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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Ophthalmology
  [SJR: 0.536]   [H-I: 34]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0301-4738
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, uvea, and oculoplasty:
           Survival is the only option

    • Authors: Santosh G Honavar
      Pages: 1071 - 1072
      Abstract: Santosh G Honavar
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1071-1072

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1071-1072
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1092_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Altered tear inflammatory profile in Indian keratoconus patients

    • Authors: Prashant Garg
      Pages: 1073 - 1074
      Abstract: Prashant Garg
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1073-1074

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1073-1074
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_838_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • How safe is safe, and where are we in the journey toward safest of
           safe?

    • Authors: Lalit Dar, Radhika Tandon
      Pages: 1075 - 1076
      Abstract: Lalit Dar, Radhika Tandon
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1075-1076

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1075-1076
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1054_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Pediatric ophthalmology and strabismus in India: Wake-up call and the way
           forward!

    • Authors: Ramesh Kekunnaya
      Pages: 1077 - 1078
      Abstract: Ramesh Kekunnaya
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1077-1078

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1077-1078
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_793_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Non-contact lens related Acanthamoeba keratitis

    • Authors: Prashant Garg, Paavan Kalra, Joveeta Joseph
      Pages: 1079 - 1086
      Abstract: Prashant Garg, Paavan Kalra, Joveeta Joseph
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1079-1086
      The purpose of the study is to describe epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) with special focus on the disease in nonusers of contact lenses (CLs). This study was a perspective based on authors' experience and review of published literature. AK accounts for 2% of microbiology-proven cases of keratitis. Trauma and exposure to contaminated water are the main predisposing factors for the disease. Association with CLs is seen only in small fraction of cases. Contrary to classical description experience in India suggests that out of proportion pain, ring infiltrate, and radial keratoneuritis are seen in less than a third of cases. Majority of cases present with diffuse infiltrate, mimicking herpes simplex or fungal keratitis. The diagnosis can be confirmed by microscopic examination of corneal scraping material and culture on nonnutrient agar with an overlay of Escherichia coli. Confocal microscopy can help diagnosis in patients with deep infiltrate; however, experience with technique and interpretation of images influences its true value. Primary treatment of the infection is biguanides with or without diamidines. Most patients respond to medical treatment. Corticosteroids play an important role in the management and can be used when indicated after due consideration to established protocols. Surgery is rarely needed in patients where definitive management is initiated within 3 weeks of onset of symptoms. Lamellar keratoplasty has been shown to have good outcome in cases needing surgery. Since the clinical features of AK in nonusers of CL are different, it will be important for ophthalmologists to be aware of the scenario wherein to suspect this infection. Medical treatment is successful if the disease is diagnosed early and management is initiated soon.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1079-1086
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_826_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Mitochondrial genetics and therapeutic overview of Leber's
           hereditary optic neuropathy

    • Authors: Agaath Hedina Manickam, Minu Jenifer Michael, Sivasamy Ramasamy
      Pages: 1087 - 1092
      Abstract: Agaath Hedina Manickam, Minu Jenifer Michael, Sivasamy Ramasamy
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1087-1092
      Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a common inherited mitochondrial disorder that is characterized by the degeneration of the optic nerves, leading to vision loss. The major mutations in the mitochondrial genes ND1, ND4, and ND6 of LHON subjects are found to increase the oxidative stress experienced by the optic nerve cell, thereby leading to nerve cell damage. Accurate treatments are not available and drugs that are commercially available like Idebenone, EPI-743, and Bendavia with their antioxidant role help in reducing the oxidative stress experienced by the cell thereby preventing the progression of the disease. Genetic counseling plays an effective role in making the family members aware of the inheritance pattern of the disease. Gene therapy is an alternative for curing the disease but is still under study. This review focuses on the role of mitochondrial genes in causing LHON and therapeutics available for treating the disease. A systematic search has been adopted in various databases using the keywords “LHON,” “mitochondria,” “ND1,” “ND4,” “ND6,” and “therapy” and the following review on mitochondrial genetics and therapeutics of LHON has been developed with obtained articles from 1988 to 2017.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1087-1092
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_358_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Uveal effusion syndrome in 104 eyes: Response to corticosteroids –
           The 2017 Axel C. Hansen lecture

    • Authors: Carol L Shields, Kelsey Roelofs, Maura Di Nicola, Kareem Sioufi, Arman Mashayekhi, Jerry A Shields
      Pages: 1093 - 1104
      Abstract: Carol L Shields, Kelsey Roelofs, Maura Di Nicola, Kareem Sioufi, Arman Mashayekhi, Jerry A Shields
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1093-1104
      Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the corticosteroids for uveal effusion syndrome (UES). Methods: Retrospective series of 104 eyes with UES treated with oral corticosteroids (OCS), periocular corticosteroids (PCS), topical corticosteroids (TCS), or observation (OBS). Main outcome measure was UES resolution. Results: Of 104 eyes, treatment included OCS (n = 27), PCS (n = 12), TCS (n = 11), and OBS (n = 54). A comparison of the four groups (OCS vs. PCS vs. TCS vs. OBS) revealed differences in those managed with OCS versus OBS as younger (66 vs. 72 years, P = 0.049), PCS versus OBS as male (100% vs. 54%, P = 0.002), PCS versus OBS with decreased visual acuity (VA)/visual field (91% vs. 51%, P = 0.018), and OBS versus OCS as asymptomatic (28% vs. 0%, P = 0.001). Of the 59 with follow-up information, management included OCS (n = 21), PCS (n = 12), TCS (n = 6), and OBS (n = 20). There were differences in initial VA <20/400 in PCS versus OBS (42% vs. 5%, P = 0.018), effusion thickness in TCS versus OCS (7 vs. 3 mm, P = 0.004), and serous retinal detachment in PCS versus OBS (100% vs. 30%, P < 0.001) and PCS versus OCS (100% vs. 57%, P = 0.012). Regarding outcomes, VA showed less worsening in OCS versus OBS (0% vs. 30%, P = 0.008) and OCS versus PCS (0% vs. 33%, P = 0.012). There was no difference in rate of effusion resolution or effusion recurrence. Overall, using combination of corticosteroid therapies, effusion resolution was achieved in 56/59 (95%) cases and the need for surgical management with scleral windows was necessary in only 3/59 (5%) cases. Complications included cataract (n = 9) and no instance of steroid-induced glaucoma. Conclusion: Management of UES is complex and depends on disease severity. Using various corticosteroid delivery routes, UES control was achieved in 95%, and scleral window surgery was required in only 5%. A trial of corticosteroids can benefit patients with UES.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1093-1104
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_752_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Altered tear inflammatory profile in Indian keratoconus patients - The
           2015 Col Rangachari Award paper

    • Authors: Rohit Shetty, Rashmi Deshmukh, Arkasubhra Ghosh, Swaminathan Sethu, Chaitra Jayadev
      Pages: 1105 - 1108
      Abstract: Rohit Shetty, Rashmi Deshmukh, Arkasubhra Ghosh, Swaminathan Sethu, Chaitra Jayadev
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1105-1108
      Purpose: Conventionally, keratoconus (KC) has been considered a noninflammatory corneal ectatic disorder. Recent evidence suggests a possible role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of KC. Hence, we analyzed the levels of inflammatory factors in the tear fluid of Indian KC patients. Methods: Tear fluid samples were collected from age- and sex-matched healthy controls and KC patients (with different grades). The levels of the inflammatory factors in tears were analyzed using cytometric bead array (Human Soluble Protein Flex Set System, BD Biosciences) for levels of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-23p40, IL-13, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, interferon-α (IFNα), IFNγ, tumor necrosis factor-α, CCL2/monocyte chemotactic protein-1, CCL4/macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β), MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP10, ICAM1, CD62E, vascular endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor β. Results: An increase in Kmax and Kmean, and a decrease in central corneal thickness was observed with increasing grades of KC. Tear analysis showed that most of the tear soluble factors, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and cell adhesion molecules were significantly elevated in the KC patients compared to the controls. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that inflammatory factors associated with KC may play a role in its pathogenesis. This opens the potential to explore anti-inflammatory strategies to either halt or delay the progression of KC.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1105-1108
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_233_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Immunohistochemical expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in
           eyelid sebaceous gland carcinoma predicts a worse prognosis

    • Authors: Perumal Jayaraj, Seema Sen, PS Dhanaraj, Romika Jhajhria, Shalu Singh, Vijay Kumar Singh
      Pages: 1109 - 1113
      Abstract: Perumal Jayaraj, Seema Sen, PS Dhanaraj, Romika Jhajhria, Shalu Singh, Vijay Kumar Singh
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1109-1113
      Purpose: Overexpression of the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins have been demonstrated in a variety and of solid tumors including melanomas and nonmelanomas skin cancers. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is an inhibitor of apoptosis which prevents apoptosis by inhibiting caspases 9, 7, and 3. The prognostic value of XIAP in sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC) remains unexplored. Methods: The immunohistochemical expression of XIAP was evaluated in 29 SGC cases. Results: The cytoplasmic overexpression of XIAP was detected in 62% SGC cases. XIAP expression was found to be significantly associated with advanced age, large tumor size, and with reduced disease-free survival (P = 0.0174). XIAP expression and advance tumor Grade III emerged as significant risk factors on univariate analysis. On stepwise multivariate analysis, both increased cytoplasmic XIAP expression and high tumor grade were found to be significantly associated with recurrence. Patients with low XIAP immunoexpression had a longer disease-specific survival than those with high expression in the 5-year follow-up. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates at the immunohistochemical level that XIAP is overexpressed in SGC and that high expression could be of biological significance in the development of eyelid SGC. Our finding suggests that up-regulation of XIAP may aggravate tumor metastasis in SGC.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1109-1113
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_399_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Is the distance from punctum a factor in the anatomical and functional
           success of canalicular laceration repairs?

    • Authors: Manpreet Singh, Natasha Gautam, Nitasha Ahir, Manpreet Kaur
      Pages: 1114 - 1119
      Abstract: Manpreet Singh, Natasha Gautam, Nitasha Ahir, Manpreet Kaur
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1114-1119
      Purpose: The aim is to analyze the influence of the location of lacrimal canalicular laceration over the eventual anatomical and functional success after surgery. Methods: Retrospective, observational study of proximal canalicular laceration (PCL) and distal canalicular laceration (DCL) repairs by a single surgeon (MS). The distance between lacrimal punctum and the lateral canalicular lacerated end was defined as proximal (<6 mm) and distal (≥6 mm). The operation theater setup, microscopic magnified view, local adrenaline, and pigtail probe were used to locate the medial canalicular lacerated end. All patients underwent lacrimal stenting and the stents were removed after 3 months (12th week visit). After stent removal, a fluorescein dye disappearance test and lacrimal irrigation were performed to assess the anatomical and functional success of the operation. Results: Of 36 canalicular lacerations, 30 (83.33%) were monocanalicular lacerations which were repaired using monocanalicular stents. Of 6 (16.67%) bicanalicular lacerations, three were repaired using bicanalicular stents while in the remaining three, one monocanalicular stent was placed in each lacerated canaliculi. The medial cut end was identified by magnified visualization in 27 (75%), with adjunctive local adrenaline in four (11.11%) and pigtail probe in five (13.89%) patients. The mean post stent removal follow-up was 44 weeks. The DCL (n = 24, 66.67%) showed better functional and complete success as compared to PCL (75% vs. 33.33%, P = 0.03). Eight (22.22%) had spontaneous stent extrusion, two (5.56%) had loop prolapse, four (11.11%) had punctum granuloma, and three (8.33%) had medial canthus dystopia. Conclusion: The location of canalicular laceration may help to prognosticate the functional and qualified success rate. We experienced better-qualified success in the distal canalicular laceration group.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1114-1119
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_499_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Diagnosis of limbal stem cell deficiency based on corneal epithelial
           thickness measured on anterior segment optical coherence tomography

    • Authors: Amit Mehtani, Mahesh Chandra Agarwal, Sushant Sharma, Santosh Chaudhary
      Pages: 1120 - 1126
      Abstract: Amit Mehtani, Mahesh Chandra Agarwal, Sushant Sharma, Santosh Chaudhary
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1120-1126
      Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the epithelial thickness in the cornea and limbus in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Methods: This was a cross-sectional, comparative study. OCT images of 30 eyes of 19 patients with LSCD collected by AS-OCT were scanned. Corneal epithelial thickness was recorded at the central cornea and the superior, nasal, inferior, and temporal limbus. Measurment of the same region of 30 normal eyes served as control. Epithelial thickness in all locations was measured by 2 independent observers. Results: The mean epithelial layer thickness was 61.3 ± 2.9 μ in the central cornea and 62.7 ± 4.3 μ in the limbus in the control. The epithelial thickness in LSCD patients was found to be 41.33 ± 2.8 μ. An average reduction of 22.2% in the central cornea and 32.15% in the limbus was found in patients with LSCD (P < 0.05). Epithelial thinning correlated with the severity of LSCD in both cornea and limbus. In eyes with sectoral LSCD, a similar degree of epithelial thinning was also detected in the clinically unaffected limbal regions. Conclusion: Both corneal and limbal epithelia become progressively thinner in LSCD. Epithelial thickness assessment using AS-OCT as a noninvasive tool could be used as a diagnostic measure of LSCD.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1120-1126
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_218_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • The inhibitory effect of different concentrations of KH902 eye drops on
           corneal neovascularization induced by alkali burn

    • Authors: Yan Wu, Chunyan Xue, Yan Lu, Zhenping Huang
      Pages: 1127 - 1132
      Abstract: Yan Wu, Chunyan Xue, Yan Lu, Zhenping Huang
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1127-1132
      Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of different concentrations of KH902 eye drops on rabbit corneal neovascularization (CNV) induced by alkali burn. Methods: Forty-eight adult rabbits were randomized into four groups after alkali burning: Group A (2.5 mg/ml), Group B (5 mg/ml), and Group C (10 mg/ml) by different concentrations of KH902 eye drops and Group D by saline solution as control with three times a day for 2 weeks. At days 7, 14, and 28, the anterior segment photographs, confocal microscopy, and histopathology were performed to evaluate corneal opacity, neovascularization, inflammatory cell density, vessel size, and edema. Immunohistochemistry was applied to analyze the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level. Results: (1) The CNV in the medicine-treated groups showed a reduction without obvious corneal side effects histologically. (2) Compared to the control group, the three medicine-treated groups showed a reduction in the VEGF levels and CNV areas on days 7, 14, and 28 and in the inflammatory cell density on days 14 and 28 (P < 0.01). The difference of inflammatory cell density between the three medicine-treated groups existed on day 14 (P < 0.01). There were differences in the VEGF levels between Groups A, B, and C on days 7, 14, and 28 (P < 0.01), not for Groups B and C on day 28 (P > 0.05). Conclusion: KH902 eye drops in lower concentration showed an obvious reduction of the CNV growing for rabbit corneal alkali burn without side effects.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1127-1132
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_339_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of the Endosaver with noninjector techniques in Descemet's
           stripping endothelial keratoplasty

    • Authors: Michael Tsatsos, Ioannis Athanasiadis, Nikolaos Kopsachilis, Radhika Krishnan, Parwez Hossain, David Anderson
      Pages: 1133 - 1137
      Abstract: Michael Tsatsos, Ioannis Athanasiadis, Nikolaos Kopsachilis, Radhika Krishnan, Parwez Hossain, David Anderson
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1133-1137
      Purpose: Minimal loss of corneal endothelial cells during corneal transplantation is a major target but remains a point of controversy among specialists. Hence, the available method to best achieve this continues to stir progress in the field. The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of the Endosaver injector device for graft insertion in Descemet's stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) and compare the visual outcomes and endothelial cell survival between the Endosaver injector and Goosey grasping forceps insertion techniques. Methods: This was a retrospective, interventional, consecutive case series undertaken at the University of Southampton Eye Department to assess outcomes of DSEK using the Endosaver injector device compared to noninjector DSEK insertion. Postoperative specular microscopy alongside manifest refraction at 6 and 12 months was evaluated and compared. Mann–Whitney U-test was employed for the statistical analysis of data. Results: Both the Endosaver and Goosey forceps groups showed an improvement in best corrected visual acuity. No significant statistical difference was found in preoperative and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity between the Endosaver and non-Endosaver insertion groups. Mean preoperative endothelial cell count was 2660 (±130) for the Endosaver group and 2608 (±66) for the non-Endosaver group. Postoperative endothelial counts at 6 and 12 months showed a significant difference between the Endosaver: 2104 (±199)–1896 (±226) and the non-Endosaver: 1492 (±207)–1314 (±224) (P < 0.005) groups, respectively. Conclusion: The Endosaver injection device is associated with less trauma to endothelium during graft insertion due to the minimal touch technique employed. A smaller insertion wound of 4.0 mm compared to noninjector cases enabled a more stable system during surgery with no or minimal anterior chamber shallowing. The combination of a stable host with minimal endothelial graft handling and subsequent trauma potentially leads to higher endothelial cell counts when the Endosaver injection device is used compared to forceps insertion.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1133-1137
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_360_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of seropositivity of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B
           virus, hepatitis C virus, and syphilis among Hospital Cornea Retrieval
           Programme-Donors versus voluntary cornea donors at a large eye bank in
           Eastern India

    • Authors: Soham Basak, Samar K Basak, Bani Biswas
      Pages: 1138 - 1142
      Abstract: Soham Basak, Samar K Basak, Bani Biswas
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1138-1142
      Purpose: To compare the serology profile of donors from Hospital Cornea Retrieval Programme-donors (HCRP-D) and voluntary cornea donors (VC-D) from a large eye bank in Eastern India. Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of donor details from January 2011 to December 2016. Donor demographics, cause of death, and serology reports were compiled. Postmortem blood was tested for human immunodeficiency virus 1 and 2 (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and syphilis using government-approved kits as per the National Programme for Control of Blindness Standards of Eye Banking. Donors for whom serology was not possible were excluded. Results: A total of 4300 of 4353 donors were included of which 74.3% were hospital donors and 25.7% were voluntary donors. A total of 93 (2.2%) donors with 94 seropositive reports were noted: 79 (84.9%) from HCRP-D and 14 (15.1%) from VC-D which was statistically significantly higher (P = 0.02). Among seropositive reports, HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis accounted for 12 (12.8%), 38 (40.4%), 36 (38.3%), and eight (8.5%), respectively. There was no correlation between the cause of death and seropositivity. A statistically significant decreasing trend in seroprevalence among hospital donors was observed over the years (5.3% in 2011 to 1.4% in 2016; P = 0.004). Two (0.47%) of 421 hospital donors with prior negative serology were found to be seropositive. Conclusion: Seropositive rates are significantly higher among hospital donors in spite of medical prescreening compared to nonscreened voluntary donors. Serology should be repeated even when prior reports are available.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1138-1142
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_472_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of spectral domain optical coherence tomography parameters in
           ocular hypertension, preperimetric, and early glaucoma

    • Authors: Tu&#287;ba Aydogan, Bet&#220;l &#304;lkay Sezgin Ak&#231;ay, Esra Karde&#351;, Ahmet Ergin
      Pages: 1143 - 1150
      Abstract: Tuğba Aydogan, BetÜl İlkay Sezgin Akçay, Esra Kardeş, Ahmet Ergin
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1143-1150
      Purpose: The objective of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic ability of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), macular, optic nerve head (ONH) parameters in healthy subjects, ocular hypertension (OHT), preperimetric glaucoma (PPG), and early glaucoma (EG) patients, to reveal factors affecting the diagnostic ability of spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) parameters and risk factors for glaucoma. Methods: Three hundred and twenty-six eyes (89 healthy, 77 OHT, 94 PPG, and 66 EG eyes) were analyzed. RNFL, macular, and ONH parameters were measured with SD-OCT. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and sensitivity at 95% specificity was calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the glaucoma risk factors. Receiver operating characteristic regression analysis was used to evaluate the influence of covariates on the diagnostic ability of parameters. Results: In PPG patients, parameters that had the largest AUC value were average RNFL thickness (0.83) and rim volume (0.83). In EG patients, parameter that had the largest AUC value was average RNFL thickness (0.98). The logistic regression analysis showed average RNFL thickness was a risk factor for both PPG and EG. Diagnostic ability of average RNFL and average ganglion cell complex thickness increased as disease severity increased. Signal strength index did not affect diagnostic abilities. Diagnostic ability of average RNFL and rim area increased as disc area increased. Conclusion: When evaluating patients with glaucoma, patients at risk for glaucoma, and healthy controls RNFL parameters deserve more attention in clinical practice. Further studies are needed to fully understand the influence of covariates on the diagnostic ability of OCT parameters.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1143-1150
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_157_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Simultaneous use of amniotic membrane and Mitomycin C in trabeculectomy
           for primary glaucoma

    • Authors: Usha Yadava, Kirti Jaisingh, Sonal Dangda, Prolima Thacker, Kirti Singh, Yashpal Goel
      Pages: 1151 - 1155
      Abstract: Usha Yadava, Kirti Jaisingh, Sonal Dangda, Prolima Thacker, Kirti Singh, Yashpal Goel
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1151-1155
      Purpose: This study aimed to propose the role of amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) as an additional modulator in primary Mitomycin C (MMC)-augmented trabeculectomy. Methods: This was a randomized prospective interventional study. Forty eyes of 39 adult patients with uncontrolled primary glaucoma were randomly divided into two equal groups. Control group underwent trabeculectomy augmented with MMC while the study group underwent additional AMT. Patients were followed up for 12 months and outcomes measured were intraocular pressure (IOP), need for additional intervention, and bleb morphology. Results: Complete success (defined as IOP <16 mmHg on no medication) could be achieved in 85% eyes in study group while it was 60% in control group (P = 0.04). IOP reduced by 71.1% in study group from 41.9 ± 10.6 to 12.1 ± 2.7 mmHg and from 40.5 ± 8.5 to 12.8 ± 4.5 mmHg in control group, a decline of 68.29%. Blebs in AMT group showed better bleb morphology in terms of significantly better extent (E3) on day 1 (P = 0.03) and better height (H2 and H3) (P = 0.04), according to the Indiana Bleb Appearance Grading Scale, at all follow-up visits along with normal vascularity. The study group required significantly lesser (P = 0.03) bleb needlings as compared to control group. Conclusion: Amnion enhanced the efficacy of MMC-modulated trabeculectomy in terms of eyes with complete success and lesser interventions such as bleb needling. This reiterates the role of amnion as a safe and effective bleb modulator. A diffusely elevated bleb with healthier conjunctiva can go a long way in predicting better health and longevity of the bleb.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1151-1155
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_447_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Frequency of primary mutations of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy
           patients in North Indian population

    • Authors: Anushree Mishra, Saranya Devi, Rohit Saxena, Neerja Gupta, Madhulika Kabra, Madhumita Roy Chowdhury
      Pages: 1156 - 1160
      Abstract: Anushree Mishra, Saranya Devi, Rohit Saxena, Neerja Gupta, Madhulika Kabra, Madhumita Roy Chowdhury
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1156-1160
      Purpose: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited optic neuropathy characterized by subacute painless vision loss. The majority of LHON is caused due to one of the three primary mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (m.G3460A, m.G11778A, and m.T14484C). The frequency of these mutations differs in different populations. The purpose of this study is to observe the frequency of three common primary mutations in the North Indian population. Methods: Forty LHON patients within the age group of 10–50 years underwent molecular testing for primary mutations. For two patients, testing for mother and other siblings was also carried out, using bidirectional sequencing. Results: A total of 11 out of 40 (27.5%) patients were found to be carrying m.G11778A mutation. Siblings of two probands were also positive for the same mutation. In one family, two primary mutations (m.G11778A and m.T14484C) were found in the proband and in the mother as well. Conclusion: In this study, 27.5% mutation was detected in North Indian LHON families. These results suggest that m.G11778A mutation is more frequent in this population. The results of the present study are compatible with studies of an Asian population and Northern European population.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1156-1160
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_380_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Next-generation sequencing reveals a novel NDP gene mutation in a Chinese
           family with Norrie disease

    • Authors: Xiaoyan Huang, Mao Tian, Jiankang Li, Ling Cui, Min Li, Jianguo Zhang
      Pages: 1161 - 1165
      Abstract: Xiaoyan Huang, Mao Tian, Jiankang Li, Ling Cui, Min Li, Jianguo Zhang
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1161-1165
      Purpose: Norrie disease (ND) is a rare X-linked genetic disorder, the main symptoms of which are congenital blindness and white pupils. It has been reported that ND is caused by mutations in the NDP gene. Although many mutations in NDP have been reported, the genetic cause for many patients remains unknown. In this study, the aim is to investigate the genetic defect in a five-generation family with typical symptoms of ND. Methods: To identify the causative gene, next-generation sequencing based target capture sequencing was performed. Segregation analysis of the candidate variant was performed in additional family members using Sanger sequencing. Results: We identified a novel missense variant (c.314C>A) located within the NDP gene. The mutation cosegregated within all affected individuals in the family and was not found in unaffected members. By happenstance, in this family, we also detected a known pathogenic variant of retinitis pigmentosa in a healthy individual. Conclusion: c.314C>A mutation of NDP gene is a novel mutation and broadens the genetic spectrum of ND.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1161-1165
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_442_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: An emerging entity for cluster
           endophthalmitis

    • Authors: Sarita Beri, Anurag Shandil, Rajiv Garg
      Pages: 1166 - 1171
      Abstract: Sarita Beri, Anurag Shandil, Rajiv Garg
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1166-1171
      Purpose: This was a study of acute cluster endophthalmitis along with clinical features, culture results, and visual outcomes of 10 eyes of 10 patients after intravitreal injection of Avastin (bevacizumab) in one sitting from a single vial. Methods: Retrospective review of intravitreal injection of 1.25 mg/0.05 ml bevacizumab that was given to 10 eyes of 10 patients on the same day from a freshly opened vial. All patients manifested with endophthalmitis the next day. Vitreous tap for direct smear and culture was done. Intravitreal antibiotics and steroids were injected and appropriate treatment begun. The injection vial of the same batch was sent for VITEKTM identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates. Results: Endophthalmitis presented within 24 h of intravitreal injection. There was a remarkable absence of posterior pupillary synechia. Two cases were culture-positive (20%), showing pseudomonoid growth. The vial of the same batch revealed a pseudomonoid bacilli Stenotrophomonas maltophilia using VITEKTM, which was resistant to multiple drugs. Hence, the contaminated vial was identified as the source of infection in our case. Among 10 patients, two underwent pars plana vitrectomy. Visual acuity returned to preendophthalmitis levels in 9/10 eyes after 1 month. One patient was lost to follow-up. Late complications included retinal detachment in one case and neovascular glaucoma in another. Conclusion: Early recognition and treatment are key factors in improving outcomes. Causative etiology could be microbial contamination of the drug vial. S. maltophilia should be considered a pathogenic organism of postintravitreal endophthalmitis.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1166-1171
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_314_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Retinal shortening: Ultrasonic evaluation of proliferative
           vitreoretinopathy

    • Authors: Brijesh Takkar, Shreyas Temkar, Nripen Gaur, Pradeep Venkatesh, Rohan Chawla, Atul Kumar
      Pages: 1172 - 1177
      Abstract: Brijesh Takkar, Shreyas Temkar, Nripen Gaur, Pradeep Venkatesh, Rohan Chawla, Atul Kumar
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1172-1177
      Purpose: To evaluate the effect of extraretinal proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) on retinal shortening in eyes with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD) using ultrasound (USG) and objectively prove the presence of intraretinal PVR (iPVR). Methods: This is a double-masked pilot prospective controlled case series. Patients with total RD planned for vitreoretinal surgery were included in the study. USG was used to determine retinal-to-choroidal length ratios (RCRs) in all the quadrants. Group 1 included 10 patients with preoperative PVR more than Grade B while Group 2 had 14 with PVR of Grades A or B. Severe retinal shortening was defined as RCR < 0.8. Primary outcome measures were severe retinal shortening and an early unexplained recurrence of RD within 15 days of surgery. Results: Mean RCRs were significantly low in all the four quadrants of Group 1 upon comparison with Group 2. The mean RCR had a good negative correlation with number of quadrants of PVR (R = −0.66, P ≤ 0.001). Overall, severe quadrantic retinal shortening was detected in nine patients. In these 9 patients, 11 of the 36 retinal quadrants had severe retinal shortening in the absence of extraretinal PVR (ePVR). Six patients developed early unexplained RD, and all of these belonged to Group 1. Severe quadrantic retinal shortening had the highest odds ratio of developing early unexplained RD (odds ratio = 58, P = 0.01). Conclusion: Retinal shortening occurs both due to ePVR and iPVR, and iPVR occurs independently at least in some cases. Severe quadrantic retinal shortening indicates poor primary anatomical prognoses.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1172-1177
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_481_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy of 1&#37; atropine eye drops in retarding progressive
           axial myopia in Indian eyes

    • Authors: Mihir Kothari, Vivek Rathod
      Pages: 1178 - 1181
      Abstract: Mihir Kothari, Vivek Rathod
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1178-1181
      Purpose: The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of 1% atropine eye drops for the retardation of progressive axial myopia in Indian eyes. Methods: This prospective interventional cohort study included children aged 5–16 years. Both the eyes of myopic children with progressive increase of ≥−0.5D sphere/year with the best-corrected vision of ≥6/6 were treated with once a day application of 1% atropine eye drops and progressive addition photogray lenses. The progression of myopia after 1-year follow-up was analyzed. Results: Sixty eyes of thirty myopes were included in the study. The mean age was 10 years and 15 were girls. The mean baseline sphere was −5.2D (−2.5D–−13D). Mean duration of follow-up was 23 months (12–36 months). The baseline rate of progression was reduced from −0.6D/year (range −0.5D/year to −3D/year) to −0.2D/year (range 0D/year to −1.5D/year) after atropine therapy. Seventeen patients (57%) had to use the atropine in the daytime to reach the target progression of
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1178-1181
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_418_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Conquering myopia: Have we hit pay dirt?

    • Authors: Siddharth S Kesarwani
      Pages: 1182 - 1182
      Abstract: Siddharth S Kesarwani
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1182-1182

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1182-1182
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_951_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Modified adjustable suture hang-back recession: Description of technique
           and comparison with conventional adjustable hang-back recession

    • Authors: Siddharth Agrawal, Vinita Singh, Ankur Yadav, Sonal Bangwal, Vishal Katiyar
      Pages: 1183 - 1186
      Abstract: Siddharth Agrawal, Vinita Singh, Ankur Yadav, Sonal Bangwal, Vishal Katiyar
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1183-1186
      Purpose: This study aims to describe and compare modified hang-back recession with the conventional hang-back recession in large angle comitant exotropia (XT). Methods: A prospective, interventional, double-blinded, randomized study on adult patients (>18 years) undergoing single eye recession-resection for large angle (>30 prism diopters) constant comitant XT was conducted between January 2011 and December 2015. Patients in Group A underwent modified hang-back lateral rectus recession with adjustable knot while in Group B underwent conventional hang-back recession with an adjustable knot. Outcome parameters studied were readjustment rate, change in deviation at 6 weeks, complications and need for resurgery at 6 months. Results: The groups were comparable in terms of age and preoperative deviation. The patients with the modified hang back (Group A) fared significantly better (P < 0.05) than those with conventional hang back (Group B) in terms of lesser need for adjustment, greater correction in deviation at 6 weeks and lesser need for resurgery at 6 months. Conclusion: This modification offers several advantages, significantly reduces resurgery requirement and has no added complications.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1183-1186
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_326_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Is pediatric ophthalmology a popular subspecialty in India: Present
           scenario and future remedies

    • Authors: Sucheta Parija, Preetam Mahajan
      Pages: 1187 - 1191
      Abstract: Sucheta Parija, Preetam Mahajan
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1187-1191
      Purpose: The aim of the study was to assess the attitude and perceptions of residents regarding Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (POS) subspecialty training. We also explored the possible barriers and solutions to promoting POS in India. Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 20 items, with a 5-point Likert scale, was provided to all postgraduate residents of Ophthalmology in the year 2013–2014. Semistructured interview of a selected panel of experts was carried out to understand the challenges, barriers, and opportunities for developing POS subspecialty in India. The data collected were coded and statistically analyzed using standard methods for quantitative and qualitative data. Results: Out of 81 residents, 69 responded (85.2%). The mean age of the respondents was 27.5 ± 1.23 years. Forty eight (69.0%) residents reported that there was no structured surgical teaching and systematic periodic posting in this subspecialty during their residency program. Residents who stated difficulty to understand the subject were 59%. Pursuing POS as a career choice was indicated by 21.0%. Major attracting attributes of POS fellowship were intellectual stimulation (69.7%) and independent operative skills (57.5%). Dissuading factors were difficulty to handle children (54.5%) and stress factor (48.4%). Expert views were grouped under four domains, such as doctor–patient ratio, infrastructure, training opportunities, utilization, and accessibility to POS services. Conclusion: The study has provided useful insights into the preferential behavior among trainee resident doctors and reasons for not choosing POS as a possible choice of future fellowships.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1187-1191
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_548_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Epidemiology, clinical profile and factors, predicting final visual
           outcome of pediatric ocular trauma in a tertiary eye care center of
           Central India

    • Authors: Satendra Singh, Bhavana Sharma, Kavita Kumar, Aditi Dubey, Kanchan Ahirwar
      Pages: 1192 - 1197
      Abstract: Satendra Singh, Bhavana Sharma, Kavita Kumar, Aditi Dubey, Kanchan Ahirwar
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1192-1197
      Purpose: Ocular trauma constitutes an important cause of preventable visual morbidity worldwide. This study was done to study the incidence, sociodemographic pattern, and clinical profile of ocular trauma in pediatric age group. Also to evaluate the factors influencing final visual outcome in these patients. Methods: This was a prospective interventional study concerning ocular trauma in pediatric patients up to 16 years of age of either sex. Various variables having an impact on final visual outcome were studied, and results were analyzed using statistical indices – relative risk, Chi-square test, P value, and linear regression analysis. Results: A total of 220 cases of trauma were evaluated with the mean age being 8.74 ± 3.93 years, males were predominantly affected and open globe injuries outnumbered blunt injuries. Penetrating injuries accounted for 67.79% cases of open globe injury, rupture being the least (2.54%). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis executed, showed the best predictors in the descending order for final visual outcome were presenting visual acuity, size of corneal tear, type of injury, zone of injury, time period between injury and treatment with a variance of 35.9%, 6.3%, 5.3%, 3.7%, and 2.7%, respectively. All above variables were also found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05) on Chi-square test. Conclusion: We report the first study on the epidemiology and clinical outcomes of pediatric ocular trauma in central India. Poor initial Visual Acuity and posterior segment involvement adversely affect the visual outcome. Early medical treatment and globe-salvaging repair should be done in all eyes suffering from trauma.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1192-1197
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_375_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Comparison of 30-2 Standard and Fast programs of Swedish Interactive
           Threshold Algorithm of Humphrey Field Analyzer for perimetry in patients
           with intracranial tumors

    • Authors: Manav Deep Singh, Kanika Jain
      Pages: 1198 - 1202
      Abstract: Manav Deep Singh, Kanika Jain
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1198-1202
      Purpose: To find out whether 30-2 Swedish Interactive Threshold Algorithm (SITA) Fast is comparable to 30-2 SITA Standard as a tool for perimetry among the patients with intracranial tumors. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study involving 80 patients aged ≥18 years with imaging proven intracranial tumors and visual acuity better than 20/60. The patients underwent multiple visual field examinations using the two algorithms till consistent and repeatable results were obtained. Results: A total of 140 eyes of 80 patients were analyzed. Almost 60% of patients undergoing perimetry with SITA Standard required two or more sessions to obtain consistent results, whereas the same could be obtained in 81.42% with SITA Fast in the first session itself. Of 140 eyes, 70 eyes had recordable field defects and the rest had no defects as detected by either of the two algorithms. Mean deviation (MD) (P = 0.56), pattern standard deviation (PSD) (P = 0.22), visual field index (P = 0.83) and number of depressed points at P < 5%, 2%, 1%, and 0.5% on MD and PSD probability plots showed no statistically significant difference between two algorithms. Bland–Altman test showed that considerable variability existed between two algorithms. Conclusion: Perimetry performed by SITA Standard and SITA Fast algorithm of Humphrey Field Analyzer gives comparable results among the patients of intracranial tumors. Being more time efficient and with a shorter learning curve, SITA Fast my be recommended as a standard test for the purpose of perimetry among these patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1198-1202
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_315_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Hospital anxiety and depression scale assessment of 100 patients before
           and after using low vision care: A prospective study in a tertiary
           eye-care setting

    • Authors: Pukhraj Rishi, Ekta Rishi, Aditya Maitray, Ashutosh Agarwal, Sridevi Nair, Sarika Gopalakrishnan
      Pages: 1203 - 1208
      Abstract: Pukhraj Rishi, Ekta Rishi, Aditya Maitray, Ashutosh Agarwal, Sridevi Nair, Sarika Gopalakrishnan
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1203-1208
      Purpose: Assessment of anxiety and depression in patients attending low vision care (LVC) using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Methods: In this prospective, observational study, 100 patients with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) worse than 6/18 in the better eye or limitation of field of vision to <10° from center of fixation were assessed on the depression and anxiety subscales of HADS questionnaire before and after LVC. HADS is a 14-item scale with seven items each for anxiety and depression subscales. Scoring for each item ranges from zero to three. A subscale score >8 denotes anxiety or depression. Results: Mean age at presentation was 38.2 years. Mean duration of symptoms was 9.6 years. Underlying etiology of visual impairment included retinal dystrophy/degeneration (n = 35), disorders of the optic nerve (n = 17), glaucoma (n = 10), diabetic retinopathy (n = 9), age-related macular degeneration (n = 5), uncorrected refractive errors (n = 5), and miscellaneous diseases (n = 19). Mean presenting BCVA in the better eye was 0.83 (±0.64) which improved significantly to 0.78 (±0.63) after LVC (P < 0.001). The HADS-Depression subscale score was comparable for severity of visual impairment for both distance (P = 0.57) and near vision (P = 0.61). Similarly, HADS-Anxiety scores were also comparable for severity of distance (P = 0.34) and near-visual impairment (NVI; P = 0.50). At baseline, mean HADS-Depression and HADS-Anxiety scores were 8.4 (±3.7) and 9.6 (±4.3) points, which improved significantly to 6.0 (±3.4) and 6.7 (±3.7), respectively, after low-vision correction (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Low vision correction can significantly improve anxiety and depression indicators in visually impaired patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1203-1208
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_436_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Multimodal imaging features of resolving multiple evanescent white dot
           syndrome

    • Authors: Giuseppe Casalino, Ugo Introini, Carlos E Pavesio, Francesco Bandello
      Pages: 1209 - 1210
      Abstract: Giuseppe Casalino, Ugo Introini, Carlos E Pavesio, Francesco Bandello
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1209-1210

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1209-1210
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_558_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • “Dye front reciprocation” in combined central retinal vein
           occlusion with cilioretinal artery infarction

    • Authors: Raghav Ravani, Rohan Chawla, Shreyans Jain, Atul Kumar
      Pages: 1211 - 1212
      Abstract: Raghav Ravani, Rohan Chawla, Shreyans Jain, Atul Kumar
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1211-1212

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1211-1212
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_552_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Polypoidal choroidopathy associated with choroidal nevus

    • Authors: Isabel Pascual-Camps, Paula M L&#243;pez-Corell, Mar&#237;a Andreu-Fenoll, Roberto Gallego-Pinazo
      Pages: 1213 - 1214
      Abstract: Isabel Pascual-Camps, Paula M López-Corell, María Andreu-Fenoll, Roberto Gallego-Pinazo
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1213-1214

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1213-1214
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_569_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • An unusual intraocular foreign body: Intravitreal cilium following scleral
           buckling for retinal detachment repair

    • Authors: Sundaram Natarajan, Chinmay Nakhwa, Aylette Jude D Silva
      Pages: 1215 - 1216
      Abstract: Sundaram Natarajan, Chinmay Nakhwa, Aylette Jude D Silva
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1215-1216

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1215-1216
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_545_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Revisiting the &#8220;Tram-Track&#8221; sign

    • Authors: Akshay Gopinathan Nair, Veena R Iyer, Indumati Gopinathan
      Pages: 1217 - 1218
      Abstract: Akshay Gopinathan Nair, Veena R Iyer, Indumati Gopinathan
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1217-1218

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1217-1218
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_510_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Role of amniotic membrane and full-thickness skin graft in reconstruction
           of kissing nevus of eyelids

    • Authors: Manpreet Singh, Natasha Gautam, Manpreet Kaur, Zoramthara Zadeng
      Pages: 1219 - 1221
      Abstract: Manpreet Singh, Natasha Gautam, Manpreet Kaur, Zoramthara Zadeng
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1219-1221
      A 20-year-old girl presented with a large pigmented lesion over the temporal aspect of left lateral canthus involving the lateral one-third of both eyelids, since birth. A slow increase in its size had been noticed for the past 2 years. On examination, a hairy nevus measuring 34 mm × 22 mm was noticed involving left eyelid skin, the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ), palpebral conjunctiva, and lateral canthus. The surface was irregularly thick and covered with long, thick, and pigmented hairs. A clinical diagnosis of kissing nevus of eyelids was kept and a surgical resection with reconstruction planned. A customized full-thickness skin graft (FTSG) and amniotic membrane grafts (AMGs) were used for the reconstruction of cutaneous and MCJ, respectively. Histopathology showed the features of junctional nevus. At 4 months of follow-up, a well taken FTSG and healthy/sharp MCJ were noticed with no recurrence. We advocate a possible role of AMG, particularly in the reconstruction of the conjunctival mucosa and MCJ.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1219-1221
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_407_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Congenital capillary hemangioma arising from palpebral conjunctiva of a
           neonate

    • Authors: S Padmanaban, P Sumathi, Prayagi Kandoth, RP Dharmendra
      Pages: 1221 - 1223
      Abstract: S Padmanaban, P Sumathi, Prayagi Kandoth, RP Dharmendra
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1221-1223
      Capillary hemangioma is the most common benign vascular eyelid tumor in childhood. The periocular lesion appears within the first few weeks after birth and usually has superficial or deep components. Primary conjunctival capillary hemangiomas are rarely reported. We present the case of a 2-day-old child with a pedunculated capillary hemangioma arising from superior palpebral conjunctiva. A complete surgical excision was performed under general anesthesia, and the child was asymptomatic at follow-up of two months.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1221-1223
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_487_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Predescemetocele: A distinct clinical entity

    • Authors: Priya Narang, Amar Agarwal, Dhivya Ashok Kumar
      Pages: 1224 - 1226
      Abstract: Priya Narang, Amar Agarwal, Dhivya Ashok Kumar
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1224-1226
      The case report incorporates a Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination for demonstration of the existence of pre-Descemet's layer (PDL; Dua's layer) overlying a descemetocele and demonstrates predescemetocele as a separate clinical entity. The prospective analysis was done in two cases that had descemetocele, and OCT demonstrated the presence of PDL over an unruptured descemetocele that offers resilience and can be treated with an elective deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty or a penetrating keratoplasty. A descemetocele, when covered with PDL, should be correctly designated as a predescemetocele. Loss of PDL leads to baring of Descemet's membrane that eventually ruptures.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1224-1226
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_492_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • The sting of a honey bee: An unusual subconjunctival foreign body

    • Authors: Sushank A Bhalerao, Prabhakar Singh, Padmaja Kumari Rani, Varsha Rathi
      Pages: 1226 - 1228
      Abstract: Sushank A Bhalerao, Prabhakar Singh, Padmaja Kumari Rani, Varsha Rathi
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1226-1228
      Ocular foreign bodies (FBs) are often encountered in clinical practices. However, there are cases in which the presence of the FB is difficult to diagnose based on mere history taking and/or clinical examination. We herein present a case of unusual subconjunctival foreign body in the form of the sting of a honey bee in a 63-year-old farmer. This was removed from the superior forniceal subconjunctival space in toto with forceps under a microscope in the operation theater. This case emphasizes the need to elicit a complete history and a careful ocular examination with double eversion of the eyelid to avoid missing any foreign body lodged in the fornices and subconjunctival space in patients who complained of foreign body sensation.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1226-1228
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_533_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • A tiny tick can cause a big health problem

    • Authors: Manuel John, M Raman, Keith Ryan
      Pages: 1228 - 1232
      Abstract: Manuel John, M Raman, Keith Ryan
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1228-1232
      Ticks are tiny crawling bugs in the spider family that feed by sucking blood from animals. They are second only to mosquitoes as vectors of human disease, both infectious and toxic. Infected ticks spread over a hundred diseases, some of which are fatal if undetected. They spread the spirochete (which multiplies in the insect's gut) with a subsequent bite to the next host. We describe the only reported cases of peri ocular tick bite from India that presented to us within a span of 3 days and its management. Due suspicion and magnification of the lesions revealed the ticks which otherwise masqueraded as small skin tags/moles on gross examination. The ticks were firmly latched on to the skin and careful removal prevented incarceration of the mouth parts. Rickettsial diseases that were believed to have disappeared from India are reemerging and their presence has recently been documented in at least 11 states in the country. Among vector borne diseases, the most common, Lyme disease, also known as the great mimicker, can present with rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, cardiac manifestations, encephalitis, and mental illness, to name some of the many associations. Common ocular symptoms and signs include conjunctivitis, keratitis, uveitis, and retinitis. Early detection and treatment of tick borne diseases is important to prevent multi system complications that can develop later in life.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1228-1232
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_411_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Combined central retinal artery and vein occlusion with optic perineuritis
           following herpes zoster dermatitis in an immunocompetent child

    • Authors: Reema Bansal, Ramandeep Singh, Aastha Takkar, Vivek Lal
      Pages: 1233 - 1235
      Abstract: Reema Bansal, Ramandeep Singh, Aastha Takkar, Vivek Lal
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1233-1235
      A 15-year-old healthy boy developed acute, rapidly progressing visual loss in left eye following herpes zoster dermatitis, with a combined central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), along with optic perineuritis. Laboratory tests were negative. Despite an empirical, intensive antiviral treatment with systemic corticosteroids, and vision could not be restored in the affected eye. Herpes zoster dermatitis, in an immunocompetent individual, may be associated with a combined CRAO and CRVO along with optic perineuritis, leading to profound visual loss.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1233-1235
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_480_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Optical coherence tomography angiography features of acute macular
           neuroretinopathy in dengue fever

    • Authors: Kanika Aggarwal, Aniruddha Agarwal, Deeksha Katoch, Mansi Sharma, Vishali Gupta
      Pages: 1235 - 1238
      Abstract: Kanika Aggarwal, Aniruddha Agarwal, Deeksha Katoch, Mansi Sharma, Vishali Gupta
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1235-1238
      A 39-year-old female with dengue fever presented with decreased vision in both eyes. Visual acuity was 20/200 and 20/80 in the right eye (OD) and left eye (OS), respectively. Fundus showed granular, grayish-white lesions in the parafoveal region in OD. Multimodal imaging including optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and fluorescein angiography (FA) was performed. FA showed late hyperfluorescence with few microaneurysms in OS. OCT showed hyperreflectivity in various layers, suggestive of acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). OCTA showed disruption of retinal capillary plexuses. This case shows how OCTA provides newer insights into the pathogenesis of AMN lesions in dengue fever.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1235-1238
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_485_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • A rare case of bilateral tractional retinal detachment following snakebite

    • Authors: Nicey Roy Thomas, Debmalya Das, Kumar Saurabh, Rupak Roy
      Pages: 1238 - 1240
      Abstract: Nicey Roy Thomas, Debmalya Das, Kumar Saurabh, Rupak Roy
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1238-1240
      A 13-year-old female presented with diminution of vision in both eyes for 3 months following snakebite. Best-corrected visual acuities were hand movement in both eyes. Fundoscopy showed vitreous hemorrhage, and B-scan ultrasonography revealed an underlying tractional retinal detachment (TRD) involving the macula in both eyes. Patient underwent 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy in conjunction with belt buckling, endolaser, and silicone oil tamponade in the left eye. At 6 weeks postoperatively, best-corrected visual acuity of the left eye was noted to be 20/200 with settled TRD and attached retina. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy with TRD is a hitherto unreported complication of snake bite.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1238-1240
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_542_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Blood flow pattern in a choroidal hemangioma imaged on
           swept-source-optical coherence tomography angiography

    • Authors: Brijesh Takkar, Shorya Azad, Jyoti Shakrawal, Nripen Gaur, Pradeep Venkatesh
      Pages: 1240 - 1242
      Abstract: Brijesh Takkar, Shorya Azad, Jyoti Shakrawal, Nripen Gaur, Pradeep Venkatesh
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1240-1242
      This report demonstrates the blood flow pattern in a case of choroidal hemangioma (CH) using swept-source-optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCTA). Fluorescein angiography, SS-OCT, and SS-OCTA images of a patient with CH were obtained using a standard protocol. The internal vascular pattern of the tumor was identified on both OCT and OCTA. Dark areas were identified in the CH. These were interspersed between areas of visible blood flow, as imaged on SS-OCTA. Peripheral vascular arcades were also identified within the tumor. SS-OCTA should be evaluated as an imaging tool to study the blood flow within choroidal tumors.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1240-1242
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_504_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Methoxsalen-induced macular toxicity

    • Authors: Aditya Maitray, Pukhraj Rishi
      Pages: 1243 - 1245
      Abstract: Aditya Maitray, Pukhraj Rishi
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1243-1245
      Psoralen compounds such as methoxsalen are photosensitizer agents used in conjunction with ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation exposure as photochemotherapy (Psoralens and ultraviolet-A therapy [PUVA therapy]) for certain epidermal skin disorders such as psoriasis and vitiligo. Methoxsalen has been shown to be associated with premature cataract formation by forming adducts with lens proteins following oral administration and subsequent UVA exposure. Hence, the use of UV-filtering glasses is recommended during PUVA therapy sessions. Ocular tissues can be exposed to its photosensitizing effect with subsequent UV radiation exposure through sunlight if the patient was to be without protective eye glasses, potentially causing macular toxicity. Till date, there have been no reports in the literature of any posterior segment ocular toxicity arising from methoxsalen use. Here, we describe a case of a bilateral macular toxicity in a middle-aged male treated with methoxsalen for vitiligo.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1243-1245
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_413_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Vitrectomy for full-thickness macular hole in adult-onset
           Coats&#39; disease

    • Authors: Vinod Kumar, Pradeep Kumar, Gaurav Garg, Saurabh Damodaran
      Pages: 1246 - 1248
      Abstract: Vinod Kumar, Pradeep Kumar, Gaurav Garg, Saurabh Damodaran
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1246-1248
      The occurrence of full thickness macular hole in Coats' disease is extremely rare. The purpose of this case report is to report pars plana vitrectomy for the treatment of full thickness macular hole in a patient with adult onset Coats disease. A young male presented with decreased vision in his right eye because of full thickness macular hole. The macular hole was found to be associated with adult onset Coats' disease that was evident on ultra-wide field imaging. The patient underwent laser photocoagulation to the vascular telangiectasia followed by pars plana vitrectomy, large internal limiting membrane peeling and gas tamponade. This resulted in regression of exudation, closure of macular hole and improvement in vision. Coats disease of adult onset can present with decreased vision because of full thickness macular hole. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling can result in excellent visual outcome.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1246-1248
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_546_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Severe Gemella haemolysans endophthalmitis following ranibizumab
           intravitreal injection

    • Authors: Silvia Olivia Salceanu, Sarah Levy, Richard Cunningham, Kwabena Frimpong-Ansah
      Pages: 1249 - 1251
      Abstract: Silvia Olivia Salceanu, Sarah Levy, Richard Cunningham, Kwabena Frimpong-Ansah
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1249-1251
      Gemella haemolysans is a commensal of the upper respiratory tract that is rarely involved in ocular pathology. We present a unique case of endophthalmitis with negative cultures and positive 16s ribosomal ribonucleic acid gene sequencing showing G. haemolysans infection after an intravitreal ranibizumab injection for wet age-related macular degeneration.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1249-1251
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1007_16
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Multicolor imaging in optic disc swelling

    • Authors: Nicey Roy Thomas, Prachi Subhedar Ghosh, Maitreyi Chowdhury, Kumar Saurabh, Rupak Roy
      Pages: 1251 - 1255
      Abstract: Nicey Roy Thomas, Prachi Subhedar Ghosh, Maitreyi Chowdhury, Kumar Saurabh, Rupak Roy
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1251-1255
      Differentiating optic disc edema (ODE) from pseudo optic disc edema (PODE) continues to pose a diagnostic dilemma. Current report highlights the role of multicolor imaging (MC) in differentiating ODE from PODE. Composite multicolor images of the disc in ODE show greenish hyperreflectance that extends beyond the optic disc margins with irregular blurry margins and obscured disc vasculature whereas PODE shows a greenish hyperreflectance with clear and distinct margins and well delineated disc vasculature. MC imaging adds to the present armamentarium of imaging modalities obviating needless neurological evaluation mandatory in a case of true disc edema.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1251-1255
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_473_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Commentary: Multicolor imaging in optic disc swelling

    • Authors: Apoorva Ayachit, Guruprasad Ayachit, Shrinivas Joshi, Puneet Isloor
      Pages: 1255 - 1256
      Abstract: Apoorva Ayachit, Guruprasad Ayachit, Shrinivas Joshi, Puneet Isloor
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1255-1256

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1255-1256
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_747_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Spontaneous anatomical and functional recovery of bilateral electric shock
           maculopathy

    • Authors: Ratnesh Ranjan, George Joseph Manayath, Palmeera Dsouza, Venkatapathy Narendran
      Pages: 1256 - 1261
      Abstract: Ratnesh Ranjan, George Joseph Manayath, Palmeera Dsouza, Venkatapathy Narendran
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1256-1261
      A 12-year-old boy presented with best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 6/9 in both eyes following an episode of electric shock. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed disruption of the ellipsoid zone as well as retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer. Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) showed increased central hypoautofluorescence in both eyes. At 3-month follow-up, BCVA improved to 6/6 with OCT showing spontaneous resolution of maculopathy in both eyes with reorganized RPE layer and ellipsoid zone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of bilateral electric shock maculopathy (ESM) with spontaneous anatomical as well as functional recovery. Ophthalmologists must be aware of various forms of ESM. OCT and FAF must be done in patients presenting with defective vision and history of electric shock for the diagnostic as well as prognostic evaluation.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1256-1261
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_536_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Case of intraocular foreign body partly lodged in the ethmoid sinus

    • Authors: Manish Nagpal, Hardik Jain, Rakesh Juneja, Shishir Shekhar Singh
      Pages: 1262 - 1263
      Abstract: Manish Nagpal, Hardik Jain, Rakesh Juneja, Shishir Shekhar Singh
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1262-1263

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1262-1263
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_404_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Modified Scharioth&#39;s technique of scleral fixation of
           intraocular lens

    • Authors: Roop, Prakhyat Roop
      Pages: 1264 - 1265
      Abstract: Roop , Prakhyat Roop
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1264-1265

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1264-1265
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_532_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Conjunctival leiomyosarcoma: A case report and review of literature

    • Authors: Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
      Pages: 1265 - 1266
      Abstract: Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1265-1266

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1265-1266
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_477_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Reply to Conjunctival leiomyosarcoma: A case report and review of
           literature

    • Authors: Tania L&#243;pez Montes
      Pages: 1266 - 1266
      Abstract: Tania López Montes
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1266-1266

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1266-1266
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_759_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Pediatric optic neuritis: Points to ponder&#33;

    • Authors: Selvakumar Ambika, Krishnakumar Padmalakshmi
      Pages: 1267 - 1267
      Abstract: Selvakumar Ambika, Krishnakumar Padmalakshmi
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1267-1267

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1267-1267
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_597_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
  • Reply to Pediatric optic neuritis: Points to ponder

    • Authors: Rutika Khadse, Meenakshi Ravindran, Neelam Pawar, Padmavathy Maharajan, Ramakrishnan Rengappa
      Pages: 1267 - 1268
      Abstract: Rutika Khadse, Meenakshi Ravindran, Neelam Pawar, Padmavathy Maharajan, Ramakrishnan Rengappa
      Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1267-1268

      Citation: Indian Journal of Ophthalmology 2017 65(11):1267-1268
      PubDate: Mon,13 Nov 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_721_17
      Issue No: Vol. 65, No. 11 (2017)
       
 
 
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