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Journal Cover Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services
  [SJR: 0.669]   [H-I: 42]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0969-6989
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3120 journals]
  • Effects of brand attitude and eWOM on consumers’ willingness to pay in
           the banking industry: Mediating role of consumer-brand identification and
           brand equity
    • Authors: Mário Augusto; Pedro Torres
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Mário Augusto, Pedro Torres
      The aim of this research is to investigate the influence of brand attitude (BAtt) and electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) on the willingness of customers to pay premium prices (WTPp) in the banking industry. The proposed conceptual model includes a full mediation of consumer-brand identification and consumer-based brand equity. The data was gathered through a web survey, which was administered among bank customers, yielding a total of 280 valid responses. The analysis was conducted using structural equation modelling. The results shed light on the process that transforms BAtt and eWOM in WTPp. The study has important implications for both theory and practice.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.005
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Perceived probability of food waste: Influence on consumer attitudes
           towards and choice of sales promotions
    • Authors: Guillaume Le Borgne; Lucie Sirieix; Sandrine Costa
      Pages: 11 - 21
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Guillaume Le Borgne, Lucie Sirieix, Sandrine Costa
      Based on a consumer survey including two experiments with more than 400 French respondents each, this research (1), establishes that consumers’ perceived probability of waste has a significant negative effect on consumers’ attitude towards promotions and consumers’ intention to choose perishable food products (cheese and bread) on sale and (2), highlights skepticism towards the “Buy Two Get One Free later” offer. Recommendations are presented for managers and public policies, in order to reduce households’ food waste and prevent consumers from being skeptical towards new promotional mechanisms, a brand and/or, a retailer.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.004
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Luxury product to service brand extension and brand equity transfer
    • Authors: Jiseon Ahn; Jung Kun Park; Hyowon Hyun
      Pages: 22 - 28
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Jiseon Ahn, Jung Kun Park, Hyowon Hyun
      The aim of the present study is to establish a framework for the study of luxury brand extension and to discover whether the brand equity of the parent product brand can be transferred to the extended service brand. Despite many benefits achieved by implementing successful brand extension strategies in the luxury industry, there are several obstacles that negatively influence both the extended brand and the parent brand. Because a negative effect of the vertical brand extension was found in past studies, this study focused on the horizontal brand extension to evaluate and predict possible positive outcomes in the horizontal brand extension process. Thus, this study investigates the role of brand equity, especially when the luxury brand was used to introduce upscaled service brands, in relation to a theoretical framework of brand equity. Additionally, the difference in the purchase intention among demographic groups was examined as it might offer an opportunity for developing a new strategy.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.009
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • Distinctive competencies and competency-based management in regulated
           sectors: A methodological proposal applied to the pharmaceutical retail
           sector in Spain
    • Authors: Alberto Ibañez Fernandez; Pedro Reinares Lara; Monica Cortiñas Ugalde; Gyanendra Singh Sisodia
      Pages: 29 - 36
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Alberto Ibañez Fernandez, Pedro Reinares Lara, Monica Cortiñas Ugalde, Gyanendra Singh Sisodia
      To gain the competitive advantage needed to survive and compete in an environment led by large distribution chains, small-scale retailers need to develop distinctive competencies. This is particularly relevant in the case of retail pharmacies, which are already affected by continuously eroding profit margins, increasing liberalization of the sector and growing competition from new non-pharmaceutical outlets. Against this background, this paper contributes to identifying distinctive competencies with the potential to enhance business performance in retail pharmacies. Using structural equation modelling on a sample of Spanish pharmacies, it also establishes relationships between possession of certain distinctive competencies and success in building a sustainable competitive advantage.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.007
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • The effect of information exposure of contract manufacturing practice on
           consumers' perceived risk, perceived quality, and intention to purchase
           private label brand
    • Authors: Fathony Rahman; Primidya K.M. Soesilo
      Pages: 37 - 46
      Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 42
      Author(s): Fathony Rahman, Primidya K.M. Soesilo


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.010
      Issue No: Vol. 42 (2018)
       
  • The determinants of conversion rates in SME e-commerce websites
    • Authors: Davide Di Fatta; Dean Patton; Giampaolo Viglia
      Pages: 161 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Davide Di Fatta, Dean Patton, Giampaolo Viglia
      Web retailers invest significant resources to improve the proportion of website visitors that make a purchase, also known as the conversion rate. Improving this rate is particularly important to SMEs that have traditionally lagged behind larger firms as they have found it difficult to justify the significant investment involved in website development against the historical low returns associated with an online sales channel. Identifying methods that increase conversion rates reduces these perceived barriers and increases effective SME participation in the growing e-commerce sector. This paper uses 1184 observations from 6 SME websites to identify and analyse the factors, or combination of factors, that improve conversion rates. This is achieved through a process of exploratory regression analysis to select the most relevant determinants and Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) to offer more ‘fine-grained’ detail on the conditions where conversion rates improve. Our findings suggest that a key factor that improves the conversion rate is a strategy that focuses upon either quality or promotion and avoids mixing such attributes within the web site offer.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.008
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Augmented reality in retail: A trade-off between user's control of access
           to personal information and augmentation quality
    • Authors: Atieh Poushneh
      Pages: 169 - 176
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Atieh Poushneh
      This study conducted a qualitative experimental study to develop a scale, augmentation quality that measures the output quality of augmented reality. Augmentation quality is a new aspect of user experience being captured through interaction with augmented reality. Since controlling access to their personal information is a significant concern of users, this study also conducted a quantitative experimental study and applied equity theory to examine how augmentation quality and users’ control of access to their personal information impacts user satisfaction. This study was conducted in three different contexts: online shopping, entertainment services, and basic service maintenance. ANOVA was applied to examine the significant differences in user satisfaction, user's control of access to personal information, and augmentation quality across the three contexts. Results indicated that individuals pay attention to both the privacy of their personal information as well as augmentation quality. The results also indicated that the ability to control access to personal information significantly affects user satisfaction. The results of this study carry important managerial implications for augmented reality developers and retailers.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.010
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Impact of culture, behavior and gender on green purchase intention
    • Authors: Naman Sreen; Shankar Purbey; Pradip Sadarangani
      Pages: 177 - 189
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Naman Sreen, Shankar Purbey, Pradip Sadarangani
      Green purchase can have an impact on organization bottom line. It also helps to build a positive public image, brand, and goodwill in the marketplace. The purchasing intention for the green products varies across culture, gender and individual behavior of a person. This paper examines the impact of individual behavior on green purchase intention by applying constructs from Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). A conceptual model is developed in this research by linking cultural values from Hofstede dimensions and value orientation model by Kluchhohn and Strodtbeck (1961) to determinants of green purchase intention. The paper also examines the role played by gender on purchase intention through culture and behavior. Collectivism and Long-term orientation (LTO) dimensions are included from Hofstede and Man-nature orientation is included from Kluchhohn and Strodtbeck (1961) model. The findings of the study suggest that collectivism is significantly related to all three predictors (attitude, subjective norms and Internal PBC) of green purchase intention in TPB whereas LTO is insignificantly related to attitude towards green products while examining the direct effects. Green purchase intention is also significantly related to Man-nature orientation. The research shows the path to translate cultural values, norms, and beliefs of an individual into purchase intention. Therefore, the research provides an insight to practitioners and policy-makers on how to increase intention towards green products. The study concludes that the awareness level regarding green products among individuals in India is still a matter of concern and therefore, practitioners and policymakers need to take efforts to make them knowledgeable about the same.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.002
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Online purchase return policy leniency and purchase decision: Mediating
           role of consumer trust
    • Authors: Pejvak Oghazi; Stefan Karlsson; Daniel Hellström; Klas Hjort
      Pages: 190 - 200
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Pejvak Oghazi, Stefan Karlsson, Daniel Hellström, Klas Hjort
      Recasting prior work on return-policy and purchase intentions literature, through the lens of signaling theory and relational signaling theory, we posit that returns policy, as a market signaling mechanism, is a costly investment that online retailers make to not only support current transaction but also to signal commitment towards customer service. What outcome would such costly signal result into' Based on relational signaling theory, it promotes trust, that in turn, could enhance purchase intentions. With empirical data from 730 online consumers of fast-moving consumer goods in Sweden, the study finds that, after controlling for shoppers’ age, education, income, gender, and frequency of online purchases, perceived consumer trust fully mediates the effect of perceived return policy leniency on purchase intention. Building on past research, we apply a different theoretical lens that connects costly signaling that drives relational signaling to foster customer trust to improve purchase intentions.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.007
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Are consumers willing to go the extra mile for fair trade products made in
           a developing country' A comparison with made in USA products at
           different prices
    • Authors: Md Sanuwar Rashid; Sang-Eun Byun
      Pages: 201 - 210
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Md Sanuwar Rashid, Sang-Eun Byun
      We investigated whether fair trade messages (fair labor/environment-friendly production) can counterbalance the negative country of origin effect on brand evaluations and increase willingness to pay premium prices. Our findings suggest that fair trade messages led consumers to evaluate a product made in a developing country as favorably as a product made in the U.S. While brand attitude and brand trust were higher for a fair trade product made in a developing country, consumers hesitated to buy a product with a fair trade message when the premium price was 15% higher than the base price product with no fair trade message. We discussed implications of these findings.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.011
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Portfolios: Patterns in brand penetration, market share, and hero product
           variants
    • Authors: Arry Tanusondjaja; Magda Nenycz-Thiel; John Dawes; Rachel Kennedy
      Pages: 211 - 217
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Arry Tanusondjaja, Magda Nenycz-Thiel, John Dawes, Rachel Kennedy
      This research investigates the contribution of each stock-keeping unit (SKU) within a brand portfolio towards total brand penetration and market share, by adapting a method called Saturation Curve Analysis. The study utilises UK and US data on 90,000+ SKUs across 15 packaged goods categories. The results show that while the optimal number of SKUs in a portfolio is category specific, the top-selling SKU contributes around 50% of the brand penetration and 40% of sales. This establishes a benchmark for monitoring brand performance. These results emphasise the importance of having top-selling SKUs readily available to consumers, rather than sacrificing them over new product launches.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.009
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Marketer requests for positive post-purchase satisfaction evaluations:
           Consumer depth interview findings
    • Authors: Michael A. Jones; Valerie A. Taylor
      Pages: 218 - 226
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Michael A. Jones, Valerie A. Taylor
      The somewhat common practice of marketers asking customers for a positive post-purchase satisfaction evaluation has received very little attention in the marketing, retailing, and services literature. This qualitative study investigates consumer responses to requests for positive post-purchase evaluations using real-life experiences from consumers’ actual buying stories. Depth interviews were conducted with 11 consumers who shared 14 buying stories in which each had recently been asked to provide a positive post-purchase evaluation. Interpretation of the buying stories resulted in six themes. Each of the themes is discussed with illustrative excerpts. Finally, the implications of the findings for marketers requesting positive post-purchase evaluations are discussed along with the broader concerns highlighted by the findings relative to consumer distrust of marketers in general.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.013
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Franchising in the healthcare sector: The case of Child and Family
           Wellness clinics in Kenya
    • Authors: Rozenn Perrigot
      Pages: 227 - 238
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Rozenn Perrigot
      Franchising has been growing in most countries and most industries, and it is now growing in social sectors, e.g., healthcare, education, the provision of water. The aim of this paper is to understand and assess, using the case study of Child and Family Wellness clinics (CFW), the business model used by franchisors in the social sector; i.e., how franchisors use the core elements of franchising to manage their networks in the social sector. This research deals with three main elements of franchising, i.e., know-how, assistance and brand name, as well as the franchisor/franchisee and franchisee/franchisee relationships. The empirical work, based on the Child and Family Wellness clinics (CFW) network in Kenya, relies on primary data gathered through the conduction and analysis of 19 in-depth interviews and on secondary data from access to internal data. The main findings of this research show that franchising in the social sector seems to work no differently from franchising in more traditional sectors, at least in terms of know-how, assistance, brand name and franchisor/franchisee and franchisee/franchisee relationships. This research serves as an example and a set of guidelines for entrepreneurs who want to develop a franchise concept in the healthcare sector or any other social sectors, as well as a support for these entrepreneurs to develop and grow their concept. It can provide them with ideas on what should be implemented in the areas of know-how, assistance, brand name and relationships in order to succeed, e.g., organization of training sessions, setting up of committees.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.012
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • The role of brand reputation in organic food consumption: A behavioral
           reasoning perspective
    • Authors: Jessica Ryan; Riza Casidy
      Pages: 239 - 247
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Jessica Ryan, Riza Casidy
      This study examines the role of brand reputation in influencing organic food consumption. Specifically, we adopted the behavioral reasoning theory framework and examined the mechanisms by which consumers’ values affect their attitude and intention to consume organic food under varying levels of brand reputation. To test the theoretical framework, we recruited 617 respondents from Amazon's Mechanical Turk (Mturk) platform. The analysis found general support for the application of behavioral reasoning theory in the organic food consumption context. The results revealed that the relationship between consumer values and attitude is partially (fully) mediated by consumer reasoning in low (high) brand reputation conditions.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.002
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • She loves the way you lie: Size-related self-concept and gender in vanity
           sizing
    • Authors: Seth Ketron; Miranda Williams
      Pages: 248 - 255
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Seth Ketron, Miranda Williams
      This work investigates size-related self-concept (SRSC) – the extent to which apparel size defines one's identity – and its relationship to perceived deception of and purchase intentions toward vanity-sized garments. Through the lens of self-enhancement theory, two studies reveal that SRSC exerts a significant influence on perceived deception and purchase intentions in garment size labeling contexts, moderated by gender. Study 1 indicates that among females, SRSC has no influence on perceived deception when a properly-fitting garment is labeled one size smaller than the consumer's typical size. However, when the garment is the same size as the typical, SRSC has a positive relationship with perceived deception. Study 2 shows that gender moderates the effect of SRSC on perceived deception of as well as purchase intentions toward a vanity-sized garment, such that SRSC positively predicts perceived deception among males but not among females, while SRSC positively predicts purchase intentions among females but not among males. This work contributes the concept and role of SRSC to the vanity sizing context, indicating that SRSC is just as important as gender in the vanity sizing discussion.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2018.01.003
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2018)
       
  • Reversing the dependency-trust relationship in B2C services
    • Authors: Johra Kayeser Fatima; Rita Di Mascio
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Johra Kayeser Fatima, Rita Di Mascio
      While the existing notion of customer dependency in the business-to-business literature is that it facilitates trust, this study proposes that the relationship works in reverse for services firm–consumer dependency relationships. Using partial least squares-based structural equation modeling, the study provides evidence that rapport through service interactions and the mediation impact of competence, contractual, and goodwill trust build an evoked set of services in consumers’ minds, making them dependent on the firm at a cognitive level. However, most of the moderated and moderated mediation roles of relationship age and frequency are found as non-significant except relationship age as a moderated mediator between goodwill trust and consumer dependency relationship. Implications are provided for the services relationship literature and services firms.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.005
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Investigating the drivers for social commerce in social media platforms:
           Importance of trust, social support and the platform perceived usage
    • Authors: Imene Ben Yahia; Nasser Al-Neama; Laoucine Kerbache
      Pages: 11 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Imene Ben Yahia, Nasser Al-Neama, Laoucine Kerbache
      This study sheds light on the drivers of social commerce in social media platforms. First, it explores the perceived characteristics of the social commerce vendor and investigates their influence on users’ trust. Second, it tests the influence of trust and the platform perceived usage (using the Unified Technology Acceptance and Use of Technology Model 2) on social commerce intent. Data from a survey of Instagram users, within the Golf Corporation Council countries, were collected online. Results show that reputation and price advantage have the strongest influence on trust, although those effects are weakened by habits. Contrary to expectations, social interactions with the social commerce vendor decrease trust. Similarly, product differentiation reduces trust. Nevertheless, this effect is negatively moderated by social support. Perceived ease of use of the platform, facilitating conditions, hedonic motives and habits increase social commerce intent. The findings of this research offer some insights on the mechanisms through which the s-vendor characteristics influence social commerce intent on social media platforms. Findings help businesses better understand the social commerce landscape and improve their marketing strategies.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.10.021
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Like throwing a piece of me away: How online and in-store grocery purchase
           channels affect consumers’ food waste
    • Authors: Veronika Ilyuk
      Pages: 20 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Veronika Ilyuk
      Consumer food waste is a significant and growing concern. As such, researchers, practitioners, and policy makers have devoted increasing attention to identifying the driving factors of this consequential consumer behavior. The present research contributes to this body of knowledge by uniquely showing how grocery purchase channels (i.e., online vs. in-store) may differentially affect food waste likelihood. Indeed, online grocery shopping is projected to rise considerably in the near future and warrants attention as a catalyst to both (normatively) positive and negative downstream outcomes. Using an experimental approach, the current research proposes and demonstrates that waste likelihood is higher (vs. lower) when consumers purchase food items online (vs. in-store), and further explores the psychological mechanism underlying this effect. Three studies collectively provide evidence that online channels systematically yield lower perceptions of purchase effort, thereby reducing experiences of psychological ownership and, in turn, increasing consumers’ intentions of discarding (vs. consuming) purchased food items. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.003
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • From gambling exposure to adaptation: Implications for casino
           sustainability
    • Authors: Catherine Prentice; Zhonglu Zeng
      Pages: 31 - 36
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Catherine Prentice, Zhonglu Zeng
      This paper draws upon the adaptation theory and discusses the impact of adaptation effect on casino business growth and sustainability. The study deploys secondary data and provides evidence for likely existence of the adaptation effect. This effect is derived from analyzing visitors’ profiles over 20 years from various sources. On the basis of this analysis, the study proposes various strategies including promoting casino tourism instead of gambling focus to sustain casino business. The current study lays foundation for sustainability research on the casino industry. Findings of this study have implications for researchers and practitioners in the gambling, tourism and hospitality fields.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.004
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • The internet dilemma: An exploratory study of luxury firms’ usage of
           internet-based technologies
    • Authors: Jeff Baker; Nick Ashill; Noha Amer; Ekram Diab
      Pages: 37 - 47
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Jeff Baker, Nick Ashill, Noha Amer, Ekram Diab
      Surprisingly, there exists a paucity of research examining the adoption of Internet-based technologies by luxury firms. This represents a major shortcoming in our understanding of how luxury firms maintain the image of their brand, sustain a personal link with customers, and retain an aura of exclusivity as they seek to provide their products and services to increasingly technologically-astute customers. Using content analysis, we present the findings of a qualitative investigation of 92 luxury firm websites across the categories of automobiles, fashion, jewelry, watches, and yachts. Study findings indicate that there are noticeable differences in website characteristics and functionality across sectors. Implications of the results are discussed, noting that decisions about using the Internet for branding and selling, one-way and two-way communications, as well as operational and innovative features, are driven by the characteristics of the products being offered. Avenues for future research are also offered.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.007
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Customer engagement and online reviews
    • Authors: Rakhi Thakur
      Pages: 48 - 59
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Rakhi Thakur
      This study aims at understanding the role of customer engagement in writing online reviews by shoppers with specific focus on mobile devices for shopping. Mobile devices are becoming first screen for the customers and are being used by marketers to have interactive communication making it more suitable for building customer engagement. The research in this space however is in a very nascent stage. Current study is one of the first few empirical studies exploring the role of customer engagement in writing online reviews. The study explores mediating role of customer engagement in satisfaction - online review intention and trust - online review intention relationships. Further moderating role of trust and satisfaction levels in customer engagement - online review intention is explored. This study contributes to marketing literature in the space of customer engagement, online reviews and mobile shopping behaviour. Further, this study provides a framework to managers for motivating the customers in writing online reviews. Also recommendations for retailers in exploiting customer engagement on mobile platforms are provided to address merchants and advertisers for better management of a new technology.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.002
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Green purchasing behaviour: A conceptual framework and empirical
           investigation of Indian consumers
    • Authors: Deepak Jaiswal; Rishi Kant
      Pages: 60 - 69
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Deepak Jaiswal, Rishi Kant
      The purpose of this empirical study is to operationalize the relationship of cognitive factors influencing on green purchase intention directly and indirectly via the mediating role of attitude towards green products which in turn investigated with green purchasing behaviour in order to validate the proposed research model in the Indian context of ecologically friendly buying behaviour. The model is based on ‘attitude-intention-behaviour’ and analysed by using structural equation modeling (SEM) from that data collected of 351 Indian consumers. The findings unveiled that Green purchase intention (GPI) was significantly and directly driven by Attitude towards green products (AGP), Environmental concern (EC), and Perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE) directly and indirectly via the mediating the role of AGP however, perceived environmental knowledge (PEK) was found to be insignificant effect on both AGP and GPI in this study. Moreover the measure of GPI was found to be the fundamental predictor of Green purchase behaviour (GPB) in the model. Hence, the present model provides valuable inputs to policymakers and marketers to design from the perspective of green marketing policies and strategies in order to cope with the indigenous Indian context.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.008
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Curiosity motivated vacation destination choice in a reward and
           variety-seeking perspective
    • Authors: Rita Martenson
      Pages: 70 - 78
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Rita Martenson
      Most research in marketing and consumer behavior is focused on inexpensive products and customer loyalty, rather than on experience-centric services and variety-seeking behavior. This paper aims to address that gap by focusing on what drives European consumers’ variety-seeking vacation behavior. Europeans maximize their utility (happiness) through leisure (Okulics-Kozaryn, 2011). It is therefore reasonable to assume that rewards drive variety-seeking vacation-behavior in Europe. The proposed and tested model integrates neuro-research with research in marketing to provide new ways of thinking about the variety-seeking phenomenon.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.009
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • A segmentation study of cinema consumers based on values and lifestyle
    • Authors: Asunción Díaz; Mar Gómez; Arturo Molina; Jesús Santos
      Pages: 79 - 89
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Asunción Díaz, Mar Gómez, Arturo Molina, Jesús Santos
      The objective of this study is to analyse the segments of cinemagoers in a shopping centre based on their values ​​and lifestyle. Hierarchical segmentation techniques are used to identify different groups of consumers. Specifically, four segments are obtained from a sample of 391 participants, and the variation among the segments in the frequency of leisure activities in the shopping centre is analysed. The results contribute to the body of theoretical and empirical literature regarding the segmentation of customers at shopping centres. The conclusions and recommendations for managers of shopping centres highlight the importance of executing different strategies for each segment.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.001
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Consumer preference for national vs. private brands: The influence of
           brand engagement and self-concept threat
    • Authors: Richie L. Liu; David E. Sprott; Eric R. Spangenberg; Sandor Czellar; Kevin E. Voss
      Pages: 90 - 100
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Richie L. Liu, David E. Sprott, Eric R. Spangenberg, Sandor Czellar, Kevin E. Voss
      Previous research on self-brand connections has not considered the inclusion of brand categories (e.g., national and private brands). The current work examines consumers’ preference for national and private brands and their tendency to include brands as part of their self-concept (measured by the brand engagement in the self-concept (BESC) scale and manipulated using a tagline). Study 1 revealed higher BESC consumers to prefer national (vs. private) brands. Study 2 identified a boundary condition for our initial study by demonstrating consumers higher in BESC to prefer national brands (relative to private brands) less when presented a self-concept threat. Additionally, results showed lower BESC consumers deferring to national (vs. private) brands when facing a self-concept threat. Finally, Study 3 results were consistent with Study 2 findings when brand engagement was manipulated (vs. measured). Our work suggests that when a self-concept threat unrelated to the branded self is presented, the central importance of brands, for those consumers more highly engaged with brands, will decrease to the point of impacting preferences.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.010
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Examining the role of consumer hope in explaining the impact of perceived
           brand value on customer–brand relationship outcomes in an online
           retailing environment
    • Authors: Syed Muhammad Fazal-e-Hasan; Hormoz Ahmadi; Gary Mortimer; Martin Grimmer; Louise Kelly
      Pages: 101 - 111
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Syed Muhammad Fazal-e-Hasan, Hormoz Ahmadi, Gary Mortimer, Martin Grimmer, Louise Kelly
      This research examines the role of consumer hope in explaining the impact of perceived brand value on customer–brand relationship outcomes in the context of online retailing. We scrutinise the moderating impact of customer goal attainment on the relationship between consumer hope and customer–brand relationship outcomes. Data were collected from 418 online shoppers. The results indicate that three dimensions of brand value had a positive impact on consumer hope. Consumer hope was also positively related to customer–brand relationship outcome variables and the moderating role of customer goal attainment was supported. Theoretically, this model highlights the important role that hope can play in a customer–brand relationship in an online retail environment.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.004
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • The relationship between individual-level culture and consumer
           decision-making styles through consumer involvement
    • Authors: Jeffrey Ian Isaacson; Yolanda Jordaan; Gené van Heerden
      Pages: 112 - 120
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Jeffrey Ian Isaacson, Yolanda Jordaan, Gené van Heerden


      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.003
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Who seeks a surprise box' Predictors of consumers’ use of fashion
           and beauty subscription-based online services (SOS)
    • Authors: Hongjoo Woo; Bharath Ramkumar
      Pages: 121 - 130
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Hongjoo Woo, Bharath Ramkumar
      Subscription-based online services (SOS), the e-businesses that provide periodic delivery of a customized box of merchandise to consumers, have become a $5 billion industry with over 2000 SOS retailers in the United States. This new method of online shopping that removes consumers’ responsibility to select merchandise and visit stores is substantially changing consumers’ consumption habits and, further, their lifestyles. However, there is little information about who are the target customers of such SOS, and what consumer characteristics predict consumers’ use of SOS. This study surveyed 385 American consumers focusing on fashion and beauty SOS. Results revealed that SOS users are more likely to be female with high level of e-tailer trust and fashion consciousness. Age and exploratory product acquisition tendencies of consumers had no significant influence. Both supported and unsupported hypotheses testing results suggest implications regarding potential target market strategies to SOS retailers, and provide a better understanding of consumers who have used this new, effortless shopping method, for consumer researchers.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.011
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Fashion brands on retail websites: Customer performance expectancy and
           e-word-of-mouth
    • Authors: Sandra M.C. Loureiro; Luisa Cavallero; Francisco Javier Miranda
      Pages: 131 - 141
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Sandra M.C. Loureiro, Luisa Cavallero, Francisco Javier Miranda
      The current study explores the drivers and outcomes of performance expectancy for fashion brand websites and estimates two alternative models to explain the drivers of word-of-mouth. The study also aims to test the mediator effect of trust on the relationship between customer satisfaction and word-of-mouth. The study builds on data collection from consumers selected through mall intercept convenience sampling (in Lisbon city center). Researchers gave consumers tablets which they used to answer the online survey. The final sample consisted of 312 participants. The findings of this research may generate a flow process in which the quality of the information and technology of the fashion website, together with the past experience of the fashion consumer, influence the performance expectancy and this, in turn, contributes to them recommending the fashion brand and the website through online posts and reviews.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.005
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Customer segmentation with purchase channels and media touchpoints using
           single source panel data
    • Authors: Satoshi Nakano; Fumiyo N. Kondo
      Pages: 142 - 152
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Satoshi Nakano, Fumiyo N. Kondo
      This study examines how customers use multiple channels and media in modern retail environments. It segments customers by using Latent-Class Cluster Analysis, which focuses on the purchase channels of bricks-and-mortar and online stores, media touchpoints of PC, mobile, and social media, and psychographic and demographic characteristics. It extends the framework of prior research by analyzing 2595 Japanese single source panelists’ data in which purchase scan panel data on low-involvement, more frequently purchased categories, media contact log data, and survey data are tied to the same ID. The analyses reveal seven segments including the properties of research shoppers and multichannel enthusiasts.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.11.012
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Investigating discounting of discounts in an online context: The mediating
           effect of discount credibility and moderating effect of online daily deal
           promotions
    • Authors: Jeffrey R. Carlson; Monika Kukar-Kinney
      Pages: 153 - 160
      Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 41
      Author(s): Jeffrey R. Carlson, Monika Kukar-Kinney
      This research sheds light on the theoretical mechanism behind consumer discounting of discounts and extends it to the online daily deals context. Based on advertising and behavioral pricing research, we develop and empirically test a conceptual model of the effects of discount level on consumer perceptions of discount credibility, the extent of discounting of discounts, and change in purchase intentions for online daily deal promotions as compared with price promotions offered directly by online stores. The findings offer important managerial recommendations for retailers and daily deal managers with respect to utilizing direct online price promotions and daily deal promotions.

      PubDate: 2017-12-26T22:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.12.006
      Issue No: Vol. 41 (2017)
       
  • Consumer perception and behavior in the retail foodscape–A study of
           chilled groceries
    • Authors: Ulla Lindberg; Nicklas Salomonson; Malin Sundström; Karin Wendin
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Ulla Lindberg, Nicklas Salomonson, Malin Sundström, Karin Wendin


      PubDate: 2017-09-14T00:19:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.001
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Governance capabilities and relationship performance in international
           franchising
    • Authors: Nabil Ghantous; Shobha S. Das; Fabienne Chameroy
      Pages: 19 - 30
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Nabil Ghantous, Shobha S. Das, Fabienne Chameroy
      This paper investigates governance capabilities driving relationship performance of international franchisors. We collected data from internationalized French franchisors with a mixed-methods design. Interviews from Study 1 (N = 28) complemented previous literature and led to the proposed integrative model of governance capabilities. Questionnaire data from Study 2 (N = 94) was used to test the model with PLS-SEM. We find that two international communication capabilities, intercultural communication and communication adaptation, enhance performance directly, and indirectly through their impact on knowhow transfer, monitoring, and contract adaptation capabilities. The number of countries where the franchisor is present is negatively related to contract and communication adaptation.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T00:19:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.022
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Parents and children in supermarkets: Incidence and influence
    • Authors: Bill Page; Anne Sharp; Larry Lockshin; Herb Sorensen
      Pages: 31 - 39
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Bill Page, Anne Sharp, Larry Lockshin, Herb Sorensen
      Children influence up to a fifth of all household purchase decisions, yet little is known about how this influence is brought to bear. This research looks at the primary householder purchase context of grocery shopping and establishes the incidence of children accompanying adult shoppers. It identifies the effect of their presence on the spend, time taken to complete the trip and the route taken in-store. More than 33,000 observations are analysed, using exit interviews and structured observation of the in-store location of shoppers across two Australian states and four grocery retail outlets. Refuting the commonly held assertion that taking children shopping makes you spend more, accompanied shoppers do not spend more than unaccompanied shoppers, but rather shop 15% faster, tending to avoid busy areas in-store. We establish that, on average, 17% of grocery store shoppers are accompanied by children. Children are seen to accompany adults on both small and larger spend grocery shopping trips. Men, who are known to grocery shop less frequently than women, are found to have a lower incidence of being accompanied by a child when they do shop. This has implications for store layout and services offered. Products for children and parents need to be placed in areas where parents are more comfortable (that is, less busy areas), but also merchandised in ways that make it easy for parents to shop at their faster pace. The balance of these two needs is a direction for future research.

      PubDate: 2017-09-20T03:19:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.023
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Examining price and service competition among retailers in a supply chain
           under potential demand disruption
    • Authors: Syed Mithun Ali; Md. Hafizur Rahman; Tasmia Jannat Tumpa; Abid Ali Moghul Rifat; Sanjoy Kumar Paul
      Pages: 40 - 47
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Syed Mithun Ali, Md. Hafizur Rahman, Tasmia Jannat Tumpa, Abid Ali Moghul Rifat, Sanjoy Kumar Paul
      Supply chain disruptions management has attracted significant attention among researchers and practitioners. The paper aims to examine the effect of potential market demand disruptions on price and service level for competing retailers. To investigate the effect of potential demand disruptions, we consider both a centralized and a decentralized supply chain structure. To analyze the decentralized supply chain, the Manufacturing Stackelberg (MS) game theoretical approach was undertaken. The analytical results were tested using several numerical analyses. It was shown that price and service level investment decisions are significantly influenced by demand disruptions to retail markets. For example, decentralized decision makers tend to lower wholesale and retail prices under potential demand disruptions, whereas a proactive retailer needs to increase service level with an increased level of possible disruptions. This research may aid managers to analyze disruptions prone market and to make appropriate decision for price and service level. The manufacturer or the retailers will also be able to better determine when to close a market based on the proposed analysis by considering anticipated disruptions. The benefits and usefulness of the proposed approach are explained through a real-life case adopted from a toy supply chain in Bangladesh.

      PubDate: 2017-09-20T03:19:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.025
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Revisiting the supermarket in-store customer shopping experience
    • Authors: Nic S. Terblanche
      Pages: 48 - 59
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Nic S. Terblanche
      Marketing academics and practitioners agree on customer experience as a means for differentiation. The customer experience is challenging for retailers because it is influenced by elements which the retailer can control and elements which are beyond their control. This paper deals with the in-store customer shopping experience of a supermarket and found that merchandise assortment, interaction with staff and the internal shop environment and customers’ in-shop emotions have a strong positive and significant relationship with cumulative customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction has a strong positive relationship with repatronage intentions. A comparison of the current study's findings with those of two similar earlier studies yielded considerable differences. The major contributions of this study are firstly the identification of differences over time of the elements of an in-store customer shopping experience in a supermarket and the role of positive emotions that are caused by supermarket shopping environments.

      PubDate: 2017-09-20T03:19:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.004
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Whom do customers blame for a service failure' Effects of thought
           speed on causal locus attribution
    • Authors: Natália Araújo Pacheco; Maggie Geuens; Cristiane Pizzutti
      Pages: 60 - 65
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Natália Araújo Pacheco, Maggie Geuens, Cristiane Pizzutti
      This research investigates the impact of customers’ thought speeds in a service failure setting. Fast-thinking induces not only heuristic processing, but also positive affect. As both factors predict a different outcome on whom customers blame for the failure, this study examines rival hypotheses. Findings from three experiments show that fast-thinking leads respondents to attribute failures to the service providers (i.e., showing a self-serving bias). In addition, fast-thinking also has more downstream consequences, as it negatively affects repurchase intentions and positively affects intentions to spread negative word of mouth. Therefore, service providers are encouraged to stimulate slow thought during service encounters.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T03:53:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.006
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • A dose of nature and shopping: The restorative potential of biophilic
           lifestyle center designs
    • Authors: Mark S. Rosenbaum; Germán Contreras Ramirez; Jaime Rivera Camino
      Pages: 66 - 73
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Mark S. Rosenbaum, Germán Contreras Ramirez, Jaime Rivera Camino
      This study contributes to the biophilia design paradigm in marketing by empirically demonstrating the restorative potential of lifestyle centers. Lifestyle centers, such as manicured gardens, plants, fountains, and walkways typified by trendy retail, dining, and entertainment spots, represent an expanding global retail design concept. By drawing from attention restoration theory, this research links biophilia design to human health; namely, restoration from mental fatigue and suggests a transformative benefit to lifestyle visitors. Furthermore, a series of experiments demonstrate the steadfastness of biophilia design by exploring consumers’ responses to natural elements depending on the purpose of their shopping trip (browsing vs. purposeful consumption) and whether they are paying full or discounted prices. Given the restorative potential of lifestyle centers, this study shows not only the importance of their expansion but also their transformative role in enhancing both individual and societal well-being.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T03:53:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.018
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Critical success factors of temporary retail activations: A multi-actor
           perspective
    • Authors: Jennifer Lowe; Isabella Maggioni; Sean Sands
      Pages: 74 - 81
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Jennifer Lowe, Isabella Maggioni, Sean Sands
      Temporary retail activations have been increasingly adopted by brands as an innovative experiential marketing strategy to engage existing and new customers. Through a series of in-depth interviews with multiple-actors (agency executives, brand managers, and consumers), this study identifies divergences and commonalities in defining the concept of temporary retail activation success. Further, we propose a conceptual framework of key factors that can contribute to the success of experiential-driven initiatives in retail. Four critical success factors (relational touchpoint, strategic alignment, surprise and delight, and serendipity) are discussed. We suggest that temporary retail activations should be considered as retail exchange events aimed at generating relationship-driven outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T03:53:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.005
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Using the senses to evaluate aesthetic products at the point of sale: The
           moderating role of consumers’ goals
    • Authors: Sonia Vilches-Montero; Nik Mohd Hazrul Nik Hashim; Ameet Pandit; Renzo Bravo-Olavarria
      Pages: 82 - 90
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Sonia Vilches-Montero, Nik Mohd Hazrul Nik Hashim, Ameet Pandit, Renzo Bravo-Olavarria
      In this research, we expand our understanding of how aesthetic products induce shoppers’ responses at the point of sale. We advance and test a more integrative approach in which not only the sensory evaluations of the aesthetic product, but also the shoppers’ personal goals affect their purchase responses. Study 1 uses a lab setting to reveal that shoppers’ sensory evaluations of a new apartment elicit feelings of attachment, which mediate the effect of the apartment's aesthetic features on shoppers’ purchase responses. Further, shoppers assess the extent to which the product will contribute to attaining personal goals, which moderates the effect of emotional attachment on purchase responses. Study 2 replicates these findings using a field-study approach. In contrast to prior research, our results show that affective processing is not the sole driver of shoppers’ responses to aesthetic products, as its effect is moderated by cognitive evaluations of whether social status and materialistic goals will be attained through the acquisition of the aesthetic product. We discuss how both retailers and manufacturers who market aesthetic products can benefit from appealing to the personal goals of their shoppers.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.008
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Do all roses smell equally sweet' Willingness to pay for flower
           attributes in specialized retail settings by German consumers
    • Authors: Meike Rombach; Nicole Olynk Widmar; Elizabeth Byrd; Vera Bitsch
      Pages: 91 - 99
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Meike Rombach, Nicole Olynk Widmar, Elizabeth Byrd, Vera Bitsch
      The study investigated flower buying behavior and willingness to pay for cut flower attributes by German consumers in physical and online retail settings. A sample of 978 respondents participated in an online survey, including a hypothetical choice experiment. The choice experiment presented rose bouquets produced in Germany, the Netherlands, or in Kenya and considered the attributes “fairly traded” and “freshness guarantee”. In both retail settings German consumers showed the highest willingness to pay for the rose bouquets produced in Germany. Significant statistical differences in estimated mean willingness to pay were found across retail settings and product attributes.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T18:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.007
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • How store attributes impact shoppers’ loyalty in emerging countries: An
           investigation in the Indian retail sector
    • Authors: Monica Grosso; Sandro Castaldo; Anjana Grewal
      Pages: 117 - 124
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Monica Grosso, Sandro Castaldo, Anjana Grewal
      This paper takes a first step towards verifying a loyalty building model in the Indian retail sector. The results show that the intensity of some core loyalty model paths in developed countries, are confirmed within the Indian retail sector. One such path refers to the relationship between store loyalty and its main driver, customer satisfaction. Satisfaction comes mainly from the store environment and the perceived value according to customers, which is influenced by the retailers’ product assortment decisions. Surprisingly, promotions don’t have an impact on the perceived value, while the perceived value has only a small and negative impact on store loyalty.

      PubDate: 2017-10-18T06:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.024
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Examining factors influencing Jordanian customers’ intentions and
           adoption of internet banking: Extending UTAUT2 with risk
    • Authors: Ali Abdallah Alalwan; Yogesh K. Dwivedi; Nripendra P. Rana; Raed Algharabat
      Pages: 125 - 138
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Ali Abdallah Alalwan, Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Nripendra P. Rana, Raed Algharabat
      The key objective of this study is to propose and examine a conceptual model that best explains the key factors influencing Jordanian customers' intentions and adoption of Internet banking. The conceptual model proposed was based on the extended Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2). This was further extended by adding perceived risk as an external factor. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was conducted to analyse the data collected from the field survey questionnaires administered to a convenience sample of Jordanian banking customers. The results show that behavioural intention is significantly influenced by performance expectancy, effort expectancy, hedonic motivation, price value and perceived risk; however, social influence does not have a significant impact on behavioural intention. This study offers Jordanian banks some guidelines for designing and marketing such channel in order to enhance their acceptance by their customers.

      PubDate: 2017-10-18T06:20:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.08.026
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • The effect of telepresence, social presence and involvement on consumer
           brand engagement: An empirical study of non-profit organizations
    • Authors: Raed Algharabat; Nripendra P. Rana; Yogesh K. Dwivedi; Ali Abdallah Alalwan; Zainah Qasem
      Pages: 139 - 149
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Raed Algharabat, Nripendra P. Rana, Yogesh K. Dwivedi, Ali Abdallah Alalwan, Zainah Qasem
      Although there are several marketing implications that have been considered in the context of social media marketing, less attention has been paid to the influence of antecedents of consumer brand engagement (telepresence, social presence and involvement) and their consequences for non-profit organizations. Thus, the main purpose of current research is to examine the influence of telepresence, social presence and involvement on consumer brand engagement (CBE) (second-order), which in turn affects electronic word of mouth and willingness to donate. To test the proposed model, this paper used social media platforms. We employed a Facebook page that presents non-profit organizations (brands) using a sample of non-students. We found that telepresence, social presence and involvement positively impact CBE, which in turn impacts electronic word of mouth and willingness to donate. The findings of our research demonstrate how CBE is formed in this particular context and what outcomes are to be expected, with important implications for both marketing theory and practice.

      PubDate: 2017-10-26T02:31:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.011
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • The moderating effect of managers' leadership behavior on salespeople's
           self-efficacy
    • Authors: Valter Afonso Vieira; Marcelo Gattermann Perin; Claudio Hoffman Sampaio
      Pages: 150 - 162
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Valter Afonso Vieira, Marcelo Gattermann Perin, Claudio Hoffman Sampaio
      The authors develop a conceptual framework depicting relationships between salespeople's self-efficacy and customer response (defined as satisfaction, word-of-mouth, loyalty and cross-selling) as moderated by two dimensions of manager leadership behavior. The conceptual framework hypothesized that transactional leadership behavior amplifies the positive association between salespeople's self-efficacy and these four customer response variables. Otherwise, transformational leadership behavior reduces the positive influence of salesperson´s self-efficacy on customer satisfaction, word-of-mouth, loyalty and cross-selling. The authors collected data from the main retail companies and distributed a survey questionnaire to 341 customers. These customers were attended by 174 salespeople in the retail segment (electronics products), and these salespeople were managed by 55 managers who supervised the retail stores. The results showed that (i) salesperson self-efficacy has a positive and main effect on customer satisfaction, word-of-mouth, loyalty and cross-selling, (ii) transactional leadership behavior moderates positively the association between salesperson's self-efficacy and customer satisfaction, word-of-mouth and loyalty, and (iii) transformational leadership behavior negatively moderates the association between salespeople's self-efficacy and word-of-mouth. The results are robust to endogeneity concerns, supporting our hypotheses. The original value comes from path-goal theory (House, 1971, 1996), which explains the positive effect of transactional leadership behavior on vendor behavior. Path-goal theory suggests that the leader guides the followers to choose the best paths to reach their goals. Since this guidance happens, it amplifies the influence of self-efficacy. In addition, the second original value originates from the negative effect of transformational leadership (Khoo and Burch, 2008; Kark et al., 2003). Transformational leaders increase follower dependency on their actions and decisions and this dependency reduces the effects of self-efficacy.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T03:24:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.09.010
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Showrooming and retail opportunities: A qualitative investigation via a
           consumer-experience lens
    • Authors: Jason Kokho Sit; Anna Hoang; Alessandro Inversini
      Pages: 163 - 174
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Jason Kokho Sit, Anna Hoang, Alessandro Inversini
      Showrooming represents a shopper behaviour prevalent in today's retail landscape, referring to consumers inspecting a desired product at a retailer's physical store and then buying it online, usually from a competitor. Showrooming has been examined frequently from a negative standpoint (e.g. free-riding and channel-hopping), via the theoretical lens of multichannel shopping and using a quantitative (theory-testing) approach. The present study seeks to investigate showrooming from a positive standpoint and help retailers to diagnose and appreciate potential opportunities that may be presented by this shopper behaviour. Our investigation is guided by the theoretical lens of consumer experience and a qualitative (theory-building) approach, based on convergent interviews with eleven self-proclaimed showroomers and the shopping context of consumer electronics. The present study contributes to retail theory and practice by illustrating that showrooming can be conceived and managed as a positive shopper behaviour. Its potential opportunities can be better appreciated when retailers consider fully its experiential aspects, such as decision activities and emotions.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T03:24:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jretconser.2017.10.004
      Issue No: Vol. 40 (2017)
       
  • Immersion and emotional reactions to the ambiance of a multiservice space:
           The role of perceived congruence between odor and brand image
    • Authors: Karim Errajaa; Patrick Bruno
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Karim Errajaa, Patrick Legohérel, Bruno Daucé


      PubDate: 2017-10-11T14:52:39Z
       
  • The positive effect of contextual image backgrounds on fluency and liking
    • Authors: Erik Maier; Florian Dost
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Erik Maier, Florian Dost
      In e-commerce websites, products may be presented either deprived of context, in a product image on white background, or with context, in an image with a contextually fitting background. Extant fluency research would suggest preferring context-less to contextual images, because detailed image contexts increase the complexity of the image, possibly decreasing viewers’ fluency perceptions and, in turn, liking. The current research, however, establishes that despite their higher complexity, contextual images can also be perceived more fluently and liked more, because they facilitate the recognition of the product. Three experimental studies show this positive effect of contextual backgrounds in an e-commerce setting (e.g., actual product images from e-commerce). Furthermore, the present investigation shows that the positive effect of contextual backgrounds is amplified for ambiguous products, as they profit more from a facilitation of recognition. Online retailers can thus profit from presenting products in contextual images, particularly if the products are ambiguous or difficult to recognize.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T14:52:39Z
       
  • Heterogeneity in consumers’ mobile shopping acceptance: A finite mixture
           partial least squares modelling approach for exploring and characterising
           different shopper segments
    • Authors: Michael
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Volume 40
      Author(s): Michael Groß
      This study investigates the phenomenon of mobile shopping (m-shopping), which, despite its growth in practice, is still underdeveloped as a field of research regarding the segmentation approach. The aims of this study are therefore twofold: (1) to propose an extended version of the technology acceptance model (TAM) to reflect a multidimensional framework of m-shopping acceptance, in which data heterogeneity regarding consumers’ acceptance is expected; and (2) to apply an advanced segmentation approach for revealing different mobile shopper (m-shopper) types to highlight precise marketing activities and measures. For that purpose, the relationship between attitude, intention, and behaviour is elaborated with additional constructs (e.g. perceived enjoyment, vendor trust, social influences, and satisfaction) and analysed with a representative sample of 734 German m-shoppers. The study results not only confirm the relevance of all factors on an aggregate data basis, thus supporting the proposed multidimensional framework of acceptance, but they also indicate some (unobserved) heterogeneity in the path model structure using the finite mixtures partial least squares (FIMIX-PLS) technique. This finally reveals three important m-shopper segments: ‘motivated m-shoppers’, ‘thoughtful utilitarian-oriented m-shoppers’, and ‘satisfied convenience-conscious m-shoppers’. Managerial implications are illustrated and provided with respect to these segments with the use of a complementary importance-performance matrix analysis (IMPA). Since focused research on m-shopper types is still limited, this study provides new insights into the acceptance and profile of m-shoppers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T00:19:42Z
       
 
 
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