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Comparative Literature Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.159
Number of Followers: 44  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal(Not entitled to full-text)
ISSN (Print) 0010-4132 - ISSN (Online) 1528-4212
Published by Penn State University Press Homepage  [35 journals]
  • Introduction: Global Crises And Twenty-First-Century World Literature
    • Abstract: In his 2017 Nobel Lecture, Kazuo Ishiguro makes a slightly lugubrious remark on the new century we are living in, before reaffirming the importance of literature and appealing for more diversity in our common literary world. To the Japanese-born British novelist's dismay, the present world is a "much smaller" place than he had ever imagined, and our time is "of dangerously increasing division."1 Having taken "the unstoppable advance of liberal-humanist values" in Europe and America for granted, Ishiguro admits that it may have been "an illusion," and that he has been "living for some years in a bubble."2 His pessimism is not unusual in our time, and with good reasons—the terrorist attacks in the United States on ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Nuclear Disaster and Global Aesthetics in Gerald Vizenor's Hiroshima Bugi:
           Atomu 57 and Ruth Ozeki's A Tale for the Time Being
    • Abstract: Over seventy years have passed since the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki heralded the start of the Atomic Age, and the literary world has continued to produce a steady stream of new texts on nuclear disaster. As military scholar Thomas M. Nichols contends, "The physical properties of nuclear explosions are well understood; it is the political and social outcomes of nuclear use that are unknowable."1 It makes sense, then, that nuclear disaster occupies a central place in the literary imagination, where the "unknowable" can be explored, critiqued, and even resolved through fictional experimentation. Literary scholar Paul Williams explains that "nuclear representations in anglophone literary, filmic and other ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Novels in the Translation Zone: Abbas Khider, Weltliteratur, and the
           Ethics of the Passerby
    • Abstract: Abbas Khider's first novel, Der falsche Inder (The Village Indian), seems to exhaust its plot in the first chapter already.1 It narrates the story of an Iraqi political prisoner who flees his country, and who travels, often illegally, through Libya, Tunisia, Jordan, Turkey, Greece, Italy, eventually reaching Germany, where he receives asylum. The second chapter narrates the same story again, with a focus on the character's compulsion to record his experiences and on the repeated loss of his notes; the chapters that follow are variations on the same main events, as if the story could not be narrated once and for all, or as if memory were unreliable, and it kept correcting itself—for these are all ostensibly chapters ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Global Crises in Ernst-Wilhelm Händler's Wenn Wir Sterben (When We Die)
           and Kathrin Röggla's Wir Schlafen Nicht (We Never Sleep)
    • Abstract: A focus on the influence of economic crisis on average people is characteristic of many contemporary authors, starting with the financial crash of the 1920s.1 While the prose of the twentieth century underlines the lack of opportunity, the poverty of citizens in a metropolis, and the gap between the rich and the poor, many artists of the new millennium focus instead on the insecure situation of individuals as determined by unpredictable fluctuations of the free market and the influence of the virtual economy on their everyday life. In comparing the novels Wenn wir sterben (2002) by Ernst-Wilhelm Händler2 and wir schlafen nicht (2004)3 by Kathrin Röggla, I intend to prove the thesis that in their work both writers ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Crouching Terrorist, Lurking Author": On The Terror Narrative In Zhang
           Chengzhi's and Xiao Bai's Historical Fiction
    • Abstract: It might be too early to name the defining crisis of the twenty-first century, but the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 is a most likely candidate. Although Jacques Derrida suggests that "the impression of [9/11] being a major event" needs more qualification in philosophy,1 few would doubt that the fall of the Twin Towers has had repercussions far beyond the scope of American geopolitics and national traumas. Global terrorism, emerging in the late 1960s and rampant in the wake of the "war on terror," has been plaguing many places—London, Paris, Kunming, Manila, Bombay, Mogadishu, Nairobi, Brussels, to name but a few—most of which at first seemed neutral in the antagonism between the United States and ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Celebrity Authors, Humanitarian Narratives, And The Role Of Literature In
           World Crises Today: The Medecins Sans Frontiers' Newspaper Chronicles
           Testigos Del Horror (Witness Of Horror)
    • Abstract: From 2008 to 2010, the humanitarian organization Médecins sans frontièrs (MSF) sent eight well-known Spanish-speaking authors to cover forgotten conflicts across the globe, including the Nobel Literature Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa (Peru), Sergio Ramírez (Nicaragua), Juan José Millás (Spain) Laura Restrepo (Colombia), John Carlin (England-Spain), Leila Guerriero (Argentina), Laura Esquivel (Mexico), and Manuel Vincent (Spain) accompanied by photojournalist Juan Carlos Tomasi (Spain). They wrote a series of reportages (crónicas) about humanitarian crises in Congo, Yemen, Haiti, Kashmir, Malaysia, Guatemala, Zimbabwe, and Colombia for the Spanish newspaper El País, which appeared under the title Testigos del Horror ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Suspended Crisis In Arab-American and Arabic Literatures: Modernity,
           Violence, and Afflicted Textuality
    • Abstract: The abiding image of the Middle East as permanently vulnerable to an unremitting flow of crises has solidified.1 Several Arab-American memoirists, Arab novelists, and poets have inscribed crisis as a matter of a double bind: they must keep pace with writing a persistent condition of affliction and must grapple with defining the unbroken root of modern crisis, violence. Franz Fanon (The Wretched of the Earth, 1963), Jean Paul Sartre ("Materialism and Revolution," 1946; Hope Now, 1980), and even Hannah Arendt (the Human Condition, 1958; On Violence, 1969) have conceded that the colonial project of Europe's expansionism in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Middle East was established through a systematic deployment ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hues of Red: The Facades of Leftist Insurgency and Crisis in India in
           Select Fiction
    • Abstract: The convergence of the boundaries between the fluid terms, Naxalism and Maoism, is more or less an impasse which has led to the problematic premise on which leftist insurgency in India rests today. As far as its delineation in literature is concerned, there is no effective demarcation which classifies texts as Naxalite or Maoist literature categorically. This is because, over the years, these two disseminating ideologies have been assigned to various "signifieds" in Saussurean terms, connoting often more than what these terms actually "signify." Often the conjecture and prejudice that these terms have acquired in popular imagination, literature, and television have led to the positive/negative propaganda that the ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reconsidering Modernist Totality
    • Abstract: The growth of the "new" modernist studies, which is now well into its second decade, has been marked by explicit self-consciousness about modernism's temporal and geographic boundaries. Scholars including Susan Stanford Freidman, Eric Hayot, Gayle Rogers, Rebecca L. Walkowitz, Urmila Seshagiri, and Christopher Bush among many others have broadened the parameters of modernism as a field of study, while carefully reimagining and questioning modernism's aesthetic and historical valences. Two new volumes stand apart from modernist studies' mainstream in sharply different respects. In Putting Modernism Together, the late Daniel Albright encapsulates what we might term the "old" modernism, focusing entirely on European ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fiction Unbound: The Contemporary Landscape of Narrative Theory
    • Abstract: The discipline of narrative theory, even though it has been the focus of several studies, is still a vital subject to explore. Whether traditional approaches have searched for the fixed principles on which narratives are built, postmodern perspectives have reexamined those theoretical hypotheses to defy the precepts of conventional assumptions. Much of this division is to be found in Brian Richardson's Unnatural Narrative, Kent Puckett's Narrative Theory, and Guido Mazzoni's The Theory of the Novel. The three authors reflect on the major figures and ideas that define the field of narrative theory, thus offering a dialectical performance that opposes story versus discourse, and mimetic versus antimimetic.Narratives ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Exhaustion: A History by Anna Katharina Schaffner (review)
    • Abstract: Exhaustion: A History by Anna Katharina Schaffner is a vigorous review of the various lenses through which exhaustion has been viewed throughout human history. Throughout this review, Schaffner is making the case that exhaustion, though treated as something new by each successive generation, is better understood as the same snake shedding different types of skin. She suggests that although exhaustion is considered a more modern phenomenon, it has actually manifested under various guises over the centuries. Schaffner poses the following questions regarding exhaustion and the specter with which it shadows humanity:"Is not ours the most exhausted age in history' And does the current epidemic of exhaustion not threaten ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Love, War, and the Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Transatlantic
           World: Alonso de Ercilla and Edmund Spenser by Cyrus Moore (review)
    • Abstract: The neglect of Alonso de Ercilla y Zuñiga's La Araucana, the great Spanish epic of Philip II's (incomplete) conquest of Chile, in English translation history and in literary criticism is one of the great mysteries—and losses—of insular literary history. For that reason alone, Cyrus Moore's comparative study of Ercilla and Edmund Spenser's epic-romances is greatly to be welcomed. Both poems are fascinating precisely because their respective authors were themselves participants in the inglorious campaigns of conquest which they sought to translate into epic. Ercilla, as poet-conquistador, switched back and forth between pen-and swordsmanship, "la pluma ora en la mano, ora la lanza" (20.24.8); Spenser, that other ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Love's Wounds: Violence and the Politics of Poetry in Early Modern Europe
           by Cynthia N. Nazarian (review)
    • Abstract: Lucid and compelling throughout, Cynthia N. Nazarian's reconceptualization of the Petrarchan mode in romantic verse from Italy, France, and England during the long Renaissance is a significant contribution to our knowledge of a central dimension of lyric poetry in the early modern period, one that should productively reshape our understanding of works even beyond those that she treats in her text. Love's Wounds begins with the relatively simple and uncontroversial premise that Petrarch and his many imitators adopted striking "metaphors of torment and vulnerability" (3)—images that Nazarian contends become more bloody and violent as the Petrarchan tradition modulates and evolves—and then ventures to ask "what their ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Persistent Forms: Explorations in Historical Poetics ed. by Ilya Kliger
           and Boris Maslov (review)
    • Abstract: As Boris Maslov accurately notes, "Alexander Veselovsky's versatile body of work is notably hard to synthesize" and "does not lend itself easily to either systematic summary or piecemeal extraction" (128). This ambitious volume, however, aims at the very least to recover Veselovsky's contributions, related to but not necessarily integrated with more familiar movements in Russian and Soviet formalism and various subsequent models of structuralism. The authors of articles in the volume are members of the "Historical Poetics Working Group," whose 2011 conference at the University of Chicago ("Historical Poetics: Past, Present, and Future") provided the proximal impetus for the volume, but more importantly, represents ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Music into Fiction: Composers Writing, Compositions Imitated by Theodore
           Ziolkowski (review)
    • Abstract: Theodore Ziolkowski's Music into Fiction Composers Writing, Compositions Imitated brings together a collection of essays investigating how music and fiction have intersected in the creative output of individual composers or authors. Ziolkowski attempts to delimit this immense topic by bracketing off discussion of complex issues of poetry, text setting, and theoretical relationships between music and language. Still, the scope of the book spans two centuries and cuts through a broad swath of topics: the literary efforts of well-known composers, the compositional efforts of well-known authors, literary attempts at adapting musical genres as formal guides for fiction, the literary reference to famous compositions, and ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Late Style and its Discontents: Essays in Art, Literature, and Music ed.
           by Gordon McMullan and Sam Smiles (review)
    • Abstract: This earnest volume is the belated issue of two conferences held almost a decade ago. Many of the contributors digest or supplement books they have written on their topics, sometimes recycling previously published material. (I found earlier publications of one essay, slightly revised, and sentences from another, and there may be others; this is not unusual but should have been acknowledged.) And all the essays sing the same tune about the diversity of late styles. In addition to citing themselves and one another, the other two walls off which the echoes bounce are named Theodor Adorno and Edward Said. All but one of the authors cite one or both, always stressing their limitations, with the final essay devoted to a ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bachelor Japanists: Japanese Aesthetics and Western Masculinities by
           Christopher Reed (review)
    • Abstract: This book examines the history and context of Western conceptions of Japanese art and of Japan during the time period from roughly 1860–1960, a time far removed from the culturally aware climate of 2017, and in which questions of cultural appropriation were nearly nonexistent; the more important questions revolved around who in the West could claim patronage of Japan, and who deserved to be considered a japoniste. Christopher Reed does this by presenting three case studies: the case of the Goncourt brothers in France beginning in the 1860s, the case of the "bachelor Brahmins" of Boston beginning around 1890, and the case of Mark Tobey, whose story of japonisme starts around the 1920s.Beginning this chronological ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lateness and Modern European Literature by Ben Hutchinson (review)
    • Abstract: Scholarly interest in the concept of lateness has experienced a surge in the last couple of years, especially in the European context, following Edward Said's On Late Style (2006). In August 2015, the New German Critique published a special issue entitled Figuring Lateness in Modern German Culture, and Ben Hutchinson's Lateness and Modern Europe represents the culmination of years of his own research in the field. "Lateness" as a heuristic for cultural and literary studies encompasses several subcategories, including lateness as maturity or old age, as tardiness, as epigonality, and as proximity to death. These subcategories are part of the European focus and do not broach the topic of "belated modernity," a phrase ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Borges and Kafka: Sons and Writers by Sarah Roger (review)
    • Abstract: The grounds for comparison of this superb study on Borges and Kafka are incontrovertible. As Sarah Roger's usefully annotated bibliography makes clear, Jorge Luis Borges wrote sixty-five pieces that mention or discuss Kafka, beginning in 1935 and ending in 1995 (131–48). Her first appendix lists all of the stories by Kafka that Borges "mentioned by name, reviewed or translated" (149). In her multiply sectioned bibliography, there are two sections of Borges's translations of Kafka: the first lists eleven translations of Kafka attributed to Borges alone; the second lists seven translations of Kafka attributed to Borges in collaboration with others, usually Adolfo Bioy Casares. She has also done her homework in the ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Locating the Destitute: Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction by Stanka
           Radović (review)
    • Abstract: In Locating the Destitute: Space and Identity in Caribbean Fiction, Stanka Radović shows how anglophone and francophone Caribbean novels reclaim space for those made destitute by displacement, slavery, and neocolonial oppression through humor, exuberant language, and communal solidarity. Radović draws largely on Henri Lefebvre's seminal work The Production of Space, while also engaging a range of other geographers and literary critics including Edward Soja, Doreen Massey, Michel Foucault, Homi Bhabha, Frantz Fanon, Antonio Benítez-Rojo, and Edouard Glissant. A vital objective of the study is to interrogate the persistence of spatial metaphors in postcolonial writing and "their triumphant yet inevitably failing ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Secularization without End: Beckett, Mann, Coetzee by Vincent P. Pecora
           (review)
    • Abstract: The author of this study is deeply learned in modern cultural theory; his analysis is complex and nuanced; his style is dense. Summary of his ideas is therefore challenging. The leading idea can perhaps be stated in this way: Classic historians of the novel (Ian Watt, followed by many others) got the story wrong when they characterized the genre as product and agent of a final secularization. They missed the reemergence of Christian ideas, especially ideas of sin and redemption, in narratives that could not be continued without them. The very denial of God's relevance to human life reemphasized the problem of a sinfulness that could not be expiated. Inescapably, though in diverse ways, authors of the past seven ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Výuka dobrého vkusu jako státní zájem II: Závěr rané pražské
           univerzitní estetiky ve středoevropských souvislostech 1805–1848 by
           Tomáš Hlobil (review)
    • Abstract: The Teaching of Good Taste As a State Interest II: The Conclusion of Early Prague University Aesthetics in its Central European Contexts, 1805–1848, is the second in a two-book study of the aesthetics taught at Prague University from the establishment of the first chair of esthetics (1763) up to the revolutionary year of 1848. The topic had previously received some attention from literary historians working on German-and Czech-language literature in Bohemia, both of which took direction and inspiration from these professors and their instruction. Tomáš Hlobil aims to reexamine the conclusions of that work and integrate it into the larger history of aesthetics. That larger history has mostly ignored such areas, he ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Global Wallace: David Foster Wallace and World Literature by Lucas
           Thompson (review)
    • Abstract: When a piece of literary criticism makes you aware at every turn of the substantial limits not just of your knowledge of a subject—one you thought you knew something about—but also of the frameworks in which you think, its worth and importance are blindingly obvious. Such was my experience in reading Lucas Thompson's Global Wallace: David Foster Wallace and World Literature. Its well-researched and wide-ranging attention to Wallace's global influences and intertexts should also be a shot of adrenaline into a Wallace Studies that threatens to grow tired, from a steady infusion of hairsplitting arguments that place Wallace's work in the same much-explored contexts, often postmodernism and American culture. Thompson ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • China Reinterpreted: Staging the Other in Muromachi Noh Theater by Leo
           Shingchi Yip (review)
    • Abstract: China Reinterpreted analyzes a series of noh plays, mainly composed in the Muromachi period of Japan (1392–1477), that feature Chinese stories and characters. Its overall approach is to see these plays as representations of China, which in the author's eyes constituted a foreign "other" in the Japanese cultural world. The study organizes plays into groups reflecting a set of stances they adopt toward this "other": auspicious (Seiōbo, Tōbōsaku, Tsurukame), sympathized and distant (Shōkun and Yōkihi), exotic (Shakkyō and Ryōko), destructive (Haku Rakuten and Zegai), and harmonious (Sanshō and Tōsen).A burden for books like this is that they cannot assume knowledge in their readers, and so they both have the task of ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Translation's Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation,
           and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature by Heekyoung Cho (review)
    • Abstract: Non-Western literatures, no matter whether we call them literatures of the Global South or literatures of the Three Continents, have been constituted in the process of fighting for legitimacy within the Western literary model. For this reason, scholarship on non-Western literatures necessarily entails postcolonial projects. Translation's Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature explores colonized Korean writers' translations as a deliberate, constructive practice for tackling their specific colonial situations, and conducts its own postcolonial project in the sense that it confronts colonial negotiations in the birth of modern Korean literature without ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • J. M. Coetzee's The Childhood of Jesus: The Ethics of Ideas and Things ed.
           by Jennifer Rutherford and Anthony Uhlmann (review)
    • Abstract: J. M. Coetzee's 2013 novel The Childhood of Jesus (2013) is even more enigmatic than the rest of the author's challenging oeuvre. No one named Jesus—or Mary or Joseph—makes an appearance in the book. It is set not in Bethlehem, Nazareth, or Jerusalem, but in a seaport named Novilla. The local tongue is not Aramaic, Hebrew, Latin, or even English, the language in which Coetzee's Jesus books were written, but rather Spanish. The title of the novel invites a reader to expect some sort of Christian allegory, but the signifié, whatever it is, has drifted far, far away from the signifiant.It is inevitable that Coetzee's Jesus fiction would provoke analysis. And, since the author, a native of South Africa, has been a ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Age of Silver: The Rise of the Novel East and West by Ning Ma (review)
    • Abstract: Challenging the widespread understanding of the "rise of the novel" as a uniquely European literary phenomenon, The Age of Silver attempts to move beyond this monocentric world-system perspective and remap world literature across national lines. Endeavoring to further the parallel globalizing impulses in both the humanities and the social sciences, Ma aims at establishing a more balanced model of transregional comparison and advancing "a transcultural category of the realist novel as having analogous materialist tendencies and shared macrohistorical roots in the world system" (6) in the 1500–1800 period, or "the Age of Silver." This is indeed an ambitious attempt (a reflection of the "think big" mentality), and a ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Rhetoric of Exile: Duress and the Imagining of Force by Vladimir
           Zorić (review)
    • Abstract: In Roman Jakobson's classic account of aphasic disturbances in language, meaning arises from the intersection of metaphor and metonymy, relations of resemblance and association respectively. The Rhetoric of Exile, which makes frequent reference to Jakobson's scheme, observes that an analogous structure prevails in the rhetoric of exile. Because exile entails a transformative transfer from one realm to another, it is a dramatization of metaphor, but because the exile is forced from one space to another by a causal chain of political events, there is a metonymic aspect as well.Vladimir Zorić's erudite and often deeply absorbing study examines texts by exiled authors, often in dialogue with the legal and political ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Roberto Bolaño as World Literature ed. by Nicholas Birns and Juan E.
           De Castro (review)
    • Abstract: Twelve chapters comprise the anthology, including the exemplary Introduction. It is the best Bolaño critical ensemble since Bolaño Salvaje (2006). It best compares with articles from a published conference, updating issues and inventing others, ahead of the next round on Bolaño it so well inspires. First Part: "Bolaño and World History" delves deep into fascism in fictional and counterfactual terms (Federico Finchelstein); into Nocturno de Chile, extended into Nietzsche and Junger and European aestheticism (Thomas O. Beebee); and also into Amuleto's "ethical turn" and its recasting of Mexico's 1968 students insurgency, less in revolutionary ideological terms, more so through the narration's distanced moral ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Speculative Formalism: Literature, Theory, and the Critical Present by Tom
           Eyers (review)
    • Abstract: In Speculative Formalism: Literature, Theory, and the Critical Present, Tom Eyers writes, "Humanities scholarship in the United States and United Kingdom is perhaps more fragmented now than at any time in recent memory" (33). We might think of this fragmentation in terms of the ongoing culture wars, accounts of critical history that continually condemn the past in favor of the new, the never-ending supply of "theoretical subcultures" (33) competing to fill the void left after the demise of the romantic–modernist literary assumptions underwriting the paradigms that governed criticism through the 1980s, and of course, a job market that each year brings the university sponsorship of literary studies one step closer to ... Read More
      Keywords: Vizenor, Gerald Robert,; American literature; Arabic literature; India; Petrarca, Francesco,; European literature; Borges, Jorge Luis,; Caribbean fiction (English); Secularization (Theology); Education, Higher; Wallace, David Foster; Translating and interpretin
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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