioning her sanity, so she sent her own letter to counteract their reports. This Feature introduces four letters from Rush's incoming correspondence, all of which concern Brent's health. During his long career as a physician in Philadelphia, Rush received letters from patients and physicians all over ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Not Feeling Right: Queer Encounters with American Women's Writing

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      Abstract: Queer theory arrived on the critical scene in part as an outgrowth of feminist critique, but how has its anti-identitarian approach to gender and sexuality advanced the study of US women's writing' First, the deconstructive project of queer criticism unseats binaristic understandings of gender, productively destabilizing the very category of female authorship on which this field has largely depended. Moreover, queer theory reveals gender and sex norms to be culturally produced and historically contingent, an especially vital perspective from which to read nineteenth-century women's writing, a body of work that offers a veritable index and pedagogy of normativity. After all, isn't Harriet Beecher Stowe's breathless ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Dr. Annette Kolodny, 1941–2019

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      Abstract: I was first inspired by Dr. Annette Kolodny upon reading her influential 1980 essay "Dancing through the Minefield: Some Observations on the Theory, Practice, and Politics of a Feminist Literary Criticism" as a first-year master's student in a feminist theory seminar. In preparation for writing this tribute to Annette, who would later co-direct my PhD dissertation, I reread the essay, again turning to its reprint appearance in the same well-worn edition of Feminisms: An Anthology of Literary Theory and Criticism we were assigned in that seminar and that I still reach for today when I teach feminist critical approaches. Seeing my annotations and marginalia from twenty years ago brought me back to my early journey as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Writings of Elizabeth Webb: A Quaker Missionary in America,
           1697–1726 ed. by Rachel Cope and Zachary McLeod Hutchins (review)

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      Abstract: Scholars of Quaker and religious studies, early modern transatlantic history, colonial American literature, and women's life writing and literary history will welcome The Writings of Elizabeth Webb: A Quaker Missionary in America, 1697–1726, the first volume to collect this once well-known Quaker minister's published and unpublished works. Webb (1663–1727) was one of a few hundred eighteenth-century women traveling ministers in the Society of Friends. In colonial America and England, Webb preached in religious gatherings, Quaker meetings, town halls, country barns, and remote forests. Webb is unique in her prolific output, which circulated in manuscript and was excerpted in nineteenth-century Quaker publications. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Teaching with Digital Humanities: Tools and Methods for Nineteenth-Century
           American Literature ed. by Jennifer Travis and Jessica DeSpain, and: Words
           Used in Characterization: English-Language Fiction, 1800–2007 by Ted
           Underwood and Nikolaus N. Parulian (review)

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      Abstract: As an Americanist who specializes in digital humanities, I expected Teaching with Digital Humanities to expand my digital humanities (DH) toolkit and fuel future revisions of my "Introduction to Digital Humanities" syllabus. It did not disappoint. However, I was surprised that the collection also inspired me to revamp my fairly traditional "Introduction to Women's Writing" syllabus. As Travis and DeSpain note, Teaching with Digital Humanities brings about "an important shift in emphasis to DH pedagogy, moving from a focus on digital humanities writ large to how particular DH methods and practices operate at a field-specific level" ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lydia Sigourney: Critical Essays and Cultural Views ed. by Mary Louise
           Kete and Elizabeth Petrino (review)

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      Abstract: This book is as necessary as it claims to be. The essays contribute to the ongoing reevaluation of Lydia Sigourney in ways that nothing else has. It is also interesting. Every essay has some compelling information, ideas, and/or questions. Many pieces begin with nano-scale close readings, then move to larger cultural concerns without grinding gears. Even those who have little interest in Sigourney will find the methods of these essays useful.Our improved understanding of Sigourney is part of the larger critical process that brought so many nineteenth-century female poets out of patronizing obscurity. This effort includes (but is not limited to) the series of thoughtful essays (beginning with Nina Baym's 1990 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Adulthood and Other Fictions: American Literature and the Unmaking of Age
           by Sari Edelstein (review)

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      Abstract: Although age studies came to literary scholarship later than other identity-based frameworks, it now represents an established subfield with its own journal—Age Culture Humanities—and an expanding body of research on how life stages have been imagined and inhabited over time. Scholars of old age including Devony Looser, Valerie Lipscomb, and Lawrence Switzky have built on Kathleen Woodward's early work, while Kay Heath and Anne Wyatt-Brown have shed light on middle age. Interest in childhood and adolescence continues to grow—especially among early Americanists—thanks to pioneering work from Karen Sánchez-Eppler, Anna Mae Duane, Robin Bernstein, and Sarah Chinn. While examining particular age constructs, however ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fictions of Western American Domesticity: Indian, Mexican, and Anglo Women
           in Print Culture, 1850–1950 by Amanda J. Zink (review)

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      Abstract: In Fictions of Western American Domesticity, Amanda J. Zink has tackled an ambitious project of recovery and recasting in which she skillfully juxtaposes an impressive archive of written and visual materials. The outcome is a multi-pronged argument concerning the ideology of domesticity that establishes its throughput well into the twentieth century. By introducing the photographs, advertisements, cookbooks, keepsakes, and ephemera of domesticity alongside a diverse array of written texts by Mexican American, Native American, and white women, Zink effectively establishes how domestic narratives—in whatever their form—differ in function depending on who produces and receives them.The book is organized around ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Progressivism's Aesthetic Education: The Bildungsroman and the American
           School, 1890–1920 by Jesse Raber (review)

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      Abstract: At the heart of Progressive Era social and political reforms was a vision of unified national purpose. America was no longer a frontier country of individual, autonomous citizens but an increasingly complex industrial society requiring a national vision in which disparate individuals willingly participated in social action for the public's economic, social, and political interests and in mutually beneficial "reciprocal relations" (31). Social action progressives of the time called for education that prepared citizens for this visionary reformed society. Jesse Raber's ambitious book investigates how Americans envisioned learning about themselves and their place in such a society, and how this Bildung could be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Artificial Color: Modern Food and Racial Fictions by Catherine Keyser
           (review)

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      Abstract: Catherine Keyser's impeccable and exciting study Artificial Color: Modern Food and Racial Fictions considers the making of race and identity in modernist American fiction by women and men writers of the 1920s and 1930s through the technologies of modern food systems and the troping of food and bodies, positing this making as both "artificial color" and "culinary concoction" (14). While the representation and thematic of food has certainly preoccupied scholars of modernist literature—think of the sustained attention to Gertrude Stein's Tender Buttons or the boeuf en daube served forth in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse—newer approaches to food studies have called upon readers to look beyond the table to networks ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Historian's Passing: Reading Nella Larsen's Classic Novel as Social
           and Cultural History ed. by Lynn Domina (review)

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      Abstract: Accessible, low-cost editions of previously out-of-print texts are essential to the recovery of women writers whose work was lost or deemed inferior by critics in other eras. The current availability of Nella Larsen's novels and short stories, along with two meticulously researched biographies, makes clear that Larsen is a prime example of how a woman writer who once languished in obscurity can become canonized because of the recovery efforts of African American activists and feminist literary critics, which began in the 1970s and 1980s. In addition to a wealth of scholarship on the author, her work, and her female Harlem Renaissance contemporaries, a new edition of Passing, one of Larsen's psychologically ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women's Cross-Cultural
           Teaching by Sarah Ruffing Robbins (review)

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      Abstract: I will never have a chance to spend time with the women who attended Spelman College in its very first years, or to visit Hull House right when it was opening, or to meet the Native American students who found ways to survive together as they resisted the boarding schools. But reading Learning Legacies: Archive to Action through Women's Cross-Cultural Teaching, I felt connected to these remarkable people and to the scholars who have helped preserve and explain their archives. For me, the best thing about reading the book was that sense of connection. It felt like it was personally addressed to me. Robbins explicitly addresses her work to "scholar-teachers committed to the public humanities" who search for "a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Introduction: American Women's Writing and the Genealogies of Queer
           Thought

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      Abstract: Seminal: how ideas are assumed to originate from male bodies.This Legacy special issue addresses a key contradiction in the development of contemporary American queer theory: on the one hand, queer intellectual history has clear roots in feminism and women's writing; on the other hand, many of queer theory's most defining arguments draw inductively from narrow archives that occlude women's embodiment, history, desires, and experiences. The issue engages this contradiction by bringing queer thought into dialogue with American women's writing from the eighteenth through the early twentieth centuries. How does our understanding of queer theory and its history change when examined through a longer and more diverse ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Producing Intimacy: Queer Attachments in Workingwomen's Writings

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      Abstract: Mr. Lee has here turn to me he has been expecate his Affec towards me but I act so indifferently that he dont know what to make of me I like him as a Friend and nothing more then that but Dear Rebecca if I should ever see a good chance I will take it for I'm tired roving around this unfriendly world . . . I do believe by Mr. Lee action that he truly loves me I cannot reciprocate his love. . . . [I]f I only exchange this pen and paper for a seat by my loving Rebecca it is possible and must be thus separation how long how long God knows and he only my heart is breaking for you and only you good night from your sweet Affec.AddieFor nearly a decade after meeting, Addie Brown and Rebecca Primus, African American women ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Editor's Note

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      Abstract: Why, with notable exceptions like Patricia Highsmith and Gertrude Stein (an author whose work I am desperate to publish about in Legacy; tell your friends), has the emerging American queer canon centered on male authors; and why has the discourse on American queer writing been largely defined by approaches to male writers and their work' To borrow from "Disturbing the Peace: What Happens to American Studies If You Put African American Studies at the Center'," Mary Helen Washington's presidential address to the American Studies Association in 1997, what happens to queer thought when you put American women writers at its center' What happens to American literary studies when you put women writing queerly at its ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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