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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access  
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access  
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0971-9962 - ISSN (Online) 2454-8316
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Preventive psychiatry: Where do we stand?

    • Authors: Roy Abraham Kallivayalil, Rakesh Kumar Chadda
      Pages: 69 - 70
      Abstract: Roy Abraham Kallivayalil, Rakesh Kumar Chadda
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):69-70

      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):69-70
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_47_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive psychiatry: Current status in contemporary psychiatry

    • Authors: Rakesh Kumar Chadda
      Pages: 71 - 75
      Abstract: Rakesh Kumar Chadda
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):71-75
      Preventive psychiatry is one of the most ignored subdiscipline of psychiatry, which has got important role to play in the contemporary psychiatry. Mental disorders are very common with lifetime prevalence of about 25%, and tend to be chronic. Due to the stigma associated with mental disorders, lack of awareness, and also lack of adequate mental health resources, nearly 60%–80% of the persons suffering from mental disorders do not access mental health care services. Mental and substance use disorders have been identified as one of the major contributors to the disease-related burden and disability-adjusted life years. In this background, preventive psychiatry has an important role to play in public health sector. Since etiology of most of the mental disorders is not known, it is not possible to follow here the standard model of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of public health. A concept of universal, selective, and indicated prevention has been proposed in primary prevention. Preventive approaches in psychiatry focus on evidence-based risk and protective factors, promoting quality of life, reducing stressors, and improving resilience. Such interventions, when planned targeting at specific mental disorders, have a potential to prevent mental disorders. Thus, preventive psychiatry has a crucial role to play in mental health, considering the high prevalence of mental disorders, the associated disability and burden, and a great drain on human resources.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):71-75
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_37_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive psychiatry: Overview

    • Authors: Shridhar Sharma
      Pages: 76 - 78
      Abstract: Shridhar Sharma
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):76-78
      Preventive psychiatry aims at the reduction of mental disorders and behavioural problems by identifying risk and protective factors and applying evidence-based interventions in the framework of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. Preventive psychiatry located within a public mental health framework provides an opportunity to recognise important preventive elements in the existing psychiatric practice. Mental health professionals have several important roles to play in the prevention field. These include role of mental health advocates, technical advisers, program leaders, researchers and preventive care providers.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):76-78
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_49_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive psychiatry in clinical practice

    • Authors: Mamta Sood, Vijay Krishnan
      Pages: 79 - 85
      Abstract: Mamta Sood, Vijay Krishnan
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):79-85
      In the last two and a half decades, there have been series of global burden of disease studies which have highlighted significant disability attributable to mental and behavioral disorders with a huge treatment gap. Integration of the preventive strategies in the clinical practice has the potential to reduce the disability due to mental illnesses. The patients come to the clinic with an intention to get treated and investigated for the symptoms they have. At this point, they may also be amenable to the advice related to prevention. Therefore, the clinical encounter can be seen as an opportunity to implement preventive strategies. Preventive efforts in clinical practice must be guided by knowledge about the epidemiological data related to specific mental illnesses and about the evidence-based preventive strategies available for specific mental illnesses. These should be directed toward all those persons (patients, caregivers accompanying and at home, teachers, employers, etc.) who are present and also toward those who are not present during the clinical encounter and must be age, gender, and culture sensitive. Sociodemographic characteristics of a person seeking relief from a problem in the clinical encounter help in directing the preventive efforts. The preventive efforts are also driven by the fact that the patient has the first episode or established or treatment refractory mental illness and the short or long duration of illness. For prevention-minded clinical practice, it helps to have a template so that the assessments and interventions relevant for prevention can be carried out as per that scheme; it also helps in orienting the practicing mental health professionals. While making various assessments, making a list of the likely issues to be addressed by preventive efforts during clinical encounter ( first and subsequent) is also helpful.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):79-85
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_48_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive strategies for common mental disorders

    • Authors: Jasmin Garg, Nitin Gupta
      Pages: 86 - 90
      Abstract: Jasmin Garg, Nitin Gupta
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):86-90
      Common Mental Disoders (CMDs) include depressive and anxiety disorders; one in five individuals, worldwide, gets afflicted with CMDs over lifetime. A wide range of preventive strategies have shown promise when implemented across different stages of lifespan. There is a common thread of emerging preventive strategies for CMDs on the lines for those already established for non-communicable diseases. In India, although there is emerging research in this area, the much required prevention is still in its incipient stage. Some critical issues in planning research and implementing preventive strategies are also outlined to provide a more appropriate perspective.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):86-90
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_53_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevention for common mental disorders in low-resource settings

    • Authors: Raman Deep Pattanayak
      Pages: 91 - 94
      Abstract: Raman Deep Pattanayak
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):91-94
      Only a limited research evidence is available from low- and middle-income countries for various preventive strategies for anxiety and mood disorders. In the context of these low-resource settings, the models of primary and secondary prevention have to be adapted to the available resources and sociocultural context. The thrust of preventive activities for common mental disorders, as per emerging evidence and expert consensus, may be placed on information and awareness campaigns, workplace prevention, task shifting to community health workers (CHWs), multi-sectoral collaborations with broad-based preventive approach, targeting multiple risk factors, identifying unique protective factors with cultural relevance, and use of modern technology and smart tools for cost-effective solutions with a wider reach. In the future research, the scalability aspects, cost-effectiveness evaluation, and methodological rigor as well as cultural acceptability should be important considerations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):91-94
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_33_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive strategies for severe mental disorders

    • Authors: Subho Chakrabarti
      Pages: 95 - 103
      Abstract: Subho Chakrabarti
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):95-103
      Since the 1990s, there has been a tremendous upsurge in research on early intervention in psychotic disorders. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis enabled the development of clinical staging models of schizophrenia, which in turn demonstrated that early intervention is possible before the onset of psychosis. Such intervention relied on early detection using prodromal vulnerability indicators and on targeted and stage-specific treatments. Initial efforts were focused on reducing the duration of untreated psychosis to improve outcome. As these efforts were not always successful, research moved on to the examination of prodromes and high-risk states. The “at-risk mental state” strategy based on principles of indicated prevention consisted of the “ultra-high risk” and the “basic symptoms” approaches. A large body of evidence indicated that about 30% of the patients who met criteria for either approach went on to develop full-blown psychosis in the next 2–3 years. Several early psychosis detection programs have been set up worldwide, and controlled trials have shown efficacy of early intervention in first-episode psychosis as well as prodromal or at-risk states. However, several issues regarding identifying and managing such patients still need to be sorted out before prevention of severe mental disorders becomes a reality.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):95-103
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_40_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevention of severe mental disorders in low-resource settings

    • Authors: Rohit Verma
      Pages: 104 - 107
      Abstract: Rohit Verma
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):104-107
      Research in the field of preventive psychiatry is consistently developing. Previous literature has provided information of transformational epidemiology of prodromal and early stages of psychosis into the full blown psychotic state. Recent studies have focused on delivering preventive interventions in such population cohorts and have reported mixed findings. Several evidence-based recommendations for early intervention have been mentioned, although more data are required to formulate a specific robust plan keeping in mind the potential role of treatment and age effects. This article mentions certain steps to cater for a preventive approach in psychiatry, particularly severe mental disorders.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):104-107
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_45_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive strategies for substance use

    • Authors: Anju Dhawan, Piyali Mandal
      Pages: 108 - 111
      Abstract: Anju Dhawan, Piyali Mandal
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):108-111
      Drug use among adolescents is on the rise, posing a great challenge to the health-care providers. The above concerns have led to recent research initiatives aiming at the development of preventive interventions for adolescents. This review gives an overview of such initiatives which target at reducing modifiable risk factors and enhancing protective factors through family, school, and community prevention programs.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):108-111
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_42_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevention strategies for substance use disorders in low-resource settings

    • Authors: Koushik Sinha Deb, Swati Kedia Gupta
      Pages: 112 - 117
      Abstract: Koushik Sinha Deb, Swati Kedia Gupta
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):112-117
      Substance use continues to be a major public health problem for the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) around the world. Prevention strategies, which are theoretically grounded, culturally sensitive, and cost effective, can help such resource-constrained nations mount effective control measures against drug use. Multisectorial involvement and multistakeholder participation can result in the development of sustainable prevention programs which earn long-term benefits for the nation. This narrative review looks into the various principles of primary prevention in drug use disorders and discusses the merits and effectiveness of varied intervention strategies used for universal, selective, or targeted prevention of drug use. Although evidence for effectiveness exists for various prevention programs in high-income countries (HICs), research from the developing world remains scarce. This paper focuses specifically on strategies which have found usefulness in other LMICs and interprets interventions from HICs in light of such findings. Policy-based programs, population interventions, community efforts, and treatment strategies are discussed to understand best pathways for prevention in various settings.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):112-117
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_41_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive strategies in child and adolescent psychiatry

    • Authors: Rajesh Sagar, Vijay Krishnan
      Pages: 118 - 122
      Abstract: Rajesh Sagar, Vijay Krishnan
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):118-122
      Childhood and adolescence are periods of growth and development that are critical to the formation of adult personality and psychopathology. Moreover, childhood psychopathology may differ significantly in presentation and risk factors from those seen among adults and may require different preventive strategies. Service-related characteristics such as the shortage of trained child and adolescent mental health professionals also demand that the focus should shift from resource-intensive treatment interventions, toward preventive measures that can be delivered at lower cost in terms of workforce, money, and time; and can lead to improved outcomes for a wide variety of conditions. Preventive strategies that have been implemented in this population have mostly included both preventive measures (aiming at reducing the prevalence of risk factors) and promotive components (aimed at increasing resilience and positive mental health characteristics), usually in combination. Interventions have been shown to be most effective when they are targeted at underlying latent structures that predict risk; they are also more effective when delivered over a prolonged period. Interventions must also be formulated such that they are developmentally appropriate, and with clearly stated outcome parameters for evaluation. A few example interventions that have made use of these strategies are discussed in the course of this article.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):118-122
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_43_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevention for child and adolescent psychiatry in low-resource settings

    • Authors: Rachna Bhargava, Anamika Sahu, Debabani Bhattacharya
      Pages: 123 - 128
      Abstract: Rachna Bhargava, Anamika Sahu, Debabani Bhattacharya
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):123-128
      Preventive measures for mental health issues among children have received meager attention. Although the prevalence rates of mental disorders are significant, systematic focused efforts toward management specifically in this special population in low-resources settings have been markedly inconsequential. Certainly, unlike other medical conditions, policies, and services related to mental health of children and adolescent are not adequate and efficient to deal with the burden of mental disorders in children and adolescents. This article reviews the available resources and highlights the possible strengths that can be utilized in prevention strategies.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):123-128
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_32_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Approaches for preventive psychiatry in the geriatric population

    • Authors: Amit Khanna, Om Prakash Jhirwal
      Pages: 129 - 135
      Abstract: Amit Khanna, Om Prakash Jhirwal
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):129-135
      In the last couple of decades, researchers have focused on finding strategies for the prevention of cognitive decline in the geriatric age group. Equivocal evidence is available from high-quality randomized controlled studies regarding causative role of modifiable midlife risk factors in cognitive decline and dementia. Among the cardiovascular risk factors, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, high saturated fat intake, and cigarette smoking have been found to be present in more than 50% of the cases of dementia and cognitive decline. Adopting healthy lifestyle changes with diet, regular moderate levels of physical activity, and abstinence from substance use have been found to have consistent evidence in the prevention of cognitive decline among other ambiguous findings across cultures. Studies assessing preventive and beneficial role of pharmacological treatment strategies such as preemptive use of disease modifying drugs, cerebroactive drugs, and nutritional supplements have been inconclusive. Psychological intervention strategies have shown some promising results. This review attempts to understand some of the perplexing issues in the prevention of cognitive decline in old age.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):129-135
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_39_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevention in old age psychiatry in low-resource settings

    • Authors: Bichitra Nanda Patra
      Pages: 136 - 138
      Abstract: Bichitra Nanda Patra
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):136-138
      Recently, the global population is aging as a result of demographic transition. The elderly are at a higher risk of developing mental illness. This could be due to many reasons including biological factors such as multiple physical illnesses and their treatments and psychosocial factors such as migration, social isolation, and changing family structure. At times, the psychiatric illnesses in the elderly present with atypical features and often go unnoticed. There is a huge treatment gap in addressing the mental health issues of older adults in low-resource countries like India. So far, the preventive aspects in psychiatry are less developed and the mental health care mainly focuses on sickness and treatment. As the number of trained mental health professionals and resources allocated to the field of mental health is meager in low-resource settings, prevention of psychiatric disorders in older adults seems to be a cost-effective option for these settings. In this article, various measures for prevention of psychiatric disorders in elderly low-resource settings have been discussed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):136-138
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_36_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Prevention of suicide

    • Authors: Rajiv Gupta, Nikhil Jain
      Pages: 139 - 141
      Abstract: Rajiv Gupta, Nikhil Jain
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):139-141
      Suicide is a major public health problem in India, probably even bigger than in the West. Suicidal behavior is the best conceptualized as a multifaceted complex problem involving social factors and mental illnesses. Broadly, there are two approaches to suicide prevention; population preventive strategies and high-risk preventive strategies. Population preventive strategies include reducing availability of means for suicide, education of primary care physicians, influencing media portrayal of suicidal behavior, education of the public, telephone helplines, and addressing economic issues associated with suicidal behavior. High-risk preventive strategy includes identifying individuals with high risk of committing suicide, intensively treating mental illness if present, and providing psychosocial support. Thus, prevention requires a multipronged effort with collaboration from various sectors including mental health professionals, social justice department, and macroeconomic policy makers.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):139-141
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_35_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive psychiatry in medical curriculum

    • Authors: RC Jiloha
      Pages: 142 - 147
      Abstract: RC Jiloha
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):142-147
      Mental and behavioral disorders are responsible for 7.4% of the total disease burden. Even with optimal care and service delivery, <30% of the burden of disease attributable to mental disorders can be averted, making a strong case for an increase in preventive efforts in psychiatry and mental health promotion. Clinicians can play an important role in implementation of preventive interventions. To carry out these important preventive skills, the training of the future physicians and psychiatrists should incorporate mental health prevention and promotion in the medical curriculum. Although preventive aspects of mental health have been included in the medical curriculum for undergraduates and postgraduates, most of the emphasis during training is on the curative aspects. In this article, various ways of enhancing mental health prevention and promotion component in the undergraduate and postgraduate medical curriculum have been discussed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):142-147
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_34_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Preventive psychiatry from public health perspectives

    • Authors: N Manjunatha
      Pages: 148 - 152
      Abstract: N Manjunatha
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):148-152
      The focus in public health has been shifted to noncommunicable diseases (NCD) in last decade. Mental health is gaining momentum as fifth NCD. The concept of prevention in psychiatry is new, but an interesting area from public health perspectives. The concepts of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention relevant to psychiatry are discussed. Among primary prevention interventions, universal, selective, and indicated prevention strategies in psychiatry are discussed with examples from published literature. Challenges in preventive psychiatric practice on issue of payments, available standard of evidence, and best health-care professionals for its delivery are also discussed. There is a need to focus on preventive psychiatric interventions, especially in developing countries.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):148-152
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_38_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Challenges in preventive psychiatry

    • Authors: Pratap Sharan, Saurabh Kumar
      Pages: 153 - 156
      Abstract: Pratap Sharan, Saurabh Kumar
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):153-156
      Prevention of mental disorders offers opportunities for decreasing enormous health, economic, and social burden attributable to them. Substantial evidence exist showing effectiveness of prevention strategies in reducing risk factors, strengthening protective factors, and decreasing psychiatric symptoms and disability. The government and various stakeholders should work toward developing policies on national and regional levels for the prevention of mental disorders and integrate them with various public policies. Research should be focused on enhancing the evidence base for these interventions. It should also cover additional domains such as quantification of the burden of disease associated with particular risk factors, the interaction between lifestyle behaviors and mental health, and integrating mental health outcome measures in large community-based interventions for noncommunicable diseases. Special efforts should be made in devising alternative strategies to deliver these programs in low-resource settings. Integrating the research from the field of neurosciences with prevention strategies can augment the effort in this direction. One of the important challenges is to design programs that are either indigenously developed or culturally adapted. Mental health professionals have to play an important and multiple roles to make prevention of mental and behavioral disorders a reality.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):153-156
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_31_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Epilogue &#8211; special issue on preventive psychiatry

    • Authors: Debasish Basu
      Pages: 157 - 158
      Abstract: Debasish Basu
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):157-158

      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):157-158
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_44_17
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Predictors of depression among people living with HIV/AIDS on
           antiretroviral therapy attending tertiary care hospitals in the Capital of
           Uttar Pradesh: A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Mukesh Shukla, Monika Agarwal, Jai Vir Singh, Anil Kumar Tripathi, Anand Kumar Srivastava, Vijay Kumar Singh
      Pages: 159 - 164
      Abstract: Mukesh Shukla, Monika Agarwal, Jai Vir Singh, Anil Kumar Tripathi, Anand Kumar Srivastava, Vijay Kumar Singh
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):159-164
      Introduction: HIV/AIDS is one of the most devastating illnesses that humanity has ever faced. Depression in HIV/AIDS patients is very common but the factors affecting it are not well studied. Therefore, the present study aims to assess the prevalence and the predictors of depression among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2013 to March 2014 at antiretroviral therapy centers of two tertiary care hospitals in Lucknow and a total of 322 adult HIV patients on antiretroviral treatment for at least 6 months were interviewed with the help of a predesigned and pretested schedule. Systematic random sampling was used to recruit the patients. Becks depression inventory was used to measure depression. Results: About one-fifth (18.6%) of the patients were having depressive symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that depression was significantly associated with female gender (odds ratio [OR]: 3.45; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.50–7.90; P = 0.00), counseling gap more than 3 months (OR: 2.06; 95% CI: 1.14–4.21; P = 0.04), nonadherence to treatment (OR: 2.66; 95% CI: 1.47–6.19; P = 0.02), and socioeconomic status upper lower and below (OR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.12–4.21; P = 0.04). Conclusions: Low socioeconomic status, female gender, long counseling gaps more than 3 months, and nonadherence to treatment were found to be important predictors of depression. Therefore, there is a need of timely assessment of the PLHA for depression to ensure early detection and management to maintain optimal adherence to the treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):159-164
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.209200
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • A descriptive study of pattern of psychiatric referrals and effect of
           psychiatric intervention in consultation-liaison set up in a tertiary care
           center

    • Authors: Bheemsain Tekkalaki, Adarsh Tripathi, Amit Arya, Anil Nischal
      Pages: 165 - 170
      Abstract: Bheemsain Tekkalaki, Adarsh Tripathi, Amit Arya, Anil Nischal
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):165-170
      Background: There is paucity of published data pertaining to consultation psychiatric services (CLP) in India. The data available reflect the under developed status of this subspecialty and need for strengthening the same. Research assessing the effectiveness of CLP services is the need of the hour. Objectives: Current study was taken up with the aim to study the pattern of psychiatric referrals in a teaching hospital, and to study the effect of intervention in CLP at the end of 4 weeks. Materials and Method: Sample was drawn from Indoor patients referred to department of psychiatry. Psychiatric diagnosis was made using International classification of diseases (CD-10 DCR). Clinical Global Impression severity (CGI-S) and Improvement (CGI-I) ware used to assess the effect of psychiatric intervention after 4 weeks. Results: about half of patients were referred from Internal Medicine, followed by Neurological sciences and surgical branches. About 30% of patients had no diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Common reasons for referral were evaluation of medical patient having co- morbid psychiatric symptoms, followed by assessment for intentional self-harm, past history of psychiatric illness, and substance use. There was a statistically significant reduction in the mean CGI-S scores after four weeks (t=16.356; p <0.001). Mean CGI-I score after 4 weeks was 1.89(±0.993). suggesting much improvement. Conclusion: Majority of patients are referred to Psychiatry from internal medicine and neurology. About one-third of the patient did not receive any Psychiatric diagnosis. Psychiatric intervention was found to be significantly beneficial.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):165-170
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.209181
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Awareness about mental illness among the family members of persons with
           mental illness in a selected District of Assam

    • Authors: Nurnahar Ahmed, Arunjyoti Baruah
      Pages: 171 - 176
      Abstract: Nurnahar Ahmed, Arunjyoti Baruah
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):171-176
      Background/Objectives: Knowledge about mental illness is essential for family members to provide effective care at home to the person with mental illness. Existing literature has shown that family members either have poor knowledge or aware about some facts but not adequate for effective patient management. Moreover, many of the time, attitude toward mental illness is seen to be negative. The present study aimed to assess the knowledge of family members of persons with mental illness about mental illness and to find the demographic associates. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at the outpatient department (OPD) of a Tertiary Care Mental Health Institute in North-East India. Total 111 family members of patients diagnosed as psychosis (F20-F39; as per the International Classification of Diseases-10 diagnostic criteria) attending OPD for follow-up were selected purposively for the study. Structured sociodemographic pro forma and the Knowledge of Mental illness Questionnaire were used to collect data about knowledge of mental illness among the family members. Results: Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, Chi-square test, and Pearson's correlation by using SPSS version 16.0. Family members' knowledge about mental illness was found to be inadequate in some areas. Knowledge about mental illness was found significantly correlated with family members' age (r = 0.254, P = 0.007) and caregiving duration (P = 0.268, P = 0.004). Family members' gender and relationship with patients were found to be significantly associated with knowledge of mental illness. Conclusion: The present study finding suggests for the need of intervention to enhance knowledge of family members about mental illness for better patient management.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):171-176
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.209199
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of psychological distress and its associated factors among
           chronic disease and healthy subjects in rural Puducherry, India

    • Authors: Karthik Laksham Balajee, Ganesh S Kumar, Umakant G Shidam
      Pages: 177 - 180
      Abstract: Karthik Laksham Balajee, Ganesh S Kumar, Umakant G Shidam
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):177-180
      Context: There is paucity of data on the comparison of psychological distress among chronic noncommunicable disease (NCD) and healthy subjects in developing countries such as India. Objective: To assess and compare psychological distress and its associated factors among chronic disease and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural field practice area attached to a tertiary care medical institution in Puducherry, India. Data were collected from the chronic disease subjects which included those with diabetes and or hypertension registered in the rural health center. Healthy subjects residing nearest to the corresponding case from the respective village were taken as controls. Psychological distress was assessed by General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ 12). Results: There were 260 subjects with 130 in each group. Subjects with chronic disease had significantly higher proportion of psychological distress (50.8%) compared to healthy subjects (35.4%). The mean ± standard deviation GHQ 12 score of those with chronic disease is also significantly higher than that of healthy subjects (13.35 ± 4.89 vs. 11.15 ± 4.43, P< 0.001). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that subjects with diabetes and/or hypertension had higher psychological distress (adjusted odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.1–3.5) compared to healthy subjects. Conclusion: Subjects with diabetes and/or hypertension have higher proportion of psychological distress compared to healthy subjects. Screening subjects with chronic NCD for psychological distress may help to take appropriate measures.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):177-180
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0971-9962.209190
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of unmet needs of patients on treatment of schizophrenia
           perceived by patients and their family caregivers

    • Authors: Krishnan Ganesh, Sandhya Gupta
      Pages: 181 - 186
      Abstract: Krishnan Ganesh, Sandhya Gupta
      Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):181-186
      Background/Objectives: The significance of need assessment has been widely recognized for providing holistic and quality care for mentally ill patients all over the world. The current study is an attempt to assess the unmet needs of patients with schizophrenia as perceived by themselves and their family caregivers. Methodology: Unmet needs were assessed on a convenience sample of 100 patients with schizophrenia and their respective 100 family caregivers from a psychiatric outpatient department of tertiary care hospital by Camberwell Assessment of Needs questionnaire using descriptive, cross-sectional, and comparative research design. Results: The results showed that mean number of unmet needs rated by patients was 7.23 (SD = 3.22) and the caregivers was 3.45 (SD = 2.43). Most common areas of unmet needs identified by patients were welfare benefits (79%), company (72%), information on condition and treatment (71%), psychological distress (70%), psychotic symptoms (57%), and physical health (55%). Most common unmet needs reported by caregivers were welfare benefits (77%), psychotic symptoms (55%), money (31%), psychological distress (29%), and information on condition and treatment (25%). Agreement on unmet needs of patients between the patients and caregivers was poor to fair in most of the areas of needs. Conclusions: There was high discrepancies and poor agreement on unmet needs perceived by patients and their family caregivers. There is a need to develop effective strategies to appreciate all the unmet needs of the patients accurately so as to act accordingly.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Social Psychiatry 2017 33(2):181-186
      PubDate: Fri,30 Jun 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_31_16
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 2 (2017)
       
 
 
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