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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2347-5625 - ISSN (Online) 2349-6673
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • Palliative Care: Opportunities for Nursing

    • Authors: Ayda Gan Nambayan
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: Ayda Gan Nambayan
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):1-3

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):1-3
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_77_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Nursing and the future of palliative care

    • Authors: Karla Schroeder, Karl Lorenz
      Pages: 4 - 8
      Abstract: Karla Schroeder, Karl Lorenz
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):4-8

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):4-8
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_43_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Empowering nurses through end-of-life nursing education in Asia: Nurses as
           advocates for patients' dignity

    • Authors: Sayaka Takenouchi
      Pages: 9 - 11
      Abstract: Sayaka Takenouchi
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):9-11

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):9-11
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_68_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The status of palliative care in the Asia-Pacific Region

    • Authors: Odette Spruyt
      Pages: 12 - 14
      Abstract: Odette Spruyt
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):12-14

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):12-14
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_71_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Providing palliative care education: Showcasing efforts of asian nurses

    • Authors: Pam Malloy, Sayaka Takenouchi, Hyun Sook Kim, Yuhan Lu, Betty Ferrell
      Pages: 15 - 20
      Abstract: Pam Malloy, Sayaka Takenouchi, Hyun Sook Kim, Yuhan Lu, Betty Ferrell
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):15-20
      Most of the world's population lives in Asia. Prevention and detection of cancer, as well as ensuring equitable access to cancer care for all Asians remains a major public health issue and requires governmental involvement and dedicated resources. Palliative care, a medical and nursing specialty, promotes holistic attention to suffering and provides compassionate and interdisciplinary care to the most vulnerable in all societies—those with serious illness. It is nurses who provide the majority of care for patients with cancer, as no other healthcare professional spends more time at the bedside or out in the community assessing and managing these patients and their families. The purpose of this article is to showcase nursing leaders throughout Asia who are receiving palliative care education, educating their colleagues in this care, improving clinical practice, participating in the development of healthcare policies, and advocating for this care.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):15-20
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_55_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Singapore takes six steps forward in ‘The Quality of Death
           Index’ Rankings

    • Authors: Stella Seow Lin Goh
      Pages: 21 - 25
      Abstract: Stella Seow Lin Goh
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):21-25
      In the latest 2015 Quality of Death Index, Singapore managed to move SIX steps forward from 18th to the 12th position. This advancement has been hard-won, with victories to improve the level of palliative care such as creating awareness of palliative service, improving coordinated care and growing an adequate capacity to meet the demand of care in our fast -growing ageing population. But it hasn't always been easy. Despite being a first world country, Asian societies like Singapore have inherited taboos regarding public dialogue about death and dying. Such dialogue is traditionally avoided. However, through years of continual effort in improving the standard of palliative care delivery, redesigning education module, creating public awareness and improving funding system, Singapore's palliative care providers have improved the lives of those with life-limiting illnesses. Nevertheless, the government will continue to improve and work toward achieving single digits in the next ranking of the Quality of Death Index.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):21-25
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_66_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Hospice and palliative care in China: Development and challenges

    • Authors: Yuhan Lu, Youhui Gu, Wenhua Yu
      Pages: 26 - 32
      Abstract: Yuhan Lu, Youhui Gu, Wenhua Yu
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):26-32
      Hospice and palliative care have been demonstrated to improve quality of life, shorten hospital stays, and save costs. As a developing country, faced with a rapidly aging population and an increasing number of patients with life-threatening illnesses such as cancer, China has made great progress in promoting hospice and palliative care during the past few decades. A trained nurse can play a significant role in promoting quality hospice and palliative care by providing care, coordinating a multidisciplinary team, calling for policy support, and raising public awareness. It is critical for nurses to clearly understand the development and challenges that currently exist in the country. With this awareness, nurses will improve their ability to recognize and address patients' and families' needs, resulting in quality, dignified, and individualized end-of-life care.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):26-32
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_72_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Translating a US early palliative care model for Turkey and Singapore

    • Authors: Imatullah Akyar, James N Dionne-Odom, Grace Meijuan Yang, Marie A Bakitas
      Pages: 33 - 39
      Abstract: Imatullah Akyar, James N Dionne-Odom, Grace Meijuan Yang, Marie A Bakitas
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):33-39
      The field of palliative care is growing in acceptance and sophistication globally. No longer considered just for patients at end-of-life, palliative care is now being incorporated early in the disease trajectory. Despite professional guidelines supporting early palliative care, there are few models that have been created that can be translated into practice cross-culturally. In the United States, the Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before, Life Ends (ENABLE) early palliative care telehealth model has demonstrated effectiveness in improving quality of life, mood, symptom relief, and survival for patients with cancer and is now being tested in patients with heart failure. Family caregivers of patients who have received ENABLE concurrent with their care recipients have also demonstrated positive outcomes in quality of life and caregiver burden. Internationally, a number of investigators are culturally adapting ENABLE for patients and family caregivers. While some elements of ENABLE, such as symptom management and self-care, and the caregiving role are relevant cross-culturally, others have been built on Western principles of self-determination or represent concepts such as advance care planning which will require more cultural adaptation. In addition, ENABLE was initially an in-person approach that was converted to telehealth to accommodate a rural population-it will be important to understand cultural norms related to receiving care by phone or if an in-person approach will be more culturally acceptable. This paper describes efforts in Turkey and Singapore to culturally adapt the ENABLE early palliative care principles for their countries.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):33-39
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_73_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cancer in the elderly: Challenges and barriers

    • Authors: Tania Estape
      Pages: 40 - 42
      Abstract: Tania Estape
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):40-42

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):40-42
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_52_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • What can qualitative studies offer in a world where evidence drives
           decisions?

    • Authors: Sally Thorne
      Pages: 43 - 45
      Abstract: Sally Thorne
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):43-45
      In an environment in which evidence-based practice is the espoused norm, nurses have understandably sought to frame the knowledge they deem relevant to practice decisions, including the findings of their qualitative studies, as a form of evidence. However, since cancer patients face a significant challenge interpreting various evidence claims, it is important to recognize that the results of our qualitative studies reflect a different form of knowledge from that which an evidence-based practice definition of evidence presumes. Thus, we need to rethink our relationship to what qualitative studies offer to the evidentiary dialog. An approach to qualitative inquiry that derives from a nursing disciplinary logic model is, therefore, presented as an alternative means by which to generate the kinds of knowledge nurses need to practice and to gain expertise in clinical wisdom. Drawing on cancer communications research as an example, a nursing angle of vision on how best to use qualitative approaches to interpret evidence and inform practice emerges.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):43-45
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_51_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Breast cancer screening in the high-risk population

    • Authors: Mary M Vecchio
      Pages: 46 - 50
      Abstract: Mary M Vecchio
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):46-50
      The risk for developing breast cancer can be influenced by a number of critical factors. An individual's age, gender, personal and family health history, nutritional status, level of physical activity, environmental exposures, and substance use can significantly shift the recommended screening guidelines format from the general risk population to a high-risk population. It is essential for health-care providers to become proficient in obtaining a complete cancer genetic risk assessment to accurately identify those who may be at high risk. There are a number of evidence-based risk models that can be utilized by providers to determine if an individual is indeed at a higher risk to develop breast cancer. In addition, there are evidence-based guidelines for breast cancer screening and possible recommendations for medical management/risk reduction that are appropriate to discuss for those high-risk individuals.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):46-50
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_53_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • How Can We Use Symptom Clusters in Nursing Care of Children with
           Leukemia?

    • Authors: Esra Erdem, Ebru Kilicarslan Toruner
      Pages: 51 - 56
      Abstract: Esra Erdem, Ebru Kilicarslan Toruner
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):51-56
      The incidence of childhood cancers has been gradually rising worldwide. The rate of leukemia, which is the most common cancer type in childhood, has been increasing as well. In recent years, multiple chemotherapeutic agents, radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation have been using in leukemia treatment. Children receiving treatment for leukemia may experience many symptoms due to the disease and its treatment. These concurrent symptoms may have a complex relationship. The aim of this paper is to review and compile current literature data related to symptom clusters used to explain multiple symptoms that occur in a complex structure due to leukemia and its treatment. Symptom clustering is used in oncology nursing to explain the complex relationship among multiple symptoms and to find out the effects that symptoms have on each other and patient outcomes. There are generally two statistical approaches to modeling symptom clusters. One is to establish the symptom clusters by grounding on clinical experiences, while the other is to establish them according to the results of statistical analysis and then clinical experiences. With the latter method, symptom clusters can be established more objectively and more number of symptoms can be assessed. In the literature, there are four instruments available for the measurement of a large number of symptoms in children. It is important to increase use of symptom clusters in nursing care for a better understanding of the relationship among multiple symptoms experienced during leukemia treatment, a more effective symptom management, and a more holistic care.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):51-56
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_57_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening and treatment methods:
           Mapping of systematic reviews

    • Authors: Hossein Mashhadi Abdolahi, Ali Sarabi Asiabar, Saber Azami-Aghdash, Fatemeh Pournaghi-Azar, Aziz Rezapour
      Pages: 57 - 67
      Abstract: Hossein Mashhadi Abdolahi, Ali Sarabi Asiabar, Saber Azami-Aghdash, Fatemeh Pournaghi-Azar, Aziz Rezapour
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):57-67
      Objective: Due to extensive literature on colorectal cancer and their heterogeneous results, this study aimed to summarize the systematic reviews which review the cost-effectiveness studies on different aspects of colorectal cancer. Methods: The required data were collected by searching the following key words according to MeSH: “colorectal cancer,” “colorectal oncology,” “colorectal carcinoma,” “colorectal neoplasm,” “colorectal tumors,” “cost-effectiveness,” “systematic review,” and “meta-analysis.” The following databases were searched: PubMed, Cochrane, Google Scholar, and Scopus. Two reviewers evaluated the articles according to the checklist of “assessment of multiple systematic reviews” (AMSTAR) tool. Results: Finally, eight systematic reviews were included in the study. The Drummond checklist was mostly used for assessing the quality of the articles. The main perspective was related to the payer and the least was relevant to the social. The majority of the cases referred to sensitivity analysis (in 76% of the cases) and the lowest point also was allocated to discounting (in 37% of cases). The Markov model was used most widely in the studies. Treatment methods examined in the studies were not cost-effective in comparison with the studied units. Among the screening methods, computerized tomographic colonography and fecal DNA were cost-effective. The average score of the articles' qualities was high (9.8 out of 11). Conclusions: The community perspective should be taken into consideration at large in the studies. It is necessary to pay more attention to discounting subject in studies. More frequent application of the Markov model is recommended.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):57-67
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_50_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Women's experiences with deciding on neoadjuvant systemic therapy for
           operable breast cancer: A qualitative study

    • Authors: Anne Herrmann, Alix Hall, Nicholas Zdenkowski
      Pages: 68 - 76
      Abstract: Anne Herrmann, Alix Hall, Nicholas Zdenkowski
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):68-76
      Objective: We explored, qualitatively, in a sample of Australian early-stage breast cancer patients eligible for neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NAST): (i) their understanding of the choice of having NAST; (ii) when and with whom the decision on NAST was made; and (iii) strategies used by patients to facilitate their decision on NAST. Methods: A sub-sample of patients participating in a larger intervention trial took part in this study. A total of 24 semi-structured phone interviews were analyzed using framework analysis. Results: A number of women perceived they were not offered a treatment choice. Most patients reported that the decision on NAST was made during or shortly after the initial consultation with their doctor. Women facilitated decision-making by reducing deciding factors and “claiming” the decision. Most women reported that they made the final decision, although they did not feel actively involved in the decision-making process. Conclusions: When deciding on NAST, patient-centered care is not always delivered to patients. Clinicians should emphasize to patients that they have a treatment choice, explain the preference-sensitive nature of deciding on NAST and highlight that patients should be involved in this treatment decision. Providing patients with appropriate time and tailored take-home information might facilitate patient decision-making. Process-orientated research is needed to adequately examine patient involvement in complex treatment decisions.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):68-76
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_60_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Palliative chemotherapy: The perspectives and experiences of south african
           nurses

    • Authors: Johanna Elizabeth Maree, Theola Potgieter
      Pages: 77 - 82
      Abstract: Johanna Elizabeth Maree, Theola Potgieter
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):77-82
      Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the perspectives and experiences of South African nurses caring for patients receiving palliative chemotherapy. Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used and purposive sampling allowed us to select 11 nurses practising in a private ambulatory cancer care center in Port Elizabeth. In-depth interviews, guided by three broad themes were conducted and analyzed using qualitative content analyses. Data saturation determined the sample size. Results: Two themes emerged from the data – the patients cling to hope and the positive influence of palliative chemotherapy. The participants believed that patients consenting to palliative chemotherapy were clinging to false hope. They were also of the opinion that family members pressurize patients to consent to treatment. The participants experienced palliative chemotherapy positively, especially when an improvement in the patients' quality of life or pain relief was evident. Fatigue was highlighted as the major side effect, but it did not temper the participants' positive attitudes toward the treatment. Conclusions: Although the participants believed that patients cling to hope and consent to palliative chemotherapy because they hope to be cured, they experienced the treatment as positive. For them, the improvement in pain and quality of life outweighed the side effects the patients experienced. The positive attitude patients upheld while receiving this treatment encouraged them. Nurses should gain more knowledge about the meaning, people living with advanced cancer, attach to hope to prevent them from interpreting patients' hope as denial and false.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):77-82
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.217443
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Psychological flexibility of nurses in a cancer hospital: Preliminary
           validation of a chinese version of the work-related acceptance and action
           questionnaire

    • Authors: Xianghua Xu, Xiangyu Liu, Meijun Ou, Chanjuan Xie, Yongyi Chen
      Pages: 83 - 90
      Abstract: Xianghua Xu, Xiangyu Liu, Meijun Ou, Chanjuan Xie, Yongyi Chen
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):83-90
      Objective: To translate the English work-related acceptance and action questionnaire (WAAQ), make cross-cultural adaptations, and examine its psychometric properties when used by Chinese oncology nurses. Methods: After translation, the psychometric properties of the Chinese WAAQ were analyzed among 417 nurses, and content validity was determined by six experts. Results: Item-level content validity index (CVI) values were between 0.83 and 1.00; scale-level CVI/universal agreement (S-CVI/UA) and S-CVI/average were 0.86 and 0.98, respectively, which implicated a good content validity. The correlation of the Chinese WAAQ with AAQ-II (rs= −0.247, P < 0.001) suggested criterion validity, and those with General Health Questionnaire-12 (−0.250, <0.001) and general self-efficacy scale (0.491, <0.001) and Utrecht work engagement scale (UWES) (0.439, <0.001) suggested convergent validity. Exploratory factor analysis identified a seven-item, one-factor structure of WAAQ. The Chinese version of WAAQ had high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.920), with an item-total correlation coefficient of 0.702–0.828 (P < 0.05), split-half reliability of 0.933, and test-retest reliability of 0.772. Conclusions: The Chinese WAAQ is a reliable and valid tool for assessing psychological flexibility in Chinese oncology nurses.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):83-90
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_62_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Survey of difficult experiences of nurses caring for patients undergoing
           radiation therapy: An analysis of factors in difficult cases

    • Authors: Yumiko Tsuchihashi, Yuko Matsunari, Yumiko Kanamaru
      Pages: 91 - 98
      Abstract: Yumiko Tsuchihashi, Yuko Matsunari, Yumiko Kanamaru
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):91-98
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the difficult experiences of nurses who cared for patients undergoing radiation therapy and factors related to patient feelings toward the progress and difficulties of treatment and the kind of care needed. Methods: A descriptive survey using a questionnaire. Anonymous self-report data were collected from a sample of 228 nurses who had 2–5 years of nursing experience in a National University Hospital in Japan. Years of working experience; knowledge and training in radiation therapy and difficult experiences of nurses caring for patients undergoing radiation therapy. Results: In hospital “A”, about 80% of the nurses had cared for patients undergoing radiation therapy, and about 40% had experience with difficult cases. The characteristics of competent nurses in radiation nursing were the following: while not having knowledge and experience, they were seriously facing their patients. However, the treatment process could not be predicted, skills related to the whole-human involvement of patients were insufficient, and communication was similar. In addition, the characteristics of competent nurses in radiation nursing became apparent. Although these nurses lacked knowledge and experience, they interacted with patients in a serious manner. However, the treatment process could not be predicted, and the skills related to the holistic involvement of patients were insufficient. Furthermore, communication between the nurses and patients was difficult. Conclusions: Competent nurses with 2–5 years of working experience, but lacking specific knowledge and experience regarding radiation therapy could cope with difficult radiation therapy cases. However, additional education, training, and mentoring from expert nurses would improve the quality of care for patients undergoing radiation therapy and reduce distress for nurses with less experience. In this study, the need for educational measures and a support system to help competent nurses face difficult cases were suggested.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):91-98
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_48_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Nursing students&#39; perspectives on assisting cancer patients

    • Authors: Sevgisun Kapucu, Hulya Deniz Bulut
      Pages: 99 - 106
      Abstract: Sevgisun Kapucu, Hulya Deniz Bulut
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):99-106
      Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the experiences of student nurses who have provided care to cancer patients. Methods: A mixed method approach consisting of semistructured focus groups (n = 61) and a survey questionnaire (n = 129) was used in the study. Student nurses were first interviewed, and then, a questionnaire was developed for them to answer. Following the content analysis, three themes and 19 subthemes were identified. Frequency and percent were used for qualitative data. Results: Among the student nurses, 80.6% reported that working with cancer patients was “difficult.” Difficulties experienced by the student nurses included patients rejecting their care, a large number of problems cases encountered when providing care to cancer patients, communication problems (38.0%), working with patients and attendants who fear death, and problems arising from family attendants who obstruct care. The majority of students experienced patients fearing death (28.7%) and felt feelings such as pity (71.1%), sadness (50.0%), and fear of cancer (41.9%) during their internships in oncology clinics. Conclusions: Students should be supported by instructors and oncology nurses, and nursing curricula should contain topics on how to best approach cancer patients.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):99-106
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_44_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A comparative study of hypofractionated and conventional radiotherapy in
           postmastectomy breast cancer patients

    • Authors: Kartick Rastogi, Sandeep Jain, Aseem Rai Bhatnagar, Sandeep Bhaskar, Shivani Gupta, Neeraj Sharma
      Pages: 107 - 113
      Abstract: Kartick Rastogi, Sandeep Jain, Aseem Rai Bhatnagar, Sandeep Bhaskar, Shivani Gupta, Neeraj Sharma
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):107-113
      Objective: The aim of this study was to compare toxicity and locoregional control of short duration hypofractionated (HF) radiotherapy (RT) with conventional RT in breast cancer patients. Methods: A total of 100 postmastectomy breast cancer patients were randomized for adjuvant RT in control group (comprising fifty patients who received the standard conventional dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions with 2 Gy per fraction) and study group (comprising fifty patients who received HF RT with dose of 42.72 Gy in 16 fractions with 2.67 Gy per fraction). All patients were treated on linear accelerator with 3-dimensional conformal RT technique. Outcome was analyzed in terms of toxicity, tolerability, and locoregional control. Results: In the present study, at a median follow-up of 20 months, almost similar results were seen in both the groups in terms of toxicity, tolerability, and locoregional control. Adjuvant postmastectomy HF RT was found to be well tolerated with mild-to-moderate side effects that neither reached statistical significance nor warranted any treatment interruption/hospitalization. Conclusions: HF postmastectomy RT is comparable to conventional RT without evidence of higher adverse effects or inferior locoregional tumor control and has an added advantage of increased compliance because of short duration; hence, it can help in accommodating more breast cancer patients in a calendar year, ultimately resulting in decreased waiting list, increased turnover, and reduced cost of treatment.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):107-113
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_46_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Effect of education based on health belief model on the behavior of breast
           cancer screening in women

    • Authors: Leila Masoudiyekta, Hojat Rezaei-Bayatiyani, Bahman Dashtbozorgi, Mahin Gheibizadeh, Amal Saki Malehi, Mehrnaz Moradi
      Pages: 114 - 120
      Abstract: Leila Masoudiyekta, Hojat Rezaei-Bayatiyani, Bahman Dashtbozorgi, Mahin Gheibizadeh, Amal Saki Malehi, Mehrnaz Moradi
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):114-120
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of education based on health belief model (HBM) on the behavior of breast cancer screening (bCS) in women. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 226 women who were selected with cluster sampling method from those referred to Dezful health centers. Data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire. Demographic questionnaire bCS- scale, and the Knowledge about questionnaire, all given before and 3 months after the intervention. Results: According to the findings of the study, there was a significant relationship between women's performance and variables of knowledge, perceived sensitivity, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy, and cues to action. Conclusions: Poor knowledge of women indicates a crucial need for formal educational programs to sensitize women regarding the importance of bCS. These educational programs should consider factors affecting bCS behaviors.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):114-120
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_36_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Developing written information for cancer survivors from culturally and
           linguistically diverse backgrounds: Lessons learnt

    • Authors: Georgina Wiley, Amanda Piper, AM Phyllis Butow, Penny Schofield, Fiona Douglas, Jane Roy, Linda Nolte, Michael Jefford
      Pages: 121 - 126
      Abstract: Georgina Wiley, Amanda Piper, AM Phyllis Butow, Penny Schofield, Fiona Douglas, Jane Roy, Linda Nolte, Michael Jefford
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):121-126
      Australia is a multicultural nation with a large migrant population. Migrants with cancer report inferior quality of life and the need for more information in their own language. This paper describes lessons learnt from developing culturally appropriate written information resources with and for Arabic, Italian, and Vietnamese cancer survivors and carers. The information needs of survivors from these language groups as well as guidelines for the development of written resources for culturally diverse populations were identified through literature review. Community consultation was undertaken with focus groups. The content was developed and tested with health professionals who spoke the appropriate language and focus group participants, ensuring relevance and appropriateness. Resource design and dissemination were informed through community consultation. A number of key tasks for developing resources were identified as follows: (1) community engagement and consultation; (2) culturally sensitive data collection; (3) focus group facilitators (recruitment and training); (4) content development; (5) translation and review process; (6) design; and (7) sustainability. This project reinforced literature review findings on the importance of cultural sensitivity in the development of resources. Engaging with community groups and incorporating culturally appropriate recruitment strategies optimises recruitment to focus groups and facilitates content development. Stakeholders and lay persons from the intended ethnic-minority communities should be involved in the development and formative evaluation of resources to ensure appropriateness and relevance and in the dissemination strategy to optimize penetration. We believe the lessons we have learnt will be relevant to any group intending to develop health information for culturally and linguistic diverse groups.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):121-126
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_63_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Navigate the world with college of nursing, Taipei Medical University,
           Ranked No. 1 nationally in nursing subject, Academic Ranking of World
           Universities (ARWU)

    • Authors: Kuei-Ru Chou, Chiou-Fen Lin
      Pages: 127 - 128
      Abstract: Kuei-Ru Chou, Chiou-Fen Lin
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):127-128

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):127-128
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_64_17
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Erratum: Telomeres and stress: Promising avenues for research in
           psycho-oncology

    • Pages: 129 - 129
      Abstract:
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):129-129

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2018 5(1):129-129
      PubDate: Wed,3 Jan 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.222137
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
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