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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Psychiatry
  [SJR: 0.496]   [H-I: 15]   [3 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0019-5545 - ISSN (Online) 1998-3794
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • A possible role for ketamine in suicide prevention in emergency and
           mainstream psychiatry

    • Authors: TS Sathyanarayana Rao, Chittaranjan Andrade
      Pages: 259 - 261
      Abstract: TS Sathyanarayana Rao, Chittaranjan Andrade
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):259-261

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):259-261
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_345_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Cannabis: Does it have a medicinal value?

    • Authors: Aniruddh P Behere, Prakash B Behere, TS Sathyanarayana Rao
      Pages: 262 - 263
      Abstract: Aniruddh P Behere, Prakash B Behere, TS Sathyanarayana Rao
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):262-263

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):262-263
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_208_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The use and effectiveness of pro re nata psychotropic medications in
           children and adolescents: A systematic review

    • Authors: Kenneth Asogwa, Jerome Okudo, Joel Idowu
      Pages: 264 - 274
      Abstract: Kenneth Asogwa, Jerome Okudo, Joel Idowu
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):264-274
      Background: Published studies have not demonstrated the benefits of the practice of psychotropic PRN administration.Aim: The goal of this study is to perform a systematic review on pro re nata (PRN) psychotropic medications administration in children and adolescents and examine the safety and effectiveness of this practice in child and adolescent psychiatric care units.Settings and Design: This is a systematic review.Materials and Methods: Several databases were searched till date. One hundred and sixty-five titles and abstracts were found and a total of 14 studies, for which most were retrospective, met the absolute criteria. The patients studied were children, adolescents and patients that presented to the emergency room or admitted as inpatient.Results: Indications for admission included aggression and agitation for all the studies. Most the medications used include haloperidol, olanzapine, diazepam, and risperidone. Commonly reported adverse effects following the administration of the PRN medications were sleepiness, acute dystonia, and drowsiness. The effectiveness of PRN medications, which was reported in four of reviewed studies, ranged from 30% to 50%.Conclusion: Different effectiveness/outcome measures were used for all the studies; therefore, we could not generalize effectiveness across all the studies. Findings of the reviewed articles show the imperativeness of more research to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of PRN medications among child and adolescent populations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):264-274
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_34_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Substance use and dependence in the Union Territory of Chandigarh: Results
           of a household survey using a multistage stratified random sample

    • Authors: Ajit Avasthi, Debasish Basu, BN Subodh, Pramod K Gupta, Nidhi Malhotra, Poonam Rani, Sunil Sharma
      Pages: 275 - 283
      Abstract: Ajit Avasthi, Debasish Basu, BN Subodh, Pramod K Gupta, Nidhi Malhotra, Poonam Rani, Sunil Sharma
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):275-283
      Background: Substance misuse is a global health and social problem with major adverse consequences. A number of regional studies on prevalence of substance use and dependence have been carried out in India; but methodologically robust data from Chandigarh are sparse.Methodology: A house-to-house survey was carried out to estimate the prevalence of substance use and dependence in an adequate multistage-stratified random sample in the Union Territory (UT) of Chandigarh, using standardized instruments and predefined measures. Two thousand individuals (1000 each from urban and rural sites) from 743 households were interviewed.Results: Lifetime use of any substance was reported in 21.26% households (8.01% of all respondents; 13.6% males and 1.01% females). Current use was reported in 6.55% of respondents. Prevalence rates of both lifetime and annual/current substance dependence were 2.96% (4.74% for males and 0.72% for females). Alcohol (6.72%) was the most common substance to be ever used by respondents, followed by tobacco (3.34%), opioids (0.17%), and hypnotics (0.04%). Lifetime dependence rates were found to be 1.76%, 2.28%, 0.04% and 0.17% for alcohol, tobacco, hypnotics, and opioids, respectively. None reported the use of cannabinoids, inhalants, or stimulants. Substance users were more likely to be married, employed, and in higher income group as compared to those who never used substance. Only 3.78% substance users had ever sought treatment for the same.Conclusion: Substance use is prevalent in the UT of Chandigarh, with a higher prevalence in males. Substance users hardly ever seek treatment for substance use. This highlights the need of awareness and community-level services for the treatment of substance use disorders.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):275-283
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_326_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Pattern and prevalence of substance use and dependence in the Union
           Territory of Chandigarh: Results of a rapid assessment survey

    • Authors: Ajit Avasthi, Debasish Basu, BN Subodh, Pramod K Gupta, Nidhi Malhotra, Poonam Rani, Sunil Sharma
      Pages: 284 - 292
      Abstract: Ajit Avasthi, Debasish Basu, BN Subodh, Pramod K Gupta, Nidhi Malhotra, Poonam Rani, Sunil Sharma
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):284-292
      Background: Substance misuse is a matter of major public health concern in India. House-to-house survey, though an appealing method to generate population-level estimates, has limitations for estimating prevalence rates of use of illicit and rare substances.Materials and Methods: In this rapid assessment survey (RAS), respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit substance-using individuals from the field. Size of the substance-using population was estimated using the “benchmark-multiplier” method. This figure was then projected to the entire population of the Union Territory (U.T) of Chandigarh. Focused group discussions were used to study the perceptions and views of the substance users regarding various aspects of substance use.Results: Prevalence of any substance dependence in the U.T of Chandigarh was estimated to be 4.65%. Dependence rates on opioids, cannabinoids, and sedative hypnotics were found to be 1.53%, 0.52%, and 0.015%, respectively. Prevalence of injectable opioids was calculated to be 0.91%. Injectable buprenorphine was the most commonly used opioid, followed by bhukhi/doda/opium and heroin. A huge gap was found between the prevalence rates of substance-using population and those seeking treatment.Conclusion: RAS can be a useful method to determine the prevalence of illicit and rare substances. Our survey shows that the use of substance including that of opioids is highly prevalent in the U.T of Chandigarh. The findings of this survey can have implications for policymaking.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):284-292
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_327_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Comparative outcome in patients with delirium tremens receiving care in
           emergency services only versus those receiving comprehensive inpatient
           care

    • Authors: Sojan Baby, Pratima Murthy, K Thennarasu, Prabhat K Chand, Biju Viswanath
      Pages: 293 - 299
      Abstract: Sojan Baby, Pratima Murthy, K Thennarasu, Prabhat K Chand, Biju Viswanath
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):293-299
      Background: Delirium tremens (DT) is a medical emergency. Many cases are treated and discharged from emergency services (ES), after complete or partial resolution of delirium. Few receive comprehensive inpatient addiction treatment (CIAT) after the initial emergency management.Objective: The objective of this study was to compare 6-month outcomes of treatment in alcohol-dependence syndrome (ADS) patients presenting with DT receiving either only emergency care or emergency care along with CIAT.Materials and Methods: In this prospective observational study, all patients of ADS presenting in DT over a 1-year period were followed up for 6 months. Patients who received care only in the emergency services (ES) (111) were compared with patients who received ES followed by CIAT (90). Primary followup measure was regular followup (RFU) at outpatient department, and patients not presenting for RFU received telephonic followup (TFU). Alcohol use status was monitored at 6 months, as per Feuerlein and Küfner criteria.Results: Patients who received both ES and CIAT had better RFU compared to patients treated in the ES alone at 6 months (71/90 vs. 17/111, respectively, P < 0.005). CIAT also resulted in better combined follow-up (RFU and TFU) (85/90 vs. 60/111, respectively, P < 0.005). Compared to ES treatment group alone, ES plus CIAT group had fewer relapses (41/85 vs. 42/60, respectively, P < 0.05). The most common reason for direct discharge from ES was nonavailability of beds for inpatient treatment.Conclusions: Merely emergency treatment of ADS patients presenting with DT does not provide satisfactory treatment outcome with respect to alcohol use. ES treatment followed by CIAT ensures better outcome in the form of fewer relapses and better follow up.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):293-299
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_260_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Risk factors for the development of delirium in alcohol dependence
           syndrome: Clinical and neurobiological implications

    • Authors: Sukanto Sarkar, Sunayana Choudhury, Gem Ezhumalai, Janet Konthoujam
      Pages: 300 - 305
      Abstract: Sukanto Sarkar, Sunayana Choudhury, Gem Ezhumalai, Janet Konthoujam
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):300-305
      Introduction: Alcohol withdrawal delirium (AWD) or delirium tremens (DT) is associated with severe complications and high mortality. Prospectively identifying patients with increased risk of developing DT would have important preventive and therapeutic implications. Thus, the present study aimed to identify clinical risk factors predicting the development of DT.Materials and Methods: The study was a cross-sectional quasi-experimental one with equivalent control group, conducted at a tertiary hospital from August 2014 to May 2015. Forty adult male inpatients, diagnosed with DT, were compared with forty age- and sex-matched inpatients in alcohol withdrawal state without delirium. Assessments were done using confusion assessment method, Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale, and Mini–Mental Status Examination. For group comparisons, Pearson's Chi-square test and independent sample t-test were used; logistic regression was applied to identify predictors followed by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.Results: Heavy drinking (P = 0.005; odds ratio [OR]: 1.17, confidence interval [CI]: 1.05–1.31), continuous pattern of drinking (P = 0.027; OR: 4.67, CI: 1.19–18.33), past history of delirium (P = 0.009; OR: 552.8, CI: 4.88–625.7), alcohol-induced psychosis (P = 0.002; OR: 74.6, CI: 4.68–1190), and presence of cognitive deficits (P = 0.044; OR: 12.5, CI: 1.07–147.3) emerged as strong predictors of AWD.Conclusion: The risk factors found can be easily evaluated in a clinical setting for physicians to readily identify patients at risk for developing DT and plan intensive therapies for them. At a neurobiological level, patients with preexisting brain neurotransmitter disturbances are at greater risk for developing DT.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):300-305
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_67_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Partial mediator role of physical abuse on the relationship between
           attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and severity of
           dissociative experiences in a sample of inpatients with alcohol use
           disorder

    • Authors: Cuneyt Evren, Gokhan Umut, Muge Bozkurt, Yesim Can, Bilge Evren, Ruken Agachanli
      Pages: 306 - 312
      Abstract: Cuneyt Evren, Gokhan Umut, Muge Bozkurt, Yesim Can, Bilge Evren, Ruken Agachanli
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):306-312
      Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the relationship of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms with dissociative experiences, and the mediator role of childhood traumas on this relationship, while controlling the effect of depression in alcohol use disorder (AUD).Settings and Design: It was a hospital-based, cross-sectional study.Materials and Methods: One hundred and ninety inpatients with AUD were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory, the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS), Childhood Trauma Qestionnaire, and Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES).Statistical Analysis: One-way ANOVA, Chi-squared test, and hierarchical linear regression model were performed.Results: The ratio of those who receive 10 points or less from DES was 26.8%, those who receive points between 11 and 30 was 45.3%, and those who receive more than 30 points was 27.9%. The latter group that was considered as a group with high risk of dissociative disorder had higher scores from depression, childhood trauma, and ADHD scores than the other groups. Rate of those with high probability of ADHD was higher among this group. ASRS total score and inattentive subscale scores were moderately (r = 0.552 and r = 0.547, respectively) and hyperactive/impulsive subscale was mildly (r = 0.430) correlated with DES score. Severity of ADHD was related with the severity of dissociative symptoms, and physical abuse had partial mediator effect on this relationship, even after controlling the depressive symptoms.Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that the presence of severe IN symptoms is an important factor related with dissociative tendency in AUD population with a history of physical abuse.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):306-312
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_366_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Psychological adaptation of Indian expeditioners during prolonged
           residence in Antarctica

    • Authors: Sudhir K Khandelwal, Abhijeet Bhatia, Ashwani K Mishra
      Pages: 313 - 319
      Abstract: Sudhir K Khandelwal, Abhijeet Bhatia, Ashwani K Mishra
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):313-319
      Background: In view of the growing human activities in Antarctica and increasing exposure of humans to prolonged isolation under extreme conditions, such as space travel and deep sea diving, it is necessary to study the psychological adaptation to such an environment. The current study aimed to assess the psychological adaptation of Indian expeditioners to prolonged residence in Antarctica.Materials and Methods: Twenty-four winter team members of 27th Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica were administered seven instruments 5 times during the expedition. The instruments measured cognition and memory, general psychological health and tobacco, and alcohol consumption.Results: Alcohol consumption was maximum during the initial days of arrival on the continent and decreased thereafter, with another spike during the peak of the winter season. Externalized psychological reactions peaked during the midwinter period. Anxiety and insomnia peaked during the coldest period whereas depressive symptoms did not change throughout the expedition. Cognition was at its worst during the final phase of Antarctic residence. No significant change was noted in the third quarter of wintering.Conclusion: Each phase of Antarctic residence could be equated with a particular stage in psychological adaptation. There was no third quarter phenomenon.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):313-319
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_296_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Identification and treatment of Nepal 2015 earthquake survivors with
           posttraumatic stress disorder by nonspecialist volunteers: An exploratory
           cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Arun Jha, Suraj Shakya, Yinyin Zang, Nishita Pathak, Prabhat Kiran Pradhan, Khem Raj Bhatta, Sabitri Sthapit, Shanta Niraula, Rajesh Nehete
      Pages: 320 - 327
      Abstract: Arun Jha, Suraj Shakya, Yinyin Zang, Nishita Pathak, Prabhat Kiran Pradhan, Khem Raj Bhatta, Sabitri Sthapit, Shanta Niraula, Rajesh Nehete
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):320-327
      Context: In April 2015, a major earthquake struck northern regions of Nepal affecting one-third of the population, and many suffered mental health problems.Aims: This study aimed to conduct a preliminary investigation of prevalence and feasibility of brief therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among earthquake survivors.Settings and Design: This is an exploratory cross-sectional study of prevalence and feasibility of brief trauma-focused therapy for PTSD among survivors 3 and 11 months after the earthquake in affected areas near Kathmandu.Methodology: A team of local nonspecialist mental health volunteers was trained to identify survivors with PTSD using the PTSD checklist for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (PCL-5) (cutoff score 38). They were trained to deliver either shortened versions of narrative exposure therapy (NET)-revised or group-based control-focused behavioral treatment (CFBT).Results: Altogether, 333 survivors were surveyed (130 in July 2015 and 203 in March 2016) with PCL-5 as the screening instrument, using the cutoff score of 38 or more for diagnosing PTSD. A PTSD prevalence of 33% was noted in 2015 and 28.5% in 2016. This drop of 4.5% prevalence in the intervening 8 months suggests that a significant number of survivors are still suffering from PTSD. Most participants were female, aged 40 or above, married, and poorly educated. Compared to the brief (four sessions) individual NET-revised, a group-based CFBT was found more acceptable and affordable.Conclusions: PTSD is common following earthquake trauma, and if untreated, survivors continue to suffer for a long time. Management of PTSD should be included in future disaster management plans.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):320-327
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_236_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Attitudes toward the mentally ill among community health-related personnel
           in South Korea

    • Authors: Wook Jung, Eunkyung Choi, Jaehak Yu, Doo-Heum Park, Seung-Ho Ryu, Jee Hyun Ha
      Pages: 328 - 332
      Abstract: Wook Jung, Eunkyung Choi, Jaehak Yu, Doo-Heum Park, Seung-Ho Ryu, Jee Hyun Ha
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):328-332
      Background and Aims: Prejudice and negative attitudes toward mental illness are major obstacles in the rehabilitation and functional recovery of patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of health-related personnel toward mentally ill patients in a local urban community in South Korea.Materials and Methods: In total, 401 participants (men, 132; women, 269; mean age, 37.3 ± 9.5 years) were recruited. The participants were health-related personnel in a district of Seoul, who were recruited from three different workplaces: a local administration office, a public health center, and a community welfare center. Sociodemographic data were gathered, and the community attitudes toward the mentally ill (CAMI) inventory were administered. Comparisons of the CAMI subscales were conducted among participants using statistical analysis.Results: Community welfare center workers showed more authoritarianism and social restriction and less community mental health ideology than the other two groups. Among the demographic variables, a shorter working career, higher education, female gender, and younger age were also related to a more negative attitude toward mentally ill patients.Conclusion: Community health-related personnel who have contact with patients with mental illness should be encouraged to have a fair, hospitable, and open-minded attitude. It is advisable for these workers to receive interventions such as regular educational programs early in their careers.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):328-332
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_58_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A cross-sectional comparative study on the assessment of quality of life
           in psychiatric patients under remission treated with monotherapy and
           polypharmacy

    • Authors: Benson Koshy, CM Gopal Das, Yogananda Rajashekarachar, DR Bharathi, Shashank S Hosur
      Pages: 333 - 340
      Abstract: Benson Koshy, CM Gopal Das, Yogananda Rajashekarachar, DR Bharathi, Shashank S Hosur
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):333-340
      Context: The concept of quality of life (QoL) is becoming an important measure of the impact of psychiatric disorders. It is natural that once patient achieves remission, QoL would improve, but very few studies are conducted under this phase. This study compares the differences in QoL in remitted patients with monotherapy and polypharmacy.Aims: The aim of this study is to compare the QoL between psychiatric patients in remission treated with monotherapy and polypharmacy.Settings and Design: It is a questionnaire based cross-sectional comparative study.Materials and Methods: This study included outpatients under remission who come for follow-up in psychiatric department. Semi-structured data collection form was used. Remission was confirmed using suitable scales, and QoL was assessed using the World Health Organization quality of life-Brief (WHOQOL-BREF) scale. Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) were applied to understand the overall improvement and functioning levels.Results: Out of the total 100 patients enrolled in the study, fifty patients were on monotherapy and fifty patients on polypharmacy. The cost of medication was comparatively high for polypharmacy (Rs. 3568.92 [±348.54]) than monotherapy (Rs. 1936.56 [±252.07]). The QoL in physical, psychological, and social domains was significantly high in patients on polypharmacy rather than monotherapy when assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF scale. Ninety-six percent of monotherapy patients had CGI scores between 1.5 and 2.4 while 74% of polypharmacy patients had scores between 1.0 and 1.5. Ninety-six percent of monotherapy patients had <80 GAF scores while 92% of polypharmacy patients had >80.Conclusions: Patients treated with polypharmacy had better QoL and also clinical improvement and functioning levels were superior.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):333-340
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_126_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Attitude toward psychiatrists and psychiatric medication: A survey from
           five metropolitan cities in India

    • Authors: Aron Zieger, Aditya Mungee, Georg Schomerus, Thi Minh Tam Ta, Aino Weyers, Kerem B&#246;ge, Michael Dettling, Malek Bajbouj, Ulrike von Lersner, Matthias C Angermeyer, Abhinav Tandon, Eric Hahn
      Pages: 341 - 346
      Abstract: Aron Zieger, Aditya Mungee, Georg Schomerus, Thi Minh Tam Ta, Aino Weyers, Kerem Böge, Michael Dettling, Malek Bajbouj, Ulrike von Lersner, Matthias C Angermeyer, Abhinav Tandon, Eric Hahn
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):341-346
      Background: Stigmatization and overall scarcity of psychiatrists and other mental health-care professionals remain a huge public health challenge in low- and middle-income countries, more specifically in India. Most patients seek help from faith healers, and awareness about psychiatrists and treatment methods is often lacking. Our study aims to explore public attitudes toward psychiatrists and psychiatric medication in five Indian metropolitan cities and to identify factors that could influence these attitudes.Materials and Methods: Explorative surveys in the context of public attitudes toward psychiatrists and psychiatric medication were conducted using five convenience samples from the general population in Chennai (n = 166), Kolkata (n = 158), Hyderabad (n = 139), Lucknow (n = 183), and Mumbai (n = 278). We used a quota sample with respect to age, gender, and religion using the census data from India as a reference.Results: Mean scores indicate that attitudes toward psychiatrists and psychiatric medication are overall negative in urban India. Negative attitudes toward psychiatrists were associated with lower age, lower education, and strong religious beliefs. Negative attitudes toward psychotropic medication were associated with lower age, male gender, lower education, and religion.Conclusion: In line with the National Mental Health Policy of India, our results support the perception that stigma is widespread. Innovative public health strategies are needed to improve the image of psychiatrists and psychiatric treatment in society and ultimately fill the treatment gap in mental health.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):341-346
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_190_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Quality of sleep and well-being of health workers in Najran, Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: O Ogunsemi Olawale, O Afe Taiwo, Almohandes Hesham
      Pages: 347 - 351
      Abstract: O Ogunsemi Olawale, O Afe Taiwo, Almohandes Hesham
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):347-351
      Background: Health care involves taking care of other peoples' lives. Professionals in the field of health care are expected to be at their best all the time because mistakes or errors could be costly and sometimes irreversible.Aim: This study assessed the quality of sleep and well-being of health workers in Najran city, Saudi Arabia.Materials and Methods: It was a cross-sectional study done among health workers from different hospitals within the kingdom of Najran, Saudi Arabia. The subjects were administered questionnaire that contained sections on demographic and clinical characteristics, sleep quality, and section relating to well-being.Results: One hundred and twenty-three health workers comprising 29 (23.6%) males and 94 (76.4%) females participated in this study. The majority of the workers 74 (60.2%) were nurses; a quarter were doctors while the remaining 13.6% accounted for other categories of health workers such as the pharmacist and laboratory technicians. Fifty-two (42.3%) of the workers were poor sleepers. Significantly (χ2 = 23.98, P = 0.000), majority of the subjects that were poor sleepers (84.6%) compared with the 42.3% of the good sleepers rated the last 12 months of their profession as a bit stressful or quite a bit stressful. Similarly, 46.2% of the workers that were poor sleepers significantly (χ2 = 24.69, P = 0.000) rated their ability to handle unexpected and difficult problems in their life as fair or poor compared with 14.1% of the good sleepersConclusion: Health workers expressed some level of stress in their professional life, and a good proportion of the subjects were poor sleepers. There is, therefore, the need to establish a program within the health-care organization to address social, physical, and psychological well-being at work.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):347-351
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_241_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Association of chronic disease prevalence and quality of life with
           suicide-related ideation and suicide attempt among Korean adults

    • Authors: Pankaj Joshi, Han-Byol Song, Sang-Ah Lee
      Pages: 352 - 358
      Abstract: Pankaj Joshi, Han-Byol Song, Sang-Ah Lee
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):352-358
      Aims: The aim of this study is to find the association of chronic disease prevalence (CDP) with suicide-related ideation (SI) and suicide attempt (SA) and to determine the combined effect of CDP and quality of life (QoL) with SI or SA.Design: This was a cross-sectional study.Materials and Methods: The data were collected from the nationally representative Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV and V (2007–2012). For the analysis, a total of 35,075 adult participants were selected as the final sample, which included 5773 participants with SI and 331 with SA.Statistical Analysis: Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the odds ratio after adjusting for age, sex, marital status, education, occupation, and household income.Results and Conclusion: SI was positively associated with selected CDP, such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke, ischemic heart disease (IHD), cancer, diabetes, renal failure, and depression, except hypertension. Subjects with CVD, IHD, renal failure, and depression were found likely to have increased odds for SA as compared to non-SA controls. Lower QoL strongly affected SI and SA. Furthermore, the likelihood of SI increased for depressed and cancer subjects who had low QoL in comparison to subjects with high QoL and without chronic disease. Similarly, statistically, significant interaction was observed between lower QoL and depression in relation to SA compared to non-SA controls. These data suggest that suicide-related behavior could be predicted by the prevalence of chronic disease and low QoL.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):352-358
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_282_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Special educators&#39; knowledge and training on autism in
           Karnataka: A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Shivani Tiwari, Joyce John
      Pages: 359 - 365
      Abstract: Shivani Tiwari, Joyce John
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):359-365
      Context: In the wake of increasing prevalence of autism globally, with a substantial change in understanding of the disorder, it is essential to update knowledge of the healthcare professionals involved in the intervention of children with autism. Special educators are important team members in the rehabilitation of children with autism. There are only a few studies addressing knowledge and training of special educators in the rehabilitation of children with autism, particularly in the Indian context.Aim: The present study investigated knowledge and training on autism among special educators in a southern state of India, Karnataka.Settings and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study design was adopted for this study.Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 47 special educators, who answered questions related to general knowledge, knowledge of educational programming, knowledge about classroom behaviors, and professional development needs regarding autism.Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 16).Results: Results of the study indicated that special educators had an overall reduced level of understanding about autism and poor knowledge on educational programming and classroom behaviors in children with autism. Further, their knowledge regarding autism varied with educational qualification and years of work experience.Conclusions: Findings of the study, thus, emphasize the need for increasing awareness by providing knowledge and training to special educators working with children with autism in India.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):359-365
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_133_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A comparison of dexmedetomidine with propofol versus esmolol with propofol
           to attenuate the hemodynamic stress responses after electroconvulsive
           therapy

    • Authors: Radhe Sharan, Neeru Bala, Joginder Pal Attri, Keerty Garg
      Pages: 366 - 369
      Abstract: Radhe Sharan, Neeru Bala, Joginder Pal Attri, Keerty Garg
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):366-369
      Background: Modified electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) under anesthesia is an important modality in the treatment of severe, persistent depression; bipolar disorder and schizophrenia; especially in cases resistant to pharmacologic therapy.Aim: The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and esmolol on patients' hemodynamics, motor seizure duration, and recovery times following ECT.Materials and Methods: Ninety cases aged between 18 and 50 years of the American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I and II; were randomly divided into three groups of 30 each. Group A received normal saline (placebo), Group B received dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg, and Group C received esmolol 1 mg/kg; followed by induction with propofol 1 mg/kg and muscle relaxation with succinylcholine 0.75 mg/kg. Hemodynamic parameters at baseline, after study drug infusion, after induction, and after ECT application were recorded at different time intervals. The motor seizure duration using arm isolation method and recovery times using postanesthesia discharge scoring system were noted.Results: The maximum increase in hemodynamic parameters was seen following the ECT current application. Post-ECT rise in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate in dexmedetomidine group was significantly less as compared to esmolol and control group at 2, 4, 6, and 8 min using unpaired t-test. There was no significant difference in motor seizure activity duration, emergence, and recovery times among the three groups.Conclusions: Both dexmedetomidine and esmolol attenuate the hyperdynamic response to ECT without affecting the seizure duration, but dexmedetomidine has a more favorable response in view of stable vitals, smooth emergence and no adverse effect on recovery duration.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):366-369
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_373_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Effectiveness of dexmedetomidine as premedication prior to
           electroconvulsive therapy, a Randomized controlled cross over study

    • Authors: Deepa Sannakki, Naina Parag Dalvi, Shilpa Sannakki, Devangi P Parikh, Sanchita K Garg, Bharati Tendolkar
      Pages: 370 - 374
      Abstract: Deepa Sannakki, Naina Parag Dalvi, Shilpa Sannakki, Devangi P Parikh, Sanchita K Garg, Bharati Tendolkar
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):370-374
      Background: This study evaluated the effect of dexmedetomidine on the acute hyperdynamic response, duration of seizure activity, and recovery profile in patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).Aims: To study the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg intravenous in ECT in terms of attenuation of the hyperdynamic response, seizures duration, and sedation.Design: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, crossover study.Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were included in the study and were treated as both cases and controls. The study drug was given 10 min before induction of anesthesia. Vital parameters and recovery scores were recorded.Results: In Group D, heart rates at 3rd and 5th min after electric stimulus (T6 and T7, respectively) were 94.5 ± 20.1 and 90.4 ± 12.8/min as compared to 111.9 ± 15.5 and 109.0 ± 13.7 in Group N, respectively (P < 0.0001). The systolic blood pressure in Group D and Group N were 116.53 ± 26.09 and 138.03 ± 19.32 at T6, respectively (P < 0.001). Diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were significantly reduced after induction and electric stimulus in Group D. The seizures duration was similar in both groups. Modified Aldrete's Score and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Score were prolonged in Group D.Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine, before the induction of anesthesia, prevents the acute hyperdynamic responses to ECT without altering the seizures duration. However, patients may have delayed recovery and delayed discharge.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):370-374
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_33_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Alvars of South India: A psychiatric scanner

    • Authors: Ottilingam Somasundaram, Tejus Murthy
      Pages: 375 - 379
      Abstract: Ottilingam Somasundaram, Tejus Murthy
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):375-379
      Vaishnavism, the other important Hindu tradition besides Saivism, gained importance by the Bhakti movement sprouting from the Tamil land in the 7th–9th centuries Common Era and spreading all over the subcontinent, and as preached by the Alvars, which is discussed along with the evolution of the Godhead of Lord Vishnu is briefly mentioned. The maternal care of the divine child Sri Krishna by Yashodha as described by the Alvar, Perialvar, is summarized. The mysticism of Nammalvar and the religious experiences of other two Alvars, Kulasekarar and Andal, are sketched in this study.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):375-379
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_383_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Treatment of substance use disorders through the government health
           facilities: Developments in the “Drug De-addiction Programme”
           of Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India

    • Authors: Anju Dhawan, Ravindra Rao, Atul Ambekar, Amal Pusp, Rajat Ray
      Pages: 380 - 384
      Abstract: Anju Dhawan, Ravindra Rao, Atul Ambekar, Amal Pusp, Rajat Ray
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):380-384
      Substance use disorder (SUD) is a major problem worldwide, including in India, and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality. The Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, Government of India, addresses the prevention and rehabilitation aspect of substance use through the establishment of “rehabilitation centers” run by nongovernmental organizations. The Drug De-addiction Programme (DDAP) was initiated in 1988 under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, and was mandated with provision of treatment for SUDs. Through the DDAP, de-addiction centers (DACs) have been established in government hospitals by providing a one-time financial grant by the central government, with the recurring expenses to be borne by the state governments. In addition, some premier institutions as well as DACs from Northeastern region are provided annual recurring grants for their functioning. Capacity building has been a major focus area of DDAP in which nonspecialist medical officers working in government hospitals have been trained, and various training materials have been developed. Another major area of work is the development of “drug abuse monitoring system” to track the pattern of drug use and profile among individuals seeking treatment in the DACs. Monitoring and evaluation exercises carried out show that the existing model of inpatient treatment and of shared responsibility between central and state governments is partially successful. The establishment of drug treatment clinics on pilot basis with a focus on outpatient treatment and direct support from the DDAP for staff as well as for medicines is showing encouraging results.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):380-384
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_19_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Nurture the nature

    • Authors: Lakshmi Sravanti
      Pages: 385 - 385
      Abstract: Lakshmi Sravanti
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):385-385

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):385-385
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_341_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Hallucination and priapism associated with methylphenidate usage: Two case
           reports

    • Authors: Erman Esnafoglu, Esra Yancar Demir
      Pages: 386 - 387
      Abstract: Erman Esnafoglu, Esra Yancar Demir
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):386-387

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):386-387
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_273_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Nonconvulsive status epilepticus and central paralysis after modified
           electroconvulsive therapy in a schizophrenic patient

    • Authors: Peng Deng, Xiahong Wang, Jingjing Sui, Jianyue Pang, Qian Liu, Hengfen Li
      Pages: 387 - 388
      Abstract: Peng Deng, Xiahong Wang, Jingjing Sui, Jianyue Pang, Qian Liu, Hengfen Li
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):387-388

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):387-388
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_301_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Significant improvement of posttraumatic stress disorder and psychotic
           symptoms after inpatient Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing
           treatment: A case report with 6-month follow-up

    • Authors: Leonhard Kratzer, Peter Heinz, Rebecca Schennach
      Pages: 389 - 390
      Abstract: Leonhard Kratzer, Peter Heinz, Rebecca Schennach
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):389-390

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):389-390
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_318_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Clozapine-associated Pisa syndrome: A rare type of tardive dystonia

    • Authors: Pattath Narayanan Suresh Kumar, Arun Gopalakrishnan
      Pages: 390 - 391
      Abstract: Pattath Narayanan Suresh Kumar, Arun Gopalakrishnan
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):390-391

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):390-391
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_308_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Lithium-induced polyuria and amiloride: Key issues and considerations

    • Authors: Raman Deep Pattanayak, Pallavi Rajhans, Pooja Shakya, Namita Gautam, SK Khandelwal
      Pages: 391 - 392
      Abstract: Raman Deep Pattanayak, Pallavi Rajhans, Pooja Shakya, Namita Gautam, SK Khandelwal
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):391-392

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):391-392
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_168_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Pharmacovigilance in drugs used in the treatment of drug dependence

    • Authors: Anusha Thota, Prasad Thota, Vivekanandan Kalaiselvan, Siddharth Sarkar, Gyanendra Nath Singh
      Pages: 393 - 395
      Abstract: Anusha Thota, Prasad Thota, Vivekanandan Kalaiselvan, Siddharth Sarkar, Gyanendra Nath Singh
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):393-395

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):393-395
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_268_16
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Questionable usefulness of the everyday abilities scale of India to screen
           for dementia

    • Authors: Swapnajeet Sahoo, Sutanaya Pal, Avisha Mahla, Satish Suhas, Ekta Franscina Pinto, Chittaranjan Andrade
      Pages: 395 - 396
      Abstract: Swapnajeet Sahoo, Sutanaya Pal, Avisha Mahla, Satish Suhas, Ekta Franscina Pinto, Chittaranjan Andrade
      Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):395-396

      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):395-396
      PubDate: Fri,6 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_130_17
      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Response to questionable usefulness of the everyday abilities scale of
           India to screen for dementia

    • Authors: Sunil Kumar Raina, Vishav Chander, Sujeet Raina, Dinesh Kumar
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      Abstract: Sunil Kumar Raina, Vishav Chander, Sujeet Raina, Dinesh Kumar
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      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):396-397
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      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
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      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
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      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
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      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):399-400
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      Issue No: Vol. 59, No. 3 (2017)
       
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      Citation: Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2017 59(3):400-401
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