Publisher: U of Florida   (Total: 11 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 11 of 11 Journals sorted alphabetically
Athanor     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Florida J. of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Florida Libraries     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ImageTexT : Interdisciplinary Comics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Public Interest Communications     Open Access  
J. of the Florida Mosquito Control Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
New Florida J. of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studies in African Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Lepidoptera Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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Studies in African Linguistics
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0039-3533 - ISSN (Online) 2154-428X
Published by U of Florida Homepage  [11 journals]
  • The combinatorial patterns of twá 'to cut' in Asante-Twi
           (Akan):

    • Authors: Dorothy Pokua Agyepong
      Pages: 199 - 219
      Abstract: Cross-linguistically, verbs have combinatorial patterns. When the semantics of a verb combines with the semantics of its internal arguments, different interpretations are derived. These interpretations can be literal or non-literal (Ameka 2019; Spalek 2015; Rappaport Hovav 2014; Bobuafor 2013, 2018; Levin and Rappaport Hovav 2013; Ameka and Essegbey 2007; Levin 1993). Using data collected from written texts, video-stimuli descriptions, spontaneous utterances and native-speaker intuitions, this paper explores the potential combinatorial patterns of twá ‘to cut’ in Asante-Twi (Akan, Kwa-Niger Congo). I show that the verb combines with different types of internal arguments, in different argument structure constructions to derive multiple interpretations. Taking into consideration the fact that “natural language tries to minimize polysemy” (Levin and Rappaport Hovav 2013: 2), I propose a univocal lexical semantics for twá ‘to cut’ and show that its basic semantics is kept constant even in non-prototypical contexts. I argue that the use of twá ‘to cut’ in non-prototypical contexts represent contextual modulations of the verb’s single meaning. Following Spalek (2015) and Ameka (2019), I suggest that such contextual interpretations should be analysed compositionally, paying attention to the verb’s internal arguments as well as the argument structure constructions in which it occurs.
      PubDate: 2023-02-22
      DOI: 10.32473/sal.51.2.127839
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Deverbal nominalization in Runyankore

    • Authors: Larry Hyman
      Pages: 220 - 255
      Abstract: In this paper I examine eleven different processes of deverbal nominalization in Runyankore, a Lacustrine Bantu language spoken in Uganda. After establishing both general and Runyankore-specific properties that distinguish nouns from verbs, I test each of these nominalizations against 13 phonological, morphological, and syntactic criteria. Although all eleven nominalization constructions can take the determiner-like initial vowel “augment”, and all can be derived from verb bases that include derivational suffixes (“extensions”), e.g. causative, applicative, and reciprocal, only some of the nominalizations allow a pronominal object prefix or a following noun phrase object or adverbial. The various properties are tabulated to show that the different nominalizations vary along a cline, meeting all, some, or none of the nine most discriminating criteria in defining “noun” vs. “verb”.
      PubDate: 2023-02-21
      DOI: 10.32473/sal.51.2.129396
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Kiswahili-English on Public Signage: A Morpheme- By -Morpheme Approach

    • Authors: Sarah Marjie
      Pages: 256 - 276
      Abstract: Communication could be oral and written. These forms of communication may be formal or informal depending on the setting, people involved, age and class. Codeswitching is an informal form of communication. It is used most at times in oral communication. However, in recent times, its has been used extensively in written communication. This has raised issues as to whether written communication can also be a possible platform for informal communication. This study investigates codeswitching on public signage by Kiswahili –English bilinguals. The study examines how Kiswahili –English bilinguals use the two languages on public signage by structurally analysing how Kiswahili and English words are distributed in a given mixed constituent. To achieve this, Kiswahili-English codeswitched data was gathered from tokens of public signage from Kenya specifically, Nairobi. Using the Matrix Language Frame Model of Myers-Scotton, the study observes that theories propounded for oral codeswitching data could be used to analyse written communication (public signage texts) data because writers adhere to the syntax of both Kiswahili and English as stipulated by the tenets of the Matrix Language Frame Model. This is possible when the aim is to solely look at text items on public signage without keen considerations to the graphics therein that is, if the analysis is based purely on syntax. The study therefore recommends that the importance of codeswitching especially on public signage is evidence of how language is used and as accepted by members of a speech community.
      PubDate: 2023-02-21
      DOI: 10.32473/sal.51.2.124793
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The Semantics and Metaphorical Extensions of "PԐ" (To cut)
           in Nzema Communication

    • Authors: Mohammed Yakub, Cecilia Tomekyin
      Pages: 277 - 293
      Abstract: Verbs of separation and material disintegration are a category of verbs commonly referred to as ‘CUT and BREAK’ (C&B) verbs (Guerssel et al., 1985). This class of verbs has sparked a lot of arguments and discussions in the literature (cf. Guerssel et al., 1985; Levin, 1993; Essegbey, 2007; Lüpke, 2007; Majid et al., 2007; 2008; Hsiao, 2015; Agyepong, 2017). In Nzema, pɛ ‘to cut’ is the prototypical CUT- verb which describes actions that result in object separation/disintegration; usually carried out by using bladed instruments. This paper discusses the semantic extensions of pɛ ‘to cut’ in Nzema discourse. The paper employs the Cognitive Approach of Semantic Change (Sweetser, 1990) in exploring the semantic properties of pɛ, based on the cognitive-conceptual, environmental, and socio-cultural experiences of the people of Nzema. Data were obtained from primary and secondary sources. The paper demonstrates that the various extended usages have a close relationship with the original meaning of the verb. The paper also finds that the primary sense of pɛ ‘to cut’ evokes several contextual interpretations, such as pɛ awolɛ ‘cut childbearing’ (to stop procreation), pɛ azule ‘cut river’ (to travel overseas), pɛ ɔ nli ‘cut his/her mother’ (to insult one’s mother) among others. We note that the various meaning extensions of the verb are dependent on the context of use and/or communication.
      PubDate: 2023-02-21
      DOI: 10.32473/sal.51.2.125156
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Against expectations – the rise of adverbs in Swahili phasal
           polarity

    • Authors: Aron Zahran, Eva-Marie Bloom Ström
      Pages: 294 - 322
      Abstract: This article provides a first analysis of the expression of phasal polarity in Swahili. Phasal polarity (henceforth PhP) refers to linguistic concepts which express the phase of a given situation in relation to a prior and/or subsequent phase, as well as expressing whether a certain situation holds or not. These concepts, represented here in English as a meta-language with already, no longer, still and not yet, are interrelated in interesting ways and form a semantic sub-system. In contrast to many other Eastern Bantu languages, we show that the dedicated expressions for PhP concepts in Swahili are mainly adverbs, with limited use of verbal affixes. It also stands out in the area by not having any gaps in the expressibility of PhP concepts, and by making use of internal negation. In order to target present-day spoken Swahili, the results are based on speaker interviews, through the use of carefully introduced contexts. The main strategy for expressing already was through the verbal affix sha-. There is also an adverb tayari ‘ready’ to express this concept, which occurs not infrequently in our results. We show that there are differences in their distribution, and hypothesize that this could be related to an ongoing change in the use of (me)sha- in relation to perfective me-. For all other PhP concepts, adverbs are used as the main strategy. There was variability in speaker responses in the use of constructions which we have considered contextual paraphrases rather than dedicated PhP expressions. The current work is inspired by a recent increase in interest in PhP systems in languages of the African continent, previously relatively unexplored (Kramer 2021). The analysis is based on the parameters for cross-linguistic comparison as presented by Kramer (2017)
      PubDate: 2023-02-21
      DOI: 10.32473/sal.51.2.129687
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The V and CV augment and exhaustivity in Kinyakyusa

    • Authors: Jenneke van der Wal, Amani Lusekelo
      Pages: 323 - 345
      Abstract: In addition to the stem and noun class prefix, the structure of nouns in Bantu languages may contain an augment. This augment typically is a vowel, but some languages show a CV augment. Interestingly, the Bantu language Kinyakyusa shows nouns with a V as well as with a CV prefix, both of which have been analysed as augments (De Blois 1970). In this short paper we clarify the formal and functional properties of the ‘CV augment’ in Kinyakyusa. First we show that it does not behave like the V augment, but is a separate marker that is attached to the noun phrase. Second, we narrow down the previous analyses of the CV marker that describe it as ‘emphatic’ (De Blois 1970, Persohn 2020): On the basis of a range of focus tests, we argue that the CV marker functions as a marker of exhaustivity. This is remarkable, as exhaustive focus is in Bantu languages typically associated with marking in the clause and not on the noun itself.
      PubDate: 2023-02-21
      DOI: 10.32473/sal.51.2.129805
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 2 (2023)
       
 
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Publisher: U of Florida   (Total: 11 journals)   [Sort by number of followers]

Showing 1 - 11 of 11 Journals sorted alphabetically
Athanor     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Florida J. of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Florida Libraries     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ImageTexT : Interdisciplinary Comics Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Public Interest Communications     Open Access  
J. of the Florida Mosquito Control Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Veterinary Forensic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
New Florida J. of Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Selbyana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studies in African Linguistics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Lepidoptera Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
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