Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Narrative Therapy & Community Work
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1446-5019
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Issue 2 - What to do at home during times of quarantine: A guidebook for
           adults by children
    • Abstract: Dulwich Centre Foundation
      This guidebook for adults about what to do at home during times of quarantine has been created from the knowledge of children in Turkey and Australia. Initiated by Mehmet Dinc and drafted by David Denborough, it contains sparkling advice from Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australian children and Turkish kids from 6 to 15 years of age.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Death-care practices in the shadow of the pandemic: Can history
           help us'
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Sanders, Cody J
      In the West, there has been a significant shift towards the medicalisation and professionalisation of the end of life, with people more likely to die in hospital than at home, and bodies tended by the funeral industry rather than by loved ones. David Denborough interviewed Reverend Cody J. Sanders about his research on the history of attitudes, practices and understandings in relation to death and dying, particularly our own dead loved ones and community members. They discuss culturally and historically located notions of the 'good death', and how they have been challenged by the COVID-19 crisis in which many people have died alone and conventional funeral practices have been curtailed. This disruption provides an opportunity to imagine new ways of practicing death care, including funerals that take account of the more-than-human world. The interview is followed by responses from practitioners from various cultural and religious experiences.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Lessons from Rwanda
    • Abstract: Freedman, Jill
      "Jill Freedman offers a short reflection on two interviews by Rwandan narrative practitioners:

      Survivors supporting survivors: Recalling the history of the Ibuka counselling team - An interview with Adelite Mukamana and Broadcasting hope and local knowledge during the pandemic lockdown in Rwanda: An interview with Chaste Uwihoreye."

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Broadcasting hope and local knowledge during the pandemic
           lockdown in Rwanda: An interview with Chaste Uwihoreye
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Uwihoreye, Chaste
      In this interview, Chaste Uwihoreye discusses his ongoing commitment to discovering local names for the difficulties people face. This is one step towards establishing solutions that fit their own lives and contexts. He also describes how the circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown in Rwanda have led to further innovations. The lockdown that has affected much of the world coincided with the annual period of commemoration in Rwanda, providing a unique challenge. Normally, April is a time of coming together for Rwandan people and communities as they remember the genocide and support one another. It is also a challenging time for mental health workers. This year, Chaste has had to find a new means to respond to people despite physical separation. Combining a range of narrative practices with communication technology, social media, radio and television to reach people both individually and collectively, Chaste has managed to overcome physical barriers to establish contexts of mutual and community support and connectedness.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Survivors supporting survivors: Recalling the history of the
           Ibuka counselling team
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Mukamana, Adelite
      Adelite Mukamana was in her early twenties when, as a newly qualified psychologist, she found herself in the position of coordinating a team of equally young and inexperienced colleagues to support survivors of the Rwandan genocide. In this interview, Adelite describes the process of finding solutions for complex challenges through necessity, and the steps she and her team developed in order to more effectively support those they worked for and with during these profoundly difficult times. This interview took place in Kigali in February 2020, just days after a reunion event with members of the original Ibuka counselling team. The interviewer was David Denborough.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - You can ask me: A guideline for parents and teachers to answer
           their questions on resilience and digital lives of young people
    • Abstract: Dinc, Mehmet
      Young people's relationships with emerging digital technologies are often presented as a problem. I have been working with young people since 2003, and working with young people and their parents in relation to online activities since 2006. However, the funny thing is I had never listened young people in relation to their experiences, understandings, values and difficulties in the online world. This article describes a group work project to explore young people's understandings of their digital behaviours and relationships, their skills and capabilities in this area, and their experiences of negotiating their digital lives with parents and teachers. I avoided taking an expert position and instead set up a process of coresearch with young people to elicit their insider knowledge.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Integrating narrative practice into alcohol and other drugs
           counselling
    • Abstract: Bosch, Heidi
      This paper reflects on integrating narrative therapy practices into an alcohol and other drugs context. It includes examples of these techniques with clients, highlighting externalising conversations, re-authoring conversations and the migration of identity concept. It also describes how therapeutic letter writing has been used in this context to provide an opportunity for people recovering from addictions to tell and develop their own stories.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - The power to speak: Poetic re-presentation as an ethical
           aesthetic research practice for narrative therapists
    • Abstract: Penwarden, Sarah; Richardson, Laurel
      Narrative therapists may hold a commitment to a person speaking for and making meaning of their own life stories - maintaining a person's speaking rights as the primary meaning maker of their lives. When therapists wish to research counselling practice to gain new insights about the effects of the work, how they handle the speaking of those who participate in their research requires ethical sensitivity. This paper considers the value to narrative therapy practitioners of a qualitative research approach to representing participants' words: poetic re-presentation. Created by American sociologist Laurel Richardson, poetic re-presentation is a research strategy that involves a researcher turning transcripts of participants' words into found poetry. This strategy clearly delineates between the speaking of the participant in a research conversation and the later representation of this speaking on the page in a researcher's writing. As such, this approach seeks to maintain the participant as speaking in excess of the meaning the researcher makes of it: speaking for themselves.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Narrative therapy, poetics and poetry: Revisiting a workshop
    • Abstract: Freedman, Jill; Combs, Gene
      In this short piece, Jill Freedman and Gene Combs describe how they began to write poetic responses as a form of outsider witness practice. Also included is an exercise that they first facilitated at the 2001 Narrative Therapy and Community Work conference in Adelaide.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Developing a thera-poetic practice: Writing rescued speech
           poetry as a literary therapy
    • Abstract: Penwarden, Sarah
      In narrative therapy, documents written by counsellors as part of therapy can assist with the re-authoring of clients' lives in tune with their preferred narratives. Rescued speech poems are an addition to documentation such as letters and certificates. In this thera-poetic practice, a therapist writes poems directly from the client's talk, offering these poems back as a retelling. Drawing on my doctoral study, I explore the writing of rescued speech poems through five practices: listening for the poetic in the ordinary, listening multiply, capturing a client's words, depicting their speaking on the page and offering the poems back. I also discuss elements of power in this approach, and how dialogue between client and therapist facilitates the client's evaluation of the effects of the poetry. This kind of poetic writing can assist with the re-authoring of client's identities through the therapist's tuning of their ears to hear the tones of the poetic in ordinary talk.

      PubDate: Fri, 29 May 2020 02:32:22 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Narrative approaches in a domestic violence hotline
    • Abstract: Lumsden, Ryo
      This paper explores how narrative approaches - externalising, unique-outcomes, re-membering and re-authoring conversations - have been used in work at a domestic violence hotline to assist clients in deconstructing dominant stories and getting in touch with their personal agency. Examples are drawn from experiences in Japan and highlight certain aspects of Japanese culture. However, the focus is on the applicability of narrative techniques to counselling in a single telephone conversation.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Child-centred play therapy and narrative therapy: Consilience
           and synthesis
    • Abstract: Castan, Lani
      This paper explores some of the ways narrative therapy can be combined with child-centred play therapy when working with children, families and other relevant systems. It considers the ways in which these two, seemingly theoretically contradictory philosophies and approaches, has conciliant features. The author draws on her own therapeutic experiences to highlight how these two approaches can work well together, and hopes for a continued discussion and evolution of these ideas with those who work with children and families.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Queer invitations: Fostering connection between queer young
           people and their loved ones
    • Abstract: Maeder, Rosie
      This paper demonstrates ways that queer theory can inform narrative practice, including through practices of invitation, deconstruction, questioning dominant discourses and mobilising nonbinary superpowers. The particular focus of the paper is on counselling conversations with queer and trans young people and their families. However, the paper argues that queer theory, with its critical practices that unsettle hegemonic assumptions and call into question the naturalness of taken-for-granted binaries, can fruitfully inform narrative practice in general. Specific examples of practice are included, such as inviting loved ones to join counselling conversations, using therapeutic letters to foster collaboration, guiding conversations about preferred names and pronouns, and responding to pathologising discourses including in relation to gender dysphoria.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Narrative therapy, Buddhism, Taoism and Chinese medicine: An
           interview with Ming Li
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Li, Ming
      Ming Li is a narrative practitioner in Beijing, China, with an interest in the resonances he sees between some narrative ideas and practices, and those of Buddhism, Taoism and other aspects of Chinese culture, history and medicine. In an interview with David Denborough, Ming draws on multiple domains of knowledge and experience to describe some of the congruencies and points of difference he has noticed, and to explain what draws him to using a narrative practice approach in his own context.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Story variations: Resisting the cultural gaze
    • Abstract: Cao, Sophie Shuang
      In contemporary China, concepts of individualism and collectivism have become entangled in ways that have established a complex array of norms and expectations that can make it difficult to escape a sense of personal failure. This paper describes how engaging with narrative practices of co-researching problems, making discourses visible and deindividualising collective experiences through definitional ceremony enabled two young Chinese men who were living with unwelcome effects of social expectations to reclaim their preferred sense of identity, develop alternative storylines of their lives and make important contributions to the lives of others.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Games, activities and narrative practice: Enabling sparks to
           emerge in conversations with children and young people who have
           experienced hard times
    • Abstract: Nyirinkwaya, Serge
      Drawing on narrative practices - re-authoring conversations, the absent but implicit and collective narrative practices - and on experiential learning models, this paper describes a playful practice to assist children and young people who have experienced hard times to respond to traumatic memories from a safe territory, without requiring them to speak in the first person about their experiences. Games and other activities are used to create a shared experience in which young people employ skills and values. These experiences are used as the basis for a cycle of experiential learning in which children reflect on their experiences and make links with their pasts and futures to support alternative story development and rich acknowledgment of what they give value to and their skills of living and being. In addition to seeking ways to avoid retraumatising, pathologising and stigmatising young people, this process has been developed to offer practitioners an easy to apply and locally resonant way of engaging with children and young people who have been through hard times. It uses local metaphors like making visible young people's capacity to resist and endure (being mudaheranwa), inviting young people to stand together on Akarwa k'amahoro (Peace Island), and enabling mutual contribution through features of traditional Itorero schooling, including the use of stories of pride, songs and poetic mottos (ibyivugo).

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Some useful narrative therapy practices for responding to people
           seeking psychological assistance
    • Abstract: Dolman, Chris
      This paper was originally delivered as a webcast presentation in mid-February 2020 for psychologists, counsellors and others in China who had volunteered their time and skills to a free WeChat service that was established to respond to medical staff and community members who were seeking psychosocial assistance due to the effects of the coronavirus. It explores various narrative practices including establishing collaboration, developing double-storied testimonies, responding to expressions of distress, and taking-it-back practices.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Walking in sunshine: Collecting insider knowledge about
           detaching from depression
    • Abstract: Chao, Sun
      In China, there is significant stigma associated with depression. This article describes the founding of a co-research group that resisted the stigma and isolation of depression and instead sought to identify and share insider knowledge and skills for gaining distance from depression. It describes the use of externalising conversations, re-authoring, documenting insider knowledges and therapeutic letters in the group, which met both in person and online.

      PubDate: Mon, 20 Apr 2020 23:06:49 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Matters of care-taking
    • Abstract: Denborough, David
      The focus of this course is in enabling participants to increase their knowledge and skills in relation to narrative practice and so matters related to participants' own lives will only rarely become the focus of discussion. Topics will be discussed, however, that may powerfully resonate with aspects of your own life experiences or the lives of people you care about. This is an expected part of the training. While moving resonances no doubt also occur in your regular work, and there are probably a range of skills of self-care that you engage with during these times, you will be away from home during the training blocks and so we would like to invite you to take care in relation to this aspect of the course. There may be times when calling home, writing an email or letter, taking time off to walk around the nearby parklands, or de-briefing with another participant in the course, may become relevant.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Trauma-informed teaching in a narrative practice training
           context
    • Abstract: Lainson, Kristina
      Trigger or content warnings have become a common feature in higher education settings. Alongside their increasing use in the lecture theatre or classroom, a potentially divisive debate has arisen. Proponents for the use of trigger warnings view this practice as part of appropriate care-taking of students, making connections with trauma-informed practice. Others argue their increased use evidences a rise in problematic paternalistic attitudes that limit opportunities for rigorous and engaged learning. This debate becomes particularly meaningful where students are part of training programs that ultimately provide them with entry into professions that will expose them to difficult contexts, creating an imperative to prepare them for the work they may be doing. This article discusses the implications of this debate for narratively informed training contexts. By drawing on narrative ideas it outlines opportunities for attending to both sides of this debate, highlighting shared concerns and establishing a range of practices that offer practical solutions to address this complex dilemma.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Being both narrative practitioner and academic researcher: A
           reflection on what thematic analysis has to offer narratively informed
           research
    • Abstract: Lainson, Kristina; Braun, Virginia; Clarke, Victoria
      What opportunities are there for narrative practitioners to engage in academic research whilst retaining an alignment with poststructuralist ideas, feminist commitments and narrative practice principles' This paper considers Virginia Braun and Victoria Clarke's model of thematic analysis (TA) as an approach which can overcome some of the tensions that arise when integrating both narrative practitioner and researcher stance. Drawing on one practitioner-researcher's experience of navigating some of these dilemmas and incorporating a rich discussion of some of the heritages, understandings and intentions that underpin TA and its development, this paper seeks to assist, inform and encourage narrative practitioners who are reaching for approaches that offer a good fit for their research hopes and aims.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Supporting genocide survivors and honouring Rwanda n healing
           ways: Our own names, our own prescriptions
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Uwihoreye, Chaste
      The 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda took place over 100 days. Each year, there is therefore a 100-day commemoration period during which Chaste Uwihoreye is involved in supporting survivors. In this interview, Chaste spoke with David Denborough.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Solidarity and friendship: An interview with Claver Haragirimana
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Haragirimana, Claver
      Claver Haragirimana is the co-founder of OPROMAMER, an association to promote solidarity among people with mental illness in Rwanda. OPROMAMER is working to transform understandings about mental health and to reduce the significant burden of stigma faced by mental health patients and ex-patients in Rwanda. Founded by former patients of a psychiatric hospital with which it is now affiliated, OPROMAMER has grown from a single person's vision to become a nationwide organisation with twenty independent groups and 1000 members. In addition to advocacy work, Claver's organisation runs a savings club that has supported the development of small economic projects and enabled members to access loans to pay for school fees or healthcare. This interview of Claver Haragirimana was conducted by David Denborough.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Stories from the train station: Or what ca n you do when you
           don't know when the train is coming, whether the train is coming, or where
           it goes
    • Abstract: Kafkas, Yiannis
      This work has to do with a meeting in a train station when you don't know when the train is coming, whether the train is coming, or where it goes. In other words, it is a story about the struggle of a teenage boy from Syria to gain authorship over the stories of his life. And about how to keep your dreams alive in times of great adversity.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Narrative tools in social work supervision: The supervisor life
           certificate and supervisee's journey tools
    • Abstract: Fareez, Mohammed
      This paper discusses the use of two tools in the supervision of social workers: the supervisor life certificate and the supervisee's journey template. These have been used to help thicken the preferred stories of social workers in a social service organisation in Singapore. Social workers are often expected to acquire a robust repertoire of skills and theories to help them manage and support the people who consult them, and social work supervisors might adopt an 'expert' position from which to impart these skills through Socratic questioning and coaching. A narrative perspective acknowledges that social workers who enter the profession already have skills and knowledges that they can access to support their work. The supervisee's journey template allows for these skills to be documented and thickened through scaffolding questions. The supervisor life certificate is a tool to help social workers reflect on the values that they bring to their supervisory roles.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Gender group at peak house: Making space beyond inclusion,
           resisting cis- and heteronormativity - a response
    • Abstract: Semeschuk, Kelsi
      In the article 'Gender Group at Peak House: Making space beyond inclusion, resisting cis- and heteronormativity' by Bhupie Dulay, Graeme Sampson, Stefanie Krasnow and Vikki Reynolds (2019, in this issue) there are a multitude of concepts, ideas and practices that I found thrilling and capturing of my attention. Here, I will focus on one excerpt that I found especially relevant to my practice context. The explorations of the youth at Peak House, and those of Dulay and colleagues, in relation to 'the interrelationships of substance misuse, gender and sexuality, systemic oppression and resistance' were so richly described that I felt the need to hone in on particular aspects that linked to my context. I thought that I could most skilfully act as a witness to the stories told in this article from the viewpoint of my therapeutic practice, with access to the insider knowledges of the people consulting me.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Adding letters to telephone counselling: A narrative response to
           frequent callers
    • Abstract: Schon, Daniela
      This paper demonstrates how therapeutic letter writing and other narrative practices were implemented in a phone-based community counselling service in relation to work with regular and frequent callers. Helplines provide support for people in distress. Although the focus of these services is often on times of crisis when lives may be at stake, many callers to helplines are struggling with ongoing mental health issues, and may phone frequently, sometimes several times a day, over long periods. This can stretch helpline resources, preventing urgent calls from getting through and taxing counsellors who may be peer-support workers or volunteers. Lifeline Aotearoa's attempts to manage frequent callers raised questions about the services the organisation was offering and whether it was contributing to 'maintaining' those frequent callers. Narrative ideas were introduced to facilitate conversations that offered rich story development, for both callers and counsellors, and to situate problems callers presented in a wider social context in which they might make a contribution.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Narrative practice and peer support
    • Abstract: Kennedy, Hamilton
      In 2018, Hamilton was working in a youth psychiatric hospital as a peer-support worker and studying narrative therapy. Having initially trained in intentional peer support (IPS), Hamilton began to incorporate narrative ideas into their work. This paper offers an exploration and some stories of this process. It recounts the strengths and challenges of combining a peer approach with narrative practice. Combining narrative practice with a peer approach provided new opportunities for resisting totalising narratives of 'illness', working towards achieving meaningful lives, and reconnecting with people and relationships.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Narrative practice and intentional peer support: A conversation
           between Hamilton Kennedy and Sherry Mead
    • Abstract: Kennedy, Hamilton; Mead, Shery
      Hamilton and Shery Mead spoke with each other over the course of 2019. They had been united through their connection to intentional peer support (IPS), of which Shery is the founder and Hamilton a practitioner. Narrative therapy and IPS have both proposed meaningful alternatives to clinical ways of work with people. More recently, Hamilton has attempted to use both of these skills together. You can read about this more in the accompanying article, 'Narrative practice and peer support' (Kennedy, 2019).

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Companion piece
    • Abstract: Yuen, Angel
      I have been aware of the significant narrative-informed work and practices of Peak House in Vancouver for over two decades, so when I was invited to write a companion piece to 'Gender Group at Peak House: Making space beyond inclusion, resisting cis- and heteronormativity', I was immediately up for the task and dove into reading. Memories came back of several gender diverse young people from whom I have had the privilege to learn. As I read, I was very much wishing they could have been involved in a similar Gender Group to that run at Peak House. At one point, while perusing this paper filled with ethics and practices that spoke to me, I had a vivid recollection of a young person named Sidney. I could picture them being animated and appreciative to be in such a group.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Passion, desire, fun and justice: Ideas and stories from the
           editorial team of Balaknama, a newspaper for and by street and working
           children
    • Abstract:
      Narrative practitioners interviewed editors and reporters from Balaknama, a newspaper that is determined to honour the stories and experiences of street and working children. The Balaknama team shared their passion for bringing to light the strengths and skills of street children, and their hopes and dreams, in addition to reporting stories of the hardships faced by young people living on the streets. The team also shared some of the practices they have developed to sustain their work, to build rapport with other street children, to invite previously untold stories, and to protect the safety of reporters and those whose stories they tell, which sometimes extends to working with a whole family.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Gender Group at Peak House: Making space beyond inclusion,
           resisting cis- and heteronormativity
    • Abstract: Dulay, Bhupie; Sampson, Graeme; Krasnow, Stefanie; Reynolds, Vikki
      Gender Group is an ever-evolving therapeutic group at Peak House. Peak House is a live-in program for 13 to 18-year-olds of all genders who are struggling with problematic substance use, exploitation and oppression in their lives. This article explores Gender Group's historical and current attempts to make space while resisting sexualised and gendered violence, cisnormativity and heteronormativity. Particular ethics structure the practice of Gender Group. These include: contextualising problems, enacting accountability, attending to language, resisting the binary while acknowledging the impact of the binary and recognising youth as changemakers in communities. The authors examine how practitioners co-construct safety with youth by holding structure and fluidity/ flexibility in tension, and through the therapists decentring themselves and demasking professionalism. All of these practices create space for outcomes that cannot be measured, such as the therapeutic value for young people's lives, the reduction of harm, the amplification of youth wisdom, solidarity through lateral mentoring and the transformation of communities by young people.

      PubDate: Fri, 3 Jan 2020 00:51:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Reflections on narrative, neuroscience and social engagement
    • Abstract: Combs, Gene
      This journal issue comes at a time when some people who consider themselves to be narrative therapists have become concerned that narrative theorising and practices neglect 'the body', or that they privilege thoughts and words over affect. I have been mystified by this concern. As David Denborough lovingly documents in his paper 'Travelling down the neuro-pathway', the things that happen in the course of a narrative session have moved people to tears (and laughter, and righteous indignation, and awe, and . . .) since before this way of working had a name. In reading this paper, I was touched and transported to memories of encounters I witnessed over my years of study with Michael White. Denborough's eloquent account resonated with my own analyses and experiences of practicing narrative therapy.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Lainson, Kristina
      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Refusing to separate critique from respect
    • Abstract: Semeschuk, Kelsi
      This paper provides a brief exploration of the notion of critique within the field of narrative therapy. It raises questions, considerations and dilemmas about how practices of critique might be engaged in without contributing to the dissolution of important relationships. The author draws on some of her own experiences with the hope of articulating how critique and respect can exist alongside each other.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Travelling down the neuro-pathway: Narrative practice,
           neuroscience, bodies, emotions a nd the affective turn
    • Abstract: Denborough, David
      In recent times, a complex interplay of factors has led to the social sciences grappling with neuroscience, affect/emotion and embodied experience in new ways. This paper engages with the following four questions: How does narrative therapy fit with neuroscience' How does narrative practice engage with emotion' How does narrative practice relate to the affective turn' How does narrative therapy engage with the body/somatic experience/embodied experience' Throughout this paper examples from Michael White's therapy practice and contemporary examples of collective narrative practice are discussed.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Responding to David Denborough's paper: A short interview with
           Marie-Nathalie Beaudoin
    • Abstract: Lainson, Kristina; Beaudoin, Marie-Nathalie
      A key theme of this special issue is considering ways to engage rigorously with practices of critique. As part of embracing this ethos, an invitation was extended to Marie-Nathalie Beaudoin, asking her if she would like to offer a critical response to David Denborough's paper, 'Travelling down the neuro-pathway: Narrative practice, neuroscience, bodies, emotions and the affective turn'. Marie-Nathalie kindly accepted the opportunity, and it was mutually decided that an interview format would work well. Kristina Lainson acted as interviewer on behalf of Dulwich Centre Publications, and the following interview sought to create space to represent divergent viewpoints and promote generative conversations about differences of opinion.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - A reflection on self-regulation and neuro-conceal
    • Abstract: van der Klift, Emma
      I am an Autistic person currently questioning and writing about the ethics and effects of various compliance-based behavioural therapies experienced by Autistic children, and am doing so from a narrative perspective. Many of the remedial programs I am looking at rely heavily on the language of neuroscience to bolster their credibility, and in this context I was fascinated by David Denborough's provocative article 'Travelling down the neuro-pathway: Narrative practice, neuroscience, bodies, emotions and the affective turn'. Although there are many ideas in this paper that warrant further discussion, several were of particular interest to me. In this reflection, I turn specifically to Denborough's discussion of self-regulation and neuro-conceal. However, before I do so, let me provide a bit of context.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Narrative therapy, neuroscience and socio-emotional discourses:
           Comments
    • Abstract: Strong, Tom
      I appreciate this opportunity to comment on two developments that have understandably been a focus of attention among narrative therapy's practitionerauthors. The two developments are discourses brought to supplement narrative therapy's primary metaphor or discourse: neuroscience and socio-emotional discourses.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Feelings, thinking and action as a coherent whole: A ref lection
           on 'travelling down the neuro-pathway'
    • Abstract: Freedman, Jill
      In 2007, as part of a collaboration with Ibuka counsellors in Rwanda, I was privileged to consult to the Kigali Memorial Centre (see Denborough, Freedman, and White, 2008). The staff walked me through the museum, which had exhibits showing the context and history of the genocide. The very last room held only family photographs or whatever pictures could be found of people who had perished in the genocide. The director of the centre told me that it was not unusual for a visitor to walk into that room and be overwhelmed by the sheer number of people, or by the image of someone they had known personally, and to begin sobbing, often collapsing on the floor. I, too, felt tremendous grief on witnessing these photographs, so I could appreciate at least a little of the devastation people might experience when entering this room. If people did not compose themselves, the staff would try to comfort them. If they were unsuccessful, the only option that they had was to call medical services to bring these re-traumatized persons to a hospital. The director and staff members all wanted some other ways of responding. They hoped that I could offer some help. I was not the first consultant they had asked. The last consultant, the director told me, had suggested 'a sport called yoga'.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Reflections on narrative, neuroscience and social engagement
    • Abstract: Young, Karen
      I really appreciated the points in David Denborough's paper, 'Travelling down the neuro-pathway: Narrative practice, neuroscience, bodies, emotions and the affective turn', about the importance of speaking and writing about the intentions of narrative therapy as they relate to deconstructing meaning, power and knowledge, and how ideas from neuroscience create explanations that move away from these purposes. As a narrative practitioner, I am much more interested in the politics of narrative practices, for example, externalising practices, in terms of the ethics of a depathologising naming and unpacking practice as opposed to a pathologising naming practice (such as internalised diagnostic language) and the knowledge and actions that externalising practices make possible. I have written about this often (see Young, 2018).

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Narrative responses to physical pains: An interview with Sister
           Seraphine Kaitesirwa
    • Abstract: Kaitesirwa, Seraphine
      Sister Seraphine Kaitesirwa is a narrative practitioner in Kigali, Rwanda, where she works at a clinic for children and young people, some of whom experience concerns that show up as physical pains in their bodies. Sometimes, these pains have become named somatoform disorder. The pains can have serious effects for the lives of the children and young people, and their families, causing significant distress. Drawing on narrative principles, and with her appreciation for embodied experience, Sr Seraphine has developed a series of externalising questions and practices that invite the children and young people into a new sort of relationship with the pain, with remarkable effects. On a recent visit to Kigali, David Denborough caught up with Sr Seraphine, eager to hear more about her practice. The two were joined by Yishai Shalif and Cheryl White.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Michael White's particularist ethics in a biological age
    • Abstract: Byers, Philippa
      This paper offers a reading of Michael White's ethics of narrative therapy as a form of ethical particularism that seeks particularity rather than generalities or rules of thought, speech, behaviour or action. The paper draws on insights from British novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch, and others, to characterise an approach to practice which does not privilege theory (which reaches in the direction of generality) but is a restrained form of moral attention and receptivity to discovery in the words, phrases, stories and story fragments that are offered in therapeutic conversations. The paper suggests that a hallmark of the ethics of practice that Michael White offered in his writing is that personal and philosophical questions and interpretations are left open for discovery. For this reason, the paper suggests caution about introducing terms and concepts from brain and neurological sciences, and the implicit philosophical assumptions that come with that introduction, into narrative therapy and practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Intensifying the preferred self: Neurobiology, mindfulness and
           embodiment practices that make a difference
    • Abstract: Beaudoin, Marie-Nathalie
      Neurobiology and mindfulness offer fascinating ideas for therapeutic conversations informed by narrative therapy. This article introduces two re-authoring practices that intensify the preferred self and enhance clients' abilities to live according to their values in spite of traumatic experiences. The application of these ideas is described with the story of a young mother who, for over a year, fought for the survival of her newborn baby crippled by a life-threatening disease and who, when the infant recovered, fell into the grips of a debilitating depression ('Critical Voice'). This depressive state lasted two years before narrative therapy was initiated. Given the neuroplasticity of our brains, how can we increase the likelihood that re-authoring conversations will be intense enough to neutralise the influence of fight or flight brain states, and gripping depressive neural networks, which have been strengthened for years' This article describes two neurobiology inspired ways to help our clients intensify the preferred self typically explored in narrative therapy: embodiment and positive affect development. Enriching narrative work with these practices increases the likelihood that we will succeed in a timely and enduring manner, in assisting people who have been suffering from long lasting, intense, viscerally embodied emotional problems and traumas.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 3 - Narrative therapy, neuroscience and anorexia: A reflection on
           practices, problems and possibilities
    • Abstract: Lainson, Kristina
      The effects of anorexia are serious and have significant consequences for people's lives. A prevalent concern among professionals working within these realms include that available therapeutic approaches may have limited usefulness for some people, especially when anorexia has been in a person's life for a long time. Both narrative therapy and neuroscience have contributed to ways of working with people's experiences of anorexia. This article responds to a current, broader, conversation between narrative therapy and neuroscience by exploring some of the implications of each in the context of working with anorexia. By establishing a series of tensions between the principles and practices associated with certain neuroscientific models of anorexia and what is offered by narrative therapy, a case is put for eating disorder services to favour therapeutic approaches that attend to the politics of experience, and that privilege insider experience and knowledge. This article argues that these possibilities also extend into the realms of academic research, and that they have the potential to generate hope.

      PubDate: Thu, 7 Nov 2019 17:13:44 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Winter stories: Therapeutic conversations from the land of ice
           and snow
    • Abstract: Tilsen, Julie
      People living in colder climates often diagnose themselves with 'winter depression' or 'seasonal affective disorder' when they experience sadness, low energy, fatigue and other difficulties that they attribute to the cold and dark days of winter. There are limitations to locating these problems only in bodily and medical discourses and ignoring the culture-bound ways these discourses are constructed and circulated through the kinds of stories we tell about winter. I use a narrative approach to these problems, inviting people to remember their childhood relationships with winter, and to situate their experiences in context, thus making new ways forward possible. When their childhood winter stories become available, people reconnect with a history that helps them construct preferred relationships with winter.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Moments to treasure: Narrative family therapy with trans
           children and cisgender parents
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Nylund, David
      David Nylund's primary work is at the Gender Health Center in Sacramento, California, with family members, caregivers, and parents of young trans and gender diverse folks. David works primarily with parents to invite them to come to a place of supporting and affirming their child's gender identity. This interview explores the ways in which he engages in narrative family therapy in this context.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - 'Some of us have a body that we need to adjust in order for the
           m to be a good place to live': Belonging, resting places and gender
           talents
    • Abstract: Denborough, David; Benestad, Esben Esther Pirelli
      This paper describes the application of the dialectical narrative inquiry, a therapeutic approach that incorporates phenomenology and narrative inquiry within narrative practices in order to elicit double-storied accounts of people's lives. I describe this approach through my work with Sarah, a 28-year-old university student who had been experiencing difficulties in her interpersonal relationships. Sarah and I were able to develop her personal dialectic, chart her landscapes through re-authoring questions, and clarify her positions regarding her problematic and preferred responses to experiences of 'Ambivalence and Insensitivity'. Through the use of macro-scaffolding over subsequent sessions, Sarah and I were able to identify her personal values and her hopes and intentions for the future. We also identified specific barriers to enacting these preferences, and personal skills and knowledges that she would be able to draw on in order to move towards her hopes and intentions for the future.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Living like playing: Working with online gamers from a narrative
           therapy perspective
    • Abstract: Ding, Mehmet
      Many young people and their parents experience ongoing conflict about online gaming. These conflicts can lead to shame, distance and decreased self-esteem for young people. This paper explores the use of co-research, re-authoring, therapeutic documents and other narrative practices for working with young people experiencing issues with and conflict about online gaming.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Narrative therapy approaches in single-session trauma work
    • Abstract: Batrouney, Amelia
      This paper outlines opportunities to incorporate narrative approaches in singlesession telephone counselling, with a particular focus on working with women who have experienced sexual violence. Practices described include externalising the problem, deconstruction, re-authoring, double listening, double-story development and re-membering conversations.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - She/he/they/ze/hir: Talking about pronouns and gendered language
    • Abstract: Maeder, Rosie; Sostar, Tiffany; Denborough, David
      When participants arrive at a workshop at Dulwich Centre, they are invited to indicate their pronoun(s) on their name tag. As this practice is new to many people, this resource explains what it's all about, why we care about this, and how readers can join in this collaborative project.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Non-binary superpowers! a collaborative conversation between
           non-binary youth in Adelaide, South Australia, and non-binary youth in
           Calgary, Alberta
    • Abstract: Maeder, Rosie; Sostar, Tiffany
      A common experience of folks who identify outside of binary gender is that of erasure, an experience of not being seen, fighting daily to 'prove' that our identities and experiences are 'real' and 'valid'. In April and May of 2019, two small groups of Trans and Non-Binary (enby) young people and some of their loved ones came together on opposite sides of the world. Tiffany Sostar (they/them) and Rosie Maeder (she/ her) hosted narrative conversations in Adelaide, Australia, and Calgary, Canada, and linked them through a collective document. This was the beginning of an ongoing trans-continental conversation exploring the skills, knowledges and experiences of Non-Binary young people and of the ways they are or hope to be seen and supported by loved ones. Tiffany and Rosie hoped to draw out rich, multi-storied accounts of Non-Binary experiences and to make visible the skills, knowledges and complicated superpowers required to resist rigid constructs of gender. They seek to further subvert Non-Binary invisibility by sharing these stories with other enby folks and anyone else who wants to learn more about Non-Binary experiences or identities ‒ including and especially Narrative Practitioners who work with Trans and Non-Binary young people.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Re-storying children's nightmares and night terrors
    • Abstract: Mutter, Kelvin F
      Nightmares and night terrors are common childhood experiences. Through the use of first-person narrative and composite stories, this essay documents an emergent incorporation of narrative therapy practices in work with families seeking help for children experiencing nightmares and night terrors. Key transitions and innovations in clinical practice are identified. Reflections identify and discuss potential success factors and limitations regarding the outcomes of this practice. This paper concludes by identifying and reflecting on three novel outcomes that emerge from the paper.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Responding to grief and loss using therapeutic documents
    • Abstract: Mittet, Karen Esakin
      This article demonstrates some of the healing practices that narrative therapists have available to them when helping people who are grieving the death of someone they love. It emphasises the healing effects of therapeutic documentation and the significance of effective note taking when preparing therapeutic letters for individuals who have been bereaved.

      PubDate: Mon, 29 Jul 2019 12:40:55 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Thwarting shame: Feminist engagement in group work with men
           recruited to patriarchal dominance in relationship
    • Abstract: Dowse, Kylie
      Through the eyes of an Aboriginal feminist, this paper documents group work with men who have used violence in intimate relationship. Adapting narrative externalising techniques to scaffold a conceptual support group for Shame enabled men engaged in group work to view responsibility and respect in new ways. The paper considers the role of women facilitators in working with men, and ways the politics of women's experience add value to group discussion.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Responding to those surviving the unchosen loss of love
    • Abstract: Jones, La uren
      This paper describes how a community worker informed by narrative practice formed a participatory community group in response to those within the community highly influenced by thoughts of self-harm following the loss of love. This paper highlights the privileging of community members' uncommon knowledge in finding a way forward. The community's devalued and subjugated knowledge is used to co-create an artful expression of ways group members are taking care following the loss of love, to externalised regret via a playful metaphor, to acknowledge anxiety in a co-produced document, to co-author a list of 'growing group rules', and to recreate a powerful 50th birthday ritual for a group member. Ethical ways of working are explored to guide community practice. The paper posits that a reclamation of faith in uncommon knowledge might be made all the more possible when devalued knowledge is privileged within a participatory community.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - A narrative therapy approach to dealing with chronic pain
    • Abstract: Phillips, La urel
      This article outlines a narrative therapeutic approach to working in collaboration with people experiencing chronic pain. This approach was created in concert with 13 co-researchers who were experiencing, or had partners who experienced, varying degrees of pain. Contributing therapeutic conversations spanned a ten-month period. Outcomes were achieved through the application of various narrative therapy principles including externalisation, mapping the influence of the problem, remembering practices, developing an experience-near definition of the problem, double listening, alternative or preferred story development and the use of collective documents and definitional ceremonies What emerged from this were two themes: The identification, importance and use of personally constructed strategies, and the reduction of pain experiences by addressing self-identified problems that were more pressing than pain. Narrative therapy was successful in helping to re-establish valued ways of living that chronic pain often sidelines. We found that it is possible to reduce experiences of pain by addressing more pressing problems.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Conformity pressures: Deconstructing social discourses in the
           Korean context
    • Abstract: Lee, Eunjoo
      This paper sets out a narrative approach to deconstructing social discourses in a Korean context, with a focus on pressures to conform. An overview of deconstructing social discourses is presented, and the socio-centric Korean context is discussed. A process map and several tips for deconstructing social discourses are offered. Finally, field application of the map and the tips are demonstrated through case examples of work with an individual and a group.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Children authoring storybooks: A narrative approach for children
           learning a new language
    • Abstract: Liu, Amy
      For young people from non-Chinese speaking backgrounds who are attending schools in Hong Kong, acquiring Chinese language proficiency can be a significant and anxiety-provoking challenge. When students are not yet proficient in Chinese language, their low estimation of their Chinese language ability can create a vicious circle: feeling incompetent and worrying about language acquisition makes it more difficult to learn. Acquiring an additional language is not merely a linguistic and grammatical exercise, but an affective one. This article explores the use of narrative tools and perspectives for supporting culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) students in Hong Kong with their Chinese language learning. In particular, it shows how externalisation, therapeutic documents (in this case storybooks), Denborough's (1995) 'step by step' process and a search for 'wonderfulnesses' (Marsten, Epston, and Markham, 2016) were used with individuals and groups. The article includes accounts of work with an individual and two groups of students. In the first story Alex, a 13-year-old student attending a mainstream secondary school, externalises negative emotions that adhered to the learning of Chinese, thus paving ways to see her abilities. In the second story, a group of three 14-yearold students from a mainstream secondary school externalise 'strengths' and 'resources' for learning Chinese so that the internal quality of a person was made apparent (M. White, 2007, p. 38). The third story involved a group of five students, eight to nine years of age, from a primary school attended mainly by CALD students. 'Chinese' was externalised and became an imaginary friend. This imaginary friend learned from the students, thus making the language less intimidating to approach. Recruited as a carrier and consolidator of the dominant knowledge associated with ethnic minorities, as a local Cantonese speaking person I attempted to maintain a position of being decentred but influential in these stories.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 1 - Responding to children in situations of family violence:
           Narrative therapy group work with children
    • Abstract: Lee, Jocelyn
      This paper discusses a practice innovation: a two-day, one-night group work process conducted with children who lived in households that use violence. The author developed the 'My Happy Ending' group work using narrative therapy principles and practices to respond to children in situations of family violence. The children were clients consulting with social workers or counsellors within the social service agency the author works in, Tampines Family Service Center in Singapore. As part of the practice innovation, the author created an original group work curriculum, consisting of the performance and narration of an original fictional story, and several play- and art-based activities. The purpose was to decrease the influence of family violence in the children's lives and to increase their personal agency in dealing with it, using key narrative therapy practices. These narrative practices included externalisation of the problem, using metaphors, increasing people's sense of personal agency, scaffolding preferred stories and identities, de-constructing discourses, outsider-witnessing, definitional ceremonies and creating collective documents. Narrative therapy practices were found to be helpful for enhancing children's sense of agency and diminishing the influence of past and ongoing experiences of family violence and other difficulties faced in their daily lives.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Exploring narrative group work for responding to burnout in
           novice teachers
    • Abstract: Lingli, Fan
      This paper describes a project supporting six novice teachers in Chinese public kindergartens to successfully take charge of their lives during their first year of teaching. With the help of externalising conversations and re-authoring conversations, we explored the realities of being a new teacher, and how burnout had invaded these teachers' lives. The teachers came to recognise themselves again and to honour their own uniqueness. Using the mobile instant messaging software WeChat, the project established a virtual community for teachers to gain further interpersonal support and develop skills and knowledges about extricating themselves from their predicaments. Finally, through a definitional ceremony, the project created an opportunity for teachers to tell their stories more vividly and to build consensus with more people. All participants in this project came to understand burnout in new teachers as a sociocultural product. We hope that structural change will happen in our educational system.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Stuttering therapy when the problem isn't stuttering: Using
           narrative practices in a fluency-centric society
    • Abstract: Pang, Voon
      Since the early 2000s, practitioners have developed beneficial ways of using narrative practices in work with adults who stutter. This article extends their work to apply narrative practices to work with children and young people who stutter. In a speech language therapy context, externalising conversations were used to determine how young people understood their own speech 'problems' - sometimes in ways that contrasted with dominant fluency-centric models, which seek to eliminate or reduce stuttering. Listening for 'unique outcomes' and 'sparkling moments' enabled the development of alternative stories, in which the hard won skills and knowledges of these young people were made clear. This work was supported by the use of letter writing to support people's campaigns against the effects of stuttering, and methods to archive and disseminate the knowledges of these young people with regard to living with stuttering. Adopting a narrative approach also enabled a more collaborative way of working and provided opportunities to address issues of power and privilege in the therapeutic relationship.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - The chasing of tales: Poetic licence with the written word in
           narrative practice
    • Abstract: Ostrander, Carmen
      This paper explores narrative applications of the written word in practice, including recreations of innovations I have been drawn to in my reading and through conversations with people who have supported my development as a therapist. It also describes applications that extend the therapeutic use of the written word in the spirit of playfulness and creativity I believe to be at the heart of narrative innovation. Narrative influences on the written word in administrative contexts, letter writing, note taking and other creative forms are described, communicating the influence of a year immersed in narrative ways of working.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Recipes for life: A collective narrative methodolog y for
           responding to gender violence
    • Abstract: Tan, Meizi
      This paper explores the use of collective narrative methodology in a two-day group retreat organised for women who had experienced gender violence in their intimate relationships. The women developed 'recipes for life' by using the skills and knowledge they had developed through responding to gender violence. Outsider-witness practices were used to acknowledge the women's alternative stories of resilience and resistance to gender violence. Narrative practices of collective documentation, externalising the problem, and deconstructing social discourses that support gender violence, were incorporated through the creative use of food metaphors. This supported the women in breaking their silence and reduced the sense of isolation, shame and disempowerment that often surrounds gender violence.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - We don't give up: Developing family and community responses to
           adolescent-to-parent violence
    • Abstract: Shannahan, Ben
      This paper explores the use of narrative therapy practices in developing a community response to a young man's use of violence towards his family. Opportunities and ethical tensions experienced in incorporating principles and methods of nonviolent resistance (Omer, 2004) are discussed along with opportunities narrative therapy might offer as a response to these tensions. Different conceptions of responsibility and accountability, and the pushes and pulls of dominant aspects of men's culture, are considered in relation to how these factors might shape responses to adolescent-to-parent violence, and how multi-generational men's meetings were incorporated as part of this work.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Issue 2 - Stories of hope and pride
    • Abstract: Cox, Emma
      Pregnant women with negative identity conclusions often have their stories of hope and pride overshadowed by problem-saturated stories. Consequently, their stories of hope and pride remain unnoticed and untold. This paper describes how narrative practices can create space for these women's stories of hope and pride to be noticed and richly told in ways that allow women to reconnect with previously subjugated knowledges. Further, this paper includes two stories of practice that demonstrate the significant and powerful outcomes that have been made possible through the use of narrative practice innovations that create space for women's stories of hope and pride to be noticed and told.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:19:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Intergenerational narrative practice in response to
           intergenerational trauma
    • Abstract: Cramer, Saviona
      As part of a year-long narrative practice training program taking place in Rwanda, Saviona Cramer offered a workshop on intergenerational narrative practice in response to intergenerational trauma. She drew on her work with Jewish families whose parents or grandparents survived the Holocaust. The workshop took place on 16 August 2018 on the shores of Lake Kivu. It was a very significant day. Rwandan colleagues indicated that there was profound resonance and great interest in how such practices could be used in Rwanda. That evening, David Denborough sat down with Saviona and interviewed her in order to create this short paper. The following day, Rwandan colleagues were invited to speak about what was significant to them about this work. Their perspectives are included in the following piece, 'Intergenerational narrative practice in the shadow of genocide: Rwandan reflections'.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 17:12:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Decolonising research: An interview with Bagele Chilisa
    • Abstract: Chilisa, Bagele; Denborough, David
      In this interview, Motswana postcolonial scholar Professor Bagele Chilisa discusses strategies for decolonising research, resisting the domination of Western knowledge, working with Indigenous worldviews, and introducing accountability and collaboration with people and communities who are the subjects of research. This piece has been created from two sources - a conversation between Bagele Chilisa, Cheryl White and David Denborough that took place in Gaborone, Botswana on 23 August 2018 and Bagele's keynote presentation, Equality in diversity: Indigenous research methodologies, at the 2015 American Indigenous Research Association Conference.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 17:12:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Working with young people in residential care in India:
           Uncovering stories of resistance
    • Abstract: Sen, Maya
      This paper describes narrative therapy interventions with young people living in residential childcare institutions in Kolkata, India. It presents an analysis of the contexts of poverty, violence and oppression that shape young people's experiences before entering care, and the ideologies that shape their experiences within residential institutions. It then demonstrates the application of a narrative framework for working with young people in residential care through the stories of four young women.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 17:12:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Discovering the good man: Double story development with a
           survivor of repetitive ongoing trauma in immigration detention
    • Abstract: Pelly, Janet
      This paper explores the possibilities for transforming a trauma narrative while the person remains in a traumatic situation. It focuses on my work with Yasin (not his real name), a stateless Middle Eastern man who sought asylum in Australia in 2013 after a lifetime of persecution for his ethnicity, religion and attempts to seek protection. The paper describes the use of narrative practices, including double-storied testimony, re-authoring conversations and the Team of Life process, to help Yasin manage life in an immigration detention centre, and to reduce the frequency of his flashbacks and nightmares. The paper presents the efforts of one man to re-author elements of his life while trapped in an environment that both replicates past trauma and denies hope for a better future.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 17:12:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 A first person principle: Philosophical reflections on narrative
           practice within a mainstream psychiatric service for young people
    • Abstract: Byers, Philippa; Newman, David
      This paper is a collaboration between David Newman, an experienced narrative therapy practitioner and teacher, and Philippa Byers, a narrative therapy student with an academic background in philosophy. The paper charts ideas developed during Philippa's student placement with David, as they discussed narrative practice, other mental health practices and philosophy. The paper draws on philosophy of language and the philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, applying this to Michael White's injunction to look (and listen) for the experience-near in the words and phrases that are offered to narrative therapists. It offers philosophical reflections on an ethical principle of narrative practice which Philippa and David call a first person principle. The first person principle is elaborated in a discussion of David's narrative practice with young people. This offers philosophical and practical insights to some of the issues and questions that may arise for narrative therapists who, like David, practice within mainstream services, encountering 'neuro' and other professionalised discourses and accompanying expectations.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 17:12:11 GMT
       
  • Volume 1 Narrative walks
    • Abstract: Darmody, Chris
      Narrative Walks is a hope-based, depathologising outdoor program that was developed to engage with populations that may not be drawn to conventional methods of therapy. This structured day program encourages participants to explore 15 narrative therapy questions, and to engage in a number of other activities during a 20 kilometre walk through the bush. The program invites different perspectives on problem stories, and offers walking as a narrative metaphor. This paper sets out the steps taken in developing the program with a number of groups and individuals to ensure the program meets the needs of the people for whom it is intended. The paper describes trials undertaken with young men, the group that initially inspired Narrative Walks, and also outlines my hopes for the future development of Narrative Walks as a program transferable to many people and lands.

      PubDate: Tue, 9 Apr 2019 17:12:11 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Towards a decolonising practice: A non-Aboriginal worker finding
           meaningful ways to work in an Aboriginal context
    • Abstract: Drahm, Grace
      This paper describes the development of a decolonising therapeutic practice for working with young people and their families in Aboriginal communities. It shows how different maps of narrative practice have been used to support Aboriginal young people and their families to develop storybooks as therapeutic documents that centre and honour their knowledges and worldviews.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Narrative community work in Burundi, Africa: Working with
           orphaned children and teaching narrative practices to their caregivers
    • Abstract: Haegert, Carlin Moxley; Rachid, Marcel; Moxley-Haegert, Linda
      In this paper, we describe a project to support children from Burundi, Africa, who were orphaned by the civil war (1993 to 2003), or by poverty and the HIV/AIDS epidemic. We present our experiences of offering training in collective narrative practices to caregivers and volunteers and providing therapy for the children, and we share our plans for the future. Our hope is to inspire others to do similar work in developing countries and to inform them of some of the possible pitfalls. Although we outline many of the heartbreaking realities of life for these children, our hope is that this paper also highlights how narrative practices can be used to help such children find moments of hope in their lives.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Resilience and Trauma: Between two discourses
    • Abstract: Hyndman, Leanne
      This paper reflects on two discourses - resilience and trauma - and how being more aware of these discourses and their effects helps me shape my work with children in group settings and individual conversations.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - The dialectical narrative inquiry: Responses to Ambivalence and
           Insensitivity
    • Abstract: Ryan, Grant Thomas
      This paper describes the application of the dialectical narrative inquiry, a therapeutic approach that incorporates phenomenology and narrative inquiry within narrative practices in order to elicit double-storied accounts of people's lives. I describe this approach through my work with Sarah, a 28-year-old university student who had been experiencing difficulties in her interpersonal relationships. Sarah and I were able to develop her personal dialectic, chart her landscapes through re-authoring questions, and clarify her positions regarding her problematic and preferred responses to experiences of 'Ambivalence and Insensitivity'. Through the use of macro-scaffolding over subsequent sessions, Sarah and I were able to identify her personal values and her hopes and intentions for the future. We also identified specific barriers to enacting these preferences, and personal skills and knowledges that she would be able to draw on in order to move towards her hopes and intentions for the future.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - The narrative docket: Facilitating narrative practices with
           involuntarily referred adolescents
    • Abstract: Yee, Clement
      This paper introduces the 'narrative docket', an innovation developed for work with adolescents who have been referred to social services by police or the legal system. The paper details the three components of the narrative docket, and demonstrates their application with a young person, Aiai, in a time-limited case management program. The ideas underpinning the narrative docket include collective narrative practice, externalising problems, outsider witnessing, re-authoring and counter documentation.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Researching suffering, subjugated knowledge and practices of
           health: An interview with Rita Giacaman
    • Abstract: Giacaman, Rita
      The work of the Institute of Community and Public Health at Birzeit University, Palestine, seeks to link the biological/biomedical sphere to the political sphere through the concept of suffering. This interview explores the ways they work to expose the sociopolitical conditions of life in order to simultaneously personalise war and politicise health.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Working with people who have lost the Will to live: Following
           sudden loss, violence and acute or childhood trauma
    • Abstract: Frumin, Chana Rachel
      This article explores and researches the experience we could call 'losing the Will to live'. It is based on narrative conversations the author conducted with a group of 10 clients during the years of 2008-2018 as a practicing narrative counsellor in Jerusalem. These conversations were to give space for the stories of these women to be heard and to discover their personal, expert knowledge on this topic, especially in contrast to cultural attitudes that often influence the way people relate to it. The author's role was sensitively co-researching both the experience itself and the approaches people use to deal with it and find support - inside and outside of formal therapy. Many of the original perspectives, insights and skills these women shared are presented in this article. The intention of the quotes and poems you will read here is to place their language and their experience at the centre of the research.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
  • Issue 4 - Johann Hari discusses the opioid crisis and ways of responding
           to anxiety and depression
    • Abstract: Corballis, Anthony; Hari, Johann
      I recently had the pleasure of interviewing journalist, Johann Hari, author of Lost Connections (2018) and Chasing the Scream (2015a), and presenter of the Ted Talk 'Everything you think you know about addiction is wrong' (2015b). This was incredibly exciting for me, because many of his ideas are in alignment with the ideas and practices of the Deconstructing Addiction League (2004), which I am currently developing. In his work, Johann offers fascinating insights into the study of 'addiction', 'anxiety' and 'depression', and I'd like to share some of his findings with you.

      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 17:16:45 GMT
       
 
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