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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 9)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine
  [SJR: 0.344]   [H-I: 9]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0253-7176
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Bipolar disorder: Clinical conundrums 1

    • Authors: MS Reddy, M Starlin Vijay, Swetha Reddy
      Pages: 389 - 391
      Abstract: MS Reddy, M Starlin Vijay, Swetha Reddy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):389-391

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):389-391
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_300_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Interrelations of level of urinary cotinine and score for fagerstrom test
           for nicotine dependence among beedi smokers, and smokeless tobacco users
           in India

    • Authors: Nalini M Vinoth Kumar, Shahnawaz Khijmatgar, Chitta Chowdhury
      Pages: 392 - 398
      Abstract: Nalini M Vinoth Kumar, Shahnawaz Khijmatgar, Chitta Chowdhury
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):392-398
      Background: Tobacco related diseases is largely preventable and can stop pre-mature death. According to World Health Organization (WHO), the prevalence rate of smoking is 28.6% (40% among males and 18.2% among females).[1] Beedismoking and tobacco chewing are the commonest forms of tobacco habits in India, and strongly associated with oral cancer in India.[2] There are methods to estimation of severity of tobacco dependency, of them FTND is identified. The score for FTND is used for cigarette smoking, but we do not know the FTND score of ST users and Beedi smokers in India. Therefore, keeping the study in plan, we aim a systemic review with the following objective. Objectives: 1. To pursue a review of published researches on interrelations between Beedi smoking and FTND score. 2. To pursue a review of published researches on interrelations between consumption of ST and FTND score. Materials and Methods: A systematic search of published papers were examined from three different electronic databases namely Pubmed, Cochrane library, and ProQuest . The inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria was set based on commonality of the studies which was looked through the objectives. Total of four papers of its category were found, and those met the criteria for inclusion factors. Results: Seventy-one articles were screened initially and forty-three articles were excluded and twenty-eight articles were screened, out of which twenty articles were excluded based on inclusion criteria. The abstracts of remaining eight articles were reviewed and four were removed because of duplication of the data. Finally, four articles were included for review after three stages of screening. Review results revealed that out of four selected reviews, one research study finding was interrelated with FTND score and Beedi and ST users. This study results also revealed that there is not a set of research carried out on FTND score for Beedi smokers and ST users.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):392-398
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211758
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Cognitive behavior therapy for medically unexplained symptoms: A
           systematic review and meta-analysis of published controlled trials

    • Authors: Vikas Menon, Tess Maria Rajan, Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Siddharth Sarkar
      Pages: 399 - 406
      Abstract: Vikas Menon, Tess Maria Rajan, Pooja Patnaik Kuppili, Siddharth Sarkar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):399-406
      Medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) commonly present across the board in medical specialties and are often challenging to treat. Our objective was to assess the efficacy for cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) in MUS. Electronic search of databases was carried out for published controlled trials in English language peer-reviewed journals from inception till August 2016. Effect sizes for the trials were computed using standardized mean difference, and I2 test was used to assess sample heterogeneity. Pooled mean effect sizes were derived using a random-effects model. Critical appraisal of studies was done using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. A total of 11 trials involving 1235 subjects were included in the study. Ten trials used standard CBT techniques while one studied the efficacy of mindfulness-based CBT technique. The control arms were treatment as usual in five trials, augmented care in four and waitlisted controls in two trials. The pooled mean effect size for CBT was 0.388 (range 0.055–0.806, 95% confidence intervals 0.316–0.461). The I2 value was 0 using a random effects model indicating low heterogeneity among studies. Risk of bias was noted in many included studies. Egger plot intercept indicated potential publication bias. CBT was superior to the waiting list, treatment as usual or enhanced usual care with moderate effect sizes in the treatment of MUS. These findings are impacted by the limited number of studies in this area and questionable methodological rigor of included studies.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):399-406
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_17_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Sleep pattern and sleep hygiene practices among Nigerian schooling
           adolescents

    • Authors: Igoche David Peter, Halima Adamu, Mustafa O Asani, Ibrahim Aliyu, Umar A Sabo, Umar I Umar
      Pages: 407 - 412
      Abstract: Igoche David Peter, Halima Adamu, Mustafa O Asani, Ibrahim Aliyu, Umar A Sabo, Umar I Umar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):407-412
      Background: Sleep problems, especially in the adolescent stage of development, may be associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired neurocognitive function, and a host of others leading to suboptimal performance. Objectives: To determine the pattern of sleep problems in school-going adolescents based on the bedtime problems; excessive daytime sleepiness; awakenings during the night and problems falling back asleep; regularity and duration of sleep; sleep-disordered breathing (BEARS) sleep screening algorithm. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive study involving 353 secondary school-going adolescents in Kano metropolis. Subjects were selected for the study using multistage sampling technique. The study lasted from March 2015 to July 2015. Sleep problems were screened for using the BEARS sleep screening algorithm. Tables were used to present the qualitative data. The various BEARS sleep patterns were assessed, and comparison between stages of adolescence was done using Chi-square test (and Fisher's exact test where necessary). A significant association was considered at P < 0.05. Results: Of the 353 adolescents studied, 61.8% were males while 38.2% were females with male, female ratio of 1.6:1. Early, middle, and late adolescents constituted 13.9%, 39.9%, 46.2% respectively. BEARS sleep screening revealed awakenings during the night (34.6%) as the most common sleep-related problem reported, and this was followed by excessive daytime sleepiness (21.0%). Age-group dependent sleep duration was 7.19 ± 1.26, 7.13 ± 1.13, 7.16 ± 1.28, with P > 0.05. Although 62.9% of all the adolescents watched TV/play video games until 1 h before going to bed and this was highest in late adolescence, it was not statistically significantly associated with any of the sleep problems. Conclusion: Both the quality and quantity of sleep in Nigerian adolescents in Kano is suboptimal. Adolescent and sleep medicine should receive more attention in our environment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):407-412
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211743
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Cardiovascular response to mental stress tests and the prediction of blood
           pressure

    • Authors: Kornanong Yuenyongchaiwat
      Pages: 413 - 417
      Abstract: Kornanong Yuenyongchaiwat
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):413-417
      Background: It has been proposed that increased physiological responses (i.e., cardiovascular reactivity) to a stressor or stressors may increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) including increased blood pressure (BP) or hypertension. However, many prospective studies have examined the hemodynamic reactions to laboratory stress tests and CVD in Western countries and only a few studies have examined with varying durations of follow-up in the same sample studies. In addition, still relatively little is known about cardiovascular reactivity in Asian populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors remained a significant predictor of 40-month follow-up among initially normotensive participants in Thailand, Asia. Materials and Methods: Hemodynamic parameter was measured at rest, during, and after mental arithmetic, a speech task, and a cold pressor task. Ninety-five healthy normotensive male and female participants were reevaluated BP at 40 months later. Results: Regression analyses indicated that after adjustment for baseline BP, initial age, sex, body mass index, and family history of CVD, heightened systolic BP (SBP) responses to mental arithmetic was associated with increased future SBP (ΔR2 = 0.04, P = 0.023). Conclusions: Therefore, these findings suggest that cardiovascular reactivity remains a prediction of future BP and may play a role in the development of hypertension and CVD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):413-417
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211744
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Characteristics of patients with high lie scores in a personality test

    • Authors: Yuichi Kasai, Toshihiko Sakakibara, Tetsutaro Mizuno
      Pages: 418 - 421
      Abstract: Yuichi Kasai, Toshihiko Sakakibara, Tetsutaro Mizuno
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):418-421
      Background: It is reported that persons with high Lie score (L score) of a personality test are aggressively self-confident and are also related to depression or schizophrenia In this study, we examined the characteristics of patients with high L scores on the Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI) and examined the significance of the L score. Materials and Methods: We collected the data of 10789 subjects and examined the relationship between L score or the number of characteristic biased persons and the parameters of age, sex, education level, occupation, and degree of pain. Furthermore, we examined the changes in extraversion–introversion (E score), neuroticism (N score), and L scores at approximately 1 year after surgery in 1711 patients who underwent surgery at our university hospital or affiliated hospitals. Results: L score was significantly higher among persons with a high degree of pain, and ratio of the characteristic biased persons in L score was significantly high among persons in their 40s to 60s, healthcare professionals and those with a high degree of pain. Moreover, L score scarcely changed between before and after surgery when compared with E score and N score. Conclusion: L score is not greatly influenced by an individual's state of mind or situation at different times, and may indicate the personality traits proper to the person. It is shown that L score may indicate the personality trait characteristics of persons who want to make themselves look good in the eyes of other.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):418-421
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211745
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Internet addiction among junior doctors: A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Soumya Prakash
      Pages: 422 - 425
      Abstract: Soumya Prakash
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):422-425
      Background: The number of Internet users in India crossed 205 million in October 2013. Excessive internet use has been attributed to socio-occupational dysfunction, and this study is targeting the junior doctors on whom not many studies have been done till date. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the proportion of junior doctors with internet addiction and whether there is any relation between increased internet use and psychological distress, assessed using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Materials and Methods: One hundred postgraduate students and house surgeons were requested to fill out the specially prepared pro forma, Internet Addiction Test Questionnaire and GHQ, and the data were analyzed. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Among the 100 study participants, 13% were found to have moderate addiction and none were in severe addiction range. Internet addiction was more common among those from urban areas (P = 0.011). A significant association was found between GHQ score and internet addiction test score (P = 0.031). Conclusion: The Internet is a double-edged social revolution. Further studies are required to delineate the specific effects on human behavior.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):422-425
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211746
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Relationship of anger with alcohol use treatment outcome: Follow-up study

    • Authors: Manoj Kumar Sharma, LN Suman, Pratima Murthy, P Marimuthu
      Pages: 426 - 429
      Abstract: Manoj Kumar Sharma, LN Suman, Pratima Murthy, P Marimuthu
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):426-429
      Background: Anger is seen as comorbid condition in psychiatric conditions. It has an impact on one's quality of life. It leads to variation in the treatment outcome. The present study is going to explore the relationship of anger with treatment outcome among alcohol users after 1 year of treatment. The data for the present study were taken from the project work on correlates of anger among alcohol users, funded by center for addiction medicine, NIMHANS, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 males (50 alcohol-dependent and 50 abstainers) in the age range of 20–45 years with a primary diagnosis of alcohol dependence were taken for the study. They were administered a semi-structured interview schedule to obtain information about sociodemographic details, information about alcohol use, its relationship with anger and its effects on anger control and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. Results: 68% of the dependent and abstainers perceived anger as negative emotion and 76% in control perceived it as negative. The presence of significant difference was seen for relapsers group in relation to trait anger and state anger. The group who remained abstinent from the intake to follow-up differs significantly from the dependent group in relation to state anger and anger control out. Mean score was higher on trait anger for the dependent group. Conclusions: It has implication for anger management intervention/matching of treatment with users attributes and helping the users to develop the behavioral repertoires to manage anger.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):426-429
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211757
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Group work intervention for the parents of children with mental health
           issues admitted in the Tertiary Care Center

    • Authors: N Janardhana Navaneetham, Divya Ravindran
      Pages: 430 - 435
      Abstract: N Janardhana Navaneetham, Divya Ravindran
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):430-435
      Objectives: The objective of this study was to develop a structured curriculum for a group-based parenting program for parents/caregivers of children or adolescents treated in the inpatient child and adolescent mental health unit of a national health institute. Methods: Data from group session reports of 3 years of conducting group-based parenting programs in the same setting were analyzed and prominent themes of discussions were shortlisted before finally arriving at a six-session group parenting program module. Results: A six-session intervention module was designed by psychiatric social workers experienced in group work. The content followed combination of various theoretical approaches and methodologies ultimately aiming in improving the overall knowledge and understanding of parents or caregivers on various child and adolescent mental health issues, and enhancing their skills and competence in dealing with various emotional and behavioral problems in children. Conclusion: Group-based parenting programs are found to be effective in improving the over psychosocial health of parents and the emotional and behavioral problems of children and adolescents as a result of better parenting. Development and standardization of culture appropriate group intervention curriculums would help in the development of this cost effective method as a medium of change.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):430-435
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211762
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Felt need and treatment-seeking barriers among substance abusers in urban
           slum area in Central India

    • Authors: Himanshu Jayantrao Ashtankar, Manoj Rajanna Talapalliwar
      Pages: 436 - 440
      Abstract: Himanshu Jayantrao Ashtankar, Manoj Rajanna Talapalliwar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):436-440
      Introduction: Substance abuse is known public health problem in the world. Felt need of treatment and barriers in seeking treatment are important for successful treatment of addictions. Therefore, this study was designed to understand the pattern (type) of substance abuse among residents of urban slum and to study the felt need and barriers for the treatment of substance abuse among substance abusers in urban slum areas of the central India. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in slum area in central India. Results: The smokeless tobacco (92.5%) and alcohol (70.35%) were the most common substances used in the study population. More than half (60.4%) of study participants were felt the need of de-addiction but in reality very few approached for treatment for their addiction. The most common barriers were unawareness about place of availability of treatment, absence of any health problem and the confidence of handling their own drug problem, and dependency on substance. Conclusions: There was huge gap in the felt need and actual treatment-seeking practice due to treatment barriers in the treatment of substance abuse.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):436-440
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211760
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • A study of patterns of platelet counts in alcohol withdrawal

    • Authors: Devavrat G Harshe, Harshal Thadasare, Sagar B Karia, Avinash De Sousa, Rashmin M Cholera, Sanjiv S Kale, Omkar S Mate, Nilesh Shah
      Pages: 441 - 444
      Abstract: Devavrat G Harshe, Harshal Thadasare, Sagar B Karia, Avinash De Sousa, Rashmin M Cholera, Sanjiv S Kale, Omkar S Mate, Nilesh Shah
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):441-444
      Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the patterns of platelet counts during the course of alcohol withdrawal and its relationship if any with liver enzymes. Methodology: Forty consecutive patients, with alcohol dependence according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition, Text Revision criteria, willing for a 10-day inpatient detoxification program and presenting within 12 h of the last consumption of alcohol were recruited in the study. Details about the diagnosis and alcohol consumption patterns were assessed with a detailed psychiatric interview. After admission, routine investigations (complete blood counts [CBCs] and liver function tests) were sent and records were kept. CBC was sent for platelet counts on the 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and the 10th day of alcohol withdrawal. Results: Nearly 40% of the patients developed delirium tremens (DT group) and rest had an uncomplicated alcohol withdrawal (ND group). Platelet counts at baseline and all the 4 days of collection were significantly lower in DT group than the ND group. Platelet counts increased gradually from baseline till 10th day of alcohol withdrawal, mean increase in platelet counts being 88.61 ± 11.60% (median: 61.11%, range [23.41–391.23%]). Platelet counts in 63% of the patients showed a drop on the 4th day of withdrawal before rising till the 10th day of alcohol withdrawal. Platelet counts were not affected by liver enzymes or other alcohol consumption patterns. Conclusions: Transient thrombocytopenia and reverse thrombocytosis during alcohol withdrawal are associated with an initial drop in platelet counts. The synchrony between the drop and the onset of DT needs to be evaluated.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):441-444
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211766
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Anxiety treatment of opioid dependent patients with buprenorphine: A
           randomized, double-blind, clinical trial

    • Authors: Jamshid Ahmadi, Mina Sefidfard Jahromi
      Pages: 445 - 449
      Abstract: Jamshid Ahmadi, Mina Sefidfard Jahromi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):445-449
      Objective: The objective of this study is to examine the impact of vary doses of buprenorphine on anxiety symptoms in opioid-dependent inpatients over a 7 days period, using a randomized controlled trial design. Design: Patients were randomized to three groups. Patients and Methods: Fourteen men who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition criteria for both opioid use disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and were seeking for treatment. Intervention: Patients obtain dosages of 32 mg or 64 mg or 96 mg of buprenorphine as a single dose only and were treated in a psychiatric inpatient unit. Of 14 subjects; 5 (35.7%) obtained 32 mg, 4 (28.6%) obtained 64 mg, and 5 (35.7%) obtained 96 mg of buprenorphine. Measurements: Administering daily Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and interview. Results: All the patients ended the 7-day treatment time. The results showed a significant reduction in anxiety symptoms within each of the three groups (P = 0.00), but no difference in outcome between the groups (P = 0.605). Conclusions: The outcome suggests a single high dose of buprenorphine can supply a speedy, safe, simple, and suitable means of anxiety treatment. The single high dose of buprenorphine could be a novel mechanism medication that provides a rapid and sustained improvement for generalized anxiety disorder in opioid dependent patients. Placebo-controlled trials of longer duration are needed to evaluate ability, safety, and psychological and physiological influence of extended exposure to this medication.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):445-449
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211765
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Physical comorbidity and its impact on symptom profile of depression among
           elderly patients attending psychiatry services of a Tertiary Care Hospital
           

    • Authors: Sandeep Grover, Eish Dalla, Aseem Mehra, Subho Chakrabarti, Ajit Avasthi
      Pages: 450 - 456
      Abstract: Sandeep Grover, Eish Dalla, Aseem Mehra, Subho Chakrabarti, Ajit Avasthi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):450-456
      Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of physical comorbidities among elderly patients with depression attending psychiatric services and the secondary aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of physical comorbidities on symptom profile of depression. Methodology: 140 patients with a diagnosis of depression as per the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria were evaluated on Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and a physical comorbidity checklist. Results: More than two-third (72.1%) of the patients had at least one physical illness. Out of those with physical comorbidity, more than half (57 out of 101) had at least 2 physical illnesses. The most commonly involved systems were cardiovascular system (n = 68; 48.6%), followed by endocrinological system (27.1%) and ophthalmological system (26.4%). Most common physical comorbidity was hypertension (47.14%), followed by cataract (25.7%) and diabetes mellitus (25%). The presence of any physical comorbidity, presence of hypertension or presence of diabetes mellitus did not influence the manifestations of depression as assessed by GDS-30. Conclusion: Elderly patients with depression have high rates of physical comorbidities. Clinicians managing elderly patients with depression must get their patient thoroughly evaluated for the presence of various physical comorbidities.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):450-456
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211764
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Effects of family structure on mental health of children: A preliminary
           study

    • Authors: Aniruddh Prakash Behere, Pravesh Basnet, Pamela Campbell
      Pages: 457 - 463
      Abstract: Aniruddh Prakash Behere, Pravesh Basnet, Pamela Campbell
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):457-463
      Background: To find any association between family structure and rates of hospitalization as an indicator for behavior problems in children. Methods: Retrospective chart review of 154 patients who were admitted to the preadolescent unit at Lincoln Prairie Behavioral Health Center between July and December 2012. Results: We found that only 11% of children came from intact families living with biological parents while 89% had some kind of disruption in their family structure. Two-third of the children in the study population had been exposed to trauma with physical abuse seen in 36% of cases. Seventy-one percent had reported either a parent or a sibling with a psychiatric disorder. Children coming from biologically family were less likely to have been exposed to trauma. Children coming from single/divorced families were less likely to have been exposed to sexual abuse but more likely to have a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared to other types of families. Strong association was found between exposure to trauma and certain diagnoses in respect to hospitalization. ADHD predicted a 4 times likelihood of having more than one previous hospitalization, with mood disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and physical abuse increasing the risk by more than twice. Conclusions: Significant differences in family structure were demonstrated in our study of children being admitted to inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. The presence of trauma and family psychiatric history predicted higher rates of readmission. Our study highlighted the role of psychosocial factors, namely, family structure and its adverse effects on the mental well-being of children.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):457-463
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211767
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Predictors of inpatient treatment completion among females with opioid use
           disorder: Findings from a tertiary care drug dependence treatment centre
           of India

    • Authors: Prabhoo Dayal, Siddharth Sarkar, Yatan Pal Singh Balhara
      Pages: 464 - 468
      Abstract: Prabhoo Dayal, Siddharth Sarkar, Yatan Pal Singh Balhara
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):464-468
      Introduction: Studies have reported that females who drop out prematurely from inpatient treatment have poor treatment outcome. However, literature from India is limited in this regard. Methods: We reviewed case records of female patients admitted with opioid use disorder at NDDTC, Ghaziabad between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 to study the predictors of inpatient treatment completion among female patients with opioid use disorder in relation to their sociodemographic and clinical profile. Results: Over the 5 years, 72 female patients were admitted with opioid dependence. During the study period, out of 72 patients, 44 (61.1%) were inpatient treatment completers and 28 (38.9%) were noncompleters. Mean length of ward stay was 5.1 ± 3.8 days and 16.2 ± 11.8 days for inpatient treatment noncompleters and completers, respectively, the difference being statistically significant (t = 4.845, P < 0.001). The multivariable analysis (adjusted for selected demographic characteristics as marital status, education, and employment) revealed that most women taking drug for relief from pain, having medical morbidity, and onset of opioids at age 25 years or more had a significantly greater likelihood for being treatment completers. Conclusion: Certain factors can help in identification of women opioid users who are at risk of leaving the treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):464-468
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211769
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of dried urine spot method to screen cotinine among tobacco
           dependents: An exploratory study

    • Authors: Raka Jain, Rizwana Quraishi, Arpita Verma
      Pages: 469 - 474
      Abstract: Raka Jain, Rizwana Quraishi, Arpita Verma
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):469-474
      Background and Objectives: Assessment of cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine in body fluids, is an important approach for validating the self-report among tobacco users. Adaptation of assays on dried urine spots (DUSs) has advantages of ease of collection, transportation, minimal invasiveness, and requirement of small volume. The aim of the present study was to develop an efficient method for testing cotinine in DUSs and evaluating its clinical applicability. Methods: This involved optimization of conditions for detection, recovery, and stability of cotinine from dried urine, spotted on filter paper. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for screening, whereas confirmation was done by gas chromatography. For clinical applicability, urine samples of tobacco users were tested. Results and Interpretation: Water was found to be a suitable extracting solvent as compared to carbonate-bicarbonate buffer (pH 9.2) and saline. Screening was achieved by two punches taken from a 20 μl (diameter 1.3 cm) spotted urine samples, and confirmation was achieved by five complete circles each of 20 μl sample volume. The recovery was found to be 97% in water. Limit of detection for the method was found to be 100 ng/ml. No signs of significant degradation were found under all storage conditions. All the urine samples of tobacco users were found to be positive by a conventional method as well as DUSs, and the method proved to be efficient. Conclusions: DUS samples are a useful alternative for biological monitoring of recent nicotine use, especially in developing countries where sample logistics could be an important concern.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):469-474
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_434_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Genealogy study of three generations of patients with bipolar mood
           disorder Type I

    • Authors: Bahman Salehi, Sara Khoz, Bahman Sadeghi, Manouchehr Amanat, Mona Salehi
      Pages: 475 - 480
      Abstract: Bahman Salehi, Sara Khoz, Bahman Sadeghi, Manouchehr Amanat, Mona Salehi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):475-480
      Introduction: The purpose of this research is genealogy examination of three generation of bipolar mood disorder Type I patients. Methods: Patients selected using Poisson sampling method from 100 patients with bipolar mood disorder Type I, referring to a psychiatric center of Amir Kabir Hospital of Arak, Iran. Examine issues such as physical ailments, psychological review of living and deceased family members of each patient, drawn family pedigree using pedigree chart, check the relationship of the different pattern of the autosomal dominant and recessive disease, sex-linked dominant and recessive and linked to Y chromosome have been performed on patients. Different methods used in this study are pedigree chart and young mania rating scale and SPSS and Pearson's correlation test for analyzing the data collected. Results: Among the studied inheritance patterns, the most common inheritance pattern was autosomal recessive. There was a significant relationship between age, number of generation, and inheritance patterns with physical ailments in families of patients with bipolar mood disorder (P < 0.05), but there was no significant association with mental illness (P > 0.05). Furthermore, there was a significant relation between generation and skin, gastrointestinal, ovarian, lung, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, Cerebrovascular accident (CVA), hyperlipidemia, cardiomyopathy, hypothyroidism, and kidney disease in patients with bipolar affective disorder Type I (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that autosomal recessive was the most pattern of inheritance and there is a significant relationship between generation and some physical disorders in patients with bipolar mood disorder Type I.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):475-480
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_300_16
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Value of ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in serum as biomarkers of
           alcohol consumption

    • Authors: Lekhansh Shukla, Priyamvada Sharma, Suhas Ganesha, Deepak Ghadigaonkar, Evan Thomas, Arun Kandasamy, Pratima Murthy, Vivek Benegal
      Pages: 481 - 487
      Abstract: Lekhansh Shukla, Priyamvada Sharma, Suhas Ganesha, Deepak Ghadigaonkar, Evan Thomas, Arun Kandasamy, Pratima Murthy, Vivek Benegal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):481-487
      Background: Urinary Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl sulfate (EtS) are established markers of alcohol conumption. Measurement of these markers in serum offers certain advantages. This outpatient department based study evaluated performance of serum Ethyl glucuronide (EtG) and Ethyl sulphate (EtS) as biomarkers of recent alcohol consumption in alcohol dependent subjects. It also evaluated effect of alcohol dose and time since consumption on serum EtG and EtS concentration. Methods: Information regarding alcohol intake was collected using Time line follow back calendar method from 152 subjects. Blood samples were collected to determine serum EtG and EtS concentration. Results: The results revealed that serum EtG (at a threshold of 45 ng/mL) could detect recent moderate to heavy alcohol consumption with 85 percent sensitivity and 89 percent specificity. The results also show that simultaneous measurement of EtS does not increase test accuracy. We found that dose of alcohol and time since alcohol consumption explain 68 and 62 percent variance in serum EtG and EtS levels. Conclusion: EtG testing in blood was found useful as a way to detect recent drinking. This sensitive and specific short-term biomarker provides valuable information about recent alcohol consumption.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):481-487
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_71_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Resolution of cognitive adverse effects of electroconvulsive therapy in
           persons with schizophrenia: A prospective study

    • Authors: Channaveerachari Naveen Kumar, Vivek Haridas Phutane, Jagadisha Thirthalli, Naveen Jayaram, Muralidharan Kesavan, Urvakhsh Meherwan Mehta, Vidhi Tyagi, Bangalore N Gangadhar
      Pages: 488 - 494
      Abstract: Channaveerachari Naveen Kumar, Vivek Haridas Phutane, Jagadisha Thirthalli, Naveen Jayaram, Muralidharan Kesavan, Urvakhsh Meherwan Mehta, Vidhi Tyagi, Bangalore N Gangadhar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):488-494
      Background: Cognitive impairments are among the most important adverse effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Although much is known about them in patients with depression, there is very little information about these in persons with schizophrenia. Methods: In this study, we examined the persistence of cognitive impairments in a subsample of patients (n = 49) with schizophrenia who had earlier participated in a clinical trial comparing the therapeutic and cognitive efficacy of bifrontal ECT (BFECT; n = 23) and bitemporal ECT (BTECT; n = 29) electrode placements. Total scores on Hindi Mental State Examination, processing speed, working memory, and verbal fluency were assessed in these patients at two points: first, at the end of their respective ECT course and at the follow-up (mean [standard deviation] = 98.7 [38.3] days). The course of cognitive impairments was assessed in all patients (n = 49) as a single group. Further, BFECT and BTECT patients were also compared with one another. Results: ECT-induced acute cognitive impairments in patients with schizophrenia had normalized by the end of 3 months' follow-up post-ECT. All the tested parameters in the realm of Hindi Mental Status Examination, speed of processing, sequencing, spatial and working memory and verbal fluency showed recovery. Further, across all tests, BFECT and BTECT ultimately had similar scores at the follow-up though BFECT performed relatively better with regards to the acute effects. In fact, worst performing BTECT group caught up to recover to comparable levels of performance by the end of follow-up. Conclusions: In patients with schizophrenia, most of acute ECT-induced cognitive impairments recover by the end of 3 months' post-ECT. Further, different electrode placements do not seem to make any difference regarding ultimate recovery of cognitive deficits. Future prospective studies are needed that could address the limitations of this study.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):488-494
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_75_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Technology addiction survey: An emerging concern for raising awareness and
           promotion of healthy use of technology

    • Authors: Manoj Kumar Sharma, Girish N Rao, Vivek Benegal, K Thennarasu, Divya Thomas
      Pages: 495 - 499
      Abstract: Manoj Kumar Sharma, Girish N Rao, Vivek Benegal, K Thennarasu, Divya Thomas
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):495-499
      Background: Technology use has shown an impact of users' lifestyle. The use has been attributed to psychosocial reasons. This usage manifests as excessive to addictive use of technology. There is a need to explore its addictive potential on large sample study as well as its association with psychosocial variables. It is one of its kind study on wider age group. The present work assessed the magnitude, burden, and sociodemographic correlates of technology addiction in an urban community. Materials and Methods: A total of 2755 individuals (1392 males and 1363 females) in the age group of 18–65 years were approached for screening internet addiction and mobile overuse, using house-to-house survey methodology. Results: The survey indicated the presence of addiction for 1.3% for internet (2% males and 0.6% females) and mobile phone overuse (4.1%–2.5% males and 1.5% females). It was more common among males. Significant differences were observed in relation to family status for internet and mobile phone use more commonly among single/nuclear families. Technology addictions were found to be more common among single families and lesser in nuclear and joint families. Mobile phone users had psychiatric distress in comparison to users with internet addiction. The study showed negative correlation of age, years of marriage, and numbers of family members with internet addiction and mobile overuse. Conclusions: It has implication for raising awareness about addictive potential of technology and its impact on one's lifestyle.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):495-499
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_171_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Somatoform pain disorder presenting as “Atypical facial pain:”
           A rare presentation in a 13-year-old

    • Authors: Ruchita Shah, Nidhi Chauhan
      Pages: 500 - 502
      Abstract: Ruchita Shah, Nidhi Chauhan
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):500-502
      Children and adolescents often present to physicians and pediatricians with a range of medically unexplained symptoms, most common being headache, abdominal, and bone pains. These symptoms can be a manifestation of underlying depressive, anxiety or somatoform disorders, and sometimes the only symptom. Hence, it is important to recognize and manage these symptoms. Atypical facial pain (AFP) or atypical trigeminal neuralgia that has variably been described to be of psychological origin is considered to be rare in children. We describe the case of a 13-year-old adolescent girl who presented with AFP, who was finally diagnosed to have a somatoform disorder. We discuss the characteristics of AFP in the index case that justify the diagnosis. We also attempt to describe psychosocial factors related to such a presentation.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):500-502
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211740
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Pathological laughter in a female with multiple episodes of stroke and
           subdural hematoma

    • Authors: Sujita Kumar Kar, Sushanta Kumar Sahoo
      Pages: 503 - 505
      Abstract: Sujita Kumar Kar, Sushanta Kumar Sahoo
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):503-505
      Various brain areas in both cortical as well as subcortical locations are involved in pathological laughter. Pathological laughter may be seen as a prodromal symptom or acute manifestation or late sequel of stroke. Various other neuropsychiatric conditions attribute to stroke. It is often difficult to ascertain the cause of pathological laughter in the presence of multiple brain pathologies. Here, we highlight a case of a 55-year-old female, who had multiple episodes of stroke and subdural hematoma, presented with pathological laughter and other behavioral abnormalities.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):503-505
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211747
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Where lies the fault in diagnosing dhat syndrome among females?
           Understanding through a case study

    • Authors: Sujita Kumar Kar, Amit Singh
      Pages: 506 - 508
      Abstract: Sujita Kumar Kar, Amit Singh
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):506-508
      Dhat syndrome is a culture-bound syndrome of South-East Asia, common in young men. However, similar entity has also been described in female patients who attribute their symptoms to nonpathological or physiological vaginal discharge. The current diagnostic system for psychiatric illnesses does not encompass Dhat syndrome in females, and so these group of patients receive alternative diagnoses such as somatoform disorder or depression. As a result of which the focus of unique Dhat syndrome-centered management gets weakened, affecting the clinical outcome. This case study focuses on the diagnostic dilemmas related to Dhat syndrome in females and pitfalls in the current diagnostic system.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):506-508
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211742
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Delusion of triplet pregnancy in abdominal cavity: A case report with a
           review of literature

    • Authors: Shri Gopal Goyal, Ananya Mahapatra, Priti Kumari Goyal, Sudhir Kumar Khandelwal
      Pages: 509 - 511
      Abstract: Shri Gopal Goyal, Ananya Mahapatra, Priti Kumari Goyal, Sudhir Kumar Khandelwal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):509-511
      The two terms, pseudocyesis and delusion of pregnancy, were frequently used for pseudopregnancy. Delusion of pregnancy is a special form of hypochondriacal/somatic delusion reported in various psychiatric and organic disorders. The origin of the delusion of pregnancy in schizophrenia has often been explained by psycho-analytic interpretations attributing wish fulfilling, protective role to false beliefs, and mother establishes an undisturbed union with her fetus during pregnancy, which eliminate loneliness and helplessness. The current case is a 49-year-old married female with an illness of total duration of 10 years. Initial symptoms were delusion of infidelity and persecution and 2nd and 3rd person auditory hallucination; however, the patient started reporting around 2 years back that she was pregnant and there were three female children inside her abdominal cavity rather than in uterus. She was firm on this belief and was not convinced by family members even giving evidence contrary to her belief like showing ultrasonography report. She firmly believed that these are gift of God, and they are special children who would be delivered through special procedure. Blood investigation revealed raised prolactin level, blood sugar and ultra sonography suggestive of cholelithisis. Patient's psychiatric symptoms including delusion of pregnancy were significantly improved with treatment, and medical and surgical comorbidities were managed with appropriate consultations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):509-511
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211749
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Cyclical vomiting syndrome: Psychiatrist&#39;s view point

    • Authors: D Vijaya Raghavan, V Vimal Doshi, Shanthi Nambi
      Pages: 512 - 515
      Abstract: D Vijaya Raghavan, V Vimal Doshi, Shanthi Nambi
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):512-515
      Cyclical vomiting syndrome (CVS) is an idiopathic functional disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of nausea and vomiting separated by symptom-free intervals. Even though initially described in children, it is seen in all age groups. Exact etiology is not known. Various physical, infectious, and psychosocial stressors have been implicated for CVS. High incidence of psychiatric comorbidities such as panic attacks, anxiety disorder, and depression is seen in CVS. Most children outgrow CVS with time though some may transition to migraine or continue to have CVS as adults. Frequent misdiagnosis, delay in diagnosis, or inadequate treatment often lead to years of recurrent vomiting. This case report highlights the importance of the management of CVS by a multidisciplinary team including a psychiatrist in addressing the various physical and psychological factors effectively and that would result in faster and prolonged recovery.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):512-515
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211755
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Psychosis following carbimazole-induced acute alteration of hyperthyroid
           status

    • Authors: Guru S Gowda, Mallikarjun Rao Sagi, Sai Komal, TS Jaisoorya
      Pages: 516 - 518
      Abstract: Guru S Gowda, Mallikarjun Rao Sagi, Sai Komal, TS Jaisoorya
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):516-518
      Abrupt normalization of hyperthyroid state with antithyroid drugs is reported to precipitate psychosis. We report the development of acute psychosis in a 20-year-old woman, following 30 days use of tablet carbimazole 10 mg for hyperthyroidism due to the multinodular goiter. At the time of presentation, she was euthyroid with a resolution of hyperthyroid status both clinically and biochemically. After 20 days treatment with tablet olanzapine 10 mg/day and stoppage of carbimazole, psychotic symptoms remitted completely and she has since remained in a euthyroid state and free from psychotic symptoms. This case highlights the development of psychosis in individuals, following rapid restoration to normal serum thyroid hormone levels in hyperthyroid individuals with carbimazole.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):516-518
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211753
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Very early-onset schizophrenia with secondary onset tic disorder

    • Authors: Shilpa A Telgote, Shreyas Shrikant Pendharkar, Amol D Kelkar, Sachin Bhojane
      Pages: 519 - 522
      Abstract: Shilpa A Telgote, Shreyas Shrikant Pendharkar, Amol D Kelkar, Sachin Bhojane
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):519-522
      Very early-onset schizophrenia (defined as an onset of psychosis before 13 years of age) is a rare and severe form of the disorder which is clinically and neurobiologically continuous with the adult-onset disorder. It is rarely reported <12 years of age in Indian literature. Here, we present a 15-year-old boy who developed psychosis at 9 years of age and during illness developed tic disorder.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):519-522
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211739
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy of danger ideation reduction therapy in obsessive-compulsive
           disorder washer with poor insight: A case study and literature review

    • Authors: Masood Maqbool, KS Sengar, Vikas, Mohit Kumar, Premkant Damodhar Uparikar
      Pages: 523 - 526
      Abstract: Masood Maqbool, KS Sengar, Vikas , Mohit Kumar, Premkant Damodhar Uparikar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):523-526
      Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by obsessions and compulsions. Treatment usually consists of serotonergic medications along with exposure therapies. Danger ideation reduction therapy (DIRT) is an alternative therapy predominantly for washing compulsions and focuses on reduction of danger ideations. DIRT was tried on Ms. S. with a history of OCD for 15 years and improvement was noticed on Yale–Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, Padua Inventory, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale after 15 sessions of DIRT though she was not fully symptom-free. Thus, DIRT was found to improve OCD symptoms and improved her insight into illness.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):523-526
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211754
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Temporal lobe seizures presenting as abrupt clinging behavior in a child

    • Authors: Shabina A Sheth, Nilanjan C Chandra, Ritambhara Y Mehta
      Pages: 527 - 530
      Abstract: Shabina A Sheth, Nilanjan C Chandra, Ritambhara Y Mehta
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):527-530
      True and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) go hand in hand. One colors the picture of other. Although it is thought that children carry lower risk for PNES than adults, this may represent the under-diagnosis of this condition in childhood due to few studies on this specific topic. Again, true seizure can be misdiagnosed by dramatic and varied manifestations appearing as psychological phenomena. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy presenting with sudden onset, short lasting, off and on different “melodramatic” episodic behavioral problems with La-Belle' indifference without loss of consciousness, appearing to be of psychogenic origin but finally ended with a diagnosis of temporal lobe epilepsy and responded dramatically with antiepileptics. The goal of this case report is to alert the reader to be cautious about rarer presentations of epilepsy and see each case holistically which may be misguided as PNES.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):527-530
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211761
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Successful long-term management of a child with Kleine-Levin syndrome with
           low-dose lithium

    • Authors: Arpit Parmar, Priyanka Yadav, Bichitra Nanda Patra, Rajesh Sagar
      Pages: 531 - 533
      Abstract: Arpit Parmar, Priyanka Yadav, Bichitra Nanda Patra, Rajesh Sagar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):531-533
      Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare disorder characterized by episodic hypersomnia along with cognitive and behavioral disturbances (i.e., hyperphagia and hypersexuality). It is commonly seen in a young male. Not much is known about its long-term management; however, many reports suggest the usefulness of anticonvulsants and lithium for the same. We hereby report a case of childhood KLS from India who was successfully treated with low-dose lithium and discuss the relevant literature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):531-533
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211741
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting with isolated positive
           psychotic and catatonic symptoms

    • Authors: Arpit Parmar, Rajeev Ranjan, Rajesh Sagar
      Pages: 534 - 536
      Abstract: Arpit Parmar, Rajeev Ranjan, Rajesh Sagar
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):534-536
      Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare slowly progressing neurological illness. Although patients with SSPE initially present with symptoms such as myoclonic jerks, cognitive decline, and personality/behavioral changes usually, rarely pure psychiatric symptoms (e.g., mania, psychosis, and catatonia) have also been reported during the initial course of the illness. We report an unusual case of an adolescent with SSPE presenting with prominent positive psychotic and catatonic symptoms with the absence of classical symptoms of SSPE in initial course of illness and further discussed the relevant literature.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):534-536
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211756
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Olanzapine-induced skin eruptions

    • Authors: Nishtha Chawla, Saurabh Kumar, Yatan Pal Singh Balhara
      Pages: 537 - 538
      Abstract: Nishtha Chawla, Saurabh Kumar, Yatan Pal Singh Balhara
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):537-538
      Adverse cutaneous reactions are known to occur with psychotropic medications, which may lead to poor drug compliance. As compared to other group of psychotropics, there is relatively scarce literature on olanzapine-induced skin eruptions. We present a case of a 39-year-old man diagnosed with first episode mania and alcohol dependence syndrome who was started on tablet olanzapine which leads to fixed drug eruptions. Exhaustive investigations were done, all of which came out within normal limits. A diagnosis of fixed drug eruptions was made by the dermatologist. The skin eruptions subsided after stopping olanzapine. It has, thus, been emphasized that clinicians should be aware of the potential cutaneous eruptions associated with olanzapine. Early detection of the same would lead to timely management and hence better compliance with the psychotropic treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):537-538
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211763
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Chlorpromazine as prophylaxis for bipolar disorder with treatment- and
           electroconvulsive therapy-refractory mania: Old horse, new trick

    • Authors: Tamonud Modak, Saurabh Kumar, Arghya Pal, Rishab Gupta, Raman Deep Pattanayak, Sudhir Kumar Khandelwal
      Pages: 539 - 541
      Abstract: Tamonud Modak, Saurabh Kumar, Arghya Pal, Rishab Gupta, Raman Deep Pattanayak, Sudhir Kumar Khandelwal
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):539-541
      A 22-year-old male diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder presented to us with a 3rd episode mania resistant to both olanzapine and haloperidol as well as electroconvulsive therapy. He, however, responded to chlorpromazine (CPZ) which was also effective as a mood stabilizer. The patient had a relapse of his illness when CPZ was stopped and responded again when it was started. The case demonstrates that CPZ may have a role in as both an anti-manic agent and for the maintenance for bipolar disorders. The possible underlying mechanism for this role is also discussed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):539-541
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211759
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • “The barking girl”: A case report of psychogenic cough in a
           child with a review of literature

    • Authors: Praveen Kumar Jakati, Subrata Naskar, Anisha Khanna
      Pages: 542 - 545
      Abstract: Praveen Kumar Jakati, Subrata Naskar, Anisha Khanna
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):542-545
      A 9-year-old girl presented with 2-month history of continuous coughing; despite detailed evaluation, no organic cause was found. Considering the provisional diagnosis of a psychogenic cough, she was advised for psychiatry consultation. After a psychological assessment, she was found to have comorbid anxiety (Screen for Child Anxiety Related Disorders score- 25) along with punitive parenting and sibling rivalry issues. She was initially treated with parental psychoeducation, play therapy, and behavior therapy. Since she did not show expected progress with the treatment, low-dose escitalopram was started along with the ongoing therapy, considering her anxiety. There was a significant improvement in her symptoms in 1-month follow-up. She maintained improvement during further follow-ups. This case illustrates the need to identify and treat comorbid psychiatric issues in the management of a psychogenic cough.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):542-545
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211768
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Mental health of zika virus-infected mother and mother of newborn with
           microcephaly

    • Authors: Viroj Wiwanitkit
      Pages: 546 - 546
      Abstract: Viroj Wiwanitkit
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):546-546

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):546-546
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211750
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Benzodiazepines in schizophrenia: Nemesis or Nirvana?

    • Authors: Ahmed Naguy
      Pages: 547 - 548
      Abstract: Ahmed Naguy
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):547-548

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):547-548
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/0253-7176.211748
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Need to develop a home-based intervention for specific learning disorder
           in Indian setting

    • Authors: Anamika Sahu, Rachna Bhargava, Rajesh Sagar, Manju Mehta
      Pages: 548 - 549
      Abstract: Anamika Sahu, Rachna Bhargava, Rajesh Sagar, Manju Mehta
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):548-549

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):548-549
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_93_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Sex chromosomes: Does it affect the way you think?

    • Authors: Sowmyashree Mayur Kaku, Vikas Dhiman
      Pages: 549 - 551
      Abstract: Sowmyashree Mayur Kaku, Vikas Dhiman
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):549-551

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):549-551
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_107_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
  • Clozapine-induced tardive dyskinesia

    • Authors: Soumitra Das, Sumesh Thoppil Purushothaman, Varun Rajan, Seshadri Sekhar Chatterjee, Arjun Kartha
      Pages: 551 - 552
      Abstract: Soumitra Das, Sumesh Thoppil Purushothaman, Varun Rajan, Seshadri Sekhar Chatterjee, Arjun Kartha
      Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):551-552

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine 2017 39(4):551-552
      PubDate: Fri,28 Jul 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/IJPSYM.IJPSYM_194_17
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 4 (2017)
       
 
 
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