Journal Cover Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
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   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0969-6989
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3175 journals]
  • Proximity and time in convenience store patronage: Kaïros more than
           chronos
    • Authors: Marie-Christine Gahinet; Gérard Cliquet
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Marie-Christine Gahinet, Gérard Cliquet
      This research questions the notions of proximity and time in retailing and attempt to predict customers’ intention to patronize the new convenience store concepts developed recently in France. The analysis of 22 qualitative interviews with retailers and customers has led to propose a conceptual model that has been tested empirically on two samples of 250 customers each, based on PLS structural equation modeling. Results show that customers patronize convenience stores primarily because of relational and functional proximity, but also because these stores allow them to save time (chronos), and to better manage their time through more opportune frequentation (kaïros).

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.008
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Social media use by young Latin American consumers: An exploration
    • Authors: Ainsworth Anthony Bailey; Carolyn M. Bonifield; Alejandro Arias
      Pages: 10 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Ainsworth Anthony Bailey, Carolyn M. Bonifield, Alejandro Arias
      This paper reports on a study that was undertaken to explore the factors that drive social media use among young consumers in Latin America, a region of the world in which such studies have been sparse. The research involves the application of an extended TAM, with the addition of three new model variables whose impact on social media use have not been explored previously: social facilitation experience, fear of missing out (FoMO), and general online social interaction propensity (GOSIP). In addition, the outcome variable relates to active social media behaviors, a novel dependent variable in this stream of research. The model is tested using SEM. The results show that social influence, social facilitation experience, perceived ease of use (PEOU), and perceived enjoyment (PE) are all significantly linked to perceived usefulness (PU) of social media; however, FoMO is not. GOSIP, PU, and PE are positively related to attitude toward social media use, which is positively related to active social media behaviors. We discuss the results and provide limitations and avenues for future research.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.003
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Stock market reaction to irregular supermarket chain behaviour: An
           investigation in the retail sectors of Ireland and the United Kingdom
    • Authors: Shaen Corbet; Caroline McMullan
      Pages: 20 - 29
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Shaen Corbet, Caroline McMullan
      The creation of a single European currency, financial crises, changing consumer tastes and the entry of a significant number of new competitors has created an extremely competitive retail environment in Ireland and the United Kingdom. To defend market share, some retail companies have resorted to a variety of questionable, unethical and illicit techniques. This paper examines the reaction of investors to such incidents involving publicly traded companies. An ARMAX-GARCH(1,1) model is utilised to present evidence that increased market volatility is associated with detrimental internal behaviour and financial malpractice which may reassure regulators that these actions are not considered by investors as an acceptable manner in which to operate a company. Further, investors often do not consider a single company to be at fault, but rather punish the entire retail sector for diminished responsibility due to substandard quality assurance.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.011
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Corporate association as antecedents of consumer behaviors: The dynamics
           of trust within and between industries
    • Authors: Hyo Sun Jung; Kyung Hwa Seo; Soo Bum Lee; Hye Hyun Yoon
      Pages: 30 - 38
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Hyo Sun Jung, Kyung Hwa Seo, Soo Bum Lee, Hye Hyun Yoon
      This study aimed to clarify the effects of consumers’ corporate association (commercial expertise association and social responsibility association) on consumer citizenship behavior. In addition, the study examines the moderating effects of consumer trust and industry type on consumers’ perceptions of corporate association. The sample consisted of 633 consumers in South Korea. The results showed that the consumers’ perceptions of corporate association had a significant and positive effect on consumer citizenship behavior. In particular, commercial expertise association had a greater effect than social responsibility association. In addition, the moderating effects of consumer trust and industry type in the causal relationship between corporate association and consumer citizenship behavior were verified. The results revealed no moderating effect on the path between social responsibility association and consumer citizenship behavior. However, according to consumer trust and industry type, a significant moderating effect was found on the relationship between commercial expertise association and consumer citizenship behavior.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.010
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Identifying superfluous survey items
    • Authors: Kylie Brosnan; Bettina Grün; Sara Dolnicar
      Pages: 39 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Kylie Brosnan, Bettina Grün, Sara Dolnicar
      Surveys provide critical insights into consumer satisfaction and experience. Excessive survey length, however, can reduce data quality. We propose using constrained principle components analysis to shorten the survey length in a data-driven way by identifying optimal items with maximum information. The method allows assessing item elimination potential, and explicitly identifies which items provide maximum information for a specified number of items. We use artificial data to explain the method, provide two illustrations with empirical survey data, and make code freely available in an online tool

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.007
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Consumer adoption of mobile banking services: An empirical examination of
           factors according to adoption stages
    • Authors: Mahmud Akhter Shareef; Abdullah Baabdullah; Shantanu Dutta; Vinod Kumar; Yogesh K. Dwivedi
      Pages: 54 - 67
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Mahmud Akhter Shareef, Abdullah Baabdullah, Shantanu Dutta, Vinod Kumar, Yogesh K. Dwivedi
      Many seminal studies have explored consumers’ attitude and perception to adopt mobile banking as a general and unique service channel. However, no empirical studies have so far addressed consumers’ intentions to select mobile banking service delivery channel from behavioral, technological, social, cultural, and organizational perspectives for the three distinct stages like static, interaction, and transaction service. This quantitative study investigates consumers’ behavioral intentions to adopt mobile banking at the three distinct service stages. It is designed to examine this behavioral pattern based on the theoretical concept of GAM model. In this regard, an extensive empirical study was conducted among mobile banking service receivers in Bangladesh. The results reveal that driving factors of consumers’ behavioral intentions to adopt mobile banking at the static, interaction, and transaction service phases are significantly different, providing important theoretical and practical contributions.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.003
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Complaint as a persuasion attempt: Front line employees’ perceptions
           of complaint legitimacy
    • Authors: Denis Khantimirov; Kiran Karande
      Pages: 68 - 76
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Denis Khantimirov, Kiran Karande
      Given the rising number of fraudulent returns and illegitimate complaints both in merchandise and service settings, the purpose of this paper is to advance our understanding of such behavior by examining employees’ perceptions of complaint legitimacy. Determining complaint authenticity is a crucial step towards detecting fraudulent claims since employees must judge legitimacy of the complaint according to the rationale offered by the customer. This research conceptualizes complaints as an attempt at persuasion by the customer and empirically tests whether persuasion models work in reverse, i.e. where a customer plays no longer a role of a target but rather acts as a message source. The proposed model draws on source, context and receiver factors and findings indicate that the fundamentals of persuasion research are also applicable to complaining episodes. Using survey data collected from the front line hotel employees, customer (customer trustworthiness and attractiveness), situational (severity of service failure), and employee (customer orientation and conflict avoidance) characteristics were found to have an impact on the target's perceptions concerning the cognitive legitimacy of the message itself. In essence, the present study suggests that the employee perception on whether the voiced complaint is legitimate or not go far beyond the actual message itself; rather, employees make their conclusions on complaint legitimacy based on peripheral cues and internal characteristics.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • The survival consequences of intellectual property for retail ventures
    • Authors: Pankaj C. Patel; John A. Pearce
      Pages: 77 - 84
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Pankaj C. Patel, John A. Pearce
      While the value of patents is documented widely for technology ventures, whether retail ventures can improve their survival odds from patents, copyrights or trademarks remains unexplored. Given the relatively lower survival rate of retail ventures, whether investing in intellectual property could improve their survival odds is an important research question for both the retailing and entrepreneurship literatures. Based on a sample of 585 retail and 2406 non-retail ventures in the Kauffman Firm Survey, retail ventures have a lower chance of survival. Compared to non-retail ventures, patents, trademarks or copyrights in retail ventures increase the odds of survival. The findings have implications for resource allocations related to intellectual property in retail ventures.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.005
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Inside-outside: Using eye-tracking to investigate search-choice processes
           in the retail environment
    • Authors: Patricia T. Huddleston; Bridget K. Behe; Carl Driesener; S. Minahan
      Pages: 85 - 93
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Patricia T. Huddleston, Bridget K. Behe, Carl Driesener, S. Minahan
      In the retail environment, attention is requisite to purchase, attention being the collection and assessment of stimuli from our senses (visual stimuli are generally the most important) for cognitive processing according to the needs of the moment. Visual attention is easily and affordably measured today using eye tracking technology. This paper reviews the “state of play” of the use of eye tracking technology as a research tool in retail and retail marketing. The review is timely as during the last decade many non-proprietary eye tracking studies have been published in marketing, consumer behavior, and retail journals, and additional work is expected as the technology gains adoption in consumer research. We reviewed studies that contributed to an understanding of consumer behavior in the gold standard of consumer interface: the retail store. The goal of the paper is to provide a synthesis of retail-focused eye tracking study findings. We present the managerial and theoretical significance of the research as well as an agenda that considers the use of eye tracking from pre-shopping through point of sale.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.006
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • To what extent luxury retailing can be smart'
    • Authors: Eleonora Pantano; Rosanna Passavanti; Constantinos-Vasilios Priporas; Saverino Verteramo
      Pages: 94 - 100
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Eleonora Pantano, Rosanna Passavanti, Constantinos-Vasilios Priporas, Saverino Verteramo
      The aim of this paper is to explore how luxury brands use new technologies in the context of smart retailing. Building on qualitative data from multiple cases from the luxury industry, our analysis reveals that this sector is conscious of the benefits of using smart technologies as marketing tools, while the effective use of these innovative systems is still limited. However, studies on innovation forces affecting the retail industry are still limited in luxury sectors. The study provides an empirical contribution to the emerging topic of smart retailing with an emphasis on the luxury sector through its in-depth investigation of the usage of smart technologies by the firms studied.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.012
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • On the relationship between consumer-brand identification, brand
           community, and brand loyalty
    • Authors: Pedro Simões Coelho; Paulo Rita; Zélia Raposo Santos
      Pages: 101 - 110
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Pedro Simões Coelho, Paulo Rita, Zélia Raposo Santos
      Recent studies have highlighted the importance of social media brand communities to brand loyalty. This paper aims to stress the role of the brand in that relationship, suggesting a conceptual model in mass-market products in which consumers’ engagement in social media brand communities, brand identity, and consumer-brand identification are related to brand outcomes, such as trust and loyalty. A qualitative analysis was conducted, through in-depth interviews with experts and focus group discussions with consumers, so as to evaluate their experience with brands on social media. The findings indicated that in mass-markets, consumers engaged in social media brand communities may develop positive attitudes towards the brand, such as trust and loyalty, and that consumer-brand identification may have a fundamental role in transforming consumer-brand community interactions into consumer-brand relationships.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.011
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Investigating the mediating effect of Uber's sexual harassment case on its
           brand: Does it matter'
    • Authors: Denni Arli Griffith; Patrick van Esch; Makayla Trittenbach
      Pages: 111 - 118
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Denni Arli Griffith, Patrick van Esch, Makayla Trittenbach
      Following a barrage of serious allegations regarding a corporate culture that engendered sexual harassment, and discrimination, Uber lost a number of senior executives including its CEO. The phenomenon begs the question as to how much the scandals have affected the popular brand. The purpose of this study is to investigate consumer attitudes towards sexual harassment at Uber and the effects of anger about the scandal on Uber's brand popularity. Investigating such issues at a high profile service based organization highlights the nuances of employee and consumer attitudes and behaviors in the new technology-driven sharing economy. Participants (n = 201) were recruited through an online survey platform. Regarding factors affecting Uber's brand popularity, the findings of this study reveal that inequitable treatment by Uber negatively affects brand popularity, while consumer attachment to Uber positively affects Uber's brand popularity. Regarding the mediating effect of ‘Acceptance of Sexual Harassment at Uber’ on brand popularity, the results show that acceptance of sexual harassment only mediates the relationship between consumers’ attachment toward Uber and its brand popularity. Analysis further revealed that the sexual harassment case will not be as damaging as many people initially predicted. This study will assist managers who work in various sharing economy industries and those with devout followers, such as Uber and AirBnB, on how to recover from a scandal.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.007
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Food shoppers’ share of wallet: A small city case in a changing
           competitive environment
    • Authors: Muhammad Masood Azeem; Derek Baker; Renato A. Villano; Stuart Mounter; Garry Griffith
      Pages: 119 - 130
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Muhammad Masood Azeem, Derek Baker, Renato A. Villano, Stuart Mounter, Garry Griffith
      Australia's highly concentrated food retail environment is examined in the context of competitive entry in a small city. Based on a conceptual framework that draws on existing literature, food stores’ customers’ share of wallet (SOW) is measured in a survey (n = 379) which brackets the opening of a new supermarket. A number of variables are recorded in the survey that are not available from other data collection methods. The drivers of SOW are determined using a 2-limit Tobit model which incorporates the direct and interactive aspects of the pathways identified in the Conceptual Framework. At one of the stores (Woolworths), the influence of loyalty schemes is found to vary with customers’ perceptions of stores, with implications for enhanced customer targeting by food retail managers. The impact of loyalty programs is found to be mitigated by the entry of a competitor, particularly in the case of price-conscious customers. Senior citizens are found to allocate higher SOW to small rather than large stores, and there are small effects due to the sex of the customer. There are few indications of a bespoke small city model of the drivers of SOW, but a number of interactions are identified for future research.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.009
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • The role of identification in frontline employee decision-making
    • Authors: Rita Di Mascio; Johra Fatima
      Pages: 131 - 138
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Rita Di Mascio, Johra Fatima
      Literature claims that frontline employees (FLEs) who identify strongly with brands and organizations are more likely to make decisions that are aligned with the objectives of brand (Kimpakorn and Tocquer, 2009) and organization (Smidts et al., 2001). This claim is based on studies of general FLE identification and behaviors, and coheres with an implicit assumption in marketing literature that FLE identification levels are stable, with predictable behavioral outcomes. However, it is unknown whether the claim applies to specific instances of decision-making. This article is a first step toward testing that claim. A self-report survey was used that asked retail FLEs to think of a difficult situation they faced recently while serving a customer, and the factors they considered in resolving the situation; and then asked about general levels of brand- and organizational-identification. The stated likelihood of considering brand- and organization-factors was unrelated to general brand- and organizational-identification, but was related to service experience. This study suggests that: (a) FLE brand- and organizational- identification should be viewed as less stable (or more labile) than currently assumed in marketing literature, and that general levels of identification may not transfer to some specific situations of decision-making; (b) employees can distinguish between organization and brand identities; and (c) researchers studying retail FLE identification using survey methods should incorporate robustness checks to deal with lability of identification.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.008
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Do ethnocentric consumers really buy local products'
    • Authors: Hélène Yildiz; Sandrine Heitz-Spahn; Lydie Belaud
      Pages: 139 - 148
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Hélène Yildiz, Sandrine Heitz-Spahn, Lydie Belaud
      While the impact of consumer ethnocentrism on preference for local products has received extensive attention by researchers, this research provides further understanding by investigating the impact of commitment to a consumer's place of leaving on consumer's attitudes towards local product and on effective purchase of local products. Based on the concept of behavioral commitment from Kiesler's theory (1973), this research shows that a consumer with a high degree of ethnocentrism has a more favorable attitude towards local products than the one committed to his place of life. However, when it comes to effective purchase of local products, a consumer who is strongly committed to his place of life tends to purchase local products more than a consumer with a high level of ethnocentrism. This research contributes to existing research in supporting Kiesler's argument that consumer behavioral commitment has a stronger effect on local product purchase than beliefs (in this case ethnocentrism). In terms of practice, this research may orient retailers, manufacturers and public organizations to strengthen consumers’ commitment to their place of life.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.004
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Electronic word-of-mouth and the brand image: Exploring the moderating
           role of involvement through a consumer expectations lens
    • Authors: Anup Krishnamurthy; S. Ramesh Kumar
      Pages: 149 - 156
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Anup Krishnamurthy, S. Ramesh Kumar
      Electronic word-of-mouth (EWOM) information is used by consumers to form expectations of the brand. By properly managing consumers' expectations of a brand, managers can mitigate brand image problems. Thus, this study uses an expectations lens to investigate consumers' perceptions of the brand image formed by exposure to EWOM under the moderating influence of consumer involvement. Data were collected from over 1000 consumers across USA and India, and across smartphone and hotel services categories, using online simulations of EWOM. Findings suggest that high- versus low-involvement consumers will go through more EWOM information and spend more time with EWOM to develop an expectation or idea of the brand. High-involvement consumers also form a better image of the brand. Based on these findings, the authors develop a matrix that represents the possible strategies managers could use to encourage the formation of a good brand image from a consumer's perspective.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.010
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Wearable technology: What explains continuance intention in
           smartwatches'
    • Authors: Bruno Nascimento; Tiago Oliveira; Carlos Tam
      Pages: 157 - 169
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Bruno Nascimento, Tiago Oliveira, Carlos Tam
      Smartwatch is a recent and significant development in the domain of wearable technology. We study continuance intention and its determinants, using a combination of the expectation-confirmation model (ECM) with habit, perceived usability, and perceived enjoyment, to explain the continuance intention of smartwatches. Based on a sample of 574 individuals collected from the USA, we show that relationships of ECM enhance the continuance intention, such as confirmation, perceived usefulness, and satisfaction, and also the role of habit and perceived usability. Additionally, we find that habit was the most important feature to explain the continuance intention of smartwatches. The paper ends with a discussion of the study's limitations and implications.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.017
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Impact of the link between individuals and their region on the
           customer-regional brand relationship
    • Authors: Florence Charton-Vachet; Cindy Lombart
      Pages: 170 - 187
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Florence Charton-Vachet, Cindy Lombart
      This study examines the influence of the link between individuals and their region on the development and translation of the consumer-regional brand relationship through the concepts of trust, attachment, affective commitment, attitude and behavioral intentions. Based on data collected from 311 consumers in a supermarket in France, the study finds that the relationships established between consumers who value their region and the brands of this region vary with the positioning adopted and the products offered by these brands. It also highlights that the duration of consumers’ residence in the region improves the understanding of the studied relationships.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.016
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Providing sustainability information in shopping situations contributes to
           sustainable decision making: An empirical study with choice-based conjoint
           analyses
    • Authors: Gerrit Stöckigt; Johannes Schiebener; Matthias Brand
      Pages: 188 - 199
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Gerrit Stöckigt, Johannes Schiebener, Matthias Brand
      In their 2030 Agenda for sustainable development, the United Nations make clear that actions are required to keep the Earth inhabitable. As everybody is asked to do their share, we tried to contribute to answering the question of what consumers and suppliers can do in this regard. Using choice-based conjoint tasks, we confronted participants with decision situations in the form of simulated buying scenarios. Further, we investigated personality, materialism, and delay discounting. Results suggest a considerable effect of sustainability information on decision making. Delay discounting and materialism are negatively linked to sustainable decision making. The study indicates that consumers would contribute to sustainable development more if suppliers helped them by providing clear sustainability information.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.018
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Assessing the sales effectiveness of differently located endcaps in a
           supermarket
    • Authors: Pei Jie Tan; Armando Corsi; Justin Cohen; Anne Sharp; Larry Lockshin; William Caruso; Svetlana Bogomolova
      Pages: 200 - 208
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Pei Jie Tan, Armando Corsi, Justin Cohen, Anne Sharp, Larry Lockshin, William Caruso, Svetlana Bogomolova
      This paper compares the sales effectiveness of front versus back located end-of-aisle promotional displays (endcaps) in a supermarket, through measuring sales from the endcaps alone, as well as total brand sales, across three experiments. This paper reveals that rear endcaps generate a higher total brand sales uplift than front endcaps, acting like “billboards” to draw shoppers into the main aisle. On average, rear endcaps generated 416% sales uplift, while front endcaps generated 346% sales uplift. However, front endcaps deliver higher endcap-only sales uplift. These findings challenge industry assumptions about one of the most commonly used promotional tools.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.015
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Resale pricing in franchised stores: A franchisor perspective
    • Authors: Rozenn Perrigot; Guy Basset
      Pages: 209 - 217
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Rozenn Perrigot, Guy Basset
      How resale prices in franchising are determined is of particular interest to franchisors and franchisees, as well as researchers, due to their links with customer attraction, chain uniformity, franchisor know-how, franchisee autonomy and legal dimensions. We combine legal and managerial considerations to assess the way franchisors perceive price-setting policies within their chains by looking at which specific practices are involved in franchise chains, which rules are approved by franchisors, which ones franchisors comply with or skirt, etc. This empirical study is based on an analysis of 19 semi-structured interviews with franchisors from different brands and industries running their businesses in the French market. Findings show that franchisors have different understandings of their franchisees' freedom in terms of resale pricing. Even though the ban on directly imposed resale prices on franchisees seems to be accepted in practice by interviewed franchisors, some franchisors impose prices without openly admitting to it. This paper can be considered by franchise experts, franchisors, franchisees and franchisee candidates as an overview of resale price-related legal aspects, adopted practices and potential conflicts in franchise chains. It also highlights price-related practices to be avoided in order to prevent potential conflicts in franchise chains.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.008
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Influence of thinking style and attribution on consumer response to online
           stockouts
    • Authors: Ke Ma; Tong Chen; Chundong Zheng
      Pages: 218 - 225
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Ke Ma, Tong Chen, Chundong Zheng
      Although consumers’ responses to stockouts have been well documented, previous research findings report inconsistencies. Drawing on consumer thinking style and attribution theory, we investigate why consumers react differently toward stockouts. Through two experimental studies, we show consumer thinking style has an impact on attitude toward stockouts (involving both the product as well as the online retailer). Attribution mediates the effect of thinking style on attitude toward a stockout experience. Analytic thinkers focus on the attributes of out of stock products and evaluate out-of-stock events more negatively than holistic thinkers. Our results indicate information elaboration can improve evaluation by analytic thinkers. By raising awareness of the different effects stockouts have on consumers, online retailers can employ effective methods to minimize negative reactions.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.014
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Linking concepts of playfulness and well-being at work in retail sector
    • Authors: Sari Alatalo; Eeva-Liisa Oikarinen; Arto Reiman; Teck Ming Tan; Eija-Liisa Heikka; Pia Hurmelinna-Laukkanen; Matti Muhos; Taina Vuorela
      Pages: 226 - 233
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Sari Alatalo, Eeva-Liisa Oikarinen, Arto Reiman, Teck Ming Tan, Eija-Liisa Heikka, Pia Hurmelinna-Laukkanen, Matti Muhos, Taina Vuorela
      This conceptual article discusses the roles of playfulness and well-being at work in the retail sector with a specific emphasis on service encounters. The aim is to create a new conceptual framework to enhance research on how the element of playfulness can be part of an employee's working environment in the retail sector, and to discuss how playfulness could enhance employee's well-being at work. The framework identifies various interactive relationships characteristic to the retail environment. Furthermore, the application of playfulness in these relationships is discussed from the viewpoint of well-being at work. The framework provides a solid basis for further research to produce results with practical implications.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.013
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Brand engagement and search for brands on social media: Comparing
           Generations X and Y in Portugal
    • Authors: Marisa Bento; Luisa M. Martinez; Luis F. Martinez
      Pages: 234 - 241
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Marisa Bento, Luisa M. Martinez, Luis F. Martinez
      This paper characterizes both Generation X's and Generation Y's brand engagement on referral intentions and electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) through social media, namely Facebook. Using an online questionnaire conducted across 332 participants in Portugal, the results showed that Generation Y members consumed more content on Facebook brands’ pages than Generation X. Also, they were more likely to have an e-WOM referral intention as well as being more driven by brand affiliation, promotions and discounts. Additionally, currently employed individuals were found to contribute more frequently (e.g., posting, liking, following and sharing) than students. Our findings also revealed that Generation Y was regarded as the most cost-conscious generation. Finally, practical implications are discussed, as brands should adapt their posted online content to the characteristics of their specific audience. Accordingly, value co-creation among community participants acts as a prominent driving force in the context of social media.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.04.003
      Issue No: Vol. 43 (2018)
       
  • Effects of brand attitude and eWOM on consumers’ willingness to pay in
           the banking industry: Mediating role of consumer-brand identification and
           brand equity
    • Authors: Mário Augusto; Pedro Torres
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Mário Augusto, Pedro Torres
      The aim of this research is to investigate the influence of brand attitude (BAtt) and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) on the willingness of customers to pay premium prices (WTPp) in the banking industry. The proposed conceptual model includes a full mediation of consumer-brand identification and consumer-based brand equity. The data was gathered through a web survey, which was administered among bank customers, yielding a total of 280 valid responses. The analysis was conducted using structural equation modelling. The results shed light on the process that transforms BAtt and eWOM in WTPp. The study has important implications for both theory and practice.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.005
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Perceived probability of food waste: Influence on consumer attitudes
           towards and choice of sales promotions
    • Authors: Guillaume Le Borgne; Lucie Sirieix; Sandrine Costa
      Pages: 11 - 21
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Guillaume Le Borgne, Lucie Sirieix, Sandrine Costa
      Based on a consumer survey including two experiments with more than 400 French respondents each, this research (1), establishes that consumers’ perceived probability of waste has a significant negative effect on consumers’ attitude towards promotions and consumers’ intention to choose perishable food products (cheese and bread) on sale and (2), highlights skepticism towards the “Buy Two Get One Free later” offer. Recommendations are presented for managers and public policies, in order to reduce households’ food waste and prevent consumers from being skeptical towards new promotional mechanisms, a brand and/or, a retailer.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.004
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Luxury product to service brand extension and brand equity transfer
    • Authors: Jiseon Ahn; Jung Kun Park; Hyowon Hyun
      Pages: 22 - 28
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Jiseon Ahn, Jung Kun Park, Hyowon Hyun
      The aim of the present study is to establish a framework for the study of luxury brand extension and to discover whether the brand equity of the parent product brand can be transferred to the extended service brand. Despite many benefits achieved by implementing successful brand extension strategies in the luxury industry, there are several obstacles that negatively influence both the extended brand and the parent brand. Because a negative effect of the vertical brand extension was found in past studies, this study focused on the horizontal brand extension to evaluate and predict possible positive outcomes in the horizontal brand extension process. Thus, this study investigates the role of brand equity, especially when the luxury brand was used to introduce upscaled service brands, in relation to a theoretical framework of brand equity. Additionally, the difference in the purchase intention among demographic groups was examined as it might offer an opportunity for developing a new strategy.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.009
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Distinctive competencies and competency-based management in regulated
           sectors: A methodological proposal applied to the pharmaceutical retail
           sector in Spain
    • Authors: Alberto Ibañez Fernandez; Pedro Reinares Lara; Monica Cortiñas Ugalde; Gyanendra Singh Sisodia
      Pages: 29 - 36
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Alberto Ibañez Fernandez, Pedro Reinares Lara, Monica Cortiñas Ugalde, Gyanendra Singh Sisodia
      To gain the competitive advantage needed to survive and compete in an environment led by large distribution chains, small-scale retailers need to develop distinctive competencies. This is particularly relevant in the case of retail pharmacies, which are already affected by continuously eroding profit margins, increasing liberalization of the sector and growing competition from new non-pharmaceutical outlets. Against this background, this paper contributes to identifying distinctive competencies with the potential to enhance business performance in retail pharmacies. Using structural equation modelling on a sample of Spanish pharmacies, it also establishes relationships between possession of certain distinctive competencies and success in building a sustainable competitive advantage.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.007
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • The effect of information exposure of contract manufacturing practice on
           consumers' perceived risk, perceived quality, and intention to purchase
           private label brand
    • Authors: Fathony Rahman; Primidya K.M. Soesilo
      Pages: 37 - 46
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Fathony Rahman, Primidya K.M. Soesilo


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.010
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Clothing selection motivations and the meaning of possessions for tweens
           in a foster care group home
    • Authors: Hyo Jung (Julie) Chang; Malinda J. Colwell; Desiree N. Walisky
      Pages: 47 - 54
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Hyo Jung (Julie) Chang, Malinda J. Colwell, Desiree N. Walisky
      It is important for foster caregivers to understand children's basic and psychological needs in order to provide better life experiences, and minimize the risk and vulnerability they previously experienced. Thus, this study is designed to understand clothing selection motivations and the meaning of possessions for foster tweens and how these are related to their life experiences in foster care group homes. We conducted qualitative in-depth focus group interviews with 18 tweens in a foster care group home in the Southwest region in the U.S. Thematic interpretation was used to analyze the interview data. Six themes emerged from the data including social acceptance, self-expression, family connection, independence, ownership, and respect. Participants expressed their individual character by the clothing they chose and expressed various needs of self-expression and social interaction. We also found that clothing and possessions play an important role in giving meanings to social interactions for tweens in the foster home. Furthermore, the findings of this study emphasize the need for proper education of foster care parents and tweens regarding ownership of property and respect in a foster care group home.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.014
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Joking with customers in the service encounter has a negative impact on
           customer satisfaction: Replication and extension
    • Authors: Magnus Söderlund; Eeva-Liisa Oikarinen
      Pages: 55 - 64
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Magnus Söderlund, Eeva-Liisa Oikarinen
      Previous research has indicated that employee joke-telling in the service encounter can have a negative impact on customer satisfaction, particularly with respect to perceived overall message relevance as a mediating variable. The present study is an attempt to examine if these results would be replicated in service encounter settings with other characteristics. Two experiments were conducted, and the previous pattern was reproduced: customer satisfaction was reduced when employees told jokes compared to when jokes were not told. The results also indicate that employee joke-telling reduced both perceived relevance and positive affect, and that these two variables mediated the association between employee joke-telling and customer satisfaction. The results should be seen in contrast to several humor studies in an advertising context showing that humor-comprising ads can have positive effects on the receiver. One main reason for the differences is that a service encounter typically includes also other elements than humor in the employee's communication with a customer, and that employee humor usage attenuates the customer's attention to and comprehension of those other elements.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.013
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • How to influence consumer mindset: A perspective from service recovery
    • Authors: Ahasan Harun; Md Rokonuzzaman; Gayle Prybutok; Victor R. Prybutok
      Pages: 65 - 77
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Ahasan Harun, Md Rokonuzzaman, Gayle Prybutok, Victor R. Prybutok
      This research examines a theoretical framework that evaluates the effectiveness of service recovery strategies in influencing post-complaint consumer mindset. Based on the Justice Theory (Adams, 1963), this study investigates the interrelationships among the focal constructs related to consumers’ behavioral and attitudinal factors after experiencing service failure. We evaluate the proposed framework through the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). This study contributes to the extant literature by: a) identifying the antecedents of positive word-of-mouth in service recovery context, b) helping service industry practitioners by showing a way to tailor their service recovery strategies through the use of importance-performance map analysis (IPMA) at both the construct and indicator levels, and c) providing a unique platform by analyzing real consumer experiences as opposed to the most extant researches which examine simulated consumer behaviors based on hypothetical scenarios. The results of this study indicate that through effective execution of service recovery strategies, it is possible to create strong sense of justice in a consumer's mind, which then service industry practitioners can leverage through loyalty to create more impact on post-complaint consumer mindset. This study also provides several theoretical and managerial implications.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.012
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Relationship quality as an antecedent of customer relationship proneness:
           A cross-cultural study between Spain and Mexico
    • Authors: Ana Olavarría-Jaraba; Jesús J. Cambra-Fierro; Edgar Centeno; Rosario Vázquez-Carrasco
      Pages: 78 - 87
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Ana Olavarría-Jaraba, Jesús J. Cambra-Fierro, Edgar Centeno, Rosario Vázquez-Carrasco
      Key factors, such as globalization and the development of information technologies, have forced some firms to change their approach to customer relationship management, particularly within the new competitive framework of online channels. In this context, customer relationship proneness may guide relationship quality (RQ) by keeping commercial relations alive. This research proposes and examines a conceptual model using a comprehensive management approach that includes market orientation (MO), knowledge management (KM), and perceived relationship investment (PRI) as perceived by customers, which, when available, enhance RQ in an online context. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the effect of RQ on CRP, making a unique contribution to better understanding the continuity of customer–firm relationships. The proposed conceptual model is tested in two different cultures and economic stages, providing relevant insights on the cross-cultural relationship marketing literature. Survey questionnaires are administered to a sample of Spanish and Mexican banking customers, and structural equation modeling, using partial least squares, is used to analyze the data collected. The results show that, in both countries, CRP is significantly influenced by RQ, while PRI should be considered when improving the quality of customer relationships. However, intangible aspects (such as the level of MO or KM) seem to be relevant in more mature, competitive markets whose customers show a higher level of LTO. In terms of practical applications, banks must recognize that customers give different priorities to different capabilities and resources based on their perceptions of the RQ. Hence, banks should give clear priorities to commercial strategies aimed at improving RQ. Implications of the results are discussed, and future research avenues suggested.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.011
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Do consumers judge a book by its cover' A study of the factors that
           influence the purchasing of books
    • Authors: Luís Leitão; Suzanne Amaro; Carla Henriques; Paula Fonseca
      Pages: 88 - 97
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Luís Leitão, Suzanne Amaro, Carla Henriques, Paula Fonseca
      Research addressing the critical success factor of books and how people choose them is scarce. This study examines the factors that influence consumers when purchasing fictional books and explores whether there are differences between purchasing books for personal use or as gifts. Furthermore, it also studies impulsiveness regarding the purchase. A quantitative empirical analysis was conducted based on 487 valid responses obtained through an online questionnaire. The results of this study show that approximately one third of books are purchased as gifts, women buy and read more books than men and higher educated and older consumers tend to read and buy more books. The purchase is less impulsive when the book is a gift and women are more impulsive, when buying for themselves. In the decision-making process, the features most valued in a book are: the "Title”, "Synopsis”, “Subject covered in book”, “Recommendation of family and friends” and “Books with discount/on sale”. Twenty-four items were considered based on these features and the same factor structure was found for both buying books for personal use and as gifts. Consumers tend to value more the “Recommendation of family and friends” when buying a book for themselves rather than as a gift. However, “Author and book recognition” is more important to the consumer when the book is purchased as a gift. The findings of this study provide important insights regarding consumer preferences, which will be useful for marketers to define strategies. Moreover, by comparing the factors that influence people to buy books for themselves as opposed to buying them as gifts, bookstores can strive to satisfy consumer demands, by conceiving and implementing new ideas in order to increase their book sales.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.015
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Profiling the entitled consumer when individualism and collectivism are
           co-dominant
    • Authors: Philip Edey; Joseann Knight
      Pages: 98 - 106
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Philip Edey, Joseann Knight


      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Exploring the adoption of self-service checkouts and the associated social
           obligations of shopping practices
    • Authors: Sandy Bulmer; Jonathan Elms; Simon Moore
      Pages: 107 - 116
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Sandy Bulmer, Jonathan Elms, Simon Moore
      While retailers and other service providers are increasingly introducing self-service checkouts into stores, these technologies do not have universal appeal for consumers. The literature offers limited understanding of how self-service checkouts influence shopping practices and consumers’ experiences of the in-store environment. Using the lens of practice theory, this paper explores adoption of self-service checkouts by consumers. Semi-structured face to face interviews were used to capture consumers’ discursive accounts of their shopping practices, and to examine their interactions with self-service checkouts. Findings illustrate that unwilling customers feel a sense of social obligation to use self-service checkouts at times in order to help others. This study provides a broader appreciation of how consumers engage with self-service checkout processes, and extends understanding of how consumers manage the paradoxes that surround the introduction of in-store technologies by retailers. The managerial implications of self-service checkouts for retailers are also discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.016
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Regional product assortment and merchandising in grocery stores:
           Strategies and target customer segments
    • Authors: Cindy Lombart; Blandine Labbé-Pinlon; Marc Filser; Blandine Antéblian; Didier Louis
      Pages: 117 - 132
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Cindy Lombart, Blandine Labbé-Pinlon, Marc Filser, Blandine Antéblian, Didier Louis
      This research examines consumers’ in-store reactions to regional products. A field study has been conducted in two stores which adopt different types of visual and shelf merchandising strategies (i.e., regional products are located within their product categories with POS ads (n = 307) versus in a dedicated space with theatrical visual merchandising (n = 404)). This research shows that consumers’ perceptions of regional products assortment and merchandising (for the store where regional products are located within their product categories) have a direct impact on retailer's local image and their loyalty toward these products and an indirect impact, through these two variables, on their loyalty toward the store. This research thus points out the superior performance of the strategy of merchandising regional products within their product categories, using POS ads to identify them. This research also highlights the existence of the two groups of consumers (i.e., the “regionals” and the “moderates”) who are the most receptive to the regional products offered by grocery stores and on which retailers should concentrate their sales promotion efforts.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.002
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Exploring consumers perceived risk and trust for mobile shopping: A
           theoretical framework and empirical study
    • Authors: Hannah R. Marriott; Michael D. Williams
      Pages: 133 - 146
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Hannah R. Marriott, Michael D. Williams
      Despite mobile device usage being at an all-time high, their utilisation for mobile shopping activities is inherently low. The study, first, identifies prominent areas of academic concern and examines areas requiring further insight. A theoretical model is developed to examine multi-faceted risk and trust effects on consumer adoption intention. Empirical results demonstrate several trust and risk perceptions as having varying effects on consumers’ m-shopping intention. Inclusion of age and gender reveals discrepancies among positive and negative influencers of intention. Results contribute to theoretical and practical understandings surrounding deterrents of intention and potential risk-reduction mechanisms for future considerations.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.017
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Predictors of customer acceptance of and resistance to smart technologies
           in the retail sector
    • Authors: Sanjit Kumar Roy; M.S. Balaji; Ali Quazi; Mohammed Quaddus
      Pages: 147 - 160
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Sanjit Kumar Roy, M.S. Balaji, Ali Quazi, Mohammed Quaddus
      In recent decades, rapid advances in Internet technology have led to numerous innovative smart technologies. This research investigates the customer acceptance of and resistance to smart technologies in the retail sector, by integrating the literature on technology acceptance model, system characteristics, technology readiness, and store reputation. Data were collected using a quantitative survey and analysed using symmetrical PLS path modelling and asymmetrical fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). Results show complex relationships among perceived technology readiness, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, superior functionality, perceived adaptiveness, and store reputation in determining customers’ attitudes and behavioural intentions towards smart retail technologies. The findings also show that technology readiness does not directly affect customer attitude but does indirectly through perceived innovation characteristics. The findings indicate that retail stores should focus on smart technologies that are simple, yet offer enhanced customer value through improved shopping efficiency. Findings also suggest that retail stores can engage in brand management strategies to improve customers’ acceptance of smart technologies.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.005
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Exploring hidden factors behind online food shopping from Amazon reviews:
           A topic mining approach
    • Authors: Yan Heng; Zhifeng Gao; Yuan Jiang; Xuqi Chen
      Pages: 161 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Yan Heng, Zhifeng Gao, Yuan Jiang, Xuqi Chen
      Despite the popularity of online food and grocery shopping, little research has been conducted to understand the factors that influence consumers’ online food purchases. Using a topic modeling approach, our results show four interpretable factors have significant impacts on the helpfulness of customer reviews: Amazon Service, Physical Feature, Flavor Feature, and Subjective Expression. Readers of customer reviews perceive objective reviews as more helpful than subjective reviews. In addition, customer review helpfulness has a concave relationship with the length of the reviews. Our results provide important business implications on how to encourage more helpful reviews to assist potential shoppers in making better purchase decisions.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.006
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • A holistic understanding of the prospects of financial loss to enhance
           shopper's trust to search, recommend, speak positive and frequently visit
           an online shop
    • Authors: Shahid Bashir; Saiqa Anwar; Zohaib Awan; Tariq Waheed Qureshi; Abdul Basit Memon
      Pages: 169 - 174
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Shahid Bashir, Saiqa Anwar, Zohaib Awan, Tariq Waheed Qureshi, Abdul Basit Memon
      While studying Internet-based consumer's perspective, there appears to be no direct research on the mediating role of trust in the relationship between perceived financial risk and purchase intention. The existing literature is limited to fewer items of construct to measure perceived financial risk, which means that a comprehensive study is required on this topic. In this regards, this study measured perceived financial risk using 12 different items such as loss of credit card information, error-based purchases, no money-back guarantee, hidden charges, monetary loss, sales fraud, over-charged for product delivery fees, product delivery loss, over-charged online payments, high prices in comparison to traditional stores, low discounts in comparison to traditional stores, and wrong purchases. The study's proposed model is to highlight the role of trust in web vendors in the relationship between online consumers’ perceived financial risk and their purchasing intention. To test that proposed model, an online survey based on empirical study was conducted on Malaysian online consumers. From the sample size of 400, the results of this study revealed that perceived financial risk of online consumers does influence their trust in web vendors and online purchase intention. A consumer's intention to purchase online is also influenced by their trust in the web vendor. And there exist a mediating role of trust in web vendors in the relationship between perceived financial risk and online purchase intention. Such results offer evidence that e-business managers should consider their consumer's perceived financial risk while establishing their trust and purchasing intentions.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T15:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.02.004
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Corrigendum to Identifying Opportunities for Improvement in Online
           Shopping Sites [Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, volume 31
           (2016) 228-238]
    • Authors: Gerson Tontini; Júlio Cesar da Silva; Elis Regina Mulinari Zanin; Eliane Fátima Strapazzon Beduschi; Margarete de Fátima Marcon
      First page: 175
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Gerson Tontini, Júlio Cesar da Silva, Elis Regina Mulinari Zanin, Eliane Fátima Strapazzon Beduschi, Margarete de Fátima Marcon


      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.03.001
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • The proactive employee on the floor of the store and the impact on
           customer satisfaction
    • Authors: Magnus
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 43
      Author(s): Magnus Söderlund
      The present study examines employee proactivity (i.e., the employee initiates face-to-face contact with the customer on the floor of the store) and its impact on customer satisfaction. Two empirical studies (one survey and one field experiment) were conducted in a grocery retailing context. Both studies showed that employee proactivity boosted customer satisfaction. Moreover, the impact of employee proactivity on satisfaction was sequentially mediated by perceived employee effort and perceived employee performance. In relation to previous studies showing that many characteristics and behaviors of the employee in the service encounter influence the customer, the present study contributes by adding that the way in which the service encounter begins is causally potent, too.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
       
  • Consumer need for mobile app atmospherics and its relationships to shopper
           responses
    • Authors: Yoojung Lee; Hye-Young Kim
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
      Author(s): Yoojung Lee, Hye-Young Kim
      This study developed and tested a conceptual model delineating the interrelationships among hedonic shopping orientation, consumer need for mobile app atmospherics, entertainment gratification, mobile irritation, and intention to reuse mobile apps for apparel shopping. A total of 216 U.S. mobile shoppers in the age range of 18–34 participated in the study. Consumers with a higher need for mobile app atmospherics tended to experience increased entertainment gratification and reduced irritation in using mobile apps. Hedonic shopping orientation was found to be an antecedent of consumer need for mobile app atmospherics. However, hedonic shoppers’ mixed emotions toward mobile apps were confirmed through the positive influences of hedonic shopping orientation on both entertainment gratification and irritation. Consumer need for mobile app atmospherics played a significant role in predicting the intention to reuse mobile apps for apparel shopping, along with entertainment gratification and mobile irritation. This study extended the research scope of mobile shopping behavior and provided implications for mobile app retailing.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.10.016
       
  • Reversing the dependency-trust relationship in B2C services
    • Authors: Johra Kayeser Fatima; Rita Di Mascio
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Johra Kayeser Fatima, Rita Di Mascio
      While the existing notion of customer dependency in the business-to-business literature is that it facilitates trust, this study proposes that the relationship works in reverse for services firm–consumer dependency relationships. Using partial least squares-based structural equation modeling, the study provides evidence that rapport through service interactions and the mediation impact of competence, contractual, and goodwill trust build an evoked set of services in consumers’ minds, making them dependent on the firm at a cognitive level. However, most of the moderated and moderated mediation roles of relationship age and frequency are found as non-significant except relationship age as a moderated mediator between goodwill trust and consumer dependency relationship. Implications are provided for the services relationship literature and services firms.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.005
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Investigating the drivers for social commerce in social media platforms:
           Importance of trust, social support and the platform perceived usage
    • Authors: Imene Ben Yahia; Nasser Al-Neama; Laoucine Kerbache
      Pages: 11 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Imene Ben Yahia, Nasser Al-Neama, Laoucine Kerbache
      This study sheds light on the drivers of social commerce in social media platforms. First, it explores the perceived characteristics of the social commerce vendor and investigates their influence on users’ trust. Second, it tests the influence of trust and the platform perceived usage (using the Unified Technology Acceptance and Use of Technology Model 2) on social commerce intent. Data from a survey of Instagram users, within the Golf Corporation Council countries, were collected online. Results show that reputation and price advantage have the strongest influence on trust, although those effects are weakened by habits. Contrary to expectations, social interactions with the social commerce vendor decrease trust. Similarly, product differentiation reduces trust. Nevertheless, this effect is negatively moderated by social support. Perceived ease of use of the platform, facilitating conditions, hedonic motives and habits increase social commerce intent. The findings of this research offer some insights on the mechanisms through which the s-vendor characteristics influence social commerce intent on social media platforms. Findings help businesses better understand the social commerce landscape and improve their marketing strategies.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.10.021
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Like throwing a piece of me away: How online and in-store grocery purchase
           channels affect consumers’ food waste
    • Authors: Veronika Ilyuk
      Pages: 20 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Veronika Ilyuk
      Consumer food waste is a significant and growing concern. As such, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers have devoted increasing attention to identifying the driving factors of this consequential consumer behavior. The present research contributes to this body of knowledge by uniquely showing how grocery purchase channels (i.e., online vs. in-store) may differentially affect food waste likelihood. Indeed, online grocery shopping is projected to rise considerably in the near future and warrants attention as a catalyst to both (normatively) positive and negative downstream outcomes. Using an experimental approach, the current research proposes and demonstrates that waste likelihood is higher (vs. lower) when consumers purchase food items online (vs. in-store), and further explores the psychological mechanism underlying this effect. Three studies collectively provide evidence that online channels systematically yield lower perceptions of purchase effort, thereby reducing experiences of psychological ownership and, in turn, increasing consumers’ intentions of discarding (vs. consuming) purchased food items. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.003
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • From gambling exposure to adaptation: Implications for casino
           sustainability
    • Authors: Catherine Prentice; Zhonglu Zeng
      Pages: 31 - 36
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Catherine Prentice, Zhonglu Zeng
      This paper draws upon the adaptation theory and discusses the impact of adaptation effect on casino business growth and sustainability. The study deploys secondary data and provides evidence for likely existence of the adaptation effect. This effect is derived from analyzing visitors’ profiles over 20 years from various sources. On the basis of this analysis, the study proposes various strategies including promoting casino tourism instead of gambling focus to sustain casino business. The current study lays foundation for sustainability research on the casino industry. Findings of this study have implications for researchers and practitioners in the gambling, tourism and hospitality fields.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.004
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
 
 
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