Publisher: U of Florida   (Total: 11 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 11 of 11 Journals sorted alphabetically
Athanor     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Florida J. of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Florida Libraries     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ImageTexT : Interdisciplinary Comics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Public Interest Communications     Open Access  
J. of the Florida Mosquito Control Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
New Florida J. of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studies in African Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Lepidoptera Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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Journal of the Florida Mosquito Control Association
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1055-355X - ISSN (Online) 2638-6054
Published by U of Florida Homepage  [11 journals]
  • EFFECT OF VEGETATION PATTERNS ON EFFICACY OF A GROUND ULV SPRAY OF
           AQUARESLIN® AGAINST A NATURAL POPULATION OF CULEX PIPIENS PALLENS

    • Authors: ZHONG-MING WANG, YAN-DE DONG, CHUN-XIAO LI, RUI-DE XUE, JING YU, DAN XING, XIAO-LONG ZHANG, YONG ZHANG, TONG YING, XIAO-PENG ZENG, TONG-YAN ZHAO
      Abstract: A field study was conducted to evaluate control efficacy of ground ultra-low-volume (ULV applications (Aquareslin® against a natural population of Culex pipiens pallens in three different vegetation areas (dense, open (grassland, and sparsely vegetated in Changping county, Beijing City, China. Over 80% population decline rates (PDRs were achieved from the different vegetation levels. Significantly higher PDR was achieved in the sparsely vegetated habitat compared to the dense and open habitats. Significant higher reduction (% of parity in female mosquitoes was found in the open grassland and sparse vegetation level, compared with the dense vegetation level. Control efficacy of ground ULV spray against a natural population of Cx. pipiens pallens was impacted by the different vegetation levels.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133842
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • FIELD EVALUATION OF AUTOCIDAL GRAVID OVITRAP AND SIRENIX TRAP AGAINST
           CONTAINER INHABITING MOSQUITOES IN SAINT AUGUSTINE, NORTHEASTERN FLORIDA

    • Authors: STEVEN SMOLEROFF, DENA AUTRY, VINDHYA ARYAPREMA, Rui-De Xue, WHITNEY Qualls
      Abstract: Mosquito control programs are utilizing cost-effective long-term autocidal traps targeting the gravid population of container-inhabiting and other mosquito species, with the aim of reducing vector populations and disease transmission risk. In this field study we directly compared the efficacy of two autocidal trap types-the Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGO) and SIRENIX mosquito trap in reducing mosquito abundances in St. Augustine, Florida to a control only site that had no autocidal traps deployed. Pre-treatment (wk1-4) and post-treatment (wk 5-14) adult mosquitoes were captured in all three sites using BG traps baited with BG lure and dry ice. Pre- and post-treatment trap counts of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, Culex quinquefasciatus, and total mosquitoes (three species together) were compared to determine significant changes in abundance. Percent reduction in abundance of each species/group at the two trap sites were calculated to evaluate the trap efficacy at controlling Aedes and Culex container mosquitoes. Aedes albopictus populations were significantly reduced (86.6%) at the SIRENIX site compared to the populations at the AGO site (67.7% reduction). Ae. aegypti populations were reduced by 72.4% at the SIRENIX site compared to 25% at the AGO site. Culex quinquefasciatus population reduction at the SIRENIX site was 59.6% compared to 11.8% at the AGO site. The total mosquito group had only 45.1% and 10.3% reduction at the SIRENIX and AGO sites, respectively. Furthers studies conducted across the entire mosquito season would be required for full understanding of the effectiveness of these traps.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133840
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • EFFECTIVENESS OF A COMMERCIAL COMPETITIVE ELISA FOR THE DETECTION OF WEST
           NILE VIRUS ANTIBODIES IN SENTINEL CHICKENS

    • Authors: STEVEN PEPER, MILTON STERLING
      Abstract: The use of sentinel chickens is a powerful tool to aid in arboviral surveillance efforts. Results from this type of surveillance is used to help guide abatement efforts for vector species. Many mosquito control programs use outsourced laboratories for testing sentinel chicken samples. This study evaluated the use of a commercially available competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) for in-house testing for West Nile virus antibodies from chicken serum. The commercial cELISA detected more positive sentinel chickens compared to the outsourced laboratory results. Results obtained from the in-house testing of chicken serum were reported sooner compared to the outsourced laboratory results, enhancing mosquito control programs timeliness for response to mosquito-borne disease.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133968
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • USING BG LURE VERSUS NON-ATTRACTANT IN STICKY TRAPS TO EVALUATE
           EFFECTIVENESS OF COLLECTING EYE GNATS (DIPTERA: CHLOROPIDAE: LIOHIPPELATES
           SPP.)

    • Authors: MICHAEL POGUE, RUI-DE XUE, QING-HE ZHANG
      Abstract: Increased number of eye gnats often cause a nuisance problem in St. Johns County, Florida, during spring and summer. Anastasia Mosquito Control District, St. Augustine often receives service requests and complaints about the eye gnat problem. Evaluation of traps is critically important for surveillance and control of nuisance eye gnats. This study was conducted to determine if sticky traps (RESCUE!® TrapStik for Flies) baited with BG Lure were more attractive to eye gnats than sticky traps without bait in Elkton, northeastern Florida. The results showed that sticky traps baited with BG Lure were more attractive to eye gnats than unbaited traps, which could be considered as a tool for surveillance and control of eye gnats.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133843
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • AN ASSESSMENT OF A LETHAL OVIPOSITION TRAP’S ABILITY TO PRODUCE
           IMMATURES OF AEDES ALBOPICTUS IN PANAMA CITY BEACH, FLORIDA

    • Authors: Michael Riles, Kaylyn Cullen, Mark Clifton, James Clauson
      Abstract: A series of tests were performed in the laboratory and in the field, 2014-2017, assessing the efficacy of the Trap ‘N’ Kill (TNK) (Springstar® Inc., Woodinville, WA) lethal ovitrap on Aedes albopictus adults and immatures. The TNK lethal ovitrap design is to attract and kill adult female mosquitoes as well as any larvae that emerge over a claimed 45-day period by utilizing the active ingredient dichlorvos. Cage trials demonstrate that the trap effectively killed wild-caught, adult mosquitoes (> 80% mortality) for up to 4 weeks (28 days). After 4 weeks, the ability of the trap to control adult mosquitoes declined reaching only 18.8 % mortality by week 7. A field trial demonstrated a similar 4-week maximum effective duration of the TNK trap when immature mosquitoes had emerged from eggs and were present in all traps after 4 weeks (6 weeks, 15.2 ± 2.56 % larvae per trap were observed). A field trial was also conducted to assess the ability of the TNK trap to reduce adult mosquito populations over a ~5-acre area in a residential neighborhood. No reduction in adult mosquito population could be detected with the trap density (5 traps/acre) and experimental conditions utilized in this trial.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133692
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • LABORATORY EXPLORATION OF TOLFENPYRAD AND NATURECIDE IN TOXIC SUGAR BAITS
           AGAINST AEDES AEGYPTI

    • Authors: DILLON STREUBER, Christopher Bibbs, GUNTER MULLER, RUI-DE Xue
      Abstract: Attractive toxic sugar baits (ATSB) are an effective mosquito control tool based on sugar feeding behaviors and oral ingestion. There is a demand from consumers for more effective active ingredients. Torac 15EC, containing tolfenpyrad, is a registered insecticide for control of agricultural pests, which may mean transferability to mosquito control. Another option, Naturecide Pest Management (NPM), is a botanical insecticide containing cedarwood and cinnamon oils for control of adult mosquitoes via contact. This study evaluated tolfenpyrad and a formulated essential oil blend added to toxic sugar baits (TSB) against adult Aedes aegypti, compared with a positive control of 1% boric acid toxic sugar bait, and untreated control. In this experiment setup, ingestions of tolfenpyrad at 1%, NPM at 1% (of finished product) TSB, and boric acid at 1% by female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes resulted in average mortality at 48 hrs were 71%, 73% and 95%, respectively. The results suggest that ingestible tolfenpyrad, Naturecide Pest Management, and boric acid TSBs may be potential tool for mosquito control strategies and programs, but the mode of action of essential oils to kill adult mosquitoes is still needed to be addressed.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133841
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • ADULTICIDAL AND LARVICIDAL IMPACTS OF THE MIXTURE OF BACILLUS
           THURINGIENSIS ISRAELENSIS AND BORIC ACID TOXIC SUGAR BAIT (TSB) AGAINST
           AEDES AEGYPTI AND CULEX QUINQUEFASCIATUS

    • Authors: TAYLOR BALLANTYNE, VINDHYA ARYAPREMA, RUI-DE XUE, WHITNEY QUALLS
      Abstract: Toxic sugar baits (TSBs) can be used to deliver insecticide material via ingestion instead of via contact through spraying of insecticides by targeting the resting and sugar-feeding behaviors of adult mosquitoes. This semi-field study aimed to evaluate the adulticidal and larvicidal dual action of a foliage spray of a TSB with a mixture of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), and boric acid against Aedes aegypti Puerto Rico (PR) strain (resistant) and Orlando (OR) strain (susceptible), and laboratory colony of Culex quinquefasciatus (Gainesville 1995 strain). The larval and adult evaluation of TSB consisted of 11% VectoBac (Valent Biosciences, Libertyville, IL; Bti), 5% boric acid, and 10% sucrose solution. The TSB intervention for adults consisted of the same as the larval intervention but had an addition of a food grade, 5g Blue No. 1 dye (Sigma Aldrich; St. Louis MO) to observe adult feeding. The controls received a 10% sucrose solution. For the larval mortality evaluation, the TSB was applied to the bromeliad with the runoff dripping into pans containing mosquito larvae. At 24 hours post-application, 100% larval mortality was observed. At all-time mortality recordings, 50 larvae were introduced into the larval pans and the bromeliads were sprayed with water to mimic rainfall allowing the remaining TSB to be washed off into the larval pans. After the 4th day of larval introductions, larval mortality was 83.5% ± 14.3 for Ae. aegypti_PR, 92.5% ± 6.1 for Ae. aegypti OR, and 97 % ±1.7 for Cx. quinquefasciatus. Total mean mortality at 72 hours post exposure for the adult TSB evaluation was 52.7% ± 24.2 for Ae. aegypti_PR, 34.3% ± 26.5 for Ae. aegypti_OR, and 73.7% ± 13.9 for Cx. quinquefasciatus. Our study suggests this TSB including Bti is effective against larvae when applied as an adulticide barrier application and could be a dual-action approach to mosquito control.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133967
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • IN-HOUSE TESTING OF MOSQUITO POOLS FOR WEST NILE VIRUS USING COMMERCIALLY
           AVAILABLE IMMUNOASSAY AND REAL-TIME REVERSE-TRANSCRIPTASE POLYMERASE CHAIN
           REACTION KITS

    • Authors: Keira Lucas, Rebecca Heinig
      Abstract: Arbovirus surveillance methods are an integral part of integrated mosquito management programs, providing information on arboviral presence, location, and transmission potential. For many vector control agencies, surveillance entails collecting vector mosquito species from the field and testing representative mosquito pools using commercially available immunoassays or real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction test kits. In 2016, the Collier Mosquito Control District established an in-house arbovirus surveillance program to screen mosquitoes for a variety of diseases, including the endemic arbovirus, West Nile virus (WNV). Although guidance on interpreting test results is provided by the manufacturer, end users of commercial test kits are encouraged to establish their own cut-off values signifying an arbovirus positive mosquito pool. Here we report the Collier Mosquito Control District’s efforts to develop cut-off values for mosquito pools using two commercially available WNV test kits.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133707
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • EFFECT OF NOZZLE ORIENTATION ON DISPERSION OF TRUCK MOUNTED ULTRA LOW
           VOLUME SPRAY AT DIFFERENT HEIGHTS AND DISTANCES

    • Authors: Muhammad Farooq, Rui-De Xue, Christopher Bibbs, James Cilek, STEVEN SMOLEROFF
      Abstract: A field evaluation study was conducted to understand the dispersion of spray from a truck-mounted ultra-low-volume (ULV) sprayer when released with the nozzle oriented at the conventional angle of 45° in addition to 22° and 0° with respect to ground surface. The study was conducted in an open grassy field at the Anastasia Mosquito Control District by applying Aqualuer™ 20-20 at the highest label application rate. Mortality of caged female Aedes aegypti was tested at 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, and 8.5 m heights at 0, 30, 60, and 90 m from the spray line. Spray trials were conducted during early morning hours and all test groups were replicated three times over different days. During these evaluations higher mortality was recorded from the 22° and 0° nozzle orientations up to 30 m from the spray line and at heights up to 3 m. The conventional nozzle orientation of 45° provided the greatest mortality 30 m from application source at heights of 6.0 and 8.5 m.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133691
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • CO-OCCURRENCE OF MOSQUITO COMMUNITIES IN DISTURBED ENVIRONMENTS USING
           MARKOV RANDOM FIELDS (MRFs) IN ST. JOHNS COUNTY, FLORIDA

    • Authors: Whitney Qualls, Madeline Steck, Rui-De Xue, Mohamed Sallam
      Abstract: The distribution of mosquito communities is predicted by complex micro- and macrohabitat systems. While macrohabitat variables are significant in modeling the distribution of individual mosquito species, the distribution of mosquito communities in disturbed urban and semi-urban environmental gradients was overlooked in most of the previous models. In our study, we used conditional Markov Random Fields (CRF) to evaluate spatial co-occurrence patterns between mosquito vectors of eastern equine encephalitis (EEEV) and west Nile virus (WNV) in a disturbed urban environment in Saint John’s County, Florida. We aimed to 1) quantify the strength and direction of spatial unconditional and conditional correlations between mosquito assemblages in disturbed environments, and 2) evaluate whether the strength of correlations between mosquito assemblages is conditional on landscape or climate variables. We leveraged the longitudinal surveillance effort using Biogents sentinel traps (BGS) conducted by Anastasia Mosquito Control Districts in disturbed urban environments during 2017-2020. The distribution of high mosquito abundance, especially Aedes albopictus, Ae. aegypti, Ae. vexans, Ae. taeniorhynchus, Culex nigripalpus, Cx. salinarius, and Cx. quinquefasciatus, were conditionally correlated with other EEEV and WNV vector species in reduced woody and herbaceous wetlands and evergreen forests (-54.44%), and in urban developed landscapes (3.44%) during 2019 and 2020. Moreover, conditional correlations between mosquito species pairs were positively associated with increased total precipitation and in areas with high average minimum and maximum temperatures. Our results show that the micro- and macrohabitat characteristics demonstrated spatial effects on distribution and correlations between species pairs of EEEV and WNV mosquito vectors across disturbed environments. Our findings could be used to better understand the joint effects of drivers on mosquito diversity at a specific locality, interspecific interactions among mosquito assemblages, and how this diversity changes across environmental gradients.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133688
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • EFFICACY TRIALS AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF FIVE FLEA TRAPS IN BAMAKO,
           MALI

    • Authors: MOHAMED TRAORE, AMY JUNNILA, EDITA REVAY, ALEXEY PROZOROV, AIDAS SALDAITIS, RABIATOU DIARRA, ROMAN YAKOVLEV, ASSITAN DIAKITE, GERGELY PETRANYI, GUNTER MULLER
      Abstract: Five off the shelf commercially available flea traps were tested for their efficacy against the cat/dog flea Ctenocephalides felis. Two traps were significantly better at catching fleas than the remaining three which performed very poorly. It is presumed that the unique combination of attractive features of the best performing Flea Catcher trap are what makes it so effective, including three large, intermittently illuminated light panels simulating host movement and additional synchronized lights in green wavelength pointed downwards to the flea catching base. Additionally, the Flea catcher has the largest surface area. Only two traps, the Flea Catcher and myFleaTrap were non-attractive to non-target insects, while the other traps caught large amounts of other insects quickly blocking the glue panels.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133837
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • FIELD EVALUATION OF LURES AS CANDIDATE ATTRACTANTS FOR COASTAL CULICOIDES
           IN FLORIDA

    • Authors: Aaron Lloyd, Daniel Kline, Daniel Hahn
      Abstract: Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae: Culicoides) along the coast of Florida are a severe biting nuisance that can impede outdoor activities. Methods currently available for biting midge control are limited due to environmentally sensitive larval habitats and the lack of adulticide techniques available for area-wide population suppression.
      Homeowners that live along the coast can protect their homes with the use of fine- meshed window screens and fans, coarse low volume adulticide applications, and adult removal via commercial mosquito traps. There are known attractants that have been used to enhance trap captures for adult mosquitoes, and it is logical to test these attractants against closely related adult hematophagous Diptera such as Culicoides. This study compared four attractant lures, octenol, BG lure, R-octenol, and USDA red blend, known to be attractive to mosquitoes, and tested them against C. furens and C. mississippiensis as an addition to increase trap capture. Although all attractants increased trap capture above the control, results from this study could not identify a lure that was significantly more attractive to Culicoides species captured in Cedar Key, Florida. Further studies evaluating species specific trap types as well as attractants are needed to develop an effective Culicoides adult trapping control system as part of an integrated biting insect control program.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133690
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • LABORATORY EVALUATION OF BIGSHOT MAXIM, REPELCARE, AND CLOVE ESSENTIAL
           

    • Authors: LEAH BANGONAN, Muhammad Farooq, STEVEN PEPER, VINDHYA ARYAPREMA, WHITNEY Qualls, Rui-De Xue
      Abstract: Synthetic acaricides have been the most used method for controlling tick populations. However, their frequent application has had negative impacts on treated animals and the environment and led to the development of resistance in tick populations. These factors generated interest and the need to find more environmentally friendly alternatives. In this study, the repellency and acaricidal effects of BigShot Maxim (AIs: cedarwood oil, cinnamon oil, thyme oil), RepelCare (AIs: turmeric oil and eucalyptus oil), and clove oil, Syzygium aromaticum L., were tested against the lone star tick, Amblyomma Americanum (Linnaeus). Despite no evidence of repellency for BigShot Maxim, RepelCare and clove oil, its disruption of the host seeking behavior after contact to the products was observed and further investigated. BigShot Maxim and clove oil were selected for mortality testing and resulted in complete mortality of male, female ticks, and nymphs with some application rates. The results from this study provide a better understanding of repellency and acaricidal effects of botanical products against the lone star tick that can be used to further improve the development of green chemistry. However, further studies are warranted before these botanical products can be implemented as effective alternatives to chemical acaricides to use in integrated vector control.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133839
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • EVALUATION ON THE ACTIVITY AND EFFICACY OF OMNIPRENE 20CS AGAINST AEDES,
           ANOPHELES AND CULEX MOSQUITOES IN OUTDOOR MICROCOSMS

    • Authors: Tianyun Su, Heng Su
      Abstract: Mosquito control by pesticides remains the main intervention to reduce the burden of mosquito nuisance and mosquito-borne diseases. In mosquito control, larviciding by application of environmentally friendly larvicides has been one of the routine operations. Larvicides based on microbial agents and insect growth regulators (IGRs) account for most of the available products. Ones that are formulated using S-methoprene ranged from microencapsulated concentrate (or capsule suspension - CS), various granules, and pellets to briquets for different habitats. The CS formulation has been among the traditional products based on S-methoprene due to its advantages of easy application, fast action, and even area coverage. The current paper evaluated a newly developed CS formulation OmniPrene 20CSTM containing 20% S-methoprene against mosquitoes of public health importance. High inhibition of emergence activity was indicated against the test species, and Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes showed higher susceptibility than Culex in laboratory bioassays. The performance under field conditions exceeded the label specification of the currently available products with the same application pattern. Over the 21-day evaluation period, the control levels ranged 86.4-100%, 89.8-100% and 79.8-100% against Aedes aegypti, Anopheles hermsi and Culex quinquefasciatus respectively when it was applied at the intended label dose of 54.8-73.1 mL/ha. This product is expected to be used as one of the viable tools along with other available products to combat mosquitoes of public health concerns.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133687
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The rise and fall of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus in Florida

    • Authors: Johnathan Day
      Abstract: St. Louis encephalitis virus has had a fascinating history in Florida. The virus was introduced into the Miami area in the early 1950s. This introduction resulted in two human outbreaks, one in 1952 and a second in 1958. Three urban SLE epidemics were reported in the Tampa Bay area in 1959, 1961, and 1962. The virus virtually disappeared from the state until 1977 when a widespread rural SLE epidemic was reported in 20 Florida counties with 110 confirmed human cases. An almost identical rural SLE epidemic was reported in 1990 when 226 human SLE cases were reported in 28 Florida counties. Following the introduction of West Nile virus into Florida in 2001, reports of SLEV transmission to sentinel chickens and humans decreased dramatically. Except for a 2014 focal outbreak of two SLE cases in Duval County, only sporadic transmission of SLEV to humans and sentinel chickens was reported in the state between 1998 and 2022.
      PubDate: 2023-05-02
      DOI: 10.32473/jfmca.70.1.133685
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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Publisher: U of Florida   (Total: 11 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 11 of 11 Journals sorted alphabetically
Athanor     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Florida J. of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Florida Libraries     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ImageTexT : Interdisciplinary Comics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Public Interest Communications     Open Access  
J. of the Florida Mosquito Control Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
New Florida J. of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studies in African Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Lepidoptera Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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JournalTOCs
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Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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