Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.299
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0813-0531 - ISSN (Online) 1447-4328
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Community respite service utilisation and dementia
           care: A review of literature
    • Abstract: Wakefield, Cherrie Jane
      "Objective: To explore the detrimental effects of caregiver burden, in relation to caregivers of people with dementia, and highlight caregiver burden as an emerging healthcare problem. The purpose of the literature review is to inform healthcare professionals of the barriers to utilising community respite services by caregivers and discuss the significance of respite services to caregivers of people with dementia.

      Background: Dementia is one of the leading contributors to burden of disease and disability. Increasing numbers of spouse and family caregivers play crucial roles in providing support for people with dementia enabling them to continue living in the community. Caregiver burden occurs in individuals when the demands of caregiving exceeds their resources. Community respite services are valuable resources which provide individuals a break from their caregiving role.

      Study design and methods: The literature review will draw attention to caregivers of people living with dementia in the community and their utilisation of community respite services. The target audience are healthcare professionals in multidisciplinary community teams composed of clinicians, educators, managers, administrators, and researchers. Seven online databases were accessed to search the following terms of caregiver burden, dementia care and community respite along with specific inclusion criteria. As a result, 26 scholarly articles were reviewed for the purpose of this literature review.

      Results: There are several community respite services, which help minimise the incidence of caregiver burden, available to caregivers of people with dementia but there are many barriers which affect utilisation of these services. Some of these barriers include accessibility of information on respite services, flexibility and affordability of respite services, and the caregiver's inability to recognise their need for respite services.

      Discussion: Healthcare professionals could assist caregivers to better utilise community respite services by performing through assessments on both people with dementia and their caregivers. As a result of these assessments, potential barriers to community respite service utilisation could be identified.

      Conclusion: Community respite services are essential to minimising the incidence of caregiver burden. Healthcare professionals should recognise these barriers to respite service use and implement strategies to increase service utilisation.

      Implications for research, policy, and practice: Further research is required to investigate the specific types of respite service caregivers need and which respite services have been most successful for caregivers. This knowledge can assist healthcare professionals in improving utilisation rates of respite services and inform health systems on where to focus the funding of their community resources for people with dementia and their caregivers."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Skin cancer in regional, rural and remote Australia;
           opportunities for service improvement through technological advances and
           interdisciplinary care
    • Abstract: Adelson, Pamela; Eckert, Marion
      Age standardised skin cancers (melanoma and non-melanoma) continue to increase in Australia, although they are stabilising for those under age 40. People living in regional, rural and remote Australia have higher rates of skin cancer and challenges accessing care. Better targeting of skin protection measures and improved opportunistic screening have been promoted as ways to improve care for these populations as have increased use of information technology and upskilling of primary healthcare nurses. The Australian Government supports that Optimal Cancer Care Pathways for skin cancers be used as a key resource in exploring best practice models of care for skin cancer patients both for the development of digital platforms and face to face multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). Better use of technology has been a core recommendation of national health and skin cancer organisations for improving prevention and early detection of skin cancer. Skin cancers, as a primarily visual diagnosis are considered one of the prime areas for technological health interventions. The harnessing of artificial intelligence (AI) technology as a tool for early detection and disease management of skin cancers has great potential to reduce the burden of healthcare costs to the regional, rural and remote community and improve health outcomes.

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Nurses' documentation of falls prevention in a patient
           centred care plan in a medical ward
    • Abstract: Yasan, Caglayan; Burton, Trish; Tracey, Mark
      "Objective: To evaluate the consistency of nurses' documentation in the falls prevention assessment tool, and to ascertain whether patients identified as high risk of falling had falls preventative strategies implemented.

      Background: Falls are one of the leading causes of adverse events for patients in the hospital setting. The current practice of implementing falls prevention strategies for patients has not been able to be sustained, which remains a challenge for healthcare providers. Among the falls prevention strategies, falls risk assessment tools have been identified as a crucial element in falls prevention so as the number of falls are minimised.

      Study design and methods: A retrospective chart audit, with the auditing of falls assessment documentation on the Patient Centred Care Plan.

      Results: The Patient Centred Care Plan audit revealed that 60.8% of patients (n=508) were identified as high risk of falls by the principal investigator. For the cohort of patients identified by the nurses as having a high risk of falling (53.4%), 53.7% of patients had falls prevention strategies implemented, and only 17.5% of patients were engaged with their falls prevention plan. The strategies that were documented by the nurses on the care plan for the high-risk cohort were not implemented for 16.8% of the patients, and 29.5% of high risk of falls patients did not have documentation on the plan indicating their falls status.

      Discussion: The findings show that there is a significant gap in the identification of high falls risk patients and the documentation and implementation of falls prevention strategies, between nursing staff records on the Patient Centred Care Plan and the audit conducted by the principal investigator for patients who are identified as high falls risk. As part of the audit patient engagement in their falls prevention plan revealed that patients were not informed of their falls risk status by the nursing staff.

      Conclusion: The outcome from this audit signifies that not all high falls risk patients were identified as a high falls risk, and most of the high falls risk patients were not engaged in their falls prevention plan.

      Implications for research, policy and practice: Understanding the current practices of falls prevention and raising nursing staff awareness of variance in the implementation of falls prevention strategies will improve the quality, efficiency of healthcare and patient safety."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Registered nurses as role models for healthy
           lifestyles
    • Abstract: Heidke, Penny; Madsen, Wendy L; Langham, Erika M
      "Objective: The aim of this paper is to report on registered nurses' adherence to current Australian health behaviour recommendations. Barriers and facilitators to healthy lifestyles, and their attitudes towards being role models and promoting healthy lifestyles to their patients.

      Background: It is widely accepted that a healthy diet, limiting alcohol consumption, abstinence from smoking and regular physical exercise are important components of healthy lifestyles and play a significant role in preventing chronic diseases. Nurses are well situated to contribute to providing health and patient education regarding modifiable health risk factors, however their own adherence to health behaviours may impact this.

      Study design and methods: The research is a mixed methods study of 123 registered nurses from both public and private organisations in regional Queensland. Data for this paper were generated from an online survey which is the first of two phases in the broader study.

      Results: Four health risk factors were examined; diet, smoking, physical exercise and alcohol consumption. BMI was also calculated and considered as a fifth risk factor. Of this sample, 13% of participants met the guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake, 5.2% smoked, and only 24.2% exercised enough to be classed sufficiently active for their health. Of the 93.62% of participants whom consumed alcohol, 69.3% consumed more than two standard drinks/day. The most common barriers to adhering to healthy lifestyles were shift work, long working hours and family commitments.

      Conclusion: Many nurses are not adhering to healthy lifestyle recommendations. It is recommended that the health and wellbeing of our health professionals, especially nurses be considered. Providing support and resources to enable them to care for themselves, may in turn allow them to better care for patients.

      Implications for research, policy, and practice: Research is needed into strategies to enable registered nurses' better work/life balance. To make a real difference to health outcomes, nurses own health and health education needs to be made a priority that is supported and implemented at multiple points: by policymakers, within nursing practice, nursing curriculum, and in healthcare institutions. Nurses need to be supported to provide health education to their patients with better resources, education, and time allocation. Future research should include studies conducted in different regions or ideally a large nationally representative sample."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - The organisational socialisation of new graduate
           nurses and midwives within three months of their entrance into the health
           workforce
    • Abstract: Ohr, Se Ok; Holm, Doreen; Giles, Michelle
      "Objective: To investigate if the current onboarding process influences the organisational socialisation of new graduate nurses and midwives into the workforce.

      Background: Positive organisational socialisation experience for new graduate nurses and midwives during their entry into the healthcare environment is an important contributor when building an organisation's ability to increase workforce capacity. However, few studies have investigated the onboarding processes to promote their organisational socialisation.

      Study design and methods: A quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study design was conducted at a large Local Health District that provides health services to almost one million people in metropolitan, rural and remote locations. Participants were 170 new graduate nurses and midwives who commenced their transition program at 21 acute and community healthcare settings within the District in January and February 2017. Data was collected through a document review of current onboarding processes and by an online survey of new graduates. Data sets were analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis.

      Results: The survey response rate was 47% (n= 80). Findings highlight that the onboarding process provided by the District was useful for the new graduate's transition into the workplace. The findings also indicated that the onboarding process was inconsistent across different contexts in the District and required more relevant and practical components. In addition, the current onboarding did not adequately provide strategies to build relationships for new graduates within their work environments.

      Discussion: This study provides valuable insight into current onboarding practices in both metropolitan and rural contexts and highlights gaps in this process across the health District. The findings of the study provide insights and future direction for improvements by addressing the inconsistency in the structure and content of orientation programs. The need for more accessible and consistent organisational information and a more structured framework for the organisational wide onboarding process was also identified.

      Conclusion: Re-design of an onboarding process that is relevant, consistent and enhances relationship-building is imperative to meeting both the professional and organisational needs of new graduate nurses and midwives.

      Implications for research, policy and practice: The findings of the study imply a need to streamline the onboarding process to provide greater opportunity for new graduates to develop and sustain professional networks and associated workplace relationships regardless of their locations. They also signal a need to develop policies practice and future research to assist a better organisational socialisation, in particular, the allocation of resources, better utilisation of time spent on education and workplace support in the transition into their clinical workplaces."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - COVID-19 - nurses and midwives impact on global
           security
    • Abstract: Eckert, Marion
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:27 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Roles of rural and remote registered nurses in
           Australia: An integrative review
    • Abstract: Muirhead, Susan; Birks, Melanie
      "Objective: The aim of this review is to explore the multifaceted roles of registered nursing practice in rural and remote areas of Australia.

      Background: People in rural and remote Australia have less access to healthcare than their metropolitan counterparts. They are also burdened with higher rates of chronic disease and premature mortality. These areas also have less doctors and allied health professionals than metropolitan areas, with the core workforce being registered nurses. One strategy to address the health workforce disparities, is to promote registered nurses to work to their full scope and in advanced generalist roles. An understanding of the current roles of the registered nurse is therefore required to assist in determining how their scope could be extended, and to inform appropriate educational planning.

      Study design and methods: An integrative review of literature was used to obtain articles from online databases relevant to nursing from 1995 to 2017. Data was quality appraised, extracted, and thematically analysed.

      Results: Registered nurses in rural and remote Australia work in diverse contexts that have a major influence on the roles they undertake. They are already required to be multi-skilled and to practice at an advanced level, including undertaking some aspects of the health professional role traditionally the domain of medical practitioners. These registered nurses often feel unprepared for the breadth and complexity of this role.

      Discussion: To enable registered nurses to be adequately prepared for rural and remote practice, educational programs need to be flexible, accessible and affordable. The registered nurse's existing experience and expertise should be recognised, and educational pathways structured to enable the nurse to expand their practice according to the context in which they work and the needs of the community.

      Conclusion: Registered nurses in rural and remote areas function as advanced generalists. Greater understanding these roles is necessary to inform the development of 'fit for purpose' educational models. Implications for research, policy and practice: Future research is needed to focus on evaluation of existing models of rural and remote nursing practice and in particular the role of the nurse as doctor substitute. The findings of this study highlight the potential expanded contribution of registered nurses in these areas, which is an important factor for consideration by policy makers. In practice, supportive frameworks are required to ensure registered nurses are able to function to their full capacity in their unique context."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Patients' experiences of natalizumab treatment in a
           home environment: A qualitative study
    • Abstract: Juaton, Mahasen; Cusack, Lynette; Schultz, Tim
      "Objective: This study's objective was to understand the experiences and perspectives of people with multiple sclerosis who received infusions of natalizumab at home instead of the tertiary hospital day unit.

      Background: Continually returning once every four weeks to an out-patient department to complete an intravenous infusion can be taxing for chronic disease patients. In Australia, acute care patients may be offered hospital in the home service. In-home services are delivered by highly qualified, trained nurses following the infusion protocols similar to that of the hospital. However, this service is not yet offered for chronic disease patients, such as those with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

      Study design and methods: An exploratorydescriptive study that incorporated face-to-face audio-recorded interviews of people with multiple sclerosis was undertaken as part of a larger study that trialled delivery of natalizumab at home instead of the hospital day unit. The interviews were conducted at the Ambulatory Care Day Unit of a hospital following a period of three natalizumab infusions in participants' homes. Twelve people with multiple sclerosis (two males and 10 females) aged between 18-56 years participated in this study.

      Results: A main theme of 'patient-centredness' that describes the positive contribution of having patients at the centre of care when delivering home infusions emerged. This encompassed three subthemes: 'in the comfort of their own home', 'convenience for patients and their families' and 'saving time and money'. Patient-centred care was an important part of the model of care because it provided flexibility for the participants in managing their home and work-life commitments.

      Discussion: Although home infusion therapy requires a healthcare team approach, this study's findings demonstrated that delivering patient-centred home infusions provided satisfaction for people with multiple sclerosis. This enabled natalizumab to be delivered at patients' preferred time in the convenience of their own home.

      Conclusion: If models of care are to be truly patientcentred, the convenience of the location of the delivery of safe treatment must be a consideration into the future design of services for those with long term health issues such as multiple sclerosis. Implications for research, policy, and practice: Patients should play a role in the planning of their care and infusion nurses should be flexible in negotiating and delivering appropriate care. Future research could consider the experiences of the home infusion team."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - A quality improvement pilot to initiate treatment
           summaries and survivorship care plans in oncology services in South
           Australia
    • Abstract: Corsini, Nadia; Hislop, Chantelle C; Doherty, Tracey N; Eckert, Marion C; Cameron, Kate; Fitzgerald, Michael K; Bessen, Taryn; Christensen, Chris; Loft, Nicole; Turpin, Kate H; Poprawski, Dagmara M; Koczwara, Bogda
      "Aim: To review, test and refine standardised tools for nurses to initiate treatment summaries and care plans, and identify barriers and enablers to providing them.

      Background: This paper reports on a pilot study informed by the development of a Survivorship Framework in South Australia.

      Methods: Expression of interest was sought for adult medical oncology services to pilot standardised tools within existing services and resources. A quality improvement approach was used over three months with nurse practitioners and nurse practitioner candidates to obtain feedback, refine tools and resources, and identify barriers and enablers. Quantitative and qualitative data was recorded at each site using spreadsheets, at fortnightly meetings, and at a final debriefing. Content analysis was used to identify key themes in the context of barriers and enablers.

      Findings: Four medical oncology clinics in South Australia participated (three metropolitan, one regional). Forty-three consultations were delivered at three sites. Barriers included time to complete documentation, perceived knowledge and skills, re-orientation of clinics and referral pathways, competing service priorities and lack of administrative support. Enablers included interrelationships within and between pilot teams, supporting resources, and increased familiarity with tools.

      Discussion and conclusion: There is potential for nurses to initiate treatment summaries and care plans in the treatment setting with the use of standardised tools. Further refinements are needed to make the process less time burdensome, additional specialised training is needed to improve confidence of nurses to work in a wellness model, and numerous system challenges need to be overcome to improve overall feasibility of using standardised tools to provide survivorship support to patients. Lack of systems to populate information, and lack of referral processes to support survivorship discussions with patients are likely to limit the initiation of survivorship care in treatment settings in South Australia. Further nurse-led development of tools for treatment summaries and care plans should occur in parallel with translational research designed to address system challenges."

      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - 2020 - a National Nursing Strategy: It's time
    • Abstract: White, Jill
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Relaunching the Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing
           (AJAN)
    • Abstract: Butler, Annie; Buchan, James; Peters, Micah DJ
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2020 23:32:00 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - A national survey of nurses who care for people with
           intellectual and developmental disability
    • Abstract: Wilson, Nathan J; Collison, James; Feighan, Sarah J; Howie, Virginia; Whitehead, Lisa; Wiese, Michele; O'Reilly, Kate; Jaques, Hayden; Lewis, Peter
      Objective: To describe the roles that Australian nurses play, the breadth of skills that they deploy, and the range of contexts in which they practice.

      Study design and methods: This cross-sectional study used a descriptive survey where data were collected online using Qualtrics. Survey respondents were nurses whose primary role was caring for people with intellectual and developmental disability. In addition to demographic data, the main outcome measures were: nursing roles, practice and context.

      Results: Complete responses were collected from 101 nurses; 78 females and 22 males completed the survey, the majority of whom (n=70) were from New South Wales. The major focus of care was direct assessment and care, followed by supervision of support workers, education, and advocacy for people with intellectual and developmental disability. Physical healthcare was consistent across body systems, as it was for all adaptive behaviour domains. Support for mental illness was more likely to be for depression and anxiety. Nurses liaise with a multitude of health and social agencies as part of their nursing practice.

      Discussion: This is the first study to capture the roles, practice and contexts of these Australian nurses. Nurses caring for people with IDD play a variety of roles and engage in a vast array of practice related to the physical and social needs of people with intellectual and developmental disability across the whole of the lifespan and in multiple, disparate contexts.

      Conclusion: It is important for the ongoing care of people with intellectual and developmental disability that the value added by this nursing workforce not be overlooked as disability and health policies evolve.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:43:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - COVID-19 and residential aged care in Australia
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:43:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - The effects of a hospital-based perinatal
           breastfeeding program on exclusive breastfeeding in Taiwan: A
           quasi-experimental study
    • Abstract: Yeh, Ching-Hsueh; Ng Yang, Ya-Pi; Lee, Bih-O
      Objective: To examine if a perinatal breastfeeding program would improve the exclusive breastfeeding rate at a baby-friendly hospital.

      Background: The Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding and Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative have been widely used to improve breastfeeding outcomes worldwide. A hospital-based multi-strategy intervention may provide an opportunity to increase breastfeeding in different countries.

      Study design and methods: The study used a quasi-experimental design. Data was collected in a Baby Friendly hospital. A total of 60 mother-infant dyads were included. The experimental group took part in the multi-component perinatal breastfeeding program, while the control group received routine care. The multi-strategy program included prenatal breastfeeding education, birth kangaroo mother care (skin-to-skin contact and non-separation practices) at first breastfeed, continuous 24-hour roomingin, ongoing kangaroo mother care with breastfeeding on cue, and hospital support visits. The exclusive breastfeeding rate was measured at hospital discharge, and one-month postpartum.

      Results: The mothers who participated in the intervention had a greater exclusive breastfeeding rate at hospital discharge and one month postpartum than those in the control group. In the experimental group, 90% of the infants completed the first feeding within two hours after birth. At discharge, 93.3% of the mothers in the experimental group and 53.3% in the control group were exclusively breastfeeding. At one month postpartum, 83.3% of the mothers in the experimental group and 36.7% in the control group were still exclusively breastfeeding.

      Discussion: The intervention program used in the current study is different to previous studies. The current intervention not only included prenatal education and postpartum support, but also included birth kangaroo mother care at first breastfeed and ongoing kangaroo mother care with breastfeeding on cue. Breastfeeding should be promoted through perinatal comprehensive clinical and social support starting in the prenatal period and continuing through intrapartal, postpartum, and follow-up periods.

      Conclusion: This study was the first study to use a hospital-based multi-strategy intervention including the non-separation of mother-infant dyads and other breastfeeding support for mothers in Taiwan. The program was associated with a significant improvement in the exclusive breastfeeding rate at one month postpartum.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:43:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Recognition for registered nurses supporting students
           on clinical placement: A grounded theory study
    • Abstract: Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc
      Objective: This study examined registered nurses' perspectives of being supportive of nursing students and providing them with learning opportunities when on clinical placements.

      Background: In Australia, as part of their three-year Bachelors degree, undergraduate nursing students undertake a minimum of 800 hours of clinical placement. During these clinical placement hours, nursing students are supervised by registered nurses who are required to be supportive of the students and provide them with learning opportunities.

      Study design and methods: This study used a grounded theory approach. In this qualitative study there were fifteen registered nurse participants. Thirteen participants were female participants and two were male. Participants were individually interviewed. Transcripts from these in-depth interviews were analysed using constant comparative analysis.

      Results: The major category, an added extra, emerged from this study. An added extra is about registered nurses' perception that having a student is an added extra to their daily duties. The major category an added extra is informed by three emergent themes. The first theme was time, the second theme was workload and the third theme was wanting recognition.

      Discussion: Registered nurses perceived that their workloads tend not to be taken into consideration when they have nursing students. The literature suggests that nursing students often miss out on learning opportunities when they are on clinical placement because registered nurses do not have additional time to effectively support students' clinical learning.

      Conclusion: Participants in this study believed being supportive of nursing students and providing them with learning opportunities was an added extra to their daily nursing duties. Findings revealed registered nurses want to be recognised for the extra time and effort they dedicate to students' learning.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:43:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Letters to the editors
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:43:05 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 3 - Prehospital interventions to prevent hypothermia in
           trauma patients: A scoping review
    • Abstract: Mota, Mauro; Cunha, Madalena; Santos, Margarida; Santos, Eduardo; Melo, Filipe; Abrantes, Tito; Santa, Ana
      Objective: The aim of this review is to map the prehospital rewarming measures used to prevent hypothermia among trauma victims.

      Background: Hypothermia is responsible for an increase of the mortality and morbidity in trauma victims and its recognition and early treatment are crucial for the victim's haemodynamic stabilisation. Prehospital interventions are particularly important, especially those that target bleeding control, haemodynamic stability, and safe body temperature. Registered nurses may be pivotal to prevention and minimisation of the dangerous effects of hypothermia.

      Study design and methods: A scoping review was used to identify articles from several online databases from 2010 to 2018. Studies in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were included. Two reviewers performed data extractions independently.

      Results: Seven studies were considered eligible for this review: two quantitative research studies, one qualitative research study, and four literature reviews. Rewarming measures can be divided into two main groups: passive rewarming, which includes the use of blankets, positioning the response unit to act as a windbreak, removing the patients' wet clothes, drying the patient's body, and increasing the ambient temperature; and active rewarming which includes the use of heating pads, heated oxygen, warmed intravenous fluids, peritoneal irrigation, arteriovenous rewarming, and haemodialysis.

      Discussion: Active measures reported by the included studies were always used as a complement to the passive measures. Active rewarming produced an increase in core temperature, and passive rewarming was responsible for intrinsic heat-generating mechanisms that will counteract heat loss. Patients receiving passive warming in addition to active warming measures presented a statistically significant increase in body core temperature as well as an improvement in the discomfort caused by cold.

      Conclusion: Rewarming measures seem to be essential for the prevention of hypothermia and to minimise the discomfort felt by the patient. In many countries registered nurses can play important roles in the prehospital context of trauma victim's assistance. Greater understanding of these roles is necessary to the development of better practices.

      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jul 2020 02:43:05 GMT
       
 
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