Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 427 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 427 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Medica Intl.     Open Access   (SJR: 0.101, CiteScore: 0)
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advanced Biomedical Research     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Skeletal Muscle Function Assessment     Open Access  
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.25, CiteScore: 1)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria J. of Pediatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.258, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.308, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Indian Academy of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery     Open Access  
Annals of Indian Psychiatry     Open Access  
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.352, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.238, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.524, CiteScore: 1)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Annals of Tropical Pathology     Open Access  
Apollo Medicine     Open Access  
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Cardiovascular Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.187, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.302, CiteScore: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Medicine and Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Archives of Trauma Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 2)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.856, CiteScore: 2)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.35, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Reproduction     Open Access   (SJR: 0.227, CiteScore: 1)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.491, CiteScore: 2)
Asian Pacific J. of Tropical Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.561, CiteScore: 2)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
Biomedical and Biotechnology Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Canadian J. of Rural Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.202, CiteScore: 0)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cardiology Plus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.52, CiteScore: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Cancer Investigation J.     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.811, CiteScore: 2)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.353, CiteScore: 1)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.543, CiteScore: 1)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.152, CiteScore: 0)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.416, CiteScore: 1)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.242, CiteScore: 0)
Education in the Health Professions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.799, CiteScore: 2)
Egyptian J. of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.155, CiteScore: 0)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Nursing J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.822, CiteScore: 2)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Eurasian J. of Pulmonology     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.749, CiteScore: 2)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.12, CiteScore: 0)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11, SJR: 0.113, CiteScore: 0)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.112, CiteScore: 0)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.153, CiteScore: 0)
Glioma     Open Access  
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gynecology and Minimally Invasive Therapy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.311, CiteScore: 1)
Hamdan Medical J.     Open Access  
Heart and Mind     Open Access  
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ibnosina J. of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Imam J. of Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.478, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.361, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.37, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.266, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.468, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.445, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.791, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.568, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Health Sciences and Biomedical Research KLEU     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.425, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.503, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.656, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.102, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.347, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.23, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.225, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.498, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.392, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.199, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.454, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.276, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.412, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.408, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.368, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Respiratory Care     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.119, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.34, CiteScore: 0)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Transplantation     Open Access  
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.434, CiteScore: 1)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Spine J.     Open Access  
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Abdominal Wall and Hernia Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Clinicopathological Correlation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Community Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.192, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.142, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Growth Factors and Stem Cells in Dentistry     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.535, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.17, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orofacial Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.623, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.653, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of the Cardiovascular Academy     Open Access   (SJR: 0.105, CiteScore: 0)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.4, CiteScore: 1)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Indian Journal of Medical Sciences
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.102
Number of Followers: 3  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0019-5359 - ISSN (Online) 0019-5359
Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [427 journals]
  • Sickle cell disease: Progress made & challenges ahead

    • Authors: Isaac Odame, Dipty Jain
      Pages: 505 - 508
      Abstract: Isaac Odame, Dipty Jain
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):505-508

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):505-508
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2064_20
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Epicardial adipose tissue: An anatomic component of obesity &
           metabolic syndrome in close proximity to myocardium & coronary
           arteries

    • Authors: Gjin Ndrepepa
      Pages: 509 - 512
      Abstract: Gjin Ndrepepa
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):509-512

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):509-512
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2692_19
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • White paper on smokeless tobacco & women's health in
           India

    • Authors: Shalini Singh, Pankhuri Jain, Prashant Kumar Singh, K Srinath Reddy, Balram Bhargava
      Pages: 513 - 521
      Abstract: Shalini Singh, Pankhuri Jain, Prashant Kumar Singh, K Srinath Reddy, Balram Bhargava
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):513-521
      Smokeless tobacco (SLT) use is widespread across many nations and populations, and India shares more than three-quarters of the global burden of SLT consumption. Tobacco use in India has been largely viewed as a male-dominant behaviour. However, evidence from medical, social and behavioural sciences show significant SLT use among women and young girls. This paper highlights key dimensions of SLT use among women in India including prevalence and determinants, the health effects arising from SLT use and cessation behaviours. The paper concludes by providing recommendations with the aim of setting research priorities and policy agenda to achieve a tobacco-free society. The focus on women and girls is essential to achieve the national targets for tobacco control under the National Health Policy, 2017, and Sustainable Development Goals 3 of ensuring healthy lives and promote well-being for all.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):513-521
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_537_20
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Occult drug resistance in tuberculosis: Emerging issues, upcoming
           challenges & possible solutions

    • Authors: Baijayantimala Mishra, Prasanta Raghab Mohapatra
      Pages: 522 - 524
      Abstract: Baijayantimala Mishra, Prasanta Raghab Mohapatra
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):522-524

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):522-524
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_316_19
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Why there are no effective herbal antidotes against snake venom available
           in India?

    • Authors: Antony Gomes, Sourav Ghosh, Aparna Gomes
      Pages: 525 - 527
      Abstract: Antony Gomes, Sourav Ghosh, Aparna Gomes
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):525-527

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):525-527
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_893_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

    • Authors: Ritesh Agarwal, Inderpaul S Sehgal, Sahajal Dhooria, Valliappan Muthu, Kuruswamy T Prasad, Amanjit Bal, Ashutosh N Aggarwal, Arunaloke Chakrabarti
      Pages: 529 - 549
      Abstract: Ritesh Agarwal, Inderpaul S Sehgal, Sahajal Dhooria, Valliappan Muthu, Kuruswamy T Prasad, Amanjit Bal, Ashutosh N Aggarwal, Arunaloke Chakrabarti
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):529-549
      Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is an inflammatory disease caused by immunologic reactions initiated against Aspergillus fumigatus colonizing the airways of patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. The common manifestations include treatment-resistant asthma, transient and fleeting pulmonary opacities and bronchiectasis. It is believed that globally there are about five million cases of ABPA, with India alone accounting for about 1.4 million cases. The occurrence of ABPA among asthmatic patients in special clinics may be as high as 13 per cent. Thus, a high degree of suspicion for ABPA should be entertained while treating a patient with bronchial asthma, particularly in specialized clinics. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can delay (or even prevent) the onset of bronchiectasis, which suggests that all patients of bronchial asthma should be screened for ABPA, especially in chest clinics. The current review summarizes the recent advances in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of ABPA.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):529-549
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1187_19
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Indian Council of Medical Research's International Collaboration &
           Partnerships; Health Ministry's Screening Committee: Facts, figures
           & procedures

    • Authors: Mukesh Kumar, Harpreet Sandhu, Reema Roshan
      Pages: 550 - 553
      Abstract: Mukesh Kumar, Harpreet Sandhu, Reema Roshan
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):550-553
      There is a great interest among various international agencies/countries in developing partnership with Indian research organizations, particularly with the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) for biomedical research. The ICMR is actively involved in governance and co-ordination of partnerships with several international organizations and agencies. Various MoUs (Memorandum of Understanding)/agreements of ICMR with international partners bring together the researchers and resources towards progression through shared research and innovation agenda. Growing collaboration during recent years is reflected through increased number of internationally funded/technically coordinated research projects in health research. However, for any international collaborative research study to be undertaken in India, certain regulatory requirements are to be fulfilled. This article summarizes the international partnerships of ICMR as well as the details of guidelines regarding submission of international collaborative research projects for the Health Ministry's Screening Committee (HMSC), which is a mandatory requirement before undertaking such projects.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):550-553
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_654_20
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Pathogenic gene expression of epicardial adipose tissue in patients with
           coronary artery disease

    • Authors: Anagha Vinay Sahasrabuddhe, Shailesh U Pitale, Saravana Devi Sivanesan, Purushottam K Deshpande, Swapnil P Deshpande, Atul Daiwile
      Pages: 554 - 561
      Abstract: Anagha Vinay Sahasrabuddhe, Shailesh U Pitale, Saravana Devi Sivanesan, Purushottam K Deshpande, Swapnil P Deshpande, Atul Daiwile
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):554-561
      Background & objectives: Coronary artery disease (CAD), a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide has multifactorial origin. Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) has complex mechanical and thermogenic functions and paracrine actions via various cytokines released by it, which can have both pro- and anti-inflammatory actions on myocardium and adjacent coronaries. The alteration of EAT gene expression in CAD is speculated, but poorly understood. This study was undertaken to find out the difference in gene expression of epicardial fat in CAD and non-CAD patients.Methods: Twenty seven patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and 16 controls (non-CAD patients undergoing valvular heart surgeries) were included in the study and their EAT samples were obtained. Gene expressions of uncoupling protein-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), adiponectin, adenosine A1 receptor (ADORA-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were studied by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Glucose, insulin, lipid profile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, vitamin D, TNF-α and leptin levels were estimated in fasting blood samples and analyzed.Results: Leptin levels were significantly higher in CABG group as compared to controls (P <0.05), whereas other metabolic parameters were not significantly different between the two groups. MCP-1, VCAM-1 and TNF-α were upregulated in the CABG group as compared to controls. Further, multivariate analysis showed significantly reduced adjusted odds ratio for MCP-1 [0.27; 95% confidence interval: 0.08-0.91] in the CABG group as compared to controls (P <0.05).Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed an alteration in EAT gene expression in CAD patients with significant upregulation of MCP-1. Further studies with a large sample need to be done to confirm these findings.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):554-561
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1374_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Findings from the 2017 HIV estimation round & trend analysis of key
           indicators 2010-2017: Evidence for prioritising HIV/AIDS programme in
           India

    • Authors: Damodar Sahu, Pradeep Kumar, Nalini Chandra, Shobini Rajan, DK Shukla, S Venkatesh, Saritha Nair, Anil Kumar, Jitenkumar Singh, Srikanth Reddy, Sheela Godbole, A Elangovan, MK Saha, Sanjay Rai, P.V.M. Lakshmi, T Gambhir, Savina Ammassari, Deepika Joshi, Amitabh Das, Poonam Bakshi, Sabyasachi Chakraborty, Amol Palkar, SK Singh, D.C.S. Reddy, Shashi Kant, Arvind Pandey, M Vishnu Vardhana Rao
      Pages: 562 - 570
      Abstract: Damodar Sahu, Pradeep Kumar, Nalini Chandra, Shobini Rajan, DK Shukla, S Venkatesh, Saritha Nair, Anil Kumar, Jitenkumar Singh, Srikanth Reddy, Sheela Godbole, A Elangovan, MK Saha, Sanjay Rai, P.V.M. Lakshmi, T Gambhir, Savina Ammassari, Deepika Joshi, Amitabh Das, Poonam Bakshi, Sabyasachi Chakraborty, Amol Palkar, SK Singh, D.C.S. Reddy, Shashi Kant, Arvind Pandey, M Vishnu Vardhana Rao
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):562-570
      Background & objectives: The National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) and the ICMR-National Institute of Medical Statistics, the nodal agency for conducting HIV estimations in India, have been generating HIV estimates regularly since 2003. The objective of this study was to describe India's biennial HIV estimation 2017 process, data inputs, tool, methodology and epidemiological assumptions used to generate the HIV estimates and trends of key indicators for 2010-2017 at national and State/Union Territory levels.Methods: Demographic Projection (DemProj) and AIDS Impact Modules (AIM) of Spectrum 5.63 software recommended by the United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS Global Reference Group on HIV Estimates, Modelling and Projections, were used for generating HIV estimations on key indicators. HIV sentinel surveillance, epidemiological and programme data were entered into Estimation Projection Package (EPP), and curve fitting was done using EPP classic model. Finally, calibration was done using the State HIV prevalence of two rounds of National Family Health Survey (NFHS) -3 and -4 and Integrated Biological and Behavioural Surveillance (IBBS), 2014-2015.Results: The national adult prevalence of HIV was estimated to be 0.22 per cent in 2017. Mizoram, Manipur and Nagaland had the highest prevalence over one per cent. An estimated 2.1 million people were living with HIV in 2017, with Maharashtra estimated to have the highest number. Of the 88 thousand annual new HIV infections estimated nationally in 2017, Telangana accounted for the largest share. HIV incidence was found to be higher among key population groups, especially people who inject drugs. The annual AIDS-related deaths were estimated to be 69 thousand nationally. For all indicators, geographic variation in levels and trends between States existed.Interpretation & conclusions: With a slow decline in annual new HIV infections by only 27 per cent from 2010 to 2017 against the national target of 75 per cent by 2020, the national target to end AIDS by 2030 may be missed; although at the sub-national level some States have made better progress to reduce new HIV infection. It calls for reinforcement of HIV prevention, diagnosis and treatment efforts by geographical regions and population groups.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):562-570
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1619_19
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Proactive preparedness for Cat Que virus: An Orthobunyavirus existing in
           India

    • Authors: Anita Shete, Pragya D Yadav, Mangesh Gokhale, Rajlaxmi Jain, Prachi Pardeshi, Triparna Majumdar, Devendra T Mourya
      Pages: 571 - 577
      Abstract: Anita Shete, Pragya D Yadav, Mangesh Gokhale, Rajlaxmi Jain, Prachi Pardeshi, Triparna Majumdar, Devendra T Mourya
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):571-577
      Background & objectives: The presence of Cat Que virus (CQV) in Culex mosquitoes and pigs has been reported in China and Vietnam. Due to the spread of similar species of the Culex mosquitoes in India, there is a need to understand the replication kinetics of this virus in mosquito models. As a part of preparedness and to identify the presence of this CQV in humans and swine, this study was carried out to develop diagnostic tests.Methods: Serological and molecular diagnostic assays were developed for testing the mosquito population, human and swine serum samples. In this line, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L), glycoprotein (M) and nucleocapsid (S) genes-based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays were developed for CQV. Real-time RT-PCR was used for screening of retrospectively collected human serum samples (n=1020) with acute febrile illness during 2014-2017. Simultaneously, an in-house anti-CQV swine and human IgG ELISAs were also developed to detect anti-CQV IgG antibody. Human serum samples (n=883) with post-onset of disease (POD) >4 days and swine serum samples (n=459) were tested for the presence of anti-CQV IgG antibodies. CQV NIV 612,045 isolate was used for susceptibility and replication kinetics experiment using three different species of mosquitoes to understand its behaviour in Indian mosquitoes.Results: All human serum samples (n=1020) screened for the presence of CQV using real-time RT-PCR were found to be negative. Anti-CQV IgG antibody positivity was recorded in two of 883 human serum samples tested. Virus susceptibility experiments indicated that three species of mosquito, namely Aedes aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus and Cx. tritaeniorhynchus supported multiplication of CQV by intrathoracic as well as artificial membrane/oral feeding routes.Interpretation & conclusions: Anti-CQV IgG antibody positivity in human serum samples tested and the replication capability of CQV in mosquitoes indicated a possible disease causing potential of CQV in Indian scenario. Screening of more human and swine serum samples using these assays is required as a proactive measure for understanding the prevalence of this neglected tropical virus.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):571-577
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1195_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Comparison of efficacy of potassium titanyl phosphate laser & diode
           laser in the management of inferior turbinate hypertrophy: A randomized
           controlled trial

    • Authors: Subhashini Puducherry Ravichandran, Karthikeyan Ramasamy, Pradipta Kumar Parida, Arun Alexander, Sivaraman Ganesan, Sunil Kumar Saxena
      Pages: 578 - 584
      Abstract: Subhashini Puducherry Ravichandran, Karthikeyan Ramasamy, Pradipta Kumar Parida, Arun Alexander, Sivaraman Ganesan, Sunil Kumar Saxena
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):578-584
      Background & objectives: Inferior turbinate hypertrophy (ITH) is a common condition causing nasal obstruction. This study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser and diode laser in the reduction of the turbinate size. Methods: This randomized controlled trial included 209 patients with ITH. Pre-operative symptoms were assessed based on the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) score. Diagnostic nasal endoscopy was done to rule out other nasal sinuses. Nasal mucociliary clearance was measured by saccharin transit time (STT). Postoperatively, the NOSE score, STT and complications were assessed at days one and two, at one week, one month and three months.Results: Of the 209 patients analyzed at day one, the median NOSE score was 50 in the diode group and 40 in the KTP group, and at three months, 15 in the diode group and five in the KTP group. KTP laser showed a 93 per cent improvement in the NOSE score as compared to 77 per cent improvement shown by diode laser group. Among the intra-operative complications, of the 104 patients in the diode group, 6.73 per cent had burning sensation and 91.43 per cent had bleeding, and of 105 patients in the KTP group, 54.29 per cent had burning sensation and 36.54 per cent had bleeding. Among the post-operative complications in the KTP group, 32 and 34 per cent had bloody nasal discharge on days one and two, compared to 12 and 14 per cent in diode group. Crusting was present in 61 and 49 per cent on days one and two in KTP group as compared to 9 and 15 per cent in diode group, respectively. In the KTP group 30 per cent had synechiae as compared to 10 per cent in diode group.Interpretation & conclusions: KTP laser was more efficacious than diode laser in improving the NOSE scores but with slightly increased rate of complications in early post-operative period. Both the lasers impaired the mucociliary clearance mechanism of the nose till three months of post-operative follow up.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):578-584
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_424_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Distribution of carbapenemase genes in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter
           baumannii & a comparison of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based
           detection of carbapenemase production with other phenotypic methods

    • Authors: Megha Sharma, Lipika Singhal, Vikas Gautam, Pallab Ray
      Pages: 585 - 591
      Abstract: Megha Sharma, Lipika Singhal, Vikas Gautam, Pallab Ray
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):585-591
      Background & objectives: Carbapenemase-producing Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) poses a continuous threat to the current antimicrobial era with its alarming spread in critical care settings. The present study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic potential of phenotypic methods for carbapenemase [carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDLs) and metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs)] production, by comparing with molecular detection of genes.Methods: One hundred and fifty clinical CRAB isolates collected between August 2013 and January 2014 were studied. Multiplex PCR was performed to identify the carbapenemases produced (class D blaOXA-51, blaOXA-23, blaOXA-48, blaOXA-58; class B blaVIM, blaNDM-1, blaIMP; class A blaKPC). Each isolate was evaluated for carbapenemase production by studying the pattern of imipenem hydrolysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Results: The most commonly encountered carbapenemase genes were blaOXA-51(100%), blaOXA-23(98%), blaVIM(49.3%), blaNDM-1(18.7%) and blaOXA-58(2%). MALDI-TOF MS was able to detect 30.6 per cent carbapenemases within three hours (P=0.001 for MBL and P>0.05 for CHDL) and 65.3 per cent within six hours (P=0.001 for MBL and P>0.05 for CHDL).Interpretation & conclusions: MALDI-TOF MS reliably detected carbapenemase activity within a short span of time, thus helping in tailoring patient therapy. MALDI-TOF MS, once optimized, can prove to be a useful tool for timely detection of carbapenemase production by A. baumannii and consequently in directing appropriate antimicrobial therapy.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):585-591
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1383_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Role of LRRK2 variant p.Gly2019Ser in patients with Parkinsonism

    • Authors: Dipanwita Sadhukhan, Arindam Biswas, Arunima Bhaduri, Neelanjana Sarkar, Atanu Biswas, Shyamal K Das, Tapas K Banerjee, Kunal Ray, Jharna Ray
      Pages: 592 - 597
      Abstract: Dipanwita Sadhukhan, Arindam Biswas, Arunima Bhaduri, Neelanjana Sarkar, Atanu Biswas, Shyamal K Das, Tapas K Banerjee, Kunal Ray, Jharna Ray
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):592-597
      Background & objectives: Parkinsonian disorder, including Parkinson's disease (PD), is an aetiologically complex neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been implicated in an autosomal dominant form of PD with variable penetrance. The identification of a common LRRK2 variant (p.Gly2019Ser) in dementia with Lewy bodies indicated its potential role in Parkinsonian disorder. The current study was aimed to identify the p.Gly2019Ser variant in Indian patients with Parkinsonian disorder.Methods: The patient group consisting of 412 classical PD patients, 107 PD patients with cognitive impairment, 107 patients with Parkinson plus syndrome and 200 unrelated controls were recruited from eastern part of India. The allele representing p.Gly2019Ser variant was screened by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.Results: The p.Gly2019Ser variant was identified in an East Indian young-onset female PD patient in a heterozygous state having several motor and autonomic problems without disturbed cognition. Her younger brother, sister and elder son harbouring the same mutation were asymptomatic carriers for the variant. However, the influence of DNM3 on decreased disease onset in this family was not clear.Interpretation & conclusions: Identification of the p.Gly2019Ser variant in only one patient among a large number of Indian patients (n=626) with Parkinsonian disorder in our study suggests a limited role of the LRRK2 variant towards disease pathogenesis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):592-597
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_25_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Trends & treatment outcomes of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in
           Delhi, India (2009-2014): A retrospective record-based study

    • Authors: Nandini Sharma, Ashwani Khanna, Shivani Chandra, Saurav Basu, Kamal K Chopra, Neeta Singla, Neeti Babbar, Charu Kohli
      Pages: 598 - 603
      Abstract: Nandini Sharma, Ashwani Khanna, Shivani Chandra, Saurav Basu, Kamal K Chopra, Neeta Singla, Neeti Babbar, Charu Kohli
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):598-603
      Background & objectives: The increase in the burden of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a matter of grave concern. The present study was undertaken to describe MDR-TB treatment outcome trends in Delhi and their epidemiological correlates, to assess the adequacy of treatment records and to also generate evidence towards influencing and improving practices related to the MDR-TB control programme.Methods: A retrospective record-based study (2009-2014) was conducted in three major drug resistance TB treatment centres of Delhi. Treatment outcomes and adverse effects were extracted from the existing programme records including patients' treatment cards and laboratory registers.Results: A total of 2958 MDR-TB patients were identified from the treatment cards, of whom 1749 (59.12%) were males. The mean (±standard deviation) age was 30.56±13.5 years. Favourable treatment outcomes were reported in 1371 (53.28%) patients, but they showed a declining trend during the period of observation. On binomial logistic regression analysis, patients with age ≥35 yr, male sex and undernourishment (body mass index <18.5) at the time of treatment initiation had a significantly increased likelihood of unfavourable MDR-TB treatment outcome (P <0.001).Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed an increasing burden of MDR-TB patients, especially in the young population with increased risk of transmission posing a major challenge in achieving TB elimination targets.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):598-603
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1048_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • A survey of clinical practices among oncologists regarding hepatitis B
           screening in patients with cancer

    • Authors: Sridhar Sundaram, Prachi Patil, Manju Sengar, Raosaheb Rathod, Shaesta Mehta
      Pages: 604 - 608
      Abstract: Sridhar Sundaram, Prachi Patil, Manju Sengar, Raosaheb Rathod, Shaesta Mehta
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):604-608
      Background & objectives: Screening for hepatitis B prior to the initiation of chemotherapy in patients with cancer is recommended by all major hepatology and oncology societies. This study was aimed to determine the screening practices for hepatitis B among oncologists from India and their experience with hepatitis B reactivation.Methods: A questionnaire-based survey was conducted among oncologists attending the Evidence-Based Medicine Conference at Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. The questionnaire was developed in keeping with the recent guidelines for hepatitis B reactivation on chemotherapy, with questions regarding demographics, years in practice and hepatitis B screening practices and management. There was 78 per cent response rate to the questionnaire.Results: Most respondents were <35 yr of age (69%), with < five years of experience (39%), practicing in an academic institution (81%). Seventy four per cent respondents always screened their patients with cancer for hepatitis prior to chemotherapy, whereas 19 per cent in special settings and seven per cent never screened; 96 per cent respondents used hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) as a screening test, while 17 per cent also used antibody to hepatitis B core antigen. Sixty one per cent respondents used entecavir or tenofovir for prophylaxis; 70 per cent continued prophylaxis till 6-12 months after completion of chemotherapy, while 21 per cent continued only till the end of chemotherapy.Interpretation & conclusions: More than 25 per cent of the oncologists were not screening their patients with cancer for viral hepatitis prior to cancer-directed therapy, and only 17 per cent of the oncologists used the recommended tests for screening. Better training of oncologists regarding viral hepatitis screening and management is needed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):604-608
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_2327_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Innovative virtual mentoring using the Extension for Community Healthcare
           Outcomes model for primary care providers for the management of alcohol
           use disorders

    • Authors: Jayant Mahadevan, Lekhansh Shukla, Prabhat Kumar Chand, Miriam Komaromy, Pratima Murthy, Sanjeev Arora
      Pages: 609 - 612
      Abstract: Jayant Mahadevan, Lekhansh Shukla, Prabhat Kumar Chand, Miriam Komaromy, Pratima Murthy, Sanjeev Arora
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):609-612
      The number of experts available for the management of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in rural and underserved areas in India is limited. In this study, a blended training programme was conducted for 26 primary care providers (PCPs) from nine districts of Bihar, in best practices for the management of AUDs. A two weeks on-site training was followed by fortnightly online tele-Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) clinics for six months using the 'Hub and Spokes' ECHO model, accessible through internet-enabled smartphones. A questionnaire administered at baseline and after six months assessed changes in the PCPs compliance with principles of AUD management. Significant improvements were noted in compliance to principles in the management of AUDs based on self-report. Over the six months period 2695 individuals were screened, of whom 832 (30.8%) had an AUD Identification Test score of more than 16, indicating harmful use or dependence. The PCPs reported retaining 49.1 per cent of the cases for at least one follow up and needed to refer only 80 (3%) cases to specialists for further management. The ECHO model was found to be effective in training PCPs to provide quality healthcare. To confirm these findings, it needs to be tested in a large number of PCPs with a robust study design.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):609-612
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1851_18
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Oculodermal melanocytosis

    • Authors: Kanhaiya Mittal, Shorya Vardhan Azad
      Pages: 613 - 614
      Abstract: Kanhaiya Mittal, Shorya Vardhan Azad
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):613-614

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):613-614
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1950_17
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
  • Mosaic of autoimmunity: The novel factors of autoimmune diseases

    • Authors: Narinder K Mehra
      Pages: 615 - 617
      Abstract: Narinder K Mehra
      Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):615-617

      Citation: Indian Journal of Medical Research 2020 151(6):615-617
      PubDate: Tue,21 Jul 2020
      DOI: 10.4103/ijmr.IJMR_1491_19
      Issue No: Vol. 151, No. 6 (2020)
       
 
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