Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 419 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 419 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 16, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biomedical Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Digital Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Education in the Health Professions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research KLEU     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Acute Disease     Open Access   (SJR: 0.163, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.309, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.612, CiteScore: 1)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.568
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2230-8210 - ISSN (Online) 2230-9500
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [419 journals]
  • COVID-19 and endocrine disorders – Emerging links in this
           puzzle

    • Authors: SV Madhu, Nishant Raizada
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: SV Madhu, Nishant Raizada
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):1-3

      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):1-3
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.322027
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Diagnosis and management considerations in steroid-related hyperglycemia
           in COVID-19: A position statement from the endocrine society of India

    • Authors: Sambit Das, Ashu Rastogi, KV S. Harikumar, Deep Dutta, Rakesh Sahay, Sanjay Kalra, Sujoy Ghosh, Sushil K Gupta, Kaushik Pandit, PK Jabbar, Suresh Damodaran, V Sri Nagesh, Shehla Sheikh, SV Madhu, Ganapathi Bantwal
      Pages: 4 - 11
      Abstract: Sambit Das, Ashu Rastogi, KV S. Harikumar, Deep Dutta, Rakesh Sahay, Sanjay Kalra, Sujoy Ghosh, Sushil K Gupta, Kaushik Pandit, PK Jabbar, Suresh Damodaran, V Sri Nagesh, Shehla Sheikh, SV Madhu, Ganapathi Bantwal
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):4-11
      The current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is showing no signs of abatement and result in significant morbidity and mortality in the infected patients. Many therapeutic agents ranging widely between antivirals and anti-inflammatory drugs have been used to mitigate the disease burden. In the deluge of the drugs being used for COVID-19 infection, glucocorticoids (GCs) stand out by reducing mortality amongst in-hospital severe-to-critically ill patients. Health-care practitioners have seen this as a glimmer of hope and started using these drugs more frequently than ever in clinical practice. The fear of mortality in the short term has overridden the concern of adverse long-term consequences with steroid use. The ease of availability, low cost, and apparent clinical improvement in the short term have led to the unscrupulous use of the steroids even in mild COVID-19 patients including self-medication with steroids. The use of GCs has led to the increasing incidence of hyperglycemia and consequent acute complications of diabetic ketoacidosis and mucormycosis in COVID-19 patients. There is an urgent need to dissipate information about optimum management of hyperglycemia during steroid use. In view of this, the Endocrine Society of India has formulated this position statement about the diagnosis and management of hyperglycemia due to the use of GCs in patients with COVID-19 infection.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):4-11
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.ijem_227_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • APCO framework of clinical standards of care: A major leap forward in
           streamlining osteoporosis care in India

    • Authors: Sanjay Kumar Bhadada, Manju Chandran, Rimesh Pal, Manoj Chadha, Ambrish Mithal
      Pages: 12 - 13
      Abstract: Sanjay Kumar Bhadada, Manju Chandran, Rimesh Pal, Manoj Chadha, Ambrish Mithal
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):12-13

      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):12-13
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.ijem_156_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Endocrine dysfunction among patients with COVID-19: A single-center
           experience from a tertiary hospital in India

    • Authors: Bharat Kumar, Maya Gopalakrishnan, Mahendra Kumar Garg, Purvi Purohit, Mithu Banerjee, Praveen Sharma, Satyendra Khichar, Nikhil Kothari, Pradeep Bhatia, Vijay Lakshmi Nag, Sanjeev Misra
      Pages: 14 - 19
      Abstract: Bharat Kumar, Maya Gopalakrishnan, Mahendra Kumar Garg, Purvi Purohit, Mithu Banerjee, Praveen Sharma, Satyendra Khichar, Nikhil Kothari, Pradeep Bhatia, Vijay Lakshmi Nag, Sanjeev Misra
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):14-19
      Objective: COVID-19 has emerged as a multi-system disease with the potential for endocrine dysfunction. We aimed to study the hormonal profile of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 at a tertiary care referral hospital at Jodhpur, India. Design: A hospital-based clinical study of endocrine profile of COVID-19 patients conducted from 15th May to 30th June 2020 after ethical approval. Measurements: Fasting blood samples for free thyroxine (T4), free tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroid stimulating Hormone (TSH), serum prolactin; basal and 1 h post-intramuscular adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulated cortisol, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were collected within 24 h of admission after written informed consent. All hormones and IL-6 were analyzed by chemiluminescent immunoassay. hsCRP was measured by immune-turbidimetric assay. Results: Of 235 patients studied, 14% had severe disease and 5.5% died. Adrenal insufficiency was present in 14%, most of whom had mild disease. A robust adrenal response was observed in those with severe disease. Basal and post-ACTH serum cortisol were significantly increased in severe disease or those who died compared to those who were mild or asymptomatic. Basal and post-ACTH serum cortisol showed a significant positive correlation with hsCRP but not with IL-6. Low T3 and low T4 syndrome were documented in 25% and 5%, respectively. Serum TSH and FT3 levels declined significantly from asymptomatic to severe category. Hyperprolactinemia was found in 21 patients. hsCRP showed a rising trend with disease severity while IL-6 did not. Conclusions: Endocrine dysfunction in the form of adrenal insufficiency, low T3, and low TSH syndrome and hyperprolactinemia were common COVID-19 hospitalized patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):14-19
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_577_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Lipid profile in infant

    • Authors: Ashok Kumar, Kaushik Pandit, Purushottam Chatterjee, Pradip Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy Ghosh
      Pages: 20 - 22
      Abstract: Ashok Kumar, Kaushik Pandit, Purushottam Chatterjee, Pradip Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy Ghosh
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):20-22
      Introduction: Alteration in lipid parameters at birth has a strong association with the development of cardiovascular disease in later life. Material and Methods: Sixty-one infants below the age of 6 months underwent evaluation of lipid parameters. The infants studied were categorized into two groups of ≤4 and >4 weeks of age, wherein their lipid parameters were compared. Results: The normal distribution of lipid parameters of infants <6 months was generated. The mean total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol was 126.2 ± 26.5, 149.1 ± 48.6, 40.7 ± 14.6, and 69.4 ± 19.4 mg/dl, respectively. The total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol measured in ≤4 and >4 weeks of age groups were statistically not different (total cholesterol 125.0 ± 30.1 mg/dl vs 127.4 ± 23.4 mg/dl, P = 0.727, and LDL-cholesterol 66.0 ± 19.2 mg/dl vs 75.4 ± 21.2 mg/dl, P = 0.780). However, the HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides measured at ≤4 weeks versus >4 weeks age groups were statistically different (HDL-cholesterol 44.9 ± 17.2 mg/dl vs 36.9 ± 10.8 mg/dl, P = 0.031, and triglyceride 147.4 ± 60.2 mg/dl vs 186.5 ± 75.7 mg/dl, P = 0.030). Conclusion: The mean lipid parameters were significantly more atherogenic compared to the Western population. Triglyceride levels and HDL-cholesterol levels change significantly after 4 weeks of age compared to that observed before 4 weeks of age.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):20-22
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_396_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • “Puddles on the road”: Hurdles in the pathway from symptoms to
           diagnosis and treatment in children with type 1 diabetes

    • Authors: Latika Rohilla, Rakesh Kumar, Priyanka Walia, Jaivinder Yadav, Devi Dayal
      Pages: 23 - 30
      Abstract: Latika Rohilla, Rakesh Kumar, Priyanka Walia, Jaivinder Yadav, Devi Dayal
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):23-30
      Introduction: This study was conducted to investigate the pathway from first symptoms to initiation of insulin regimen in children with new-onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) and explore the reasons behind diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) at onset among children with T1DM. Materials and Methods: An exploratory study was conducted using a pretested questionnaire, among parents of children diagnosed with T1DM within preceding 3 months. Results: Out of the total 105 children, 56.1% were males. The median age was 7 years. The commonest reported symptoms were polydipsia (97.8%), polyuria (75.2%), and nocturia (75.2%). The mean time taken by parents from onset of symptoms to decide to visit the physician (appraisal gap) was 7.85 ± 7.95 days. The help-seeking gap (from decision-making to visiting a physician) was 3.01 ± 8.31 days, diagnostic gap (from first visit to diagnosis) was 4.19 ± 6.72 days, and the treatment gap (from diagnosis to the start of insulin) was 2.12 ± 6.87 days. The DKA at onset (was present in 39 out of 105 children 37.1%) and was higher among children with lower per-capita income (P-0.017), lack of previous experience among parents (P-0.017), longer appraisal (P-0.023), and treatment gap (P-0.009). Conclusion: Increasing awareness about the diabetes among children among the public and primary healthcare workers can help prevent DKA at onset.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):23-30
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_519_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Low-carb diet in hospitalized late pubertal type 1 diabetic girls: A
           short-term CGM study

    • Authors: Nefise Aribas &#214;z, Ilknur Arslanoglu, Seng&#252;l Cang&#252;r, Semih Bolu, Kenan Kocabay
      Pages: 31 - 37
      Abstract: Nefise Aribas Öz, Ilknur Arslanoglu, Sengül Cangür, Semih Bolu, Kenan Kocabay
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):31-37
      Objective: We conducted the present study to observe potential short-term benefits or risks of low-carb diet (LCD). Methods: This is a prospective randomized cross-over study. Type 1 diabetic girls were hospitalized in ternary groups for 7 days and each group randomly started with LCD or regular diet. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was performed between 0 and 168 h. Results: Twenty-eight subjects completed the study. Total energy, protein, and fat consumption were high (P < 0.001); carbohydrate consumption and rapidly acting insulin dose were low (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively) during LCD. Morning postprandial, noon postprandial, and evening preprandial capillary blood sugar levels were lower during LCD (P = 0.013, 0.018, and 0.048, respectively). Conclusion: LCD may have the advantage of better glycemic control despite lower insulin dose which is a favorable outcome with regard to weight control and atherosclerosis prevention. No adverse events were observed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):31-37
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.ijem_176_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Insulin usage and practices in children and adolescents with type 1
           diabetes

    • Authors: Ashrita Donepudi, Harshini S Donepudi, Mythili Ayyagari
      Pages: 38 - 42
      Abstract: Ashrita Donepudi, Harshini S Donepudi, Mythili Ayyagari
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):38-42
      Context: Data on insulin usage and practices in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is sparse in India. Aims: To analyze the various insulin types and regimens used by children and adolescents with T1D, the techniques and the devices used for insulin administration, and the storage and disposal methods of delivery devices. Settings and Design: Observational cross-sectional study. Methods and Materials: Study subjects were children and adolescents with T1D ≥6 months and informed consent was obtained. A detailed demographic history was collected, and a predesigned, pretested questionnaire was used. Results: The number of subjects were 90 (M: F; 32:58), age ranging from 3 to 18 years and duration of T1D was 6 months to 16 years. Mean age was 13 ± 4.6 yrs, HbA1c was 9.11 ± 2.2% and duration was 5 years. Conventional insulins were more commonly used than analogs. Basal-bolus (BB) regimen was used in 49% of the subjects. Mean HbA1c for analogs was 7.6% and conventional was 9.3% (p = 0.001). HbA1c <8% was significantly more in those aged 3-8 yrs, mean duration ≤4.1 yrs, those using pens and BB regimen. Fifty-six percent were using own refrigerators for storage and the most common barriers for insulin usage were fear of hypoglycemia (37%), inaccessibility (20%), and apprehension of shots (18%). Site rotation patterns were followed by 84% and 94% of the subjects reported disposing syringes and sharps as general waste. Conclusions: Conventional insulins and vial-syringes remain the most commonly used insulin delivery systems. Glycemic control was better in younger age, lesser duration, BB regimen, analog usage, and pen devices.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):38-42
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_92_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Assessing adequacy of iodine intake among children from 6 months to 15
           years of age from hilly terrains of North India

    • Authors: Dinesh Kumar, Sunil K Raina, Raman Chauhan, Parveen Kumar, Sushant Sharma, Chirag Goel
      Pages: 43 - 47
      Abstract: Dinesh Kumar, Sunil K Raina, Raman Chauhan, Parveen Kumar, Sushant Sharma, Chirag Goel
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):43-47
      Background: Routine outcome-based monitoring is required to assess the status of consumption of iodized salt as USI strategy. Objective: To assess the extent of recent iodine intake among children from 6 to 15 years of age in the hilly terrain of northern states of India. Methods: A school-based cross-sectional observational study among 227 children attending school was done for assessment of socio-demographic, dietary, salt consumption and urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Results: Mean age of children was about 6 years and 87.7% were consuming salt of >30 and none with <15 ppm iodine content. Median UIC was 138.0 μg/L. Among those assessed, 37.9% had adequate level of UIC, whereas about 20% and 40% participants had less (<99.0 μg/L) and more than adequate to excessive (≥200 μg/L) levels of UIC. Insignificant difference (p = 0.07) was observed for mean log UIC between cabbage eaters (2.3) and non-eaters (1.9) consuming salt >5 grams/day. Conclusion: Recent iodine intake among children observed to be inadequate and effect of cruciferous food items on UIC needs to be studied despite high coverage of iodized salt among children.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):43-47
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_38_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Clinical, etiological and laboratory profile of children with disorders of
           sexual development (dsd)-experience from a tertiary pediatric endocrine
           unit in western India

    • Authors: Rahul Jahagirdar, Vaman Khadilkar, Ruma Deshpande, Nikhil Lohiya
      Pages: 48 - 53
      Abstract: Rahul Jahagirdar, Vaman Khadilkar, Ruma Deshpande, Nikhil Lohiya
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):48-53
      Objectives: To present the clinical profile, diagnostic work-up, and management of children with Disorders of Sexual Development (DSD).Materials and Methods: A retrospective study from a tertiary pediatric endocrine unit of western India. We included 39 patients who presented over a period of 9 years from June 2009 to June 2018. Results: Nineteen patients (48.7%) were diagnosed with 46 XY DSD, 16 (41%) with 46 XX DSD, and 4 (10.3%) with sex chromosomal DSD. Out of 46 XY DSD, androgen insensitivity was observed in 8 (42.1%) patients, 5 alpha-reductase deficiency in 5 (26.3%), gonadal dysgenesis in 3 (15.8%), ovotesticular DSD in 2 (10.5%) and 17 beta-hydroxylase (17γ-HSD3) deficiency in 1 (5.3%). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia was the most common cause in 46 XX DSD observed in 11 (68.75%) out of 16 patients, ovotesticular DSD was seen in 4 (25%) patients and testicular DSD in 1 (6.25%) patient. In sex chromosomal DSD 3 (75%) patients had mixed gonadal dysgenesis and 1 (25%) had ovotesticular DSD out of a total of 4 patients. At presentation gender of rearing was assigned as male in 16 (41%) patients, female in 20 (51.3%) patients, and no gender was assigned in 3 (7.7%). The gender of rearing was changed after diagnosis in 6 (16.7%) children. Conclusion: CAH was the most common etiology of 46 XX DSD whereas androgen insensitivity among 46 XY DSD. Assigning the sex of rearing should not be hurried and should be done only after diagnosis and parental counseling. A multidisciplinary and systematic approach is required for children with DSD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):48-53
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_520_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Effects of early initiation of growth hormone therapy on different
           auxological parameters in growth hormone deficient children: Experience
           from an Indian tertiary care center

    • Authors: Inderpal S Kochar, Smita Ramachandran, Aashish Sethi
      Pages: 54 - 58
      Abstract: Inderpal S Kochar, Smita Ramachandran, Aashish Sethi
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):54-58
      Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of early initiation versus late growth hormone in improving the predicted adult height in growth hormone deficiency (GHD) children. Methods: A retrospective study of 550 GHD children with short stature, who had taken rGH for duration of minimum 12 months were included. They were divided into groups of less than 8 years and more than 8 years of age based on the initiation of growth hormone therapy. Their pretreatment and post-treatment auxological parameters were evaluated. Results: There were 148 children in less than 8 years group and 402 children in more than 8 years old group. In 8 years or younger age group, the pre-treatment mean height of –2.015 SDS improved to –0.7753 SDS after one year of treatment. There was an improvement in the mean height from –2.0447 SDS to –1.2658 SDS post-treatment in more than 8 years group. The pre- and post-treatment difference between the Z score of height, weight, and BMI were statistically significant (<0.001). Conclusion: A significant height improvement occurred in both the groups' children after 1 year of GH treatment but the gain in final adult height was better when initiated less than 8 years of age. No significant side effects were noted during this period.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):54-58
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_739_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis: A marker of severity or
           alternate substrate for metabolism

    • Authors: Javaid Ahmad Bhat, Shariq Rashid Masoodi, Moomin Hussain Bhat, Hilal Bhat, Peerzada Ovais Ahmad, Mona Sood
      Pages: 59 - 66
      Abstract: Javaid Ahmad Bhat, Shariq Rashid Masoodi, Moomin Hussain Bhat, Hilal Bhat, Peerzada Ovais Ahmad, Mona Sood
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):59-66
      Purpose: The lactate level is being increasingly used as a marker of severity of illness and prognosis in multitude of critical conditions. However, its role in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is not well defined. Aim: To determine the prevalence and clinical importance along with the underlying role of metformin in lactic acidosis (LA) in patients admitted with DKA. Methods: A 2-year prospective and observational study involving 62 consenting in hospital DKA patients. Plasma lactate level on arrival, its clinical significance and relationship with morbidity and mortality in patients with DKA was evaluated. Results: The prevalence of LA (lactate ≥2.5 mmol/l) among the study cohort was found to be 55% with significant LA (≥5 mmol/l) documented in 16%. The median lactate level was 2.55 mmol/l (interquartile range, 1.70–3.20). No significant difference in the severity of LA was seen with metformin use. Lactate correlated positively with initial plasma glucose (IPG) (P = 0.001) and APACHE-II Score (P = 0.002); correlated negatively with systolic blood pressure (P = 0.003), pH (P = 0.002) and severity of DKA (P = 0.001). After controlling for AKI, APACHE II score and blood pressure, lactate continued to correlate positively with IPG (P = 0.002). No mortality or significant morbidity was documented in the entire cohort. Conclusions: LA has a significant presence in patients with DKA; however, it is not associated with mortality or significant morbidity. Moreover, there was no significant difference in severity of LA with metformin use. Elevated lactate levels may be an adaptation to provide alternate substrate for metabolism in the presence of hypoinsulinemic state. The study results provide rationale for large well-designed studies evaluating in-depth clinical relationship of lactate in DKA.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):59-66
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_753_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction in diabetes: An observational study

    • Authors: Ipsita Ghosh, Madhurima Basu, Beatrice Anne, Pradip Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy Ghosh
      Pages: 67 - 68
      Abstract: Ipsita Ghosh, Madhurima Basu, Beatrice Anne, Pradip Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy Ghosh
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):67-68

      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):67-68
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_822_20
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Radiological signs in osteopetrosis

    • Authors: Payal Bargujar, Kusum Devpura, Sawai Singh Lora
      Pages: 68 - 69
      Abstract: Payal Bargujar, Kusum Devpura, Sawai Singh Lora
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):68-69

      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):68-69
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.ijem_125_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • A perplexing presentation of SLE as adrenal insufficiency in a young male

    • Authors: Payal Bargujar, Hans Raj Pahadiya
      Pages: 69 - 72
      Abstract: Payal Bargujar, Hans Raj Pahadiya
      Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):69-72

      Citation: Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2021 25(1):69-72
      PubDate: Wed,21 Jul 2021
      DOI: 10.4103/ijem.ijem_122_21
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2021)
       
 
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