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Publisher: Medknow Publishers   (Total: 354 journals)

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Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Arab Academy of Audio-Vestibulogy J.     Open Access  
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African J. for Infertility and Assisted Conception     Open Access  
African J. of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African J. of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African J. of Paediatric Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.269, h-index: 10)
African J. of Trauma     Open Access  
Ain-Shams J. of Anaesthesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al-Azhar Assiut Medical J.     Open Access  
Al-Basar Intl. J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anesthesia : Essays and Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of African Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.331, h-index: 15)
Annals of Bioanthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Cardiac Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 14, SJR: 0.408, h-index: 15)
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.308, h-index: 14)
Annals of Maxillofacial Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Nigerian Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Pediatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.441, h-index: 10)
Annals of Saudi Medicine     Open Access   (SJR: 0.24, h-index: 29)
Annals of Thoracic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.388, h-index: 19)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15, SJR: 0.148, h-index: 5)
APOS Trends in Orthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab J. of Interventional Radiology     Open Access  
Archives of Intl. Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Pharmacy Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asia Pacific J. of Clinical Trials : Nervous System Diseases     Open Access  
Asia-Pacific J. of Oncology Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian J. of Andrology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.879, h-index: 49)
Asian J. of Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian J. of Oncology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian J. of Transfusion Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.362, h-index: 10)
Astrocyte     Open Access  
Avicenna J. of Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Benha Medical J.     Open Access  
BLDE University J. of Health Sciences     Open Access  
Brain Circulation     Open Access  
Bulletin of Faculty of Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cancer Translational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED J. of Health and Research     Open Access  
Clinical Dermatology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Trials in Degenerative Diseases     Open Access  
Clinical Trials in Orthopedic Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Community Acquired Infection     Open Access  
Conservation and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.82, h-index: 12)
Contemporary Clinical Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Current Medical Issues     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CytoJ.     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.339, h-index: 19)
Delta J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access  
Dental Hypotheses     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.131, h-index: 4)
Dental Research J.     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Dentistry and Medical Research     Open Access  
Digital Medicine     Open Access  
Drug Development and Therapeutics     Open Access  
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.205, h-index: 22)
Egyptian J. of Bronchology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Cataract and Refractive Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Dermatology and Venerology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Haematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian J. of Neurology, Psychiatry and Neurosurgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.121, h-index: 3)
Egyptian J. of Obesity, Diabetes and Endocrinology     Open Access  
Egyptian J. of Otolaryngology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Egyptian J. of Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Egyptian Orthopaedic J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Pharmaceutical J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Retina J.     Open Access  
Egyptian Rheumatology and Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Endodontology     Open Access  
Endoscopic Ultrasound     Open Access   (SJR: 0.473, h-index: 8)
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 11)
European J. of General Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European J. of Prosthodontics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European J. of Psychology and Educational Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Fertility Science and Research     Open Access  
Formosan J. of Surgery     Open Access   (SJR: 0.107, h-index: 5)
Genome Integrity     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 1.227, h-index: 12)
Global J. of Transfusion Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heart India     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Heart Views     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hepatitis B Annual     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IJS Short Reports     Open Access  
Indian Anaesthetists Forum     Open Access  
Indian Dermatology Online J.     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Indian J. of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Anaesthesia     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.302, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Burns     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Cancer     Open Access   (SJR: 0.318, h-index: 26)
Indian J. of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.618, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Critical Care Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.307, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.243, h-index: 24)
Indian J. of Dental Sciences     Open Access  
Indian J. of Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.448, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.563, h-index: 29)
Indian J. of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology     Open Access  
Indian J. of Drugs in Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Endocrinology and Metabolism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Indian J. of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Medical and Paediatric Oncology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.292, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Medical Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.53, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.716, h-index: 60)
Indian J. of Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.207, h-index: 31)
Indian J. of Multidisciplinary Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Nephrology     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.233, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.213, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.203, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Ophthalmology     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.536, h-index: 34)
Indian J. of Oral Health and Research     Open Access  
Indian J. of Oral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Orthopaedics     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.393, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Otology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.218, h-index: 5)
Indian J. of Paediatric Dermatology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Pain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian J. of Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5, SJR: 0.35, h-index: 12)
Indian J. of Pathology and Microbiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.285, h-index: 22)
Indian J. of Pharmacology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.347, h-index: 44)
Indian J. of Plastic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 12, SJR: 0.303, h-index: 13)
Indian J. of Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.496, h-index: 15)
Indian J. of Psychological Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.344, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.444, h-index: 17)
Indian J. of Radiology and Imaging     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.253, h-index: 14)
Indian J. of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access  
Indian J. of Rheumatology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.169, h-index: 7)
Indian J. of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS     Open Access   (Followers: 2, SJR: 0.313, h-index: 9)
Indian J. of Social Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian J. of Urology     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.366, h-index: 16)
Indian J. of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Industrial Psychiatry J.     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Intl. J. of Academic Medicine     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Advanced Medical and Health Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Applied and Basic Medical Research     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Clinical and Experimental Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Critical Illness and Injury Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Educational and Psychological Researches     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Forensic Odontology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Green Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.229, h-index: 13)
Intl. J. of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intl. J. of Heart Rhythm     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Intl. J. of Mycobacteriology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.239, h-index: 4)
Intl. J. of Noncommunicable Diseases     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Intl. J. of Oral Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Orthodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pedodontic Rehabilitation     Open Access  
Intl. J. of Pharmaceutical Investigation     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intl. J. of Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.523, h-index: 15)
Intl. J. of Shoulder Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 7, SJR: 0.611, h-index: 9)
Intl. J. of Trichology     Open Access   (SJR: 0.37, h-index: 10)
Intl. J. of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Intl. J. of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iranian J. of Nursing and Midwifery Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Iraqi J. of Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Academy of Medical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.427, h-index: 15)
J. of Anaesthesiology Clinical Pharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 8, SJR: 0.416, h-index: 14)
J. of Applied Hematology     Open Access  
J. of Association of Chest Physicians     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Basic and Clinical Reproductive Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cancer Research and Therapeutics     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.359, h-index: 21)
J. of Carcinogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 1.152, h-index: 26)
J. of Cardiothoracic Trauma     Open Access  
J. of Cardiovascular Disease Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3, SJR: 0.351, h-index: 13)
J. of Cardiovascular Echography     Open Access   (SJR: 0.134, h-index: 2)
J. of Cleft Lip Palate and Craniofacial Anomalies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical and Preventive Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Imaging Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.277, h-index: 8)
J. of Clinical Neonatology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Clinical Ophthalmology and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Conservative Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.532, h-index: 10)
J. of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine     Open Access   (Followers: 4, SJR: 0.199, h-index: 9)
J. of Current Medical Research and Practice     Open Access  
J. of Current Research in Scientific Medicine     Open Access  
J. of Cutaneous and Aesthetic Surgery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Cytology     Open Access   (Followers: 1, SJR: 0.274, h-index: 9)
J. of Dental and Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Dental Implants     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
J. of Dental Lasers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Dental Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Digestive Endoscopy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
J. of Dr. NTR University of Health Sciences     Open Access  
J. of Earth, Environment and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
J. of Education and Ethics in Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Education and Health Promotion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
J. of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock     Open Access   (Followers: 9, SJR: 0.353, h-index: 14)
J. of Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
J. of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family and Community Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
J. of Family Medicine and Primary Care     Open Access   (Followers: 11)

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Journal Cover Asian Journal of Andrology
  [SJR: 0.879]   [H-I: 49]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1008-682X - ISSN (Online) 1745-7262
   Published by Medknow Publishers Homepage  [354 journals]
  • The impact of autophagy in spermiogenesis

    • Authors: Nihan Ozturk, Klaus Steger, Undraga Schagdarsurengin
      Pages: 617 - 618
      Abstract: Nihan Ozturk, Klaus Steger, Undraga Schagdarsurengin
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):617-618

      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):617-618
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.190324
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Sex determination and maintenance: the role of DMRT1 and FOXL2

    • Authors: Shengsong Huang, Leping Ye, Haolin Chen
      Pages: 619 - 624
      Abstract: Shengsong Huang, Leping Ye, Haolin Chen
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):619-624
      In many species, including mammals, sex determination is genetically based. The sex chromosomes that individuals carry determine sex identity. Although the genetic base of phenotypic sex is determined at the moment of fertilization, the development of testes or ovaries in the bipotential early gonads takes place during embryogenesis. During development, sex determination depends upon very few critical genes. When one of these key genes functions inappropriately, sex reversal may happen. Consequently, an individual's sex phenotype may not necessarily be consistent with the sex chromosomes that are present. For some time, it has been assumed that once the fetal choice is made between male and female in mammals, the gonadal sex identity of an individual remains stable. However, recent studies in mice have provided evidence that it is possible for the gonadal sex phenotype to be switched even in adulthood. These studies have shown that two key genes, doublesex and mad-3 related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) and forkhead box L2 (Foxl2), function in a Yin and Yang relationship to maintain the fates of testes or ovaries in adult mammals, and that mutations in either gene might have a dramatic effect on gonadal phenotype. Thus, adult gonad maintenance in addition to fetal sex determination may both be important for the fertility.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):619-624
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.194420
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Is age at puberty associated with semen quality and reproductive hormones
           in young adult life?

    • Authors: Lea LB Lauridsen, Linn H Arendt, Henrik Støvring, Jørn Olsen, Cecilia H Ramlau-Hansen
      Pages: 625 - 632
      Abstract: Lea LB Lauridsen, Linn H Arendt, Henrik Støvring, Jørn Olsen, Cecilia H Ramlau-Hansen
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):625-632
      The evidence is scarce on the association between age at puberty and semen quality. A cohort of 320 Danish men aged 18-21 years enrolled in the "Healthy Habits for Two" birth cohort provided self-reported data on pubertal indicators and delivered semen and blood samples. The results indicated an association between older age at pubertal development and lower semen quality and altered reproductive hormones concentrations as measured in young adult life. Men who had their first nocturnal emission, start of pubic hair growth and first voice break episode when older than 15 years had 37.0%, 45.0% and 32.7% lower sperm concentration; 37.8%, 44.2% and 29.1% lower total sperm count; 7.4%, 13.4% and 15.3% lower testosterone concentration; and 21.3%, 1.5% and 3.7% lower inhibin B concentration, respectively, compared with the men who were younger than 13 years at their first pubertal indicators. Only few of the results were statistically significant, but similar tendencies were seen in several of the reproductive parameters suggesting an association between the timing of pubertal development and reproductive health later in life.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):625-632
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.190328
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Serum lipid profiles are associated with semen quality

    • Authors: Chin-Yu Liu, Yu-Ching Chou, Shyh-Hsiang Lin, Sheng-Tang Wu, Tai-Lung Cha, Hong-I Chen, Chih-Wei Tsao
      Pages: 633 - 638
      Abstract: Chin-Yu Liu, Yu-Ching Chou, Shyh-Hsiang Lin, Sheng-Tang Wu, Tai-Lung Cha, Hong-I Chen, Chih-Wei Tsao
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):633-638
      We aimed to explore the associations between different lipid profiles and semen quality in a large-scale general male population. Sperm concentration, total sperm motility, progressive motility, and normal sperm morphology of total 7601 participants were recorded. The association of these semen parameters with the triglyceride, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and very low-density lipoprotein of serum lipid profiles was analyzed. Sperm concentration was statistically positively correlated with triglyceride and very low-density lipoprotein (adjusted P = 0.001 and P = 0.005, respectively). Total sperm motility and progressive motility were statistically increased with increasing low-density lipoprotein and cholesterol levels (both adjusted P = 0.008 and P < 0.001, respectively). The similar J-shaped associations (high-low-low-high) were noted between individual lipid profile and normal sperm morphology, especially low-density lipoprotein and cholesterol with statistical significance (adjusted P = 0.017 and P = 0.021, respectively). The prevalence of abnormal total sperm motility and progressive motility was decreased in participants with high levels of cholesterol (P = 0.008 and P = 0.019, respectively), and the reverse J-shaped associations (low-high-high-low) were noted between high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, very low-density lipoprotein, and the prevalence of abnormal normal sperm morphology (P = 0.010, P = 0.037, and P = 0.025, respectively). A high cholesterol level was associated with better sperm motility. Similar J-shaped associations were noted between all lipid profiles and normal sperm morphology; meanwhile, the reverse J-shaped trends were identified between them and abnormal normal sperm morphology prevalence.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):633-638
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.195240
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Impact of antioxidants on seminal vesicles function and fertilizing
           potential in diabetic rats

    • Authors: Panagiota Tsounapi, Masashi Honda, Fotios Dimitriadis, Bunya Kawamoto, Katsuya Hikita, Kuniyasu Muraoka, Motoaki Saito, Nikolaos Sofikitis, Atsushi Takenaka
      Pages: 639 - 646
      Abstract: Panagiota Tsounapi, Masashi Honda, Fotios Dimitriadis, Bunya Kawamoto, Katsuya Hikita, Kuniyasu Muraoka, Motoaki Saito, Nikolaos Sofikitis, Atsushi Takenaka
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):639-646
      Diabetes mellitus significantly affects the male reproduction and sexual function. In the present study, we investigated the diabetes-induced dysfunction of seminal vesicles (SVs) in the diabetes-rat model and the role of antioxidants. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes after 4 weeks caused smaller size of the organs, hypercontractility, histological abnormalities, increased concentrations of malondialdehyde in the serum and tissue, overexpression of oxidative stress markers, and cleaved caspase-3 as identified by immunohistochemistry in the SVs. In addition, diabetes resulted in deceased levels of serum testosterone and no newborns after the mating studies. Antioxidants significantly normalized all the above parameters, except for the severely decreased serum testosterone levels and the negative outcome of the mating studies. The present study gives evidence for the important role of diabetes-induced oxidative stress in the function and structure of these androgen-dependent organs. Antioxidants may be a promising supplementary therapy for diabetic male patients to alleviate ejaculatory disorders but alone is not efficient treatment for the mitigation of infertility.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):639-646
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.186871
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Melatonin ameliorates the adverse effects of leptin on sperm

    • Authors: Fayez A Almabhouh, Khairul Osman, Siti Fatimah Ibrahim, Sergey Gupalo, Justin Gnanou, Effendi Ibrahim, Harbindar Jeet Singh
      Pages: 647 - 654
      Abstract: Fayez A Almabhouh, Khairul Osman, Siti Fatimah Ibrahim, Sergey Gupalo, Justin Gnanou, Effendi Ibrahim, Harbindar Jeet Singh
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):647-654
      This study examined the effects of melatonin on leptin-induced changes in sperm parameters in adult rats. Five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either leptin or leptin and melatonin or melatonin for 6 weeks. Leptin was given daily via the intraperitoneal route (60 μg kg−1 body weight) and melatonin was given in drinking water (10 mg kg−1 or 20 mg kg−1 body weight per day). Upon completion, sperm count, sperm morphology, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, Comet assay, TUNEL assay, gene expression profiles of antioxidant enzymes, respiratory chain reaction enzymes, DNA damage, and apoptosis genes were estimated. Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Sperm count was significantly lower whereas the fraction of sperm with abnormal morphology, the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, and sperm DNA fragmentation were significantly higher in rats treated with leptin only. Microarray analysis revealed significant upregulation of apoptosis-inducing factor, histone acetyl transferase, respiratory chain reaction enzyme, cell necrosis and DNA repair genes, and downregulation of antioxidant enzyme genes in leptin-treated rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction showed significant decreases in glutathione peroxidase 1 expression with increases in the expression of apoptosis-inducing factor and histone acetyl transferase in leptin-treated rats. There was no change in the gene expression of caspase-3 (CASP-3). In conclusion, the adverse effects of leptin on sperm can be prevented by concurrent melatonin administration.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):647-654
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.183379
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Can the lower urinary tract storage symptoms be completely resolved after
           plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate?

    • Authors: Bing-Kun Li, Bin-Shen Chen, Yu-Hong Xin, Chun-Xiao Liu, Shao-Bo Zheng, Ya-Wen Xu, Hu-Lin Li, Yong Zou, Li-Ping Li
      Pages: 655 - 658
      Abstract: Bing-Kun Li, Bin-Shen Chen, Yu-Hong Xin, Chun-Xiao Liu, Shao-Bo Zheng, Ya-Wen Xu, Hu-Lin Li, Yong Zou, Li-Ping Li
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):655-658
      The aim of this study was to determine whether the lower urinary tract storage symptoms of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO) could be completely resolved after plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate (PKEP) and the possible predictors of persistent symptoms. Two hundred and sixty-seven cases of BPO performed PKEP from July 2008 to June 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Five-year postoperative data were collected and compared with the preoperative data. According to the urodynamic results, the patients were divided into involuntary detrusor contraction (IDC) group (n = 95) and no IDC group (n = 172) preoperatively; the patients with IDC were divided into IDC-persistent group (n = 33) and IDC-resolved group (n = 62) after PKEP. The predictors of persistent IDC were analyzed. Compared with the preoperative data, the 5-year postoperative data showed that the IDC rate was lower (P = 0.000), Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) was lower (P = 0.000), maximum cystometric capacity (MCC) was larger (P = 0.000), Prostate volume (PV) was smaller (P = 0.000), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was lower (P = 0.000). Compared with the no IDC group, the IDC group showed that the age was older (P = 0.016), MCC was smaller (P = 0.004), PSA was higher (P = 0.016), and Chronic Inflammation rate was higher (P = 0.004). Compared with IDC-resolved group after PKEP, IDC-persistent group showed that the age was older (P = 0.019), MCC was smaller (P = 0.000), PSA was higher (P = 0.013), and Chronic Inflammation rate was higher (P = 0.032). The present study shows that the storage symptoms are still needed to be focused on after PKEP. The advanced patient age, MCC, PSA, and chronic inflammation may be the important clinical predictors of persistent IDC.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):655-658
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.193161
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Characterization of MAGEG2 with testis-specific expression in mice

    • Authors: Juri Jeong, Sora Jin, Heejin Choi, Jun Tae Kwon, Jihye Kim, Jaehwan Kim, Zee Yong Park, Chunghee Cho
      Pages: 659 - 665
      Abstract: Juri Jeong, Sora Jin, Heejin Choi, Jun Tae Kwon, Jihye Kim, Jaehwan Kim, Zee Yong Park, Chunghee Cho
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):659-665
      Male germ cell development is a well-defined process occurring in numerous seminiferous tubules of the testis. Uncovering testicular novel genes related to intrinsic regulation of spermatogenesis is essential for the understanding of spermatogenesis. In the present study, we investigated mouse Mageg2, which belongs to a group of melanoma-associated antigens (MAGEs). Mageg2 is transcribed in the testis specifically, and its expression level is increased at the pachytene spermatocyte stage, indicating that Mageg2 is expressed predominantly in germ cells. We generated an antibody against mouse MAGEG2 for further characterization at the protein level. Immunoblot analysis suggested that MAGEG2 has specific testicular expression and the expression primarily occurred in pachytene spermatocytes. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that mouse MAGEG2 binded to testicular germ cell-specific serine/threonine-protein kinase 31 (STK31) and heat shock protein 9 (HSPA9). Direct binding with both interaction partners was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We found that STK31 and HSPA9 bind MAGEG2 directly but not with each other. Interestingly, MAGEG2 reduced the kinase activity of STK31. Our study suggests that mouse MAGEG2 has at least two functions, including chaperone activity related to HSPA9 and regulation of pachytene spermatocyte-specific kinase, STK31. Altogether, our results provide the first information about MAGEG2 at the transcript and protein levels and suggest its potential molecular functions.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):659-665
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.192033
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Effect of statins type on incident prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis
           and systematic review

    • Authors: Ping Tan, Chen Zhang, Shi-You Wei, Zhuang Tang, Liang Gao, Lu Yang, Qiang Wei
      Pages: 666 - 671
      Abstract: Ping Tan, Chen Zhang, Shi-You Wei, Zhuang Tang, Liang Gao, Lu Yang, Qiang Wei
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):666-671
      The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of statins type or even when grouping statins by hydrophilic or hydrophobic nature on prostate cancer risk. A literature search was performed without language restrictions using the databases of PubMed (1984.1-2015.3), MEDLINE (1984.1-2015.3), and EMBASE (1990.1-2015.3). Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data. Weighted averages were reported as relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Statistic heterogeneity scores were assessed with the standard Cochran's Q-test and I2 statistic. Publication bias was detected using the Begg's and Egger's tests. All statistical analyses were conducted by STATA version 10. Finally, fourteen studies were included in the meta-analysis. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic statins showed no association with incidence of prostate cancer (RR = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.82-1.17; RR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.73-1.08, respectively). Meanwhile, the risk of prostate cancer was not reduced in simvastatin (RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.72-1.05), pravastatin (RR = 1.02, 95% CI: 0.94-1.11), atorvastatin (RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.76-1.02), fluvastatin (RR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.97-1.01), or lovastatin users (RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.79-1.08). The funnel plot showed that there was no publication bias. The results showed that statins had a neutral effect on prostate cancer risk; hydrophilic and hydrophobic statins as well as any subtype of statins did not affect the risk of prostate cancer.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):666-671
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.190327
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Sertraline-induced reproductive toxicity in male rats: evaluation of
           possible underlying mechanisms

    • Authors: Ozlem Atli, Merve Baysal, Gozde Aydogan-Kilic, Volkan Kilic, Seyda Ucarcan, Burak Karaduman, Sinem Ilgin
      Pages: 672 - 679
      Abstract: Ozlem Atli, Merve Baysal, Gozde Aydogan-Kilic, Volkan Kilic, Seyda Ucarcan, Burak Karaduman, Sinem Ilgin
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):672-679
      This study was conducted to clarify the toxic effects of sertraline (SRT) on the reproductive system of male rats and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Rats were treated orally with SRT at doses of 5, 10, and 20 mg kg−1 for 28 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment period, sperm concentration, sperm motility, and sperm morphology were investigated by computer-assisted sperm analysis system whereas sperm DNA damage was detected by comet assay. The oxidative status of the testes was investigated, and a histopathological examination was conducted. Serum testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were measured to determine the effects of SRT on the spermatogenesis process. One-way ANOVA, post-hoc Dunnett's T3 test for the sperm comet assay, and post-hoc Tukey's test for the others were performed for statistical analysis. The results showed that SRT caused an increase in sperm DNA damage and induced histopathological lesions in all groups treated with SRT. There was abnormal sperm morphology and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) in the 10 mg kg−1 treatment group. More dramatic changes were observed in the 20 mg kg−1 treatment group. Decreased sperm count was accompanied by a significant increase in abnormal sperm morphology, DNA damage, and degeneration in cellular-tubular structures. Serum LH and testosterone levels were elevated in the 20 mg kg−1 treatment group. Decreased glutathione (GSH) and increased MDA were signs of enhanced oxidative stress (OS). In conclusion, SRT induced testicular toxicity in a dose-dependent manner and OS is suggested as a crucial mechanism.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):672-679
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.192637
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone therapy is associated with
           earlier spermatogenesis compared to combined gonadotropin therapy in
           patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    • Authors: Jiang-Feng Mao, Zhao-Xiang Liu, Min Nie, Xi Wang, Hong-Li Xu, Bing-Kun Huang, Jun-Jie Zheng, Le Min, Ursula Brigitte Kaiser, Xue-Yan Wu
      Pages: 680 - 685
      Abstract: Jiang-Feng Mao, Zhao-Xiang Liu, Min Nie, Xi Wang, Hong-Li Xu, Bing-Kun Huang, Jun-Jie Zheng, Le Min, Ursula Brigitte Kaiser, Xue-Yan Wu
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):680-685
      Both pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) infusion and combined gonadotropin therapy (human chorionic gonadotropin and human menopausal gonadotropin [HCG/HMG]) are effective to induce spermatogenesis in male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH). However, evidence is lacking as to which treatment strategy is better. This retrospective cohort study included 202 patients with CHH: twenty had received pulsatile GnRH and 182 had received HCG/HMG. Patients had received therapy for at least 12 months. The total follow-up time was 15.6 ± 5.0 months (range: 12-27 months) for the GnRH group and 28.7 ± 13.0 months (range: 12-66 months) for the HCG/HMG group. The median time to first sperm appearance was 6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-10.4) in the GnRH group versus 18 months (95% CI: 16.4-20.0) in the HCG/HMG group (P < 0.001). The median time to achieve sperm concentrations ≥5 × 10 6 ml−1 was 14 months (95% CI: 5.8-22.2) in the GnRH group versus 27 months (95% CI: 18.9-35.1) in the HCG/HMG group (P < 0.001), and the median time to concentrations ≥10 × 10 6 ml−1 was 18 months (95% CI: 10.0-26.0) in the GnRH group versus 39 months (95% CI unknown) in the HCG/HMG group. Compared to the GnRH group, the HCG/HMG group required longer treatment periods to achieve testicular sizes of ≥4 ml, ≥8 ml, ≥12 ml, and ≥16 ml. Sperm motility (a + b + c percentage) evaluated in semen samples with concentrations>1 × 10 6 ml−1 was 43.7% ± 20.4% (16 samples) in the GnRH group versus 43.2% ± 18.1% (153 samples) in the HCG/HMG group (P = 0.921). Notably, during follow-up, the GnRH group had lower serum testosterone levels than the HCG/HMG group (8.3 ± 4.6 vs 16.2 ± 8.2 nmol l−1 , P < 0.001). Our study found that pulsatile GnRH therapy was associated with earlier spermatogenesis and larger testicular size compared to combined gonadotropin therapy. Additional prospective randomized studies would be required to confirm these findings.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):680-685
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.193568
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Potential therapeutic effect of epigenetic therapy on treatment-induced
           neuroendocrine prostate cancer

    • Authors: Xiang Xu, Yu-Hua Huang, Yan-Jing Li, Alexa Cohen, Zhen Li, Jill Squires, Wei Zhang, Xu-Feng Chen, Min Zhang, Jiao-Ti Huang
      Pages: 686 - 693
      Abstract: Xiang Xu, Yu-Hua Huang, Yan-Jing Li, Alexa Cohen, Zhen Li, Jill Squires, Wei Zhang, Xu-Feng Chen, Min Zhang, Jiao-Ti Huang
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):686-693
      Although adenocarcinomas of the prostate are relatively indolent, some patients with advanced adenocarcinomas show recurrence of treatment-induced neuroendocrine prostate cancer, which is highly aggressive and lethal. Detailed biological features of treatment-induced neuroendocrine prostate cancer have not been characterized owing to limited biopsies/resections and the lack of a cellular model. In this study, we used a unique cellular model (LNCaP/NE1.8) to investigate the potential role of cancer stem cells in treatment-induced neuroendocrine prostate cancer with acquired resistance to hormonal therapy and chemotherapy. We also studied the role of cancer stem cells in enhancing invasion in treatment-induced neuroendocrine prostate cancer cells that recurred after long-term androgen-ablation treatment. Using an in vitro system mimicking clinical androgen-ablation, our results showed that the neuroendocrine-like subclone NE1.8 cells were enriched with cancer stem cells. Compared to parental prostate adenocarcinoma LNCaP cells, NE1.8 cells are more resistant to androgen deprivation therapy and chemotherapeutic agents and show increased cancer cell invasiveness. Results from this study also suggest a potential epigenetic therapeutic strategy using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, as a chemotherapeutic agent for therapy-resistant treatment-induced neuroendocrine prostate cancer cells to minimize the risk of prostate cancer recurrence and metastasis.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):686-693
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.191518
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Microsurgical tunica albuginea transplantation in an animal model

    • Authors: Salvatore Sansalone, Carla Loreto, Rosario Leonardi, Giuseppe Vespasiani, Giuseppe Musumeci, Claudia Lombardo, Sergio Castorina, Venera Cardile, Rosario Caltabiano
      Pages: 694 - 699
      Abstract: Salvatore Sansalone, Carla Loreto, Rosario Leonardi, Giuseppe Vespasiani, Giuseppe Musumeci, Claudia Lombardo, Sergio Castorina, Venera Cardile, Rosario Caltabiano
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):694-699
      Several andrological diseases require surgical repair or reconstruction of tunica albuginea, which envelops the corpora cavernosa penis. Despite intense research efforts involving a variety of biological materials, such as skin, muscle aponeurosis, human dura mater, tunica vaginalis, and pericardium, engineered tunica albuginea suitable for graft use is yet to be obtained. The study investigates microsurgical tunica albuginea allotransplantation in an animal model with the purpose of creation of an organ-specific tissue bank to store penile tissue, from cadaveric donors and male-to-female trans-sexual surgery, for allogeneic transplantation. Materials were tunica albuginea tissue explanted from 15 donor rats, cryopreserved at −80°C, gamma-irradiated, and implanted in 15 recipient rats, of which three rats were used as controls. Penile grafts were explanted at different time intervals; after macroscopic evaluation of the organ, the grafts were processed to morphological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical examinations by light microscopy. Detection of pro-inflammatory cytokines was also performed. Examination of the tunica albuginea allografts collected 1, 3, or 6 months after surgery and of control tunica albuginea fragments showed that tunica albuginea implants achieved biointegration with adjacent tissue at all-time points. The integration of cryopreserved rat tunica albuginea allografts, documented by our study, encourages the exploration of tunica albuginea allotransplantation in humans. In conclusion, the effectiveness and reliability of the tunica albuginea conditioning protocol described here suggest the feasibility of setting up a tunica albuginea bank as a further tissue bank.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):694-699
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.192034
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Risk stratification for disease progression in pT3 prostate cancer after
           robot-assisted radical prostatectomy

    • Authors: Jeong Hee Hong, Young Suk Kwon, Isaac Yi Kim
      Pages: 700 - 706
      Abstract: Jeong Hee Hong, Young Suk Kwon, Isaac Yi Kim
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):700-706
      The aim of this study is to identify optimal patients for adjuvant radiation therapy (ART) in pT3 prostate cancer. The role of ART for patients with adverse pathologic features after radical prostatectomy (RP) has been demonstrated, but over- or under-treatment remains a significant concern. Two-hundred and five patients with pT3N0M0 who underwent robot-assisted RP without ART were analyzed. Multivariate Cox proportional regression analyses were used to identify predictors of biochemical recurrence (BCR) and clinical progression (CP). The estimated 5-year BCR-free survival (BCRFS) and CP-free survival (CPFS) were 52.8% and 85.6%, respectively. Preoperative prostate-specifc antigen (PSA) ≥10 ng ml−1 (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.288-6.027; P = 0.003), pathologic Gleason score (pGS) ≥8 (HR: 4.146; P = 0.014), and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (HR: 2.167; P = 0.026) were associated with BCR. Based on these factors, a risk stratification tool was developed. Patients with no risk factors (PSA
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):700-706
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.193569
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular
           localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility

    • Authors: Violeta Calle-Guisado, Ana Hurtado de Llera, David Martin-Hidalgo, Jose Mijares, Maria C Gil, Ignacio S Alvarez, Maria J Bragado, Luis J Garcia-Marin
      Pages: 707 - 714
      Abstract: Violeta Calle-Guisado, Ana Hurtado de Llera, David Martin-Hidalgo, Jose Mijares, Maria C Gil, Ignacio S Alvarez, Maria J Bragado, Luis J Garcia-Marin
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):707-714
      AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work's aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%-80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS) in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC). AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied.
      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):707-714
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.185848
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Simultaneous expression analysis of deleted in azoospermia-family genes
           and CDC25A: their potential as a predictor for successful testicular sperm
           extraction

    • Authors: Candela Rocío González, Cristian Alvarez Sed&#243;, Florencia Nodar, Sergio Papier, Alfredo Daniel Vitullo
      Pages: 715 - 716
      Abstract: Candela Rocío González, Cristian Alvarez Sedó, Florencia Nodar, Sergio Papier, Alfredo Daniel Vitullo
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):715-716

      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):715-716
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.184993
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Minimally invasive simple prostatectomy for a case of giant benign
           prostatic hyperplasia

    • Authors: Qin-Song Zeng, Yong-Bin Zhao, Bang-Qi Wang, Min Ying, Wei-Lie Hu
      Pages: 717 - 718
      Abstract: Qin-Song Zeng, Yong-Bin Zhao, Bang-Qi Wang, Min Ying, Wei-Lie Hu
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):717-718

      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):717-718
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.185851
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Association between serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR and STin2 VNTR
           polymorphisms and anejaculation: a preliminary report

    • Authors: Yuan-Yuan Huang, Xian-Sheng Zhang, Jing-Jing Gao, Pan Gao, Chao-Zhao Liang
      Pages: 719 - 720
      Abstract: Yuan-Yuan Huang, Xian-Sheng Zhang, Jing-Jing Gao, Pan Gao, Chao-Zhao Liang
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):719-720

      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):719-720
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.182821
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • A successful pregnancy by intracytoplasmic sperm injection using ejaculate
           sperm from an infertile man with 46, XX/46, XY true hermaphrodite

    • Authors: Yan-Wei Sha, Yan-Kun Sha, Lu Ding, Shao-Bin Lin, Zhi-Yong Ji, Xu Wang, Yue-Qiang Song, Ping Li
      Pages: 721 - 722
      Abstract: Yan-Wei Sha, Yan-Kun Sha, Lu Ding, Shao-Bin Lin, Zhi-Yong Ji, Xu Wang, Yue-Qiang Song, Ping Li
      Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):721-722

      Citation: Asian Journal of Andrology 2017 19(6):721-722
      PubDate: Tue,24 Oct 2017
      DOI: 10.4103/1008-682X.190329
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 6 (2017)
       
 
 
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