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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 355 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 355 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access  
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Indian Journal of Dental Research
  [SJR: 0.243]   [H-I: 24]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0970-9290
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [355 journals]
  • Exciting times

    • Authors: Jürgen Fedderwitz
      Pages: 131 - 131
      Abstract: Jürgen Fedderwitz
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):131-131

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):131-131
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_58_18
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Economic impact of dental caries in India

    • Authors: SM Balaji
      Pages: 132 - 132
      Abstract: SM Balaji
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):132-132

      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):132-132
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_253_18
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of bioflavonoids on the immediate and delayed microtensile bond
           strength of self-etch and total-etch adhesive systems to sound dentin

    • Authors: Rajeswari Kalaiselvam, Arathi Ganesh, Mathan Rajan, Deivanayagam Kandaswamy
      Pages: 133 - 136
      Abstract: Rajeswari Kalaiselvam, Arathi Ganesh, Mathan Rajan, Deivanayagam Kandaswamy
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):133-136
      Aim: This study aims to evaluate the effect of two bioflavonoids (epigallocatechin-3-gallate [EGCG] and catechin) and a protein inhibitor (chlorhexidine [CHX]) on the immediate and delayed microtensile bond strength of self-etch and total-etch adhesive systems to sound dentin. Materials and Methods: The occlusal surfaces of 96 mandibular human third molar teeth specimens were ground after removal of the excess tissues, to expose the middle dentin. The dentin specimens were randomly allocated into four groups, each consisting of 24 teeth (n = 24) according to the application of the enzyme inhibitor. The adhesive system used in this study was Adper easy bond, a self-etch adhesive system, and Adper Single Bond 2, a total-etch adhesive system. Microtensile bond strength testing was conducted using thermocycler 2000, Heto-Holten A/S. Results: All the three enzyme inhibitors increase the bond strength values of the resin–dentin interphase when used during dentin bonding. The EGCG enzyme inhibitor has shown the highest immediate bond strength to dentin when used with both the adhesive systems.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):133-136
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_284_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Angular photogrammetric analysis of the soft-tissue facial profile of
           Indian adults

    • Authors: K Saravana Pandian, Sindhuja Krishnan, S Aravind Kumar
      Pages: 137 - 143
      Abstract: K Saravana Pandian, Sindhuja Krishnan, S Aravind Kumar
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):137-143
      Introduction: Soft-tissue analysis has become an important component of orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Photographic evaluation of an orthodontic patient is a very close representation of the appearance of the person. The previously established norms for soft-tissue analysis will vary for different ethnic groups. Thus, there is a need to develop soft-tissue facial profile norms pertaining to Indian ethnic groups. Aim and Objectives: The aim of this study is to establish the angular photogrammetric standards of soft-tissue facial profile for Indian males and females and also to compare sexual dimorphism present between them. Materials and Methods: The lateral profile photographs of 300 random participants (150 males and 150 females) between ages 18 and 25 years were taken and analyzed using FACAD tracing software. Inclusion criteria were angles Class I molar occlusion with acceptable crowding and proclination, normal growth and development with well-aligned dental arches, and full complements of permanent teeth irrespective of third molar status. This study was conducted in Indian population, and samples were taken from various cities across India. Descriptive statistical analysis was carried out, and sexual dimorphism was evaluated by Student's t-test between males and females. Results: The results of the present study showed statistically significant (P < 0.05) gender difference in 5 parameters out of 12 parameters in Indian population. Conclusion: In the present study, soft-tissue facial measurements were established by means of photogrammetric analysis to facilitate orthodontists to carry out more quantitative evaluation and make disciplined decisions. The mean values obtained can be used for comparison with records of participants with the same characteristics by following this photogrammetric technique.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):137-143
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_496_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Factors associated with patients' satisfaction of rubber dam use
           during root canal treatment

    • Authors: Manal Maslamani, Amal K Mitra
      Pages: 144 - 149
      Abstract: Manal Maslamani, Amal K Mitra
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):144-149
      Background: The use of rubber dam (RD) has been recommended in dental procedures including root canal treatment. The aim of the study was to identify factors that were associated with patients' satisfaction and acceptance of RD. Setting and Design: This was a cross-sectional study, conducted from January 2015 to December 2016 at Kuwait University School of Dentistry. Materials and Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used by a face-to-face interview of patients after taking informed consent. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Review Board. The providers/operators who applied RD were grouped into three categories: undergraduate final year (7th year) dental students; general dentists and postgraduate students; and specialists. Results: Mean age of the patients (n = 175) was 31.6 ± 13.0 years. About 55% had past experience, and 52% expressed a better experience during the current procedure compared with the previous one. A positive experience during the current procedure correlated significantly with the future intention of RD use (r = 0.244, P = 0.001). Time needed for RD application was short (4 min), irrespective of the operators. The duration of RD use during the procedure was significantly shorter among dental specialists compared with the other groups. Time for RD application was the only significant predictor for patient satisfaction, after controlling for other independent variables. Conclusion: Based on the positive influence of current RD use on the future intention, dentists should spend time needed to explain the importance, safety and effectiveness of RD use with their patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):144-149
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_291_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Association between traditional oral hygiene methods with tooth wear,
           gingival bleeding, and recession: A descriptive cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Naseem Shah, Vijay Prakash Mathur, Veena Jain, Ajay Logani
      Pages: 150 - 154
      Abstract: Naseem Shah, Vijay Prakash Mathur, Veena Jain, Ajay Logani
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):150-154
      Background: Oral hygiene maintenance is crucial for prevention of various oral diseases. Oral hygiene practices across the country vary largely and people in peri-urban and rural areas use traditional methods of oral hygiene like powders, bark, oil and salt etc. Their effect on oral soft and hard tissues need to be studied to understand their beneficial and/ or harmful effects on maintenance of oral hygiene and prevention or causation of oral diseases. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the plaque-cleaning efficacy, gingival bleeding, recession and tooth wear with different traditional oral hygiene methods as compared to use of toothpaste-toothbrush, the most accepted method of oral hygiene practice. Study Design: Hospital based cross sectional analytical study. Results: Total 1062 traditional oral hygiene method users were compared with same number of toothpaste-brush users. The maximum number in the former group used tooth powder (76%) as compared to other indigenous methods, such as use of bark of trees etc and out of tooth powder users; almost 75% reported using red toothpowder. The plaque scores and gingival bleeding & recession were found to be more in traditional oral hygiene method users. The toothwear was also more severe among the toothpowder users. Conclusions: Traditional methods were found to be inferior in plaque control as was documented by increased bleeding and gingival recession. Its effect on hard tissues of teeth was very damaging with higher tooth wear scores on all surfaces.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):150-154
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_651_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Comparison of interpupillary distance and combined mesiodistal width of
           maxillary central incisor teeth in two ethnic groups of Northeast India:
           An in vivo study

    • Authors: Jogeswar Barman, Sangma Serin
      Pages: 155 - 160
      Abstract: Jogeswar Barman, Sangma Serin
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):155-160
      Background: Anthropometric measurements of the face can be used as a guide in selecting proper sized anterior teeth. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the interpupillary distance (IPD) and the combined mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisors (MDW of MCIs) to establish their morphometric criterion and their significance in two ethnic groups of Northeast India. Methodology: A total of 120 participants consisting of 60 indigenous students each from Assam and Meghalaya in the age group of 18–25 years were selected after taking their written consent. Standardized facial frontal photographs of all the participants were taken using a digital camera in such a manner that maxillary anterior teeth were visible. The photographs were uploaded onto the computer and saved in a file. Anthropometric measurements of IPD and combined MDW of MCIs in centimeters were made using both Adobe Photoshop® 7.0 software program and manually using a digital vernier caliper on the developed photographs to a same size of 15 cm × 10 cm. Data obtained were tabulated and analyzed using Student ”t”-test and Pearson correlation test. Results: The present study reveals a positive correlation with a high degree of statistical significance between IPD and combined mesiodistal width of maxillary central incisors among all the samples irrespective of gender and ethnicity where P < 0.01. Conclusion: IPD can be used as a guide in determining the suitable mesiodistal dimension of the maxillary central incisors.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):155-160
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_782_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Objective and subjective parameters of oral health in South Indian
           children: A cross-sectional study

    • Authors: PR Geetha Priya, Sharath Asokan, D Kandaswamy
      Pages: 161 - 165
      Abstract: PR Geetha Priya, Sharath Asokan, D Kandaswamy
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):161-165
      Background: Oral health of schoolchildren is a strong predictor of their overall well-being. This study was planned to assess and compare the objective and subjective parameters of oral health of South Indian school children. Methodology: Three hundred and sixty school children participated in this cross-sectional study. Their oral hygiene status, dental caries status, and treatment needs were assessed. Two questionnaires were filled by these children, to assess their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and their knowledge on oral health. Their academic scores were collected from the schools. Statistical analysis was done using Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA test and Spearman correlation test appropriately. Results: Children with no caries had better OHRQoL (P = 0.02). There was a negative correlation between dental caries status and OHRQoL score (P = 0.003) and dental caries treatment needs and OHRQoL score (P = 0.01). There was a positive correlation between knowledge on oral health and OHRQoL score (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Children with no caries had a better OHRQoL when compared to children with caries. Children with caries had more treatment needs, poor oral hygiene, low quality of life, and performed lesser in academics. However, they had adequate knowledge on oral health. Hence, both objective and subjective parameters of oral health should be given importance while treating children.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):161-165
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_259_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Efficacy of autogenous fascia lata and silicone aurosling in correction of
           congenital blepharoptosis by frontalis suspension

    • Authors: SM Balaji
      Pages: 166 - 170
      Abstract: SM Balaji
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):166-170
      Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the outcomes of frontalis sling using fascia lata and silicone aurosling for congenital unilateral ptosis patients with poor levator function. Material and Methods: Retrospective study of archival cases from 22 patients from author's center. All the patients with unilateral ptosis with poor levator function were included excluding those having poor Bell's phenomenon and associated pathology like jaw winking, 3rd nerve misdirection, squint, impaired corneal sensitivity, and neoplastic lesions. Patients were diagnosed based on the history and clinical examination including measurements. Corrections were performed by single surgeon. Marginal reflex distance-1 (MRD1) values observed preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and late postoperatively in both groups. Results: Of the 22 cases, 12 were treated with fascia while the remaining 10 were treated with silicone aurosling material. The mean age of the fascia group was 11.42 ± 3.55 years while it was 14 ± 4.2 years for the silicone group. There were 10 males and 12 females in the study group. The mean follow-up in the study group was 20.14 ± 2.05 months, and the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. The difference between the two groups at the preoperative and immediate postoperative did not vary with statistical significance (P = 0.926 and P = 0.242, respectively). The late postoperative MRD1 did vary significantly between the two groups. The mean late postoperative MRD1 for fascia group was 3.67 ± 0.32 with a range of 3.1–4.15 while for the silicone group was 3.2 ± 0.46 with a range of 2.5–4. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.023). Discussion and Conclusion: The stability of the change in silicone aurosling group was relatively less as compared to the fascia lata. The recent material aspect study of such silicone aurosling material indicates that they are susceptible to damage and that cause the loss of stability. More studies with larger sample size and longer follow-up are needed.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):166-170
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_147_18
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Immunohistochemical expression of polo-like kinase 1 in oral squamous cell
           carcinoma and oral submucous fibrosis

    • Authors: Kavitha Vittal, Sathasivasubramanian Sankara Pandian, Leena Dennis Joseph, Shilpa Germaine Raj
      Pages: 171 - 175
      Abstract: Kavitha Vittal, Sathasivasubramanian Sankara Pandian, Leena Dennis Joseph, Shilpa Germaine Raj
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):171-175
      Context: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a critical molecule in the proliferation of several human cancers. Overexpression of PLK1 has been correlated with cancer cell proliferation and lower overall survival rates. Although PLK1 has been studied in various tumors, information regarding its expression in oral cancer and precancer is limited. Aims: This study is aimed at evaluating the expression of PLK1 in a potentially malignant and malignant disorder of the oral cavity, namely, oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), respectively, using the immunohistochemistry technique. It also intended to evaluate the association of the various histological grades of OSCC with the intensity of PLK1 expression. Subjects and Methods: Thirty OSMF, thirty OSCC tissues, and thirty control tissues were obtained, and the expression of PLK1 was detected by immunohistochemistry using rabbit antihuman PLK1 polyclonal antibodies (Abcam Ab47867). The association between staining intensity and histological grade of OSCC was evaluated. Statistical Analysis Used: Using SPSS 20 version, a test for proportions, nonparametric Chi-square/correlation analysis was used to compare differences in proportions of categorical variables of interest between groups. Results: PLK1 was positively expressed in 27 (90%) OSCC tissues. OSMF showed no detectable staining in 27 (90%) tissues and positive staining in 3 (10%) tissues. PLK1 showed no staining (0%) in normal tissues. Statistically significant associations were not found between staining intensity and histological grade of OSCC. Conclusions: PLK1 could be a promising progression marker for OSCC. Therapeutically, targeting PLK1 may be a new approach to fight oral cancer.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):171-175
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_59_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • A survey on the use of various gingival displacement techniques in fixed
           partial denture by the prosthodontists in vadodara city

    • Authors: Meghna Ashok Gadhavi, Narendra Nirmal, Himanshu Arora
      Pages: 176 - 180
      Abstract: Meghna Ashok Gadhavi, Narendra Nirmal, Himanshu Arora
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):176-180
      Aims: To evaluate the use of various gingival displacement techniques prior to impression making in fixed partial dentures by the Prosthodontists in Vadodara. Settings and Design: Questionnaire based survey among prosthodontists in Vadodara city. Methods and Material: All the prosthodontists practitioners and those prosthodontists in academic institutes in Vadodara City, Gujarat, were surveyed through a questionnaire regarding their usage of gingival displacement technique and their reasons and methods of using gingival displacement technique for fixed partial denture. The results were analysed through discriminant statistical analysis. Results: Among all the Prosthodontists in Vadodara city, 62% prefer the use of gingival displacement technique for successful clinical practice while 38 % of them do not follow the procedure believing it does not make major difference in clinical practice. Conclusions: Those Prosthodontists who preferred the use of gingival displacement technique were able to detect many advantages of using it in their daily fixed partial denture practice and the percentage of prosthodontists not following gingival displacement technique blamed it as a time consuming affair and was not feasible on economic grounds for the class of patient they treated.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):176-180
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_774_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Quest for haller cells: A digital orthopantomography study

    • Authors: Kavitaa Nedunchezhian, Nalini Aswath, A Amudhan
      Pages: 181 - 185
      Abstract: Kavitaa Nedunchezhian, Nalini Aswath, A Amudhan
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):181-185
      Aims: Haller Cells refer to the ethmoidal pneumatization and are the extensions of anterior ethmoid sinus into the floor of the orbit and superior aspect of the maxillary sinus, basically an anatomic variation. They may be associated with orofacial pain, sinusitis, nasal obstruction, impaired nasal breathing, headache, chronic cough, and mucocele. The aim of the present study was to identify, determine the prevalence and characteristics of Haller's cells on Digital orthopantomographs in patient's reporting to a dental institution in Chennai. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: The study group comprised 600 radiographs inclusive of both genders (379 females and 221 males) with an age range of 20–80 years. Retrospectively panoramic radiograph for each of the patients was viewed and interpreted for the presence of Haller's cells. The data collected was subjected to statistical analysis: frequencies/percentages, descriptive statistics to obtain the results. Statistical Analysis Used: Frequencies/percentages, descriptive statistics using SPSS for Windows Version 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA), to obtain the results. Results: Haller's cells were noted in patients, accounting for a prevalence of 23.61%. The majority of the cells were circular, ovoid, and irregular in shape. Conclusions: This study has attempted to explore the characteristics of Haller's cells on panoramic radiographs. A description of Haller's cells on these radiographs may prove vital in enumerating the differential diagnosis for patients afflicted with intractable orofacial pain and reduce the risk of untoward intraoperative complications during endonasal procedures.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):181-185
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_65_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Nature and pattern of primary teeth extractions in a tertiary care
           hospital setting in South India

    • Authors: Shini Susan Samuel, Daniel Sathiya Sundaram Selvaraj, Jagadish Ebenezer, Grace Rebekah, Santosh Koshy
      Pages: 186 - 189
      Abstract: Shini Susan Samuel, Daniel Sathiya Sundaram Selvaraj, Jagadish Ebenezer, Grace Rebekah, Santosh Koshy
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):186-189
      Background: Many studies have been carried out on the prevalence of dental diseases in children although not much information is available regarding its outcome among Indian children. Aim: The aim of the present study was to analyze the type of primary tooth extracted and the reasons for the extraction among children attending a tertiary care hospital in the Southern part of India. Materials and Methods: The dental records of pediatric patients who had visited the dental clinic of a tertiary care hospital located in Tamil Nadu, South India from December 2013 to November 2016 were reviewed. Patients who underwent extraction of at least one primary tooth under local or general anesthesia were included in the study. Results: A total of 943 primary teeth were extracted from 447 patients over 3 years. The most commonly extracted tooth type was the first primary molar followed by the primary central incisor. Grouping by age, the most frequently extracted tooth type between 2 and 5 years was the primary central incisor, the first primary molar among the 6–9-year-old and the second primary molar among 10–15-year-old. The majority of primary teeth extractions were performed in the age group of 6–9 years. No significant gender differences were noted. The most common reason for extraction of primary teeth in children was dental caries. Conclusions: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of untimely primary teeth extractions in young children and dental caries continues to be the leading cause. It clearly reflects on the lack of infant oral health care, the inadequacy of awareness and underutilization of oral health services among children in India.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):186-189
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_195_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Changing trends in maxillofacial trauma: A 15 years retrospective study in
           the Southern Part of Haryana, India

    • Authors: Ashish Gupta, Aby K Babu, Pankaj Bansal, Rahul Sharma, Sneha D Sharma
      Pages: 190 - 195
      Abstract: Ashish Gupta, Aby K Babu, Pankaj Bansal, Rahul Sharma, Sneha D Sharma
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):190-195
      Objective: The aim is to analyze the pattern of maxillofacial injuries and treatment outcomes in the past 15 years (2002–2016). Materials and Methods: One thousand eight hundred and fifty patients from two tertiary referral center hospitals were studied retrospectively in which the age, sex, etiology, site of fracture, and treatment modality was recorded. Results: One thousand two hundred and twenty-eight males and 622 females were operated between 2002 and 2016. Mean age was 29 ± 17.2 years. Maximum incidence was seen in the age group of 16–30 years in males, whereas in females, the predominance of trauma was seen in both 16–30 and 31–45 age groups. Road traffic accidents were responsible for the majority of fractures (42.2%), followed by assaults (26.4), sports injuries (17.6%), and fall (10.7%). Maximum fractures were of the mandible (53.5%) followed by midface (25.6%) and panfacial trauma (20.8%). Nearly 53.6% of patients underwent open reduction, and internal fixation (ORIF), 34.2% managed by the closed method and 12.1% were kept under observation. Conclusion: This study verified a young male predominance, a shift toward more assault related fractures, especially in females. Mandibular fractures were the most common of all. Moreover, the changing trend toward ORIF in the past 15 years.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):190-195
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_202_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • BCL-X expression in oral cancer: Comparison between oral squamous cell
           carcinoma and verrucous carcinoma

    • Authors: Payal Shukla, Sudeendra Prabhu, Maji Jose, BH Sripathi Rao
      Pages: 196 - 200
      Abstract: Payal Shukla, Sudeendra Prabhu, Maji Jose, BH Sripathi Rao
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):196-200
      Background: Verrucous carcinoma (VC) should be considered a distinct clinicopathologic entity different from the more common oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) because of its unique biological behavior. Best way to understand the behavior of these carcinomas is to study them by means of molecular methods, especially in tumor progression tests and Bcl-X is an important antiapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family and is one of the newest and most useful markers to determine the aggressiveness of many carcinomas. The relationship between this Bcl-X protein and carcinomatous behavior toward it is not studied extensively, which we attempted to evaluate using immunohistochemical analysis in selected carcinomas of the head and neck region. Method: We studied Bcl-X protein expression in sections of thirty OSCC and ten VC samples and correlated this with tumor differentiation. Results: There was a significant difference in cytoplasmic staining of Bcl-X expression with statistical analysis (P < 0.005) for VC and OSCC when compared as a group. No significance was seen among the different histological grades of OSCC and when compared with VC individually. Conclusion: The significant result between OSCC and VC suggests that their biologic course is comparable and can be helpful in differentiating them with each other for establishment of a better treatment protocol.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):196-200
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_711_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • A comparative evaluation of the staining capacity of microhybrid and
           nanohybrid resin-based composite to indian spices and food colorants: An
           In vitro study

    • Authors: Carounanidy Usha, Sathyanarayanan Rama Rao, Geena Mary George
      Pages: 201 - 205
      Abstract: Carounanidy Usha, Sathyanarayanan Rama Rao, Geena Mary George
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):201-205
      Introduction: Resin composite restorative materials can mimic the natural color and shade of the tooth. However, exogenous colorants from food and drinks can stain them due to adsorption. The influence of Indian food colorants and spices on resin composite restorations has not been evaluated extensively. Aim: This study aims to evaluate the staining capacity of microhybrid and nanohybrid resin-based composites, to saffron extract, tandoori powder, and turmeric powder. Subjects and Methods: Forty samples of microhybrid (Kulzer Charisma) and nanohybrid (3M Filtek Z350) resin composites were prepared using an acrylic template of dimension 5 mm × 3 mm. They were randomly divided into four groups and immersed into solutions of saffron extract, tandoori powder, and turmeric powder. Distilled water was used as the control group. Color values (L*, a*, b*) were measured by colorimeter using the CIE L*a*b* system before and after 72 h of immersion. Color differences ΔE*ab were statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: Two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey (honest significant difference) test were done using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Results and Discussion: All the immersion media changed the color of the resin composites to varying degrees. However, turmeric solution showed the maximum mean color variation ΔE*ab of 14.8 ± 2.57 in microhybrid resin composites and 16.8 ± 3.50 in nanohybrid resin composites. Conclusion: Microhybrid and nanohybrid resin composites tend to stain to Indian food colorants, especially to turmeric powder.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):201-205
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_764_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Effect of inadequate ferrule segment location on fracture resistance of
           endodontically treated teeth

    • Authors: Satheesh B Haralur, Ahmed Fatis Alalyani, Mohammad Ali Almutiq, Abdulrahman Ahmed Alfaifi, Amer Abdullah Al-Shehri
      Pages: 206 - 211
      Abstract: Satheesh B Haralur, Ahmed Fatis Alalyani, Mohammad Ali Almutiq, Abdulrahman Ahmed Alfaifi, Amer Abdullah Al-Shehri
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):206-211
      Introduction: The circumferential 2 mm ferrule during the fabrication of the crown is strongly advocated for the long-term clinical success. During the routine clinical practice, the dentist encounters the endodontically treated tooth (ETT) with inadequacy of the ferrule in some segment due to caries, abrasion, and erosions. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the consequence of inadequate segmental ferrule location on fracture strength of the root canal-treated anterior and posterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Fifty each maxillary canine and mandibular premolar intact human teeth were root canal treated and sectioned at 2 mm above the cementum-enamel junction. The teeth samples were divided into 5 groups of 10 each. The G-I and G-V samples had the 360° ferrule and complete absence of the ferrule, respectively. The G-II had the inadequate ferrule on the palatal surface, while G-III and G-IV had inadequate ferrule at buccal and proximal area. Teeth samples were subsequently restored with glass-reinforced fiber post, composite core, and full veneer metal crown. The samples were tested with universal testing machine under static load to record the fracture resistance. The acquired data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc statistical analysis. Results: The G-I with circumferential ferrule showed the higher fracture resistance. The teeth samples with lack of the ferrule had the least fracture resistance. Among the segmental absence of ferrule, teeth samples with lack of the proximal ferrule were least affected. Deficiency of a ferrule on the lingual wall significantly affected the fracture strength in both anterior and posterior ETT. Conclusions: The ETT with sectional inadequacy of the ferrule is significantly more effective in resisting the fracture in comparison to the complete absence of the ferrule.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):206-211
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_134_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of kinetic friction between regular and colored titanium
           molybdenum alloy archwires

    • Authors: Lidhiya Alexander, Pradeep Babu Kommi, Nandakumar Arani, S Hanumanth, V Vijay Kumar, R Senkutvan Sabapathy
      Pages: 212 - 216
      Abstract: Lidhiya Alexander, Pradeep Babu Kommi, Nandakumar Arani, S Hanumanth, V Vijay Kumar, R Senkutvan Sabapathy
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):212-216
      Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic frictional properties of colored titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires (purple-coated TMA and honey dew-coated TMA) and the regular TMA archwires. Materials and Methods: The experiment comprised of three groups, Group I – Regular TMA archwires, Group II – Purple-coated TMA archwires, Group III – Honey dew-coated TMA wires involving 21 samples each that were evaluated for their frictional properties using Instron Universal Testing Machine. Results: The results were subjected to statistical analysis using analysis of variance wherein Group I Regular TMA wires revealed mean kinetic frictional value of 8.236 N and a standard deviation of 0.4038 N, while Group II (purple-coated TMA wires) showed a mean value of 5.297 N, standard deviation of 0.3128 N and Group III (honey dew-coated TMA wires) showed a mean value of 4.206 N and a standard deviation of 0.5353 N. Conclusion: The kinetic frictional values are higher for regular TMA wire exhibiting superior characteristic of color-coated TMA. Wires exhibiting superior characteristics are color-coated TMA wires, especially honey dew-coated TMA wires over the regular and purple-coated TMA wires. These superior properties of newly introduced wires can be considered for its application in both details friction and frictionless mechanics in retraction phase of fixed orthodontic treatment.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):212-216
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_817_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Restricted mouth opening and its definitive management: A literature
           review

    • Authors: Bhushan Kumar, Aquaviva Fernandes, Prabhdeep Kaur Sandhu
      Pages: 217 - 224
      Abstract: Bhushan Kumar, Aquaviva Fernandes, Prabhdeep Kaur Sandhu
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):217-224
      Purpose: This review was intended to discuss the various possible modifications suggested in the literature for prosthetic steps and surgical corrective procedures in nonresponding or complicated cases during rehabilitation of patients with restricted mouth opening. Material and Methods: Medline, PubMed, and Google were searched electronically for articles using keywords: microstomia and treatment options for restricted mouth opening. The various articles on prosthodontic rehabilitation in microstomia were segregated. From these, various modifications in the prosthetic steps were reviewed. Results: Oral hygiene maintenance is difficult for patient either due to limited access or due to associated lack of manual dexterity, so dental decay and periodontal problems are more extensive in such patients; hence, tooth loss is a common finding. All prosthetic procedures require wide mouth opening to carry out various steps, starting from tray placement during impression making to the final prosthesis insertion, especially removable prosthesis. Various prosthetic modifications given by authors are included in this review for each step in prosthodontic management. A total of eight stock tray designs, 12 custom tray designs, and 17 removable prosthesis designs are discussed along with fixed (either tooth-supported or implant-supported) and maxillofacial prosthesis. However, some patients require surgical intervention also for the correction of microstomia either for function or for esthetic purpose before prosthetic rehabilitation and are also enumerated here. Conclusion: Among all prosthetic restorative options, removable prosthesis is most difficult for dentist to fabricate as conventional methods are either very difficult or impossible to apply. To get a more accurate final prosthesis, we need to modify these steps according to the existing case. Several modifications available are discussed here which can help while managing these patients.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):217-224
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_544_16
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Efficacy of green tea-based mouthwashes on dental plaque and gingival
           inflammation: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    • Authors: Ankita Mathur, D Gopalakrishnan, Vini Mehta, SA Rizwan, Sahana Hegde Shetiya, Shreya Bagwe
      Pages: 225 - 232
      Abstract: Ankita Mathur, D Gopalakrishnan, Vini Mehta, SA Rizwan, Sahana Hegde Shetiya, Shreya Bagwe
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):225-232
      Objectives: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review and if appropriate a meta-analysis of the efficacy of daily rinsing with green tea-based mouthwashes in terms of plaque index (PI) and/or gingival index (GI) as compared to other mouthwashes in plaque-induced gingivitis patients. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, IndMed, Google Scholar, and major journals were searched for studies up to December 2016. A comprehensive search strategy was designed, and the eligible articles were independently screened for eligibility by two reviewers. Randomized controlled trials in which individuals were intervened with oral mouthwashes of interest were included. Where appropriate, a meta-analysis was performed and standardized mean differences (SMDs) for GI and PI were calculated. Results: A total of 9 articles out of the 311 titles met the eligibility criteria. A meta-analysis was performed for five studies that compared green tea-based mouthwashes with chlorhexidine (CHX). The SMD for PI was −0.14 (95% CI: −1.70, 1.43; P = 0.86 and I2 = 94%), while that for GI was 0.43 ((95% CI: -0.63, 1.49; P = 0.43, I2 = 89%). Both these estimates suffered from significant heterogeneity. For both PI and GI, two studies were in favor of green tea while three studies were in favor of CHX. Conclusions: Green tea-based mouthwashes can be considered an alternative to CHX mouthwashes in sustaining oral hygiene, especially because of the added advantages provided by such herbal preparations.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):225-232
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_493_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Classification systems for gingival recession and suggestion of a new
           classification system

    • Authors: Nagappa Guttiganur, Shivanand Aspalli, Mukta V Sanikop, Anupama Desai, Reetika Gaddale, Archana Devanoorkar
      Pages: 233 - 237
      Abstract: Nagappa Guttiganur, Shivanand Aspalli, Mukta V Sanikop, Anupama Desai, Reetika Gaddale, Archana Devanoorkar
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):233-237
      Background: Gingival recession is one of the most usual esthetic concerns associated with the periodontal tissues. Classification of such condition is important to diagnose, determine the prognosis, and frame the treatment plan. Various classifications have been put forward since decades to classify gingival recession. Miller's classification is the widely used classification among all classifications, but certain drawbacks have been noted in this classification. Therefore, an effort is made to review most commonly used classification systems for gingival recession, and their drawbacks further come up with a proposal of new classification system for gingival recession.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):233-237
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_207_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • An unusual presentation of ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: A case report
           with review of literature

    • Authors: K Remya, S Sudha, Reshmi G Nair, H Jyothi
      Pages: 238 - 243
      Abstract: K Remya, S Sudha, Reshmi G Nair, H Jyothi
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):238-243
      Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC) is a malignant odontogenic epithelial tumor which is an exceedingly rare, highly aggressive, rapidly growing, and infiltrative tumor forming the malignant counterpart of long-standing benign cystic lesions coming in the spectrum of calcifying odontogenic cysts. To date, only a few cases have been reported in the medical literature. A case of unusual presentation of GCOC is presented and the clinical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features are discussed along with a literature review. Our case report further emphasizes the bizarre biological behavior of this tumor and the need for strict long-term surveillance of the patients as metastasis to distant sites has been reported.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):238-243
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_442_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Permanent mandibular protostylid: A rare developmental anomaly and its
           overview

    • Authors: Rajendran Appadurai, D Lingeshwar, Mary Shelloni Missier, S Valli Maila
      Pages: 244 - 246
      Abstract: Rajendran Appadurai, D Lingeshwar, Mary Shelloni Missier, S Valli Maila
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):244-246
      Developmental malformations of the teeth might result in alterations of their size, shape, and structure. An accessory cusp is a developmental alteration to the shape of the teeth and is more commonly found in anterior teeth, and its occurrence in permanent molars is quite rare. Accessory cusps occurring in permanent mandibular molars are termed as protostylids. Although they do not pose any significant problem with respect to the function and occlusion, it is of tremendous importance in forensic odontology. This case report presents a rare finding of protostylid on the permanent mandibular molar, and its clinical implications are illustrated.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):244-246
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_4_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Actinomycotic osteomyelitis of palate masquerading periapical pathology: A
           rare case report

    • Authors: Prachi Baldawa, Pallavi Shirol, Dinraj Kulkarni, Supriya Koshti, Nitu Mishra
      Pages: 247 - 251
      Abstract: Prachi Baldawa, Pallavi Shirol, Dinraj Kulkarni, Supriya Koshti, Nitu Mishra
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):247-251
      Osteomyelitis is an infection that is challenging to manage due to the poor vascularization of bone that favors the proliferation of microorganisms. We report a case of osteomyelitis occurring in endodontically treated teeth in the maxillary palatal region. Clinically and radiographically, it was initially diagnosed as osteomyelitis and was treated accordingly with antibiotics for 1 year with no reported healing. Later, biopsy was done and the findings were consistent with that of chronic osteomyelitis in association with infection by Actinomyces organisms. Thus, the case highlights the rare occurrence of actinomycotic osteomyelitis in maxilla and the importance of biopsy and histopathology which will help in correct diagnosis and rapid resolution through appropriate antibiotic therapy.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):247-251
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_68_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Intra-alveolar extraction of impacted distoangular mandibular third
           molars: A novel technique

    • Authors: K Santhosh Kumar, A Emmanuel Dhiravia Sargunam, C Ravindran, GVV Giri
      Pages: 252 - 253
      Abstract: K Santhosh Kumar, A Emmanuel Dhiravia Sargunam, C Ravindran, GVV Giri
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):252-253
      Recent trends in maxillofacial surgery are to reduce the trauma to the adjacent soft tissue. The distoangular impaction presents a challenge to the maxillofacial surgeon and also results in more surgical morbidity. Here, we present a minimally invasive extraction technique for the distoangular mandibular third molar impaction.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):252-253
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_580_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
  • Chronic periodontitis prevalence and the inflammatory burden in a sample
           population from South India

    • Authors: SK Balaji, Vamsi Lavu, Suresh Rao
      Pages: 254 - 259
      Abstract: SK Balaji, Vamsi Lavu, Suresh Rao
      Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):254-259
      Context: Periodontal diseases are among the most prevalent oral diseases in the world. Apart from repercussions in the oral cavity, there is evidence that periodontitis contributes to systemic damage in chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and preterm low birth weight. Aims: The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence of chronic periodontitis in a sample urban population (<18 years) in Tamil Nadu and to estimate the inflammatory burden posed by chronic periodontitis by calculating the periodontal inflammatory surface area. Settings and Design: This was a population-based study and cross-sectional design. Subjects and Methods: A total of 1000 individuals (<18 years) were selected and screened for their periodontal status, oral hygiene status (OHI), and the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) in an outreach center located in Chennai, India. Statistical Analysis Used: The proportion of individuals with different periodontal states (health, gingivitis, and periodontitis) was determined. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the influence of the individual risk factors such as habits (tobacco use), systemic conditions (diabetes), and oral hygiene maintenance on periodontitis prevalence in the sample population. Results: A high prevalence of periodontal disease was observed in the study population (42.3%). Among the urban participants, age, cigarette smoking, pan chewing, decayed, missing, and filled teeth scores, OHI scores, and PISA scores were found to be significantly associated with periodontitis (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Periodontitis prevalence appears to be high even in areas with adequate access to oral health care and an inflammatory burden risk exists in a definitive manner.
      Citation: Indian Journal of Dental Research 2018 29(2):254-259
      PubDate: Tue,10 Apr 2018
      DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_335_17
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 2 (2018)
       
 
 
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