Publisher: RMIT Publishing   (Total: 387 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 387 Journals sorted alphabetically
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Aboriginal Child at School     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Accounting, Accountability & Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
ACORN : The J. of Perioperative Nursing in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.198, CiteScore: 0)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 0.122, CiteScore: 0)
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agenda: A J. of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
AIMA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
AJP : The Australian J. of Pharmacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ancient History : Resources for Teachers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Anglican Historical Society J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appita J.: J. of the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.168, CiteScore: 0)
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arena J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Art Monthly Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Artefact : the journal of the Archaeological and Anthropological Society of Victoria     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Artlink     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13, SJR: 0.697, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aurora J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Biotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Drama Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Epidemiologist     Full-text available via subscription  
Australasian Historical Archaeology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.212, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Early Childhood     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Australasian J. of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Human Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.144, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian J. of Irish Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australasian J. of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.118, CiteScore: 0)
Australasian Law Management J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Leisure Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australasian Musculoskeletal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Parks and Leisure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Plant Conservation: J. of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australasian Public Libraries and Information Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.13, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian and New Zealand Continence J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Bookseller & Publisher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Bulletin of Labour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Canegrower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Coeliac     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.317, CiteScore: 1)
Australian Field Ornithology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.209, CiteScore: 0)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Holstein J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Intl. Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Australian J. of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.297, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Advanced Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.299, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Cancer Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian J. of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30, SJR: 0.354, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.123, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian J. of Language and Literacy, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.282, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Australian J. of Medical Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J. of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian J. of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.549, CiteScore: 1)
Australian J. of Parapsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.511, CiteScore: 0)
Australian J. on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian J.ism Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Literary Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Nursing J. : ANJ     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Orthoptic J.     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Senior Mathematics J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Tax Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Voice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bar News: The J. of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
BOCSAR NSW Alcohol Studies Bulletins     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bookseller + Publisher Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Breastfeeding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19, SJR: 0.183, CiteScore: 0)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brolga: An Australian J. about Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cancer Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.115, CiteScore: 0)
Cardiovascular Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription  
Childrenz Issues: J. of the Children's Issues Centre     Full-text available via subscription  
Chiropractic J. of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.111, CiteScore: 0)
Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The J. of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Communicable Diseases Intelligence Quarterly Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.563, CiteScore: 1)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Connect     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary PNG Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Context: J. of Music Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Corporate Governance Law Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Critical Care and Resuscitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26, SJR: 1.032, CiteScore: 1)
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dance Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
DANZ Quarterly: New Zealand Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Early Days: J. of the Royal Western Australian Historical Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Early Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
EarthSong J.: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
East Asian Archives of Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.36, CiteScore: 1)
Educare News: The National Newspaper for All Non-government Schools     Full-text available via subscription  
Educating Young Children: Learning and Teaching in the Early Childhood Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Education in Rural Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Education, Research and Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Educational Research J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Electronic J. of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Employment Relations Record     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
English in Aotearoa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
English in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.18, CiteScore: 0)
Essays in French Literature and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Extempore     Full-text available via subscription  
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.228, CiteScore: 1)
Fijian Studies: A J. of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Fourth World J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontline     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gambling Research: J. of the National Association for Gambling Studies (Australia)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Gay and Lesbian Law J.     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gender Impact Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geographical Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Gestalt J. of Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.1, CiteScore: 0)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Government News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Great Circle: J. of the Australian Association for Maritime History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Grief Matters : The Australian J. of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
He Puna Korero: J. of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Promotion J. of Australia : Official J. of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.531, CiteScore: 1)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HIV Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
HLA News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.438, CiteScore: 1)
Hong Kong J. of Emergency Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.19, CiteScore: 0)
Idiom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
InCite     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Inside Film: If     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Institute of Public Affairs Review: A Quarterly Review of Politics and Public Affairs, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription   (SJR: 0.116, CiteScore: 0)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Intl. Employment Relations Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of e-Business Management     Full-text available via subscription  
Intl. J. of Employment Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Intl. J. of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Narrative Therapy & Community Work     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Intl. J. of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Irrigation Australia: The Official J. of Irrigation Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
ISAA Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. (Australian Native Plants Society. Canberra Region)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
J. of Applied Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
J. of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
J. of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1445-6818
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [387 journals]
  • Issue 54 - Opening address: ACWA Conference
    • Abstract: Dodds, Susan
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Opening address: Association of Children's Welfare Agencies
           Conference August 2018
    • Abstract: Goward, Pru
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Leading change for children and families
    • Abstract: Fernandez, Elizabeth
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - The rights of children in the child protection system: A case
           study in ambivalence'
    • Abstract: Driscoll, Jennifer
      The history of child protection around the world shows a gradual shift over time from the 'child rescue' movements of the nineteenth century to a rights-based approach which recognises the child as a person of value whose views are deserving of respect and who is entitled to contribute to decisions affecting her care and upbringing. The first of the charitable organisations which sprang up for the protection of children in the late 19th century was the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, formed in 1874, following the case of Mary Ellen McCormack, in which a church worker had eventually to rely on the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to secure the child's removal from an abusive foster mother. The New York Society was quickly followed by the Liverpool and London Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, founded in 1883 and 1884 respectively. The latter became the UK's National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) in 1889. The New South Wales Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSWSPCC), modelled on the NSPCC, was established in 1890, followed swiftly by the Victorian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (VSPCC) in 1894, and the Western Australian Children's Protection Society in 1906 (CPSWA) (Scott and Swain, 2002).

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Creating a family life for a child through adoption
    • Abstract: Simmonds, John
      Adoption has had a long-standing presence in the United Kingdom. Over the last 20 years adoption has been firmly embedded in government policy as an option for children who have come into State Care and cannot safely return to the birth parents or other family members within the child's timescale. The child's urgent need to establish a strong relational world centred on the adults who they experience as their parents cannot be overestimated. However, the enforced termination of the legal and experiential relationship between the birth parents and child creates a powerful set of experiences for the birth parents - a strong sense of mistrust, disempowerment, coercion, injustice and conflict. This has resulted in various challenges to the adoption sector including an inquiry and report from the British Association of Social Workers into the ethical and human rights position of social workers when it comes to adoption (Featherstone, Gupta, and Mills, 2018). Other challenges focus on the morality of government setting targets for local authorities regarding the number of children they must place for adoption, or the consequences of government policy which removes core support services from vulnerable families and, in the process, creates poverty and deprivation, and with the 'solution' being to place children with 'middle class' parents. There have been a number of protests or campaigns about 'stolen babies' or children ripped from the arms of their parents by social workers. Adoption is a powerfully conflictual and conflicted area of policy and practice.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - AT a crossroad: Residential treatment - not whether, but who,
           what, and for what purpose
    • Abstract: English, Diana J
      Child welfare services in general and out-of-home placement including residential treatment in particular are at a crossroad (AACRC, 2009). Changes in policy, practice, and program development, and the availability of data and research to inform these changes, are having an impact on the future direction of placement services to children, youth, and families. The use of data and analytics to improve outcomes for children/youth/families can apply at all levels of the child welfare system from intake through to permanency. This article focuses on the use of data and research in developing and improving targeted and effective trauma-focused services across the child welfare continuum, with specific emphasis on children/youth removed from parental care and placed in higher levels of out-of-home care such as congregate care (CC).

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Stability and permanence in long‑term foster care
    • Abstract: Biehal, Nina
      This article compares pathways and outcomes for children in two types of permanent placement: long-term foster care and adoption. Concern about providing permanent family placements for children in care dates from the early 1970s, prompted by research in the United Kingdom and United States which showed that many children drifted in foster care with no apparent plan for their long-term care and upbringing (Fanshel and Shinn, 1978; Goldstein, Freud, and Solnit, 1973; Rowe and Lambert, 1973). The studies highlighted the potential consequences of the lack of a permanent family for children's psychosocial development and contributed to growing recognition of the need to place children in families which could provide them with stable, long-term relationships (Adcock, 1980; Maluccio and Fein, 1983; Triseliotis, 1980b).

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Collaborating for the public good: Working across boundaries to
           inform preventive services for birth mothers who have lost children from
           their care
    • Abstract: Broadhurst, Karen
      Between 2014 and 2017, I was fortunate to lead a team of academic and practice colleagues who produced the first mixed methods study of birth mothers and recurrent care proceedings in England. The study was funded by the Nuffield Foundation and was prompted by increasing national concerns about what is termed the 'repeat removals' problem in the English Family Court (Broadhurst and Mason, 2013; Broadhurst, Shaw, Harwin, and Alrouh, 2014; Cox, 2012).1By repeat removals, I refer to women's experience of successive family court proceedings and multiple losses of infants and children from their care on account of child protection concerns. Our work has been widely cited as catalysing change in the availability of intensive preventative services in England and Wales and further afield, by evidencing the scale of women's vulnerability to recurrent care proceedings. In this article, rather than rehearse the team's findings, which have been widely reported elsewhere (Broadhurst, Alrouh, Yeend, Harwin, Shaw, Pilling and Kershaw, 2015a; Broadhurst, Mason, Bedston, Alrouh, Morriss, McQuarrie, Shaw and Kershaw, 2017) and covered annually by the UK national press (e.g. BBC Today Programme, 2015; The Guardian 2016; BBC Radio Wales, 2019), I will focus on the value of collaborating across academic and practice boundaries in both the conduct of research and delivery of practice change.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Identifying parents who show capacity to make and sustain
           positive changes when infants are at risk of significant harm
    • Abstract: Ward, Harriet; Brown, Rebecca; Blackmore, Jenny; Hyde‑Dryden, Georgia; Thomas, Caroline
      When there are serious child protection concerns, is it possible to distinguish between those parents who have the capacity to make significant changes to harmful behaviour patterns and lifestyles within an appropriate time frame and those who do not' What are the features that distinguish those parents who have the capacity to make such changes' How are such changes not only initiated, but also sustained'

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 54 - Help seeking and help providing in Ireland
    • Abstract: Devaney, Carmel; Rodriguez, Leonor; Cassidy, Anne
      Recent developments in the Irish child welfare system have involved a targeted move towards the provision of accessible help at a more timely point for children, young people and their families. It is widely accepted that preventing maltreatment or minimising the harm experienced by children and young people is the desired approach in social service provision. The rhetoric of prevention and early intervention has been [almost] centre stage in Ireland for well over a decade (Devaney and Dolan, 2017). However, it is only in the very recent past that this has translated into a practical orientation within service provision. Prior to this, there was quite a different landscape in children and families services. The current statutory child and family agency, Tusla, was established in 2014 as part of a comprehensive reform and consolidation of child protection, early intervention and family support services in Ireland. Before Tusla was established, child protection and welfare was delivered as part of a wider health and social services programme including hospital and primary care (Burns and McGregor, 2019). Prevention and family support services played an important but relatively minor part in terms of resources and staffing in the former statutory structures and was delivered more prominently within the voluntary and community sector (See Burns and McGregor, 2019; Devaney and McGregor, 2016; Devaney and Rooney, 2018). However, there has been a significant reorientation in this regard. Tusla now has a dedicated programme of Prevention, Partnership and Family Support (PPFS), which operates within its child protection and welfare function. This paper considers the traditional attitudes to, and arrangements for, help seeking and help providing in Ireland and debates the current approaches and their potential.

      PubDate: Tue, 30 Jun 2020 22:39:35 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - From silos to synergy: Connecting and integrating family and
           community assets and strengths
    • Abstract: Hayes, Alan; Day, Jamin
      Strong, resilient and adaptable societies are built on the foundations of their cultural, material and human assets and their capacity to mobilise the strengths of families and communities. As a social species, human adaptive capacity, capability and, ultimately, survival reflect the evolution of our ability to harness the diverse assets, strengths and resources of communities and families (DeFrain and Asay, 2007). Collectively these have enabled us to adapt to the constancy of change, solve the challenges that confront each generation and move progressively from problems to prospects. Many of the most complex family and community challenges have longstanding origins that span generations. One generation's successes and triumphs, however, can be another's burden. Contemporary crises, in part, are products of some of the 20th century's significant successes, as changes in one area tend to have intersecting impacts on other areas of family and community functioning.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - From the guest editors
    • Abstract: Hartman, Deborah; Stuart, Graeme
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - The hunter co-operative inquiry group
    • Abstract: Howard, Amanda; Ellis, Carolyn; White, Jen; Howman, Catharina; Hornery, Jacqueline; Dibley, Rani; Holmes, Lee-Anne; Cook, Sue; Gleeson, Jay; Pearce, Irene; Davies, Louise; Girdlestone, Debbie; Huggett, Tina
      The Hunter Co-operative Inquiry Group comprises front line workers, team leaders, coordinators, managers and a university researcher. We research together on topics related to work with children and families. We are committed to participatory and action oriented research which links directly to practice. We come from a range of educational and professional backgrounds including early childhood, social work, social science and early intervention.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Educating practitioners in using and interpreting data
    • Abstract: Ruse, Julie Hourigan
      For too long practitioners have successfully avoided engaging with data. Practitioners did the people work and the finance or management team did the data and reporting work. That separation is outdated, unhelpful and simply wrong. Using outcomes data to build the evidence base is not solely the work of a data analyst. It is the work of practitioners. In fact, it is crucial part of their work, and it is highly valuable.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Engaging human services with evidence-informed practice [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Bourne, Kerrell
      Review(s) of: Engaging human services with evidence-informed practice, by Debbie Plath, NASW Press, 2017.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - 'Purnu Kapi Muna'-the story of the Coolamon and the Spinifex:
           Contextualising collective impact in the Barkly region of the Northern
           territory
    • Abstract: Lock, Carrie; Hartman, Deborah
      Nearly 75% of the population of the vast Barkly Region (Northern Territory, Australia) is Indigenous, many of whom speak one of several local Aboriginal languages. Connected Beginnings in Tennant Creek, the main town in the Barkly, with a population of 3000, adopted a creative approach to explain Collective Impact (CI) to local stakeholders by using local images and words.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Strengthening the prevention delivery system for children in
           disadvantaged communities through infrastructure development
    • Abstract: Branch, Sara; Freiberg, Kate; Homel, Ross
      In Australia the most severe levels of social, health and economic disadvantage are concentrated in just 1.5% of 2,147 localities which have remained largely unchanged over the past 30 years (Vinson, 2007). The complexity, multidimensionality, and resistance to change of "wicked problems" (Bronfenbrenner, 2005; Gray, 1985; Rittel and Webber, 1973, p.1160) are increasingly viewed as demanding the use of comprehensive multisectoral developmental-ecological approaches with a geographical or 'place-based' focus in order to be able to respond to the specific needs of each community (Chilenski, Ang, Greenberg, Feinberg, and Spoth, 2014; Hawkins et al., 2015; Kania and Kramer, 2011). These approaches typically involve stakeholders from a range of professional domains and program and policy areas working collectively with community residents and local organisations (Bronfenbrenner and Evans, 2000; Fagan, Hawkins, Catalano, and Farrington, 2019). Thus, just as the social forces that perpetuate poverty are intertwined, so too are effective solutions (Schorr, 1998).

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Evidence-informed practice and the integration of research,
           policy, teaching and practice in family services
    • Abstract: Stewart, Graeme; Hartman, Deborah
      There is an increasing emphasis on evidence-based programs and practice in the professions of family work, child protection, social work and related fields (Gray, Joy, Plath, and Webb, 2015; McArthur and Winkworth, 2013; Plath, 2017; Shlonsky and Ballan, 2011; Toumbourou et al.,12017; Walsh, Rolls Reutz, and Williams, 2015). In Australia, government funding for family and community services is increasingly dependent on the implementation of evidence-based or evidence-informed practice and evidence-based programs both nationally (Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, 2012; Department of Social Services, 2014; Robinson and Esler, 2016) and at state level (Western Australian Department for Child Protection and Family Support, 2016; NSW Family and Community Services, 2016; State of Victoria Department of Health and Human Services, 2016). Yet 'evidence' is a contested term and there are a range of definitions and conceptualisations of evidence in family services.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Permanency with lifelong connections: Casework practices to
           support positive relationships between carer and birth families
    • Abstract: Wright, Amy Conley; Collings, Susan
      In Australia, the emerging model of child welfare policy and practice emphasises 'permanency and lifelong connections with birth families'. In 2014,1amidst widespread public concern about an increase in the numbers of children in out of home care, the Commonwealth Government established a national parliamentary inquiry, overseen by the Senate Community Affairs Reference Committee (Commonwealth of Australia, 2015). Its terms of reference included investigation of best practice models of care, consistency of approach across the country, and the extent to which children in care retained a connection to birth family. The committee called for Commonwealth Government leadership on a nationally consistent approach to the out-of-home-care system, and the inquiry has led to widespread reforms to improve placement security, consistency in legal decision-making and permanency practices across Australia (Commonwealth of Australia, Parliamentary Debate, 2017).

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Startts in schools: Integrating evaluation and practice to
           support students from refugee backgrounds
    • Abstract: Momartin, Shakeh; McGrath, Kevin F; Nemorin, Shaun; Coello, Mariano; da Silva Miranda, Edielson; Bibby, Helen
      The New South Wales Service for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture and Trauma Survivors (STARTTS) is a state-wide not-for-profit organisation established to provide specialised services to traumatised people from refugee and refugee-like backgrounds in New South Wales (NSW),1Australia. The STARTTS in Schools program is a collaborative, multidisciplinary initiative that works in close partnership with schools and other education stakeholders to provide a range of services to refugee students and school staff. These services include individual counselling, neurofeedback and group programs for students, psychoeducation groups for parents, community development projects, professional development training for school staff, and clinical consultation services for school counsellors. These services are underpinned by a trauma-informed biopsychosocial systemic model of therapeutic intervention and evaluated using a range of measures to ensure STARTTS in Schools is both effective and evidence based.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Driving culture change from within: A peak body and an engaged
           sector
    • Abstract: Foote, Wendy
      This article considers the role played by the Association of Children's Welfare Agencies (ACWA), the peak body for child welfare agencies providing out-of-home care (OOHC) in NSW, through the development of its two flagship tools and resources: Step by Step Foster Carer Assessment Tool (SbS Assessment Tool) and Shared Stories, Shared Lives (SSSL Training Package) (Mulroney, 2019). The unique role that ACWA played during the development of these resources demonstrates how collective action, instigated by a membership body, can drive practice changes in a sector. Over time, the use of review and development ensured these resources were responding to sector needs which were current at the time. The importance of this work is highlighted by the resources contribution to developing a sector-wide practice culture based on robust methodology and practice benchmarks.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 53 - Step by step: Mirroring practice or driving practice in
           NSW'
    • Abstract: Mulroney, Louise
      The Association of Children's Welfare Agencies (ACWA) is a peak body for child and family welfare services in NSW, with a particular focus on services for children who are unable to live with their families because of child protection concerns. For almost 20 years, ACWA has been developing tools for agency staff to use when training and assessing carers. The method employed for the development of these tools has always been consultative with the aim of ensuring that the tool(s) being developed will meet the needs of the sector.

      PubDate: Wed, 26 Feb 2020 14:16:12 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - Australian children in kinship care-hidden in plain sight'
    • Abstract: Kiraly, Meredith
      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - The not-for-profit sector-a time to reflect, regroup and
           recommit in a world of change
    • Abstract: Fitzgerald, Robert
      In acknowledging the traditional owners and custodians of the land upon which we meet, I wish to briefly reflect on one aspect of the Royal Commission. Throughout the life of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse I heard from many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Australians who suffered abuse in various institutions around Australia. I have also dealt and worked with many of their organisations. We held numerous sessions on country around Australia and conducted many private and group sessions in which the experience of past abuses were shared. There is no doubt that the adverse impacts of that abuse were exacerbated by the pain and suffering of other cultural abuses, including dispossession, forced removal of children and the deaths of siblings and relatives in custody. The thing that was remarkable, and is still remarkable to me, is, despite all this, their extraordinary generosity of spirit. It's true to say that I could never be as generous if what had happened to their community, their culture, their families, had happened to me. So I want to acknowledge the generosity of spirit we saw in so many of the survivors and victims of child abuse from all backgrounds who came through to the Royal Commission.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - The practitioner's role in statutory kinship care: "It's a
           minefield!"
    • Abstract: Borenstein, Juliette; Frederico, Margarita; McNamara, Patricia
      Challenges abound for practitioners working in statutory kinship care, where children subject to protective intervention are looked after by relatives, friends or other members of their community (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW], 2018). For program staff either new to practice, or who have developed their skills managing foster care placements, working with kinship families has required new thinking and a different professional repertoire. This practice innovation, largely practitioner-led, follows a shift in statutory preference from unrelated foster care to kin care (S.10 (h) Children, Youth and Families Act 2005), and a rapid increase in the number of children placed with family or friends: from 12,499 in 2007 to 22,639 in 2017 (AIHW, 2008, 2018). In 2017 49.5% of children in out-of-home care in Australia were being cared for by kin, compared with 38% in foster care (AIHW, 2018). This practice shift has left research and policy development lagging, and there are indications that the service response has not been delivering the financial and practical support that kinship families need (Commonwealth of Australia, 2014 and 2015; Breman, 2014; Qu, Lahausse, and Carson, 2018).

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - The impact of carer's life stage on support needs:
           Implementation of a new kinship care practice framework
    • Abstract: Di-Blasio, Merilyn
      Since the beginning of human history children have been cared for in various ways by people other than their biological parents. In many cultures around the world the concept of kinship encompasses a wide circle of people known to the child, and the adults and elders within many traditional communities share responsibility for the wellbeing and raising of the children.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - Kinship care in Australia-making it a national issue
    • Abstract: Kiraly, Meredith
      Tim Ireland's Keynote Address is a hard act to follow. I would just like to comment that I've done some research work with Indigenous organisations in Victoria and I have always come away thinking that the way the workers in these services engage warmly and respectfully with the people they work with, is something we could all learn a lot from for working with people everywhere.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kinship care
    • Abstract: Ireland, Tim
      Thank you-and thank you to Drs Eruera and Ruwhiu. Thank you for sharing your journey at home in integrating Indigenous perspectives and seeking to have your voices heard strongly in the welfare of your families and communities.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - My life as a young kinship carer
    • Abstract: Batty, Caryn
      I would first like to acknowledge the traditional owners of the land that we're meeting on and pay my respects to elders past present and future. It's very humbling to see so many people here today to meet on this issue. I feel a lot of support that I suppose I haven't felt before and seeing as there's so many people here that actually care. It's wonderful.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - "Where do I come from'": A finding family trial
    • Abstract: Roff, Joanne; Adamovskis, Daina
      "Where do I come from'" is a fundamental question for children and young people in statutory care trying to develop a sense of belonging and identity. This paper will discuss a pilot program to assist children and young people to locate and reconnect with family that was initially self-funded by Integrated Family and Youth Services (IFYS), a Queensland non-government agency, and later expanded into a Finding Family initiative called Family and Connection. This program operates in the current context of Queensland's child protection system and takes a holistic approach to exploring children's extended family and potential networks of family, community and culture.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - Permanency reform in NSW - reflections on statutory kinship
           care provision in the NSW permanency support program environment
    • Abstract: Moore, Kerry
      Extended family stepping in to take on the day to day caring of a loved one's child when they can no longer continue parenting, is core to normal human social functioning. We know that in many cultures across the world child rearing is shared amongst wide kinship and social networks (Gillies, Edwards, and Horsely, 2017). In Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, the concept of kinship is complex and profound with the continuity of cultural and kinship knowledge being central (QATSICPP, 2018).

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - Child protection Australia 2017-18
    • PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 51 - Kinship care: Increasing child well-being through practice,
           policy, and research [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Donoghue, Sheila; Stacey, Jaimee
      Review(s) of: Kinship care: Increasing child well-being through practice, policy, and research, by Ramona W. Denby, Springer Publishing Company LLC., 2016.

      PubDate: Tue, 7 Jan 2020 02:24:29 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - International Kinship care in Australia: Issues and needs of
           young immigrants
    • Abstract: Rose, David; Serr, Klaus
      "Over the decade from 2008 to 2017, 3,627 orphans without parental care migrated to Australia under the provisions of the Orphan Relative visa stream to live with and to be cared for by their extended relatives. They came from a wide range of countries and situations, including from Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Sudan and Somalia, and arrived in various states of vulnerability due to their experiences of conflict and displacement. While it is clear international kinship care placements are a big adjustment for carers and orphans, little is known about the issues and needs affecting both groups and the related service system implications.

      This paper draws on findings from two phases of a qualitative study into the needs and experiences of children and young people on orphan relative visas in Australia. The first phase of the study interviewed professionals working with orphan relative visa holders and the second phase interviewed young people about their experiences. This paper provides a brief overview of the needs of children, young people and their kinship carers identified through this study and discusses some of the broader policy and practice implications."

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - Kinship carer assessments: An Anglo-Welsh perspective
    • Abstract: Hunt, Joan
      This article focuses on kinship carer assessments in two countries of the United Kingdom-England and Wales. After outlining the legal and organisational context, it sets out the risk and protective factors identified in research and the key elements that the research and practice literature suggest should be included in a comprehensive carer assessment. It then reports on the challenges facing practitioners conducting assessments, drawing on the author's recent research on the experiences of specialist kinship social workers, before briefly considering research on carers' experiences of assessment. It concludes with some thoughts on possible ways forward in England and Wales to deal with the issues that have emerged.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - Woon-yah Ngullah Goorlanggass - caring for our children: A
           culturally strong, therapeutic kinship care for Aboriginal children, young
           people and their families
    • Abstract: Kickett, Glenda; Chandran, Shaun; Mitchell, Janise
      "Woon-yah Ngullah Goorlanggass-which means 'Caring for Our Children' in the Nyungah language-is an innovative therapeutic kinship care program to support Aboriginal kinship carers that is delivered by the Australian Childhood Foundation in south-west Western Australia.

      The number of Aboriginal children and young people living in kinship care has grown dramatically over the last decade, and kinship care is now the fastest growing form of out of home care for Aboriginal families across Australia. Children and young people coming into care often present with a complex matrix of needs and challenges that to date have neither been well understood nor responded to. The intergenerational trauma that has so deeply impacted Aboriginal families and communities also contributes to Aboriginal kinship carers experiencing a range of vulnerabilities and unique challenges. Their cultural obligation to care for children who are family and extended family places further pressures on them. This paper explores the use of trauma-informed approaches embedded within a cultural framework and highlights the positive outcomes this way of working has had for Aboriginal children, young people and their families."

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - Support for children in Kinship Care from the Commonwealth,
           States and Territories of Australia - a national policy survey
    • Abstract: Kiraly, Meredith
      In 2018 the NSW Association of Children's Welfare Agencies (ACWA) commissioned an advocacy project entitled 'Kinship Care: Making it a National Issue'. A major element of the project was a survey that explored policy and program support for children in kinship care (both informal and formal) from the Commonwealth, States and Territories of Australia. This article summarises the survey data, identifies key issues and provides recommendations for action. A more detailed description of the data collected appears in a full report that is cited in this article.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - Beyond poverty and disadvantage - achieving wellbeing for all
           Australian children in Kinship Care
    • Abstract: Kiraly, Meredith
      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child placement
           principle: A guide to support implementation
    • PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - Assessing and supporting family and friends care - a practice
           tool
    • Abstract: Hunt, Joan
      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - The Mirabel family: How we provide support
    • Abstract: McCrea, Elizabeth
      "This article describes the operations of the Mirabel Foundation which operates in Victoria and New South Wales to provide support for children in kinship care who have been orphaned or abandoned due to parental illicit drug use. Starting in 1998 with four families, Mirabel has grown to provide support for nearly 1,000 families in 2019, including around 1,700 children and young people. With the

      philosophy of ""every child deserves a childhood"", the Mirabel programs aim to give the children and teenagers the fun experiences many have missed in their early years. These include camps and day activities, intensive youth support, carer support groups, family camps and advocacy for families. Program aims include building self-esteem and confidence, breaking down the sense of isolation felt by both children and carers, providing positive role models, and helping carers to encourage the children to follow their dreams. The Mirabel families discover that they are not alone to deal with the effects of illicit drug use in their families, but part of a large network of others in similar situations who understand and who do not judge."

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - New beginnings: Issues and needs in international kinship care
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ellis-Maguire, Geraldine
      Review(s) of: New beginnings: Issues and needs in international kinship care, by Klaus Serr and David Rose, Australian Scholarly Publishing 2016.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - Kinship Carers: A perspective from the ground up
    • Abstract: Erben, Sue
      As administrator of a large Australia-wide Facebook group for kinship carers, combined with her own personal experience of being a kinship carer, the author describes some of the obstacles she believes many kinship carers encounter. The topics she discusses include: lack of recognition of the kinship caring role, social isolation, relationships between carers and caseworkers, and financial stress.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 52 - The emergence of Kinship Carers Victoria
    • Abstract: McLeish, Anne
      This article describes the inception, development and operations of Kinship Carers Victoria (KCV), the only Australian state-based peak body to represent kinship carers separately from foster carers. KCV was founded in 2010 to promote community understanding of kinship care and the role that kinship carers play in the lives of vulnerable children, and to provide support to kinship carers. The organisation places the United Nation Convention on the Rights of the Child at the centre of its operations. Its activities include advocacy with government and carer support through the provision of resources and information, kinship carer support groups and referral to relevant services.

      PubDate: Wed, 1 Jan 2020 00:06:46 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - From the guest editor
    • Abstract: Nevile, Ann
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Using evidence to improve outcomes
    • Abstract: Chilvers, Marilyn; Adams, Samantha; Osborn, Mary
      The New South Wales Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) delivers services to people who are disadvantaged or vulnerable. The aim of these services is to impact client pathways to improve their lifetime outcomes. However, to date there has only been limited evidence and measurement of whether these services have been impacting in the way intended or if clients' outcomes have improved. To overcome this issue, in 2015 FACS initiated the development of an outcomes framework methodology to enable the systematic tracking and prioritisation of client outcomes.

      This article focuses on development of the Human Serices Outcomes Framework and how it will generate evidence that will improve outcomes for clients. In the first section the following are discussed: application of a life course pathway trajectory approach; utilisation of information from seven wellbeing domains: Social and Community/Education and Skills/Empowerment/Economic/Safety/Health/Home; and incorporation of Amartya Sen's capabilities approach. In the next section key elements in applying the Outcomes Framework to FACS are discussed using Early Intervention as an example. The article concludes with a brief discussion of activities (scheduled for 2018-19) which will further embed the Framework in FACS' strategic and operational commissioning.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Volunteer family connect: A matter of trust
    • Abstract: Nevile, Ann; Tucker, Jayne Meyer
      Low levels of trust between funding agencies and service providers can have a detrimental effect on outcomes for service users. Volunteer Family Connect: A matter of trust, explores the critical factors that have enabled trust to be developed and maintained in Volunteer Family Connect, a project that comprises an early intervention program for families with pre-school children and a research component that aims to make a significant contribution to the evidence base around volunteer home visiting.

      Because of the high levels of trust between funder, service providers and research academics, the project has been able to overcome the challenges presented by funding difficulties, practice and research differences, and numerous changes in personnel. The relationships upon which the continued success of Volunteer Family Connect depend were built over a number of years and the key to maintaining those relationships over a six-year period has been an enabling leadership approach combined with a very clear shared goal. The enabling leadership approach has meant valuing the contributions of participants in the project, identifying common ground and, at times, finding different alternatives to keep the project moving forward.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Cooking the golden goose': Purchaser-provider relationships
           in out-of-home care
    • Abstract: Mason, Jennifer
      The best evidence is that 'stewardship' or relational contracting arrangements are more likely to produce outcomes consistent with the social mission of NGOs than a 'command and control' approach based on intensive monitoring and the use of competitive market mechanisms. Discussion of funding arrangements between government and the non-government sector for the provision of out-of-home care (OOHC) in New South Wales has been couched in the language of partnership and collaboration. However, the experience of government and non-government participants, interviewed as part of a research project, shows that in practice trust is low, and contracts are prescriptively designed and monitored. The paper considers the role of the authorising environment, particularly the role of external accountability and oversight bodies, in perpetuating this expensive and unproductive contracting model.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Constructing indicators of child well-being from a child
           standpoint
    • Abstract: Fottore, Tobia; Mason, Jan
      The concept of well-being has gained increasing currency as policy makers and service providers working in the child welfare sector have aimed to shift their work from compliance based to child-centred approaches. This is also evident in the efforts of national and international monitoring agencies, who have developed indicator frameworks measuring children's well-being outcomes. However, well-being frameworks developed from children's perspectives are rare, in part because of the challenges involved in developing indicators from children's perspectives. In this paper we present a set of wellbeing indicator concepts developed from multi-stage qualitative research exploring children's understandings and experiences of well-being. We outline key domains (agency, security/safety, self/identity) and dimensions (leisure, economic well-being, health) of wellbeing derived from a child standpoint before outlining the distinctive features of these indicator concepts. We conclude by discussing implications for service provision, namely the importance of emotional complexity in service work; an emphasis on lived experience and developmental outcomes in service goals; and the necessity to consider systemic factors as impacting individual well-being.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Why should we worry about how outcomes are produced'
    • Abstract: Nevile, Ann
      Government, service providers and service users all want programs designed to assist vulnerable Australians to be successful: to achieve desired policy goals. There is also agreement that achieving desired policy goals is more likely when service providers are able to deliver high quality services. How then can governments be assured that service users are receiving high quality services'

      Assessing service quality requires information about outcomes, but it also requires information on processes (what the service provider does) and how these processes lead to desired outcomes. Where outcomes are co-produced, service providers need to understand what service users value and be prepared to trust their clients' expertise in their own lives because empirical research reveals that groups, such as children, who are seen as vulnerable, have the capacity to analyse their own situation and understand what sort of assistance will help them move forward. For its part, governments need to remove performance management or funding mechanisms that constrain agency capacity to assist service users achieve desired outcomes. I argue that governments will find it easier to do this if they adopt a different way of thinking about accountability that resolves the tension between governments' accountability and policy goals.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - The Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) trial
    • Abstract: Hodgson, Jamie; Spalding, Kate
      The NSW Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) began trialing an Out-ofHome Care Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) in 2016 with three non-government organisations: Key Assets-The Children's Services Provider (Key Assets), Burrun Dalai Aboriginal Corporation and MacKillop Family Services. The trial was extended to the FACS Mid North Coast District in 2017. The QAF provides caseworkers with up-to-date, reliable data about the safety, permanency and wellbeing of children in OOHC, including measures of five domains of wellbeing. The Parenting Research Centre (PRC) provides specialist intermediary support in the implementation of the QAF.

      This paper outlines the strategies the PRC uses to support the installation and operationalisation of the QAF, with a focus on the key elements of successful implementation: staff and supervisor competency; organisation drivers (mechanisms to create a hospitable environment for the QAF at all levels); and leadership drivers. The paper presents Key Assets' learnings and experience of the QAF trial, highlighting five priority areas for implementation: conducting a service review; flexibility and adaptability; data management; leadership; and, transferring knowledge across staff. Key Assets describe the benefits of the QAF for staff, carers and ultimately children and young people.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Commissioning for outcomes in NSW: Project report
    • Abstract: Mason, Jennifer
      The Department of Family and Community Services (FACS) in NSW is seeking to transform the way that it funds and oversights services provided by the non-government (NGO) sector, particularly the provision of out-of-home care (OOHC) to neglected and vulnerable children. Research indicates the way in which a 'commissioning' model, based on relational contracting, collaboration and trust, could function in the design of services, the construction of contracts, and the monitoring and oversight of contractual performance. This is contrasted with contractual design and administration under a traditional transactional contracting regime. The article contains the results of a workshop with government and non-government participants, which shows that despite many reform initiatives, the current experience of contracting adheres to a high control, low trust model. Current commissioning models cannot be clearly distinguished from past transactional contracting, with a lack of effective co-design, expensive and unproductive compliance activity, and no clear path to shared accountability. Participants identified, as a priority, the need to focus on strategies for meaningful engagement with children and young people as a means of achieving transition to meaningful outcomes-based commissioning.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Adoptions Australia 2017-18
    • PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Out-of-home care in Australia: Children and young people's
           views after five years of national standards
    • Abstract: McDowall, JJ
      To monitor the introduction and functioning of the National Standards for Out-of-Home Care, CREATE has conducted two extensive national surveys. The first, published in 2013, provided data which benchmarked the experiences of children and young people prior to the introduction of the Standards; while the second, published five years later in 2018, focussed on the impact of the Standards. Findings from the second survey are now available in the report 'Out-of-Home Care in Australia: Children and Young People's Views After Five Years of National Standards'.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Continual change groupwork: Being an effective group leader
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Broady, Timothy R
      Review(s) of: Continual change groupwork: Being an effective group leader, by Andrew King, (2018), Groupwork Solutions.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 50 - Engaging men's responses to family violence: A book of tools
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Brown, Thea
      Review(s) of: Engaging men's responses to family violence: A book of tools, by Andrew King, (2017), Groupwork Solutions.

      PubDate: Mon, 26 Aug 2019 15:55:50 GMT
       
  • Issue 46 - From the guest editor
    • Abstract: Matheson, Iain
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - Educational outcomes for children in care: Comparisons of
           Naplan results for children in care with the general population
    • Abstract: Chambers, Sam; Hunter, Nicole
      Education is recognised as a cornerstone of social progress and individual empowerment. In his address at the launch of the Mindset Network, Nelson Mandela remarked that education is the most powerful weapon we can use to change the world (Mandela, 2003). While Mandela was referring more broadly to education's role in reforming societies, the expression speaks aptly to the potential of education for the child or young person whose world has too often been bereft of many supportive experiences offered by a stable, non-abusive environment. Equipping these children with the benefits of education can be transformative (Gilligan, 1998); education is integral to their overall development and wellbeing, and provides a gateway to future employment and life opportunities (Tilbury, Creed, Buys, Osmond, and Crawford, 2014).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - Improving the educational outcomes of children and young people
           in out-of-home care: Lessons from a review of policy approaches in
           Australia and overseas
    • Abstract: Beauchamp, Toni
      This paper focuses on the policy changes needed to improve the educational experiences and outcomes of children and young people in out-of- home care (OOHC) in Australia. It reviews promising approaches being used in Australia (Victoria and South Australia) and overseas in the United States (US) and United Kingdom (UK).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - From the guest editor
    • Abstract: Matheson, Iain
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - The TEACHaR program: Achieving better education outcomes for
           children and young people in out- of-home care
    • Abstract: David, Laura; Wise, Sarah
      There is a growing body of international and national research on the topic of outcomes among children and young people who have experienced out-of- home care (OOHC). These children and young people are vulnerable to a range of adverse outcomes, which include an increased risk of school disengagement and underachievement compared to the student community generally (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW] 2015; Department of Education and Early Childhood Development, 2001; Ferguson and Wolkow, 2012; Fernandez, 2009; Murray and Goddard, 2014; Pecora, 2012; Riggs, 2010).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - Education and out-of-home care transitions
    • Abstract: Townsend, Michelle L; Cashmore, Judy; Graham, Anne
      In Australia there are 43,400 children and young people in out-of-home care (care), mostly due to parental incapacity, abuse and neglect (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2015). These children experience a number of significant changes in their lives in terms of who they live with, where they live, and for school-aged children, often changes in school. These changes are beyond the normative transitions that are common in the lives of children.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - 3rs+: Improving the primary school years of Australian children
           in out- of-home care
    • Abstract: McNamara, Patricia
      A positive learning experience in the primary school years can act as a powerful protector of lifelong wellbeing. Later outcomes, including secondary school achievements, transition to tertiary education, enhanced employment and life opportunities almost always build on firm educational foundations (Fernandez et al., 2013-2016; Harvey, McNamara, Luckman, and Andrewartha, 2015; Mendis, Gardner, and Lehmann, 2014; Smith and McLean, 2013). The traditional 3Rs of literacy and numeracy ('reading, riting and rithmatic') are still acknowledged as core stepping stones in learning; life and social skills, culture, physicality, self-knowledge, even a 'virtuous' moral code, and more, also need to be developing appropriately by the point of high school transition. Yet for children growing up with the state 'in loco parentis', educational outcomes have frequently been overlooked in research and in policy and program development (Townsend, 2012; Trout, Hagaman, Casey, Reid, and Epstein, 2008; Stone, 2007).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - High-quality early childhood education and care can help
           address education inequality: Background to the early childhood in foster
           and kinship care study
    • Abstract: Wise, Sarah
      The developmental and mental health status of young children in out-of-home care.

      It is important to assess and monitor the development and mental health of young children in out-of-home care (OOHC) to ensure their needs are attended to in a timely way, and the practice of clinical assessment at entry into care utilising standardised and validated screening tools is becoming both more systematic and comprehensive across Australian state and territory child protection systems (Webster, Temple-Smith and Smith, 2012; Australian Government, 2011). However, it is not routine for assessment data to be aggregated and reported in a publically accessible form. The following picture of the behaviour and development of young children in OOHC has therefore been pieced together from published development and intervention studies in Australia and comparable jurisdictions overseas. It should be noted that differences in research methods, children's ages and the application of clinical cut-offs mean that results from studies using the same assessment tools may not be directly corn parable.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - Improving access to further and higher education for young
           people in public care: European policy and practice [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Brannigan, Gillian
      Review(s) of: Improving access to further and higher education for young people in public care, by Sonia Jackson and Claire Cameron, European Policy and Practice.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - The need to do better with educating children in care in NSW
    • Abstract: Harris, Lottie; Urquhart, Robert
      Education is particularly important for children in care, as it is integral to their overall development and wellbeing, and provides an important gateway to future employment and life opportunities.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 45 - The international linkedin education of children in care
           network
    • Abstract: Matheson, Iain; Brady, Eavan; Connelly, Graham
      Over recent years, engagement in social media has become an increasingly important professional tool for many. Now with 400 million members, Linkedln has been a major part of this development. This article looks at one group on the Linked In platform: the Education of Children in Care Network.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 44 - 'What hope can look like': The first 1000 days - aboriginal and
           Torres strait islander children and their families
    • Abstract: Arabena, Kerry; Panozzo, Stacey; Ritte, Rebecca
      To ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and their children benefit from the international 1000 Days movement, an Australian Model of the First 1000 Days is being developed through a year-long, nationwide engagement process. This ongoing process has linked more than 300 participants from over 100 different organisations - including early-life researchers, research institutions, policy-makers and human rights activists - with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Service delivery organisations, peak bodies, Eiders and families. As a result of this engagement, the Australian Model has broadened the original 1000 Days concept beyond its emphasis on improving nutrition and maternal and child health to include an Indigenous-Ied holistic and ecological framework focused on comprehensive primary health care with a case management style of approach. The Model also incorporates strong Community governance processes and the running of simultaneous strengthening interventions that focus on the family environment, increasing antenatal and early years engagement, improved data collection and access, and strategies for better service use and Provision.

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 44 - Early intervention and the first thousand days of child
           development
    • Abstract: Moore, Tim; West, Sue
      There has been a greatly increased focus on the early years over the past couple of decades (Moore, 2014). This has been the result of greater knowledge about child development (eg. Shonkoff and Phillips, 2000), greater awareness of the consequences of differences in rates of school 'readiness' (Brinkman et al., 2012; Goldfeld et al., 2012), and economic analyses indicating that the Investments in early childhood are more productive than later Investments (Heckman, 2013).

      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jun 2019 16:08:10 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - From the guest editor
    • Abstract: Foote, Wendy
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Leadership capabilities for inter-professional collaboration:
           The contribution of reading strategies
    • Abstract: Apte, Judi
      Human service organisations work collaboratively in many ways. Inter-professional collaborations can bring fresh thinking towards complex problems and support innovation in service delivery. Practitioners and managers may address a client's issues collaboratively, design a practice framework collaboratively, and plan service systems collaboratively. Senge, Hamilton and Kania (2015) outline the potential benefits that can flow in a service system if effective, collective system leadership can emerge.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - The voice of YoDAA: A qualitative examination of youth alcohol
           and drug support delivered via email: Practitioner's response
    • Abstract: Northcott, Jade; O'Donnell, Renee; Munro, Cara; Crocker, Alexandra; Ennis, Dominic; Ferris, Kellie; Ryan, Deirdre; Simpson, Angela; Hall, Kate; Lawler, Siobhan
      The purpose of this paper is to present the development of an email correspondence model for the delivery of Youth Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) support that drew upon naturalistic data and practitioner reflections. Emails sent by Youth Drug and Alcohol Advice (YoDAA) practitioners between 2014 and 2015 which resulted in unsolicited feedback from service users were identified and examined for themes. The findings from this qualitative study have informed the development of the Voice of YoDAA Model, a best-practice method for delivering youth AOD support via email.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Facebook and foster care: Connection, engagement and
           organisational change: Practitioner's response
    • Abstract: Stratton, Katrina; Lund, Stephan; Gray, Denise; Potten, Liz
      Facebook has provided individuals, businesses, communities, and not-for-profit (NFP) organisations opportunities to engage and relate across traditional boundaries of practice. Roles of Facebook for NFPs include information sharing, education, action, community-building, and advocacy (Auger, 2013; Briones, Kuch, Liv, and Jin, 2011; Dunlop and Fawcett, 2008). Adopting social media is a process of organisational change, requiring innovation, buy-in from multiple stakeholders, risk management, and the development of systems and frameworks.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Case closure: An under-examined part of the case management
           cycle
    • Abstract: Cousins, Carolyn
      The beginning of the case management cycle, with tasks, goal setting, and hypothesising is usually full of professional energy. This phase is not only about engaging clients, but also engages us as workers. Clients in crisis are interesting, they need us, and they are even 'exciting' professionally (Dubowitz, 2007). We get enthused in assessing the issues and determining a plan. Then, the hard work begins. While there are some wins, often there are also setbacks. New issues emerge and we may realise clients have not been fully honest with us. We can start to lose enthusiasm and feel stuck. Quite often, it becomes clear that the issues are more entrenched, complex, and multi-layered than we initially realised. Motivation can wane. So, is it time to finish' Are we done' Some clients move away or stop engaging at this point. Others would happily see us, it seems, forever. While the decision to close is often welcomed by managers in a busy system where there are more cases to allocate, our motivations for closure can be varied, and there is little written about this part of the case management cycle.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Exploring the perspectives of practitioners on the needs and
           experiences of young refugees settling in regional Australia:
           Practitioner's response
    • Abstract: Zuchowski, Jacek; Zuchowski, Ines; Karatasas, Kathy; Achiek, Dor Akech
      Across the world large numbers of people are displaced every year and seek asylum in other countries. For example, in 2010 '...there were an estimated 43.7 million forcibly displaced people worldwide, including 15.4 million refugees, 837 500 asylum seekers and 27.5 million internally displaced persons' (Phillips, 2011, p. 1). This number is increasing with the United Nations High Commission for Refugees stating that there are currently over 52 million refugees and displaced people worldwide (UNCHR, 2016). The number of refugees settled in Australia is comparatively small-in the five-year period, 2011-2015, 70,721 humanitarian refugees were settled in Australia (Department of Social Services, 2017c).

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Personal feelings: Processing emotional responses when working
           with long-term clients
    • Abstract: Mountain, Bree
      How do you explain to friends who aren't social workers that social work isn't a job that you can always simply detach from when it hits 5pm.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - The three pillars of transforming care: Trauma and resilience
           in the other 23 hours [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Vido, Debra; Urquhart, Robert
      Review(s) of: The three pillars of transforming care: Trauma and resilience in the other 23 hours, by Howard Bath and John Seita (2018), UW Faculty of Education Publishing, The University of Winnipeg, Canada.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Domestic violence and maternal health practice
    • Abstract: Femia, Natalie
      The second and final field placement of my Bachelor of Social Work began immediately following a comprehensive unit of study titled Violence Against Women and Children. This was quite formative in embedding a foundation of knowledge on a large scope of the topic area before field placement. In particular I have since drawn on the Three Planet Model (Hester, 2011). I learnt about this in the study unit and to constantly reflect on the historical and current value bases within child protection, domestic violence, and family law, in order to better understand social work practice on the frontline within a hospital context-that is to say, the ways in which these three 'planets' are still greatly impacted by their separately developed theoretical, value, and practice bases, and overarching gendered assumptions (Hester, 2011). A significant learning and point of reflection for me throughout this field placement, specifically on the maternity ward and within the Safe Start policy and program, has involved the 'absent presence' (Humphreys and Absler, 2011) of offenders of domestic violence.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
  • Issue 49 - Talking with young people about the national framework:
           Outcomes of conversations with young people about the national framework
           for protecting Australia's children
    • Abstract:
      The National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children is an approach taken by Commonwealth, State and Territory governments, as well as non-government organisations, which is aimed at improving and ensuring the safety and wellbeing of children and young people. The purpose of the project 'Talking with young people about the National Framework' was to document young people's views about the Third Three Year Action Plan 2015-2018 (the Third Action Plan) and ensure that these views were taken into account in ongoing reviews and progressive implementation of the National Framework and Third Action Plan.

      PubDate: Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:38:04 GMT
       
 
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