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Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.3, CiteScore: 0)
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Forestry Chronicle
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.3
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0015-7546 - ISSN (Online) 1499-9315
Published by Canadian Institute of Forestry Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Modernization, meet paradigm shift. Paradigm shift, meet chaos*

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      Pages: 226 - 231
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 226-231, September 2021.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-024
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Associate Editors/Corédacteurs

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      Pages: 232 - 232
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 232-232, September 2021.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-025
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Comment mettre la génomique forestière et la génomique de la
           conservation au service des communautés autochtones'

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      Authors: Lyne Touchette, Jean-Michel Beaudoin, Nathalie Isabel, Nancy Gélinas, Ilga Porth
      Pages: 233 - 249
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 233-249, September 2021.
      Les projets d’aménagement durable et de conservation (ADC) des ressources naturelles en collaboration avec les peuples autochtones ayant recours à une approche en génomique sont en émergence. Les informations et applications issues de la génomique peuvent leur être utiles particulièrement dans un contexte de changements climatiques. Toutefois, le défi de transposer ces applications dans la pratique et de les mettre au service des communautés demeure. Nous présentons ici une revue de littérature exploratoire qui aborde (1) les utilités démontrées de la génomique dans les projets d’ADC impliquant les peuples autochtones, (2) certains enjeux qui peuvent limiter l’adoption des applications de la génomique et (3) le travail collaboratif entre chercheurs et communautés autochtones dans les études analysées. Les utilités démontrées identifiées ont été essentiellement de nature socioécologique. La nature complémentaire des savoirs autochtones et des savoirs scientifiques en génomique a été reconnue comme une opportunité qui devrait être développée davantage pour relever les défis actuels, tels que les changements climatiques. En ce qui concerne l’adoption de cette technologie en ADC dans la pratique, en plus de faire face à des enjeux similaires à d’autres utilisateurs finaux, l’intégration des besoins, des valeurs traditionnelles et des connaissances des communautés autochtones dans les projets de génomique représente également un défi dans un contexte de décolonisation de la recherche en génomique. Finalement, la collaboration communauté-chercheur a été identifiée comme un élément clé pour favoriser la réussite de la transposition de la génomique en ADC.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-026
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Close-to-nature silviculture in eastern Quebec: Advances over the last
           decade

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      Authors: Robert Schneider, Laurie Dupont-Leduc, Vincent Gauthray-Guyénet, Nicolas Cattaneo, LaraMelo, Tommy Simard, Alexis Begni, Raphel Turquin, Anabelle Morache-Mercier, Samuel Pinna, Ulysse Rémillard, Charles Nock
      Pages: 250 - 262
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 250-262, September 2021.
      The increase in intensity of the harvesting of eastern Quebec’s forests has resulted in profound compositional changes at the stand level. The composition and structure of presettlement stands provide key benchmarks when implementing ecosystem-based management (EBM). A core principle of EBM is the emulation of natural disturbances, and it is hypothesized that forest resilience will be maintained. Managers have thus adapted some of their silvicultural activities to better mimic the main natural disturbances in eastern Quebec. These adaptations include using variable retention harvesting systems instead of clear-cuts and converting even-aged stands. Nevertheless, other close-to-nature silvicultural practices must be developed, as gaps between managed and unmanaged stands persist. Most importantly, there is a need to consider global change within EBM, which could be accomplished by prioritizing forest functions rather than composition or structure when establishing silvicultural objectives. Elements of the complex adaptive systems approach to increasing forest resilience can be incorporated into the larger-scale EBM approach. This could be done by considering the functional complementarity of species, forest function, and stand structure in forest management planning. These efforts must not be constrained, however, to allowable annual cut calculations, as these are not sufficiently sensitive to compare different management scenarios.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-027
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • The economic impacts of woodchip storage optimization: Reducing material
           and energy loss during transportation and storage

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      Authors: Torben Jensen
      Pages: 263 - 265
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 263-265, September 2021.
      The use of woody biomass for domestic bioenergy provides many benefits and opportunities, but also presents a challenge regarding the supply chain required for maintaining the high quality feedstock for sustained bioenergy production. This article focuses on one aspect of that supply chain – woodchip storage. To encourage the establishment of a bioenergy market and to help ensure a safe and stable fuel source, Suzanne Wetzel and Christopher Helmeste from the Canadian Forest Service, Canadian Wood Fibre Centre (CFS/CWFC) and collaborators contributed their scientific expertise to the development of a solid biofuels guide based on existing national standards from the Canadian Standard Association’s (CSA). This paper explores the potential economic impacts for bioenergy producers of implementing the CSA guidelines. These impacts include reducing material and energy loss during transportation and storage. Potential benefits were determined by cost-benefit analysis. The results of this economic impact study have significant potential implications for bioenergy producers, including the integration of economic considerations in the development of policies for biomass feedstock optimization for the Canadian bioenergy industry.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-028
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Economic impacts of short rotation woody crops in Canada

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      Authors: Torben Jensen, Tim Keddy, Derek Sidders
      Pages: 266 - 270
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 266-270, September 2021.
      Canada is seeking cost-effective means to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, particularly CO2. One of the promising means is the short rotation woody crops (SRWC) plantation, a silvicultural approach to establishing and managing fast growing plantations on previously cleared lands. This paper utilizes the data set provided by recent harvesting operations at the Ellerslie SRWC Technical Development Site in Edmonton (Alberta) to assess the ability of SRWC using High Yield Afforestation to mitigate GHG emissions and generate more wood fibre and the investment attractiveness to establish future plantations. Results illustrate that at current trading prices for carbon credits and market prices of woodchips, expected rates of return on investment for SRWC were relatively low, despite a positive net present value ($400/ha for 20 year planting cycle without carbon credits). However, estimates from the Ellerslie site indicate that 330 tons of CO2-eq per hectare are captured above and below ground over the 20 year plantation cycle. However, higher future carbon prices, a well-developed market for buying and selling carbon credits, as well as adapted policy including additional government sponsored programs for carbon credits, could make SRWC more attractive and dramatically change the economics of afforestation in the future.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-029
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Economic impacts of partial harvesting: Mitigating mid-term timber supply
           shortages as a result of pest outbreaks

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      Authors: Torben Jensen, Jean-Martin Lussier
      Pages: 271 - 276
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 271-276, September 2021.
      Natural disturbances such as pest outbreaks have a significant impact on forest dynamics and services, including the loss of mature stands. From a wood production perspective, these disturbances can lead to long-lasting imbalances in the overall age-class structure of the forest, potentially resulting in a shortage of mature harvestable stands. Researchers from Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan) Canadian Forest Service (CFS) have made a timber supply analysis of the Dunière forest located in the centre of the Gaspé Peninsula (Québec). This region suffers from an age-class structure imbalance caused by an eastern spruce budworm (ESB) outbreak that ended in 1984, and is consequently facing a reduced annual allowable cut, leading to long- term implications for the regional forest sector. The authors suggest that partial harvesting – the removal of a proportion of timber in a mature stand several years before a final cut is carried out – is a promising opportunity in the ESB-affected area for mitigating mid-term timber supply shortages by smoothing the fibre supply over time.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-030
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Economic potential of adopting genomic technology in Alberta’s tree
           improvement sector

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      Authors: Shuo Wang, Henry An, Wei-Yew Chang, Chris Gaston, Barb R. Thomas
      Pages: 277 - 299
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 277-299, September 2021.
      The adoption of genomic technology and the use of improved seeds are expected to improve timber productivity in Alberta. However, this improvement will need to take place within the confines of the public-private nature of the sector where 93% of the total forest area is publicly owned. The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which a timber harvest policy known as the allowable cut effect can affect the welfare outcomes of adopting genomics-assisted tree breeding. Using the forest industry of Alberta as the empirical setting, the economic returns to the adoption of this new breeding technology in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud. var. latifolia Engelm.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) are calculated by estimating a timber supply model and a spatial equilibrium model. Under certain policy and technology improvement scenarios, the economic returns are negative, which would result in non-adoption of the technology. However, under other feasible conditions, the payoffs of genomics-assisted tree breeding research are large and positive. These results illustrate the important role that government policies can have on the returns to adopting new technologies.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-032
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • How to put forest and conservation genomics into motion for and with
           Indigenous communities'

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      Authors: Lyne Touchette, Jean-Michel Beaudoin, Nathalie Isabel, Nancy Gélinas, Ilga Porth
      Pages: 300 - 314
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 300-314, September 2021.
      Sustainable management and conservation (SMC) projects for natural resources in collaboration with Indigenous Peoples using a genomics approach are increasing in number. Information and tools/applications derived from genomics can be useful to them, particularly in the context of climate change. However, the challenge of translating these applications into practice and harnessing them to serve Indigenous communities remains. We present an exploratory literature review that addresses: (1) the demonstrated utility of genomics in SMC projects involving Indigenous Peoples, (2) some issues that may limit the adoption of genomics tools, and (3) the collaborative work between researchers and Indigenous communities in the analyzed studies. The demonstrated uses identified were largely of a socioecological nature. The complementary nature of Indigenous knowledge and scientific knowledge in genomics was recognized as an opportunity that should be further developed to address current challenges such as climate change. Regarding the adoption into practice of this technology in SMC projects, in addition to similar issues with other end users, the integration of the needs, traditional values and knowledge of Indigenous communities in genomics projects also represents a challenge in the context of the decolonization of genomics research. Finally, community-researcher collaboration was identified as a key element in promoting the successful uptake of genomics in SMC.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-031
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Intensive moose browsing and small-scale domestic woodcutting impacts on
           forest successional trajectories in Gros Morne National Park, Canada

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      Authors: Shannon White, Xinbiao Zhu, Fanrui Meng, Scott Taylor, Charles P.-A. Bourque
      Pages: 315 - 325
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 315-325, September 2021.
      Moose (Alces alces L.) browsing in Gros Morne National Park has damaged its balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.)-dominated forest. A forest estate model was used to evaluate (i) the impacts of moose browsing and woodcutting on forest succession and (ii) strategies of forest restoration through planting and moose population management. The simulation results show that under current heavy browsing pressure growing stock of balsam fir decreases by 38%, but the area of spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP and P. glauca (Moench) Voss) increases by 32% over a 100-year planning horizon, compared to that under light browsing scenario which is assumed to be similar to the forest outside the Park due to moose population management. Annual allowable cut (AAC) for the Park’s 19 400 ha domestic harvest area is estimated to be around 120 979 m3 in a light browsing scenario, 21% higher than the sustainable harvest level in a heavy browsing scenario. The model forecasts a 97% reforestation of the Park’s 7 194 ha disturbed area by planting in the heavy browsing scenario, leading to an increase in total forest growing stock by 22% and AAC by 12%. Integration of planting with moose population management could be a more efficient way of restoring forest under high browsing pressure in GMNP.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-033
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Twenty-six years of aspen regeneration under varying light conditions in a
           boreal mixedwood forest

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      Authors: Holly D. Deighton, Arthur Groot, Nelson Thiffault, Mya Rice
      Pages: 326 - 342
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 326-342, September 2021.
      Density, height, and diameter at breast height of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) sucker regeneration were assessed over a 26-year period in openings created by harvesting in a 40-year-old aspen stand in northeastern Ontario (Canada). The opening types were 9- and 18-m diameter circles, 9- and 18- _ 150-m east-west strips, and a 100- _ 150-m clearcut, representing a range of light conditions. Density, height, and diameter at breast height of aspen regeneration were significantly affected by opening type, location relative to opening, and time since harvest. By year 26, aspen densities in circular openings declined to 0, despite high initial recruitment, and trembling aspen heights were significantly lower in the 9-m strips than in the 18-m strips or the clearcut. Year 26 aspen density, volume, and basal area increased with increasing initial light intensity, with the highest rate of increase between 80 and 100% light levels. Understory vegetation cover was largely unaffected by opening size; however, substantial understory aspen regeneration occurred in the smaller openings. Results support the traditional view that aspen is best managed under the clearcut silvicultural system, and>80% full light is recommended for adequate long-term aspen regeneration.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-034
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Regeneration of black ash (Fraxinus nigra Marsh.) in hardwood swamps of
           the Great Lakes – St. Lawrence Forest Region

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      Authors: Amanda Springer, Jeffery P. Dech
      Pages: 343 - 358
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 343-358, September 2021.
      An inductive, ordination-based approach was used to explore patterns in the microenvironment and natural regeneration of black ash across a range of representative stands in the central Ontario portion of the Great Lakes -St. Lawrence Forest Region (GLSL) near Lake Nipissing, Ontario, Canada. The objective of this study was to describe patterns of regeneration of black ash and determine the associations between multiple indicators of black ash regeneration success and biotic and abiotic factors. Using a randomized sampling design with specific selection criteria, 12 black ash stands were sampled, each with three 400 m2 circular sample plots that contained three 4 m2 sub-plots. A suite of environmental variables such as elevation, topographic wetness index, slope, and soil characteristics (percent moisture, pH, total nitrogen, exchangeable phosphorus, potassium, magnesium) were determined for each stand. Variables capturing regeneration potential, including density, diameter, and height of all germinants, seedlings, saplings and sprouts were also collected. A sample of 15 dominant or co-dominant trees in each stand, as well as numerous black ash seedlings, saplings and sprouts were examined using dendrochronological methods to estimate ages. Principal component analysis ordinations were performed exploring the variation in environment and black ash regeneration variables among the stands. High soil moisture and the presence of canopy gaps, (as indicated by high standard deviation of canopy closure), were key variables associated with greater abundance of regeneration. Black ash was the dominant species in all stands, which were also generally characterized by a common reverse-J diameter distribution. It was observed that black ash in the sapling layer reached substantial ages (up to 60 years), indicating they are capable of withstanding long periods of suppression below the canopy. Collectively, these findings suggest that black ash-dominated stands in the study area are regenerating in multiple cohorts. Based on these patterns, it appears that regeneration in these stands is occurring through gap-phase mechanisms, suggesting single tree selection as the best management option for black ash in the GLSL.
      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-035
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • La mesure des arbres et des peuplements forestiers Édition 2021

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      Pages: 359 - 359
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 359-359, September 2021.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-036
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Finding the Mother Tree: Discovering the Wisdom of the Forest

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      Pages: 360 - 364
      Abstract: The Forestry Chronicle, Volume 97, Issue 3, Page 360-364, September 2021.

      Citation: The Forestry Chronicle
      PubDate: 2021-12-29T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.5558/tfc2021-037
      Issue No: Vol. 97, No. 3 (2021)
       
 
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