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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2347-5625 - ISSN (Online) 2349-6673
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Oral agents in cancer treatment: Meeting the patients' needs to ensure
           medication adherence

    • Authors: Sultan Kav
      Pages: 273 - 274
      Abstract: Sultan Kav
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):273-274

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):273-274
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_49_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Medication burden of treatment using oral cancer medications

    • Authors: Barbara A Given, Charles W Given, Alla Sikorskii, Eric Vachon, Asish Banik
      Pages: 275 - 282
      Abstract: Barbara A Given, Charles W Given, Alla Sikorskii, Eric Vachon, Asish Banik
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):275-282
      Objective: With the changes in healthcare, patients with cancer now have to assume greater responsibility for their own care. Oral cancer medications with complex regimens are now a part of cancer treatment. Patients have to manage these along with the management of medications for their other chronic illnesses. This results in medication burden as patients assume the self-management. Methods: This paper describes the treatment burdens that patients endured in a randomized, clinical trial examining adherence for patients on oral cancer medications. There were four categories of oral agents reported. Most of the diagnoses of the patients were solid tumors with breast, colorectal, renal, and gastrointestinal. Results: Patients had 1–4 pills/day for oral cancer medications as well as a number for comorbidity conditions (>3), for which they also took medications (10–11). In addition, patients had 3.7–5.9 symptoms and side effects. Patients on all categories except those on sex hormones had 49%–57% drug interruptions necessitating further medication burden. Conclusions: This study points out that patients taking oral agents have multiple medications for cancer and other comorbid conditions. The number of pills, times per day, and interruptions adds to the medication burden that patients' experience. Further study is needed to determine strategies to assist the patients on oral cancer medications to reduce their medication burden.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):275-282
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_7_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence and determinants of adherence to oral adjuvant endocrine
           therapy among breast cancer patients in Singapore

    • Authors: Eskinder Eshetu Ali, Ka Lok Cheung, Chee Ping Lee, Jo Lene Leow, Kevin Yi-Lwern Yap, Lita Chew
      Pages: 283 - 289
      Abstract: Eskinder Eshetu Ali, Ka Lok Cheung, Chee Ping Lee, Jo Lene Leow, Kevin Yi-Lwern Yap, Lita Chew
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):283-289
      Objective: The success of oral adjuvant endocrine therapy (OAET) is greatly influenced by patients' level of adherence to treatment. The objective of this study is to measure the prevalence and determinants of adherence to OAET among breast cancer patients in Singapore. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of patients supplemented by analysis of their prescription records was used to collect data. Adherence to OAET was assessed using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items and evaluation of refill gaps. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to evaluate the association between patients' characteristics and adherence to OAET. Results: A total of 157 women who have started OAET at least 6 months before the time of interview participated in the study, of which less than half (64 patients, 40.8%) of the patients had high adherence. Univariate analysis identified patients who were 57 years or older (P = 0.027), unemployed (P = 0.027), on aromatase inhibitors (P = 0.023), on three or more concurrent medications (P = 0.001), and had one or more comorbidities (P = 0.000) to be significantly more adherent. However, only the number of comorbidities was found to be an independent predictor of adherence in a multiple logistic regression analysis (adjusted odds ratio = 2.60; 95% confidence interval = 1.208–5.593; P = 0.015). Forgetfulness was the main reason for nonadherence mentioned by 63 (67.7%) of the 93 nonadherent patients. Conclusions: Low level of OAET adherence was found in this study, and forgetfulness was cited as the main reason for nonadherence. Patients were generally receptive to the implementation of various strategies to assist them with their medication-taking behavior
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):283-289
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/2347-5625.212864
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • The effect of structured education to patients receiving oral agents for
           cancer treatment on medication adherence and self-efficacy

    • Authors: Gamze Tokdemir, Sultan Kav
      Pages: 290 - 298
      Abstract: Gamze Tokdemir, Sultan Kav
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):290-298
      Objective: This study was conducted to examine the effect of structured education on medication adherence and self-efficacy through the use of the MASCC Oral Agent Teaching Tool (MOATT) for patients receiving oral agents for cancer treatment. Methods: This quasi-experimental study has been conducted at two hospitals; 41 patients were included in the study. Data were obtained using a questionnaire, medication adherence self-efficacy scale (MASES), memorial symptom assessment scale, and a follow-up form (diary). Patients were educated through the use of the MOATT at a scheduled time; drug-specific information was provided along with a treatment scheme and follow-up diary. Phone interviews were completed 1 and 2 weeks after the educational session. At the next treatment cycle, the patients completed the same questionnaires. Results: Majority of the patients were receiving capecitabine (90.2%; n = 37) as an oral agent for breast (51.2%; n = 21) and stomach cancer (24.6%; n = 10) treatment. About 90.2% of patients (n = 37) stated that they did not forget to take their medication and experienced medication-related side effects (78%; n = 32). The total score of MASES was increased after the education (66.39 vs. 71.04, P < 0.05). Conclusions: It was shown that individual education with the MOATT and follow-up for patients receiving oral agents for cancer treatment increased patient medication adherence self-efficacy.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):290-298
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_35_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Practice model: Establishing and running an oral chemotherapy management
           clinic

    • Authors: Paige May, Kourtney LaPlant, Ashley McGee
      Pages: 299 - 303
      Abstract: Paige May, Kourtney LaPlant, Ashley McGee
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):299-303
      Oral anticancer agents, while potentially more convenient and better tolerated than traditional intravenous therapy, come with significant concerns of noncompliance, adverse effects, and high cost. This presents an opportunity for health-care practitioners to develop a method to educate and support patients who are placed on these agents. To provide a detailed example of a currently established oral chemotherapy clinic and provide direction toward setting up a new clinic at other institutions. A description of the establishment of the clinic, how it is run and examples of interventions are provided. Establishment of an oral chemotherapy clinic run by supportive oncology practitioners is feasible and may provide added value to existing oncology care. It can also provide an opportunity to further involve health-care trainees in patient care.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):299-303
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_9_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Salient features and outline of the joint Japanese guidelines for safe
           handling of cancer chemotherapy drugs

    • Authors: Kiyoko Kanda, Kazue Hirai, Keiko Iino, Hisanaga Nomura, Hisateru Yasui, Taro Kano, Chisato Ichikawa, Sumiko Hiura, Tomoko Morita, Ayako Mitsuma, Hiroko Komatsu
      Pages: 304 - 312
      Abstract: Kiyoko Kanda, Kazue Hirai, Keiko Iino, Hisanaga Nomura, Hisateru Yasui, Taro Kano, Chisato Ichikawa, Sumiko Hiura, Tomoko Morita, Ayako Mitsuma, Hiroko Komatsu
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):304-312
      The purpose of this paper is to introduce the outline and describe the salient features of the “Joint Guidelines for Safe Handling of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs” (hereinafter, “Guideline”), which were published in July 2015. The purpose of this Guideline is to provide guidance to protect against occupational exposure to hazardous drugs (HDs) to all medical personnel involved in cancer chemotherapy, including physicians, pharmacists, and nurses and home health-care providers. The Guideline was developed according to the Medical Information Network Distribution Service guidance for developing clinical practice guidelines, with reference to five authoritative guidelines used worldwide. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Ichushi-Web, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used for a systematic search of the literature. Eight clinical questions (CQs) were eventually established, and the strength of recommendation for each CQ is presented based on 867 references. The salient features of the Guideline are that it was jointly developed by three societies (Japanese Society of Cancer Nursing, Japanese Society of Medical Oncology, and Japanese Society of Pharmaceutical Oncology), contains descriptions including the definition of HDs and the concept of hierarchy of controls, and addresses exposure control measures during handling of chemotherapy drugs. Our future task is to collect additional evidence for the recommended exposure control measures and to assess whether publication of the Guideline has led to adherence of measures to prevent occupational exposure.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):304-312
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_30_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Importance of glycemic control in cancer patients with diabetes: Treatment
           through end of life

    • Authors: Denise Soltow Hershey
      Pages: 313 - 318
      Abstract: Denise Soltow Hershey
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):313-318
      Cancer patients with diabetes are at increased risk for developing infections, being hospitalized, and requiring chemotherapy reductions or stoppages. While it has been hypothesized that glycemic control increases the risk for these adverse events, few studies have explored this hypothesis. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of glycemic control in patients with diabetes and cancer during treatment through end of life. Glycemic control was found to play a role; the overall level of health-related quality of life experienced by patients with cancer and diabetes, level of symptom severity experienced and can impact the overall survival of the individual. Evidence-based policies and practice guidelines also need to be developed to help clinicians manage these patients during all phases of care. Using diabetes educators and advance practice, nurses to provide management and care coordination services need to be considered. Survivorship care plans should address both cancer and diabetes management. Finally, glycemic control should continue through end of life, with the main goal of avoiding hypoglycemic events.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):313-318
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_40_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Seeking optimal management for radioactive iodine therapy-induced adverse
           effects

    • Authors: Andreas Charalambous
      Pages: 319 - 322
      Abstract: Andreas Charalambous
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):319-322
      Radioactive iodine therapy (RAIT) is one of the important treatment modalities in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). RAIT with iodine-131 has long been used in the management of DTC for the ablation of residual thyroid or treatment of its metastases. Despite being reasonably safe, radioiodine therapy is not always without side effects. Even relatively low administered activities of RAIT used for remnant ablation have been associated with the more clinically significant side effects of sialadenitis, xerostomia, salivary gland pain and swelling, dry eyes, excessive tearing, or alterations in taste in as many as 25% of patients. Given that there is a lack of comprehensive management of these RAIT-induced adverse effects, this paper explores the use of other nonpharmacological measures and their effectiveness as interventions to minimize salivary gland damage.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):319-322
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_23_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Role of systemic antibiotics in preventing epidermal growth factor
           receptor: Tyrosine kinase inhibitors-induced skin toxicities

    • Authors: Philomena Charlotte Dsouza, Shiyam Kumar
      Pages: 323 - 329
      Abstract: Philomena Charlotte Dsouza, Shiyam Kumar
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):323-329
      The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is actively involved in the growth of multiple tumor types and has been found as an effective treatment target in various solid cancers, for example, lung cancer and head and neck cancer. Of effective drugs which target and inhibit EGFR functions, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown promising results, albeit at a cost of side effects, skin toxicity being the most common. This article provides an evidence-based strategy to oncology nurse practitioners in dealing with such toxicity.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):323-329
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_28_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Measuring oral mucositis of pediatric patients with cancer: A psychometric
           evaluation of chinese version of the oral mucositis daily questionnaire

    • Authors: Karis Kin Fong Cheng, Wan Yim Ip, Vincent Lee, Chak Ho Li, Hui Leung Yuen, Joel B Epstein
      Pages: 330 - 335
      Abstract: Karis Kin Fong Cheng, Wan Yim Ip, Vincent Lee, Chak Ho Li, Hui Leung Yuen, Joel B Epstein
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):330-335
      Objective: Oral mucositis is a frequent clinical condition that has been shown to affect pediatric cancer patients. Oral Mucositis Daily Questionnaire (OMDQ) is one of the few available patient-reported outcome measures to assess the extent and impact of oral mucositis. The objectives of the study were to translate the Mouth and Throat Soreness-Related Questions of the OMDQ into Chinese (OMDQ MTS-Ch) for children and adolescents aged 6–18 years receiving chemotherapy and to evaluate its psychometric properties. Methods: This was part of a multicenter, prospective cohort study involving two phases. Phase I involved forward-backward translation to fit the cognitive and linguistic age level of the children and adolescents, followed by face and content validation, together with pretesting. In Phase II, which evaluated the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and discriminant validity, a total of 140 patients completed the OMDQ MTS-Ch for 14 days. Results: The OMDQ MTS-Ch had satisfactory face and content validities. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the OMDQ MTS-Ch was 0.984. All of the corrected item-total correlations were higher than 0.90. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient between consecutive days for the OMDQ MTS-Ch items ranged from 0.576 to 0.983; the only value that was not over 0.70 was that for the paired study days 7 and 8 for the item of talking. The mean area-under-the-curve OMDQ MTS-Ch item scores were significantly different among patients with different degrees of mucositis severity (P < 0.001), supporting the discriminant validity. Conclusions: It has been shown that the OMDQ MTS-Ch has a good level of reliability and discriminant validity and can be completed by children aged ≥6 years and adolescents on a daily basis to measure mucositis and its related functional limitations.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):330-335
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_39_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • An investigation into the quality of life of cancer patients in South
           Africa

    • Authors: Jacoba Johanna Maria Jansen van Rensburg, Johanna Elizabeth Maree, Daleen Casteleijn
      Pages: 336 - 341
      Abstract: Jacoba Johanna Maria Jansen van Rensburg, Johanna Elizabeth Maree, Daleen Casteleijn
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):336-341
      Objective: Cancer patients in Africa face unique challenges such as poverty, access to health care and under-resourced health-care systems. Although quality of life (QoL) of cancer patients has been well researched, the perspectives of cancer patients living in Africa are unknown. The objective was to explore what constitutes QoL for cancer patients accessing public health care in South Africa. Methods: A qualitative exploratory design was used, and data were gathered by means of in-depth interviews. Purposive sampling selected the participants, and the sample size was determined by saturation (n = 22). The data were analyzed using Patton's method of content analysis. Results: The participants were aged between 20 and 79 years, with an average of 50 years. Most were female and represented seven cultural groups. Four themes that influence QoL arose from the data: psychosocial-, physical-, spiritual and financial factors. Conclusions: QoL remains a complex phenomenon, enhanced and diminished by various individual factors. Poverty was a major issue and influenced the physical aspects of QoL, as the participants had to be strong enough to work and earn a living. Support from family, friends, and church members enhanced QoL, as well as religion and religious practices. Measuring QoL would be the next step to enable nurses to implement measures to improve QoL. Whether existing QoL instruments would be suitable for this patient population is not known and should be investigated before implementation.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):336-341
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_41_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Anterior tibial artery perforator plus flaps: Role in coverage of
           posttumor excision defects around the knee joint and upper leg

    • Authors: Harshvardhan Sahijwani, Vikas Warikoo, Abhijeet Ashok Salunke, Jaymin Shah, Preetish Bhavsar, Rahul Wagh, Subodh Pathak
      Pages: 342 - 347
      Abstract: Harshvardhan Sahijwani, Vikas Warikoo, Abhijeet Ashok Salunke, Jaymin Shah, Preetish Bhavsar, Rahul Wagh, Subodh Pathak
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):342-347
      Objective: Posttumor excision defects can be very large, and many do require postoperative radiotherapy. It is therefore important to provide stable and durable wound coverage to provide ability to withstand radiotherapy as well as providing cover to vital structures. Methods: Between July 2014 and June 2016, eight females and six male patients with defects around the knee were operated upon using a perforator plus flap from the anterior tibial artery perforator. In all except two patients, the defects were the result of posttumor extirpation, while in the latter, it was due to impending implant exposure following bone tumor excision and tibial prosthesis. A constant perforator at the neck of the fibula was found using hand-held Doppler. The base of the flap was always kept intact. The flap was then transposed toward the defect and inset in a tensionless manner. Results: The average flap dimension was 14 cm × 5.5 cm. The mean follow-up was 11 months (6–20 months). All the flaps survived well except in one patient who developed partial tip necrosis, providing stable coverage of the wound. Two patients developed local recurrence and had to undergo above-knee amputation. Conclusions: The planning for the reconstruction of defects following tumor resection is to be done in accordance with a multidisciplinary team approach involving oncosurgeon, reconstructive plastic surgeons, and radiation specialist. The perforator plus flap is an excellent choice in defects around the knee to cover neurovascular structures, bone, or implant.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):342-347
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_32_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Determinants of behavioral intentions to screen for prostate cancer in
           Omani men

    • Authors: Joshua Kanaabi Muliira, Hazaa Sami Al-Saidi, Asaad Nasser Al-Yahyai
      Pages: 348 - 355
      Abstract: Joshua Kanaabi Muliira, Hazaa Sami Al-Saidi, Asaad Nasser Al-Yahyai
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):348-355
      Objective: This study aimed at exploring the perceived barriers and intention to screen for prostate cancer (PCa). Methods: A survey questionnaire and a descriptive design were used to collect data from 129 Omani men above the age of 40 years. The questionnaire comprised the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), barriers, and intention to screen scales. The participants were recruited from barbershops located in two cities of Oman. Results: The mean IPSS score was 8.31 ± 3.34 and the majority of participants had mild prostate cancer symptoms (60.4%). The others had moderate (28.7%) or severe symptoms (10.9%). Most men had low-to-moderate intention to screen using the method of digital rectal examination (DRE) (76%) and prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) (69.8%). The most common barriers to screening were fear of finding out something wrong (48.1%), not knowing what will be done during screening (54.3%), belief that PCa is not a serious disease (55.8%), and belief that DRE is embarrassing (56.6%). The significant determinants of intention to screen using DRE were perceived threat of the disease (P = 0.006) and past information from doctors that one has any prostate disease (P = 0.017). The determinants of intention to screen using PSA were perceived threat of the disease (P = 0.025), perceived general health (P = 0.047), and past information from doctors that one has any prostate disease (P = 0.017). Conclusions: The participants had diminutive intention to undergo PCa screening. Interventions aimed at enhancing PCa disease and risk awareness may help to reduce the barriers and increase PCa screening uptake.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):348-355
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_34_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Toluidine blue staining in identification of a biopsy site in potentially
           malignant lesions: A case–control study

    • Authors: Mayank Kumar Parakh, RC Jagat Reddy, Prabhu Subramani
      Pages: 356 - 360
      Abstract: Mayank Kumar Parakh, RC Jagat Reddy, Prabhu Subramani
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):356-360
      Objective: Oral cancer is a significant threat to public health all over the world, especially in Southeast Asia. At the present time, screening of oral cancer, its premalignant stages as well as its early detection, is still largely based on visual examination of the mouth. Visual examination is highly subjective and hence lacks the specificity and sensitivity. The objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of toluidine blue in marking a biopsy site in potentially malignant disorders. Methods: In this study, a total of 500 patients were screened. The study was a case–control study which included 17 lesion cases and 23 normal controls. Toluidine blue staining was taken into consideration to identify clinically doubtful oral potentially malignant lesions and to compare the clinical evaluation with toluidine blue stain followed by a punch biopsy and histological evaluation. SPSS Statistics version 16.0 and Chi-square test were used for statistical analyses. Results: The most common site for potentially malignant lesions was found to be the buccal mucosa. The sensitivity of toluidine blue was found to be 88.89%, while specificity was found to be 74.19%. The positive predictive and negative predictive values were 50% and 97.83%, respectively. P = 0.000672 was considered statistically significant. Conclusions: The results seem to be promising, but many such studies have to be done at larger scales to exactly help us in identifying the capability of toluidine blue in the long run.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):356-360
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_38_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Development and evaluation of multimedia interventions to promote breast
           and cervical health among South Asian women in Hong Kong: A project
           protocol

    • Authors: Winnie K. W. So, Dorothy N. S. Chan, Tika Rana, Bernard M. H. Law, Doris Y. P. Leung, Helen Y. L. Chan, CC Ng, Sek Ying Chair, Carmen W. H. Chan
      Pages: 361 - 365
      Abstract: Winnie K. W. So, Dorothy N. S. Chan, Tika Rana, Bernard M. H. Law, Doris Y. P. Leung, Helen Y. L. Chan, CC Ng, Sek Ying Chair, Carmen W. H. Chan
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):361-365
      Recent studies conducted in the local community indicate that the uptake rates of breast and cervical cancer screening among South Asian ethnic minorities are lower than those of the general population. The development of interventions to promote these minorities' awareness of breast and cervical health and the importance of cancer screening is therefore required. This study protocol aims to develop culturally sensitive multimedia interventions to promote awareness of breast and cervical cancer prevention among South Asian women in Hong Kong, and to evaluate the outcomes of such interventions using a Reach-Effectiveness-Adoption-Implementation-Maintenance framework. By using a multimedia approach and developing socio-culturally relevant and linguistically appropriate educational materials, information related to cancer and accessible preventive measures for breast and cervical cancer is expected to be disseminated more effectively among South Asian women and ultimately increase their awareness of engaging in healthy lifestyles and taking part in cancer screening tests. Successful engagement of community partners will enhance the future sustainability of the project.
      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):361-365
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_37_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Meeting report from Chinese Anti-Cancer Association – Chinese
           Association of Nurses in Oncology

    • Authors: Qi Wang
      Pages: 366 - 367
      Abstract: Qi Wang
      Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):366-367

      Citation: Asia-Pacific Journal of Oncology Nursing 2017 4(4):366-367
      PubDate: Fri,11 Aug 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/apjon.apjon_42_17
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 4 (2017)
       
 
 
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