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Journal Cover Information & Management
  [SJR: 1.381]   [H-I: 119]   [54 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0378-7206
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3043 journals]
  • How attachment influences users’ willingness to donate to content
           creators in social media: A socio-technical systems perspective
    • Authors: Jinlin Wan; Yaobin Lu; Bin Wang; Ling Zhao
      Pages: 837 - 850
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Jinlin Wan, Yaobin Lu, Bin Wang, Ling Zhao
      As a relatively new behavior, donation to content creators in social media has become very popular in the last few years. Different from traditional donation to nonprofit organization or victims, donation to content creators in social media has received little attention from academic researchers. On the basis of the socio-technical systems framework and attachment theory, this study develops a model to investigate the effects of social and technological factors on users’ donation behavior. Our results indicate that donation intention is determined by the emotional attachment to the content creator and functional dependence on social media, which are influenced by both social factors (identification, interaction, and information value) and technical factors (sociability and personalization).

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.007
       
  • Exposing others’ information on online social networks (OSNs): Perceived
           shared risk, its determinants, and its influence on OSN privacy control
           use
    • Authors: Tabitha L. James; Linda Wallace; Merrill Warkentin; Byung Cho Kim; Stéphane E. Collignon
      Pages: 851 - 865
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Tabitha L. James, Linda Wallace, Merrill Warkentin, Byung Cho Kim, Stéphane E. Collignon
      People using online social networks (OSNs) exchange information through posts of multimedia content, which may contain others’ information. Our study contributes to the privacy literature by examining individuals’ perceptions of the risk their OSN activity poses to others’ information. We introduce the concept “perceived shared risk,” which includes OSN users’ perceived severity and susceptibility of exposing others’ information. Results indicate culture, concerns regarding one’s own information, and Facebook information disclosure self-efficacy influence both risk components. We also identify a correlation between perceived shared risk and the use of OSN privacy controls.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.001
       
  • Expert or peer' Understanding the implications of virtual advisor
           identity on emergency rescuer empowerment in mobile psychological
           self-help services
    • Authors: Manning Li; Zhenhui (Jack) Jiang; Zhiping Fan; Jie Hou
      Pages: 866 - 886
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Manning Li, Zhenhui (Jack) Jiang, Zhiping Fan, Jie Hou
      Psychological self-help services on mobile devices play a vital role in supporting emergency rescuers who engage in highly stressful and self-devoting careers with frequent exposure to dangers and traumatic scenes right after disaster strikes. In this study, we propose and design a low-cost and widely deployable strategy for empowering emergency rescuers through an intelligent mobile psychological self-help tool. This tool will help reduce the gap between the limited number of qualified professional counsellors and the high demand for timely psychological support by rescuers. We start with a thorough investigation of user requirements, extant work, and relevant IS design theories to inform our system design choices, among which we identified that “virtual advisor identity” (VAI) needs further research. We then empirically examined how VAI influences the empowerment effect of ERMS. Involving 120 emergency rescuers who have just finished rescue tasks, our experiment shows that VAI has important effects on a user’s cognitive and emotional routes, which are significant empowering enablers that lead to positive empowerment outcomes. Interestingly, virtual peer advisor empowers users mostly through evoking emotional resonance from them, whereas virtual expert advisor is better at empowering users through cognitive channels. Important theoretical and practical implications of the findings are then discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.002
       
  • Determinants of early conformance with information security policies
    • Authors: France Bélanger; Stéphane Collignon; Kathryn Enget; Eric Negangard
      Pages: 887 - 901
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): France Bélanger, Stéphane Collignon, Kathryn Enget, Eric Negangard
      Individuals often fail to perform the security behaviors their organizations request to protect informational assets. However, forcing individuals into the compliance can trigger undesired behaviors. We propose a model grounded in Theory of Planned Behavior and information security literature to study determinants of early conformance toward technology-enforced security policies. The model was tested with 535 respondents from a university that implemented new password policies. The results show support for all the proposed relationships, except that subjective norm does not affect intentions. This important finding is explained by the leading role of early conformers, which highlights the importance of context-specific theorizing by researchers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.003
       
  • Impact of top management leadership styles on ERP assimilation and the
           role of organizational learning
    • Authors: Zhen Shao; Yuqiang Feng; Qing Hu
      Pages: 902 - 919
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Zhen Shao, Yuqiang Feng, Qing Hu
      We developed a theoretical model of how leadership style and organizational learning culture impact ERP assimilation and tested this model with data collected from organizations that have used ERP systems for at least 1year. We found that the influence of transformational leadership on organizational learning was strong but mediated by the learning culture and that of transactional leadership on organizational learning was weak but direct. These results offer new perspectives on ERP assimilation theory and provide guidance for top management to exercise specific leadership behavior to achieve ERP assimilation and long-term ERP success.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.005
       
  • Reflexivity: A third essential ‘R’ to enhance interpretive
           field studies
    • Authors: Julien Malaurent; David Avison
      Pages: 920 - 933
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Julien Malaurent, David Avison
      In this paper, we argue that reflexivity should be as essential a component of interpretive studies as the much vaunted rigour and relevance. We propose a classification of three forms of reflexivity for interpretive studies: self-reflexivity, domain reflexivity and collaborative reflexivity. We use a case study of a project from a French public organization supporting organic farming to illustrate reflexivity in action, highlighting its positive contribution. We suggest quality criteria to enhance reflexive studies and show how these can be incorporated into the well-known Klein and Myers’ principles for interpretive field studies in information systems.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.007
       
  • Decision support system (DSS) use and decision performance: DSS motivation
           and its antecedents
    • Authors: Siew H. Chan; Qian Song; Saonee Sarker; R. David Plumlee
      Pages: 934 - 947
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Siew H. Chan, Qian Song, Saonee Sarker, R. David Plumlee
      We developed an experimental decision support system (DSS) that enabled us to manipulate DSS performance feedback and response time, measure task motivation and DSS motivation, track the usage of the DSS, and obtain essential information for assessing decision performance through conjoint analysis. The results suggest the mediating role of DSS use in the relationship between DSS motivation and decision performance. Further, DSS motivation is highest in the presence of high task motivation, more positive DSS performance feedback, and fast DSS response time. The findings have important implications for both DSS research and practice.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.006
       
  • An analytical framework for online privacy research: What is missing'
    • Authors: Avshalom Ginosar; Yaron Ariel
      Pages: 948 - 957
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Avshalom Ginosar, Yaron Ariel
      The study of online privacy addresses three separated domains: user privacy concerns and behavior, website privacy notices and practices, and state privacy policies and regulations. This study suggests an analytical framework which combines these domains. While most of the framework's variables are addressed in current literature, one is missing: views of websites' managers. Our survey reveals that managers share users' concerns but report that their own websites do not violate users' privacy although asking them to provide personal information. The younger the website managers were, the less they were concerned, but the more they acted to safeguard user privacy.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.004
       
  • Design patterns for emergency management: An exercise in reflective
           practice
    • Authors: Daniela Fogli; Claudio Greppi; Giovanni Guida
      Pages: 971 - 986
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Daniela Fogli, Claudio Greppi, Giovanni Guida
      The design of a decision support system (DSS) for emergency management is an important and recurrent task in several application domains. However, despite several approaches and systems are reported in the literature, reusing such experiences is not easy. Starting from the experience gained through three concrete projects carried out by the authors in the last 10 years, in this paper, we suggest an approach based on design patterns, which can be used for the conceptual design of DSSs for emergency management. The validity of the proposed collection of design patterns has been assessed through an evaluation exercise with expert designers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.002
       
  • Effects of tourism information quality in social media on destination
           image formation: The case of Sina Weibo
    • Authors: Sung-Eun Kim; Kyung Young Lee; Soo Il Shin; Sung-Byung Yang
      Pages: 687 - 702
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sung-Eun Kim, Kyung Young Lee, Soo Il Shin, Sung-Byung Yang
      This study investigates the role of content and noncontent cues of tourism information quality in forming users’ destination image in social media. Empirical analysis based on data collected from Sina Weibo users suggests that several content cues and web page design as a noncontent cue are positively related with cognitive and affective images, which lead to a conative image. This study contributes to the body of knowledge on the role of tourism information quality in social media by providing empirical evidence on destination image formation. It also helps tourism managers build their marketing strategies to attract more tourists through social media.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.009
       
  • Social media analytics and value creation in urban smart tourism
           ecosystems
    • Authors: Tobias Brandt; Johannes Bendler; Dirk Neumann
      Pages: 703 - 713
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Tobias Brandt, Johannes Bendler, Dirk Neumann
      In this article, we demonstrate the potential value that the spatial and semantic analysis of social media messages can provide to smart tourism ecosystems. Building upon a showcase of 600,000 Twitter messages in San Francisco, we illustrate insights for stakeholders within the tourism sector from various analyses, including kernel density estimation and latent Dirichlet allocation. We show that social media analytics captures spatial patterns within the city that relate to the presence of users and the environmental and topical engagement. Furthermore, we outline how these patterns serve as an input to value creation for smart urban tourism.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.004
       
  • Shared experience in pretrip and experience sharing in posttrip: A survey
           of Airbnb users
    • Authors: Sung Joo Bae; Hyeonsuh Lee; Eung-Kyo Suh; Kil-Soo Suh
      Pages: 714 - 727
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sung Joo Bae, Hyeonsuh Lee, Eung-Kyo Suh, Kil-Soo Suh
      This research focuses on travelers’ use of shared experiences during their pretrip decision-making and their posttrip behavior in sharing their experiences. On the basis of information processing and literature on experience sharing, we developed hypotheses on how travelers make their purchase decisions on a smart tourism platform, adopting the experiences shared by others (pretrip), and how the quality of their travel experience and perceived information discrepancy affected their behavior in sharing their experience (posttrip). By testing these hypotheses using survey data from 411 Korean users of Airbnb, we draw conclusions on how firms should manage the flow of travelers’ experience information and design smart tourism platforms.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.008
       
  • The effect of user-controllable filters on the prediction of online hotel
           reviews
    • Authors: Ya-Han Hu; Kuanchin Chen; Pei-Ju Lee
      Pages: 728 - 744
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ya-Han Hu, Kuanchin Chen, Pei-Ju Lee
      Product reviews have gained much popularity in recent years. This study examines the theoretical foundation of review helpfulness and reports how the interactions among three user-controllable filters together with three groups of predictors affect review helpfulness. Reviews from TripAdvisor.com were analyzed against three analytical models. The results show that these groups of variables have a varying effect on different user-controllable filters. Review rating and number of words are key predictors of helpfulness across all three filters. The recency, frequency, and monetary (RFM) model has received a consistent support across all filters as well. Managerial implications are provided.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.009
       
  • Smart tourism technologies in travel planning: The role of exploration and
           exploitation
    • Authors: C. Derrick Huang; Jahyun Goo; Kichan Nam; Chul Woo Yoo
      Pages: 757 - 770
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): C. Derrick Huang, Jahyun Goo, Kichan Nam, Chul Woo Yoo
      The use of smart tourism technologies such as travel-related websites, social media, and smartphones in travel planning has been pervasive and growing. This study examines the mechanism of how travelers use these technologies to enhance travel satisfaction. By adopting the framework of exploration and exploitation and identifying the antecedents that advance and prohibit such uses, we find that the attributes of smart tourism technologies promote both explorative and exploitative use, while user’s security and privacy concerns have a negative effect. In addition, explorative use has a strong influence on overall travel experience satisfaction, and exploitative use mainly enhances the transaction satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.11.010
       
  • A Big Data Analytics Method for Tourist Behaviour Analysis
    • Authors: Shah Jahan Miah; Huy Quan Vu; John Gammack; Michael McGrath
      Pages: 771 - 785
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Shah Jahan Miah, Huy Quan Vu, John Gammack, Michael McGrath
      Big data generated across social media sites have created numerous opportunities for bringing more insights to decision-makers. Few studies on big data analytics, however, have demonstrated the support for strategic decision-making. Moreover, a formal method for analysing social media-generated big data for decision support is yet to be developed, particularly in the tourism sector. Using a design science research approach, this study aims to design and evaluate a ‘big data analytics’ method to support strategic decision-making in tourism destination management. Using geotagged photos uploaded by tourists to the photo-sharing social media site, Flickr, the applicability of the method in assisting destination management organisations to analyse and predict tourist behavioural patterns at specific destinations is shown, using Melbourne, Australia, as a representative case. Utility was confirmed using both another destination and directly with stakeholder audiences. The developed artefact demonstrates a method for analysing unstructured big data to enhance strategic decision making within a real problem domain. The proposed method is generic, and its applicability to other big data streams is discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.11.011
       
  • Toward a holistic understanding of continued use of social networking
           tourism: A mixed-methods approach
    • Authors: Aaron M. French; Xin (Robert) Luo; Ranjit Bose
      Pages: 802 - 813
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Aaron M. French, Xin (Robert) Luo, Ranjit Bose
      The trend of social networking tourism connects millions of tourists to others while traveling that may provide benefits such as information, tour guides, or alternative accommodations. Success of such networks depend on the continued use by its members. The current paper uses a mixed-methods approach to qualitatively identify motivations for participation and empirically test a causal model evaluating continued use intention. Motivations identified include networking and economic value that were used in the quantitative study that includes social capital, trust, attitude, and satisfaction as factors influencing continued use intention.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.10.006
       
  • Explaining travellers online information satisfaction: A complexity theory
           approach on information needs, barriers, sources and personal
           characteristics
    • Authors: Panos E. Kourouthanassis; Patrick Mikalef; Ilias O. Pappas; Petros Kostagiolas
      Pages: 814 - 824
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Panos E. Kourouthanassis, Patrick Mikalef, Ilias O. Pappas, Petros Kostagiolas
      This study explores the online information-seeking behaviour of travellers aspiring to accumulate travel-related information during their vacation planning. A theoretical model comprising information needs, online information sources, information barriers and personal characteristics is proposed to explain high degrees of information satisfaction in the online information space. Our theoretical propositions are validated through a survey (N =764). The results of a configurational analysis, based on fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis, pinpointed 13 behavioural paths that equally explain travellers’ online information satisfaction. The paper includes a critical discussion on the theoretical and practical implication of the findings.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.03.004
       
  • How do you feel about your friends' Understanding situational envy in
           online social networks
    • Authors: Tabitha L. James; Linda Wallace; Merrill Warkentin; Byung Cho Kim; Stéphane E. Collignon
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Linda Wallace, Tabitha L. James, Merrill Warkentin
      Online social networks (OSNs) offer a stream of information that readily provides comparison opportunities, often resulting in feelings of envy. Two factors that drive OSN-situational envy (OSN-SE) are a user’s personality and needs. Leveraging the five-factor model of personality and uses and gratifications theory, we explore how personality traits and OSN use affect OSN-SE. Data from 625 survey responses indicate that Facebook users experience greater OSN-SE when they exhibit neuroticism and use Facebook to gratify needs to gather information, seek attention, or pass time, suggesting that envy-prone users should use OSN for specific purposes and avoid passive pursuits.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.001
       
  • Animated conversational agents and e-consumer productivity: The roles of
           agents and individual characteristics
    • Authors: Mohammed Slim Ben Mimoun; Ingrid Poncin; Marion Garnier
      Pages: 545 - 559
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Mohammed Slim Ben Mimoun, Ingrid Poncin, Marion Garnier
      This research presents two studies, in a lab (eye-tracking) and in a natural context, that highlight the effects of interacting with an animated conversational agents (ACA) on the objective and perceived econsumer productivity. Results from Study 1 specify that only objective e-consumer productivity depends on interaction with the ACA. Going further, Study 2 then reveals that individual characteristics affect perceived productivity, either independently from ACA use (for involvement or product familiarity) or in interaction with using the ACA (for Internet skills and need for interaction). These findings highlight the need to personalize websites that display an agent fitting user profiles.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.11.008
       
  • Dynamic sales impacts of online physical product sampling
    • Authors: Xinlin Yao; Xianghua Lu; Chee Wei Phang; Sulin Ba
      Pages: 599 - 612
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Xinlin Yao, Xianghua Lu, Chee Wei Phang, Sulin Ba
      Recently, firms start to offer samples of physical products online to reach wider audience. However, literature has mostly examined offline product sampling or online sampling of digital products that differ from physical products. To address the gaps, we build on the theoretical logic of uncertainty reduction and signaling perspective to consider physical product characteristics in developing our hypotheses, and employed a unique dataset from an e-commerce platform for hypothesis testing. Our analysis reveals that online sampling could increase the physical product sales, while popular brands enjoyed greater advantages in terms of increase in both immediate and lagged sales.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.001
       
  • Weekdays or weekends: Exploring the impacts of microblog posting patterns
           on gratification and addiction
    • Authors: Qian Li; Xunhua Guo; Xue Bai
      Pages: 613 - 624
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Qian Li, Xunhua Guo, Xue Bai
      Previous research has found that social networking applications such as microblogs can develop gratification and addiction among users. Although it is generally believed that gratification reflects the gains through use and that addiction is caused by excessive use of the technology, limited research has been done to empirically verify the relationship between usage patterns and gratification versus addiction. This paper attempts to explore the impacts of posting patterns on gratification and addiction dimensions for microblog platforms. On the basis of existing literature on use and gratifications of media users, we focus on examining the different posting patterns between weekdays and weekends. By using multiple data collection methods, a data set was obtained consisting of 308 microblog users. Our analysis shows that the overall posting frequency is not significantly related to gratification and addiction levels. Moreover, the posting of microblogs is usually more intensive on weekdays than on weekends. Heavy weekend users tend to feel more socially gratified and are most likely to be addicted. In contrast, heavy weekday users are usually not addicted, and reported the lowest levels of gratification among all users. Balanced users that do not display distinguishable difference between weekdays and weekends manifest gratification levels around the average levels, and are less addicted than weekend users, even if their overall usage amounts are heavy.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.004
       
  • Applying network analysis to investigate interpersonal influence of
           information security behaviours in the workplace
    • Authors: Duy Dang-Pham; Siddhi Pittayachawan; Vince Bruno
      Pages: 625 - 637
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Duy Dang-Pham, Siddhi Pittayachawan, Vince Bruno
      As organisations are developing people-centric security workplaces, where proactive security behaviours are fostered, it is important to understand more about the sources of security influence. This research applied social network analysis methods to investigate security influence within a large interior contractor in Vietnam. The findings revealed that security influence occurs between employees in the same department, particularly those in senior positions, have longer tenure or younger age. Engagement in daily work and security-related activities can also increase the likelihood of influencing security behaviours. Moreover, the security influence network is transitive and has a hierarchical structure.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.003
       
  • A diffusion planning mechanism for social marketing
    • Authors: Yung-Ming Li; Cheng-Yang Lai; Lien-Fa Lin
      Pages: 638 - 650
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Yung-Ming Li, Cheng-Yang Lai, Lien-Fa Lin
      Social media is gaining importance as a component of marketing strategies. Many types of social media, such as social networking sites, blogospheres and micro-blogospheres, have been seeking business opportunities and establishing brand expression in the recent years. Online marketing information diffusion has become the critical business model of online social networks. However, most of the current marketing studies on discovering potential influences do not appropriately support them to diffuse advertisements. Therefore, marketing information may be lost during the diffusion process and cannot be sent to potential customers successfully. In this research, a diffusion path planning mechanism for advertisements is developed to help influencers to propagate marketing information and help marketers to evaluate possible rewards under different marketing strategies. Our experimental results show that the proposed mechanism can significantly improve the diffusion process of advertising messages and decrease marketing uncertainty.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.006
       
  • Strategic Effort Allocation in Online Innovation Tournaments
    • Authors: Indika Dissanayake; Jie Zhang Mahmut Yasar Sridhar Nerur
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Indika Dissanayake, Jie Zhang, Mahmut Yasar, Sridhar P. Nerur
      Online innovation tournaments, such as those hosted by crowdsourcing platforms (e.g., Kaggle), have been widely adopted by firms to evolve creative solutions to various problems. Solvers compete in these tournaments to earn rewards. In such competitive environments, it is imperative that solvers provide creative solutions with minimum effort. This article explores the factors that influence the solvers’ effort allocation decisions in a dynamic tournament setting. Specifically, comprehensive time variant data of teams that participated in crowdsourcing competitions on Kaggle were analyzed to gain insight into how solvers continually formulate strategies in light of performance feedback obtained through interim ranking. The results suggest that solvers strategically allocate their efforts throughout the contest to dynamically optimize their payoffs through balancing the probability of winning and the cost of expending effort. In particular, solvers tend to increase their efforts toward the end of tournaments or when they get closer to winning positions. Furthermore, our findings indicate that a last-minute surge in effort is more prevalent among high-skill solvers than in those with lower skill levels. In addition to providing insights that may help solvers develop strategies to improve their performance, the study has implications for the design of online crowdsourcing platforms, particularly in terms of incentivizing solvers to put forth their best effort.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T14:04:45Z
       
  • Understanding the Role of Competition in Video Gameplay Satisfaction
    • Authors: Sepandar Sepehr; Milena Head
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Sepandar Sepehr, Milena Head
      One of the key elements in many video games is competition. Based on Self-Determination and Flow theories, this paper explores the process through which competition makes a video game satisfying. A structural model that examines the impacts of Situational Competitiveness (manipulated via modes of competition) and Dispositional Competitiveness (as a personality trait) on gameplay experience is proposed and validated. The results show that the perception of video game competitiveness has a strong effect on Flow experience and Satisfaction. While an individual’s personality impacts the perception of a game’s competitiveness, this perception can also be influenced by the mode of competition.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T14:04:45Z
       
  • IT-enabled knowledge ambidexterity and innovation performance in small
           U.S. firms: The moderator role of social media capability
    • Authors: Jose Benitez; Ana Castillo; Javier Llorens; Jessica Braojos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Jose Benitez, Ana Castillo, Javier Llorens, Jessica Braojos
      This study examines the impact of information technology (IT)-enabled knowledge ambidexterity on innovation performance, and the potential moderator role of social media capability on a sample composed of 100 small U.S. firms. The empirical analysis suggests that IT infrastructure enables the firm to explore new knowledge and exploit existing/new knowledge to innovate more and better. We also find that social media capability has a positive moderator role in this equation: IT infrastructure and social media capabilities work together to enable knowledge ambidexterity.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T03:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.004
       
  • The Power of a Thumbs-Up: Will E-commerce Switch to Social Commerce'
    • Authors: Chia-Ying Li; Yi-Cheng Ku
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Chia-Ying Li, Yi-Cheng Ku
      By taking advantage of social networking capabilities, social commerce provides features that encourage customers to share their personal experiences. The popularity of online social networks has driven the purchase decisions of buyers on social commerce sites, but few studies have explored why consumers switch between e-commerce (product-centered) and social (social-centered) commerce sites. In applying the push–pull–mooring model, the objective of this study was to gain an understanding of specifically how push, pull, and mooring factors shape their switching intentions. The findings revealed that push effect, in terms of low transaction efficiency, drives customers away from e-commerce sites, whereas the pull effects, including social presence, social support, social benefit, and self-presentation, attract customers to social commerce sites. Moreover, mooring effects, including conformity and personal experience, strengthened consumers’ behavior in switching between e-commerce and social commerce sites. Besides, conformity was also found to moderate the influences of social presence, social support, social benefit, and efficiency on switching intention, whereas personal experience moderated the effects of social benefit, self-presentation, and efficiency on switching intention. Such an understanding assists online retailers in understanding online shoppers’ switching behaviors, and thus turning social interactions into profits and sales.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T03:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.001
       
  • Explaining IT Governance Disclosure through the Constructs of IT
           Governance Maturity and IT Strategic Role
    • Authors: Anant Joshi; Laury Bollen; Harold Hassink; Steven De Haes; Wim Van Grembergen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Anant Joshi, Laury Bollen, Harold Hassink, Steven De Haes, Wim Van Grembergen
      This study investigates the relation between the maturity of IT governance processes and the IT governance disclosure of firms. Furthermore, it examines whether the strategic role of IT in an industry induces systematic variation in IT governance disclosure. Based on a content analysis of annual reports and a field survey on the maturity of the implementation of COBIT processes, the results demonstrate a role of IT governance frameworks in stimulating accountability and transparency via enhanced external reporting of relevant IT information to external stakeholders, in particular in settings where the strategic role of IT is high.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T03:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.003
       
  • Self-Control, Organizational Context, and Rational Choice in Internet
           Abuses at Work
    • Authors: Han Li; Xin (Robert) Luo; Jie Zhang; Rathindra Sarathy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Han Li, Xin (Robert) Luo, Jie Zhang, Rathindra Sarathy
      Cyber criminals use the Internet as a major platform to launch malware and social engineering attacks. Employees’ violation of Internet use policy (IUP) elevates a firm’s security risks from cyber-attacks. In the literature, such deviant behavior is generally considered to be the result of a cost-benefit calculus. However, this study shows that dispositional factors such as self-control and procedural justice moderate the cost-benefit calculus. We conclude that self-control and procedural justice need to be integrated with the Rational Choice Theory to better explain Internet abuses at work.

      PubDate: 2017-09-08T03:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.002
       
  • Understanding the Impact of Social Media Usage among Organizations
    • Authors: Farzana Parveen Tajudeen; Noor Ismawati Jaafar; Sulaiman Ainin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 August 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Farzana Parveen Tajudeen, Noor Ismawati Jaafar, Sulaiman Ainin
      This study investigates the antecedents and impact of social media usage in organizations. This study uses the technology, organization, and environment framework and includes certain antecedent factors that are specific to social media usage in organizations. The items to measure different purposes of social media usage in organizations were developed, which contribute to the enhancement of social media usage measurement. This study develops and tests an integrated model that contributes to the scholarly research on social media and information systems. The study also helps organizations to understand the benefits of social media usage and provides a justification for investments in social media by organizations.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.08.004
       
  • Have Your Cake and Eat it Too' Simultaneously Pursuing the
           Knowledge-Sharing Benefits of Agile and Traditional Development Approaches
           
    • Authors: W. Alec Cram; Marco Marabelli
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): W. Alec Cram, Marco Marabelli
      This research examines how organizations manage knowledge-sharing processes in systems development projects that employ both agile and traditional development techniques. Using a longitudinal case study, we draw on one company’s experience with a system implementation that employed a traditional approach during its first phase and then a hybrid, agile-traditional approach in its second phase. By applying an ambidexterity theory lens, we find that the adoption of a hybrid approach allowed the project to continue to exploit the traditional techniques that were working well, abandon techniques that were underperforming, and explore the use of agile techniques in selected areas.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.08.005
       
  • Understanding the Role of Technology in Service Innovation: Comparison of
           Three Theoretical Perspectives
    • Authors: Hyun-Sun Ryu; Jae-Nam Lee
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Hyun-Sun Ryu, Jae-Nam Lee
      Although prior studies have stressed the importance of technology in service innovation, debates on the roles of technology continue to surface. This study aims to investigate the role of technology in service innovation based on a service innovation framework. After identifying four innovation orientations, we propose three competing models having different roles of technology (direct, indirect, and moderating). Using data from 193 service firms, we determine which model best explains the role of technology. Results show that technology plays multiple roles in service innovation. Our study helps managers effectively coordinate their technology infusion into service innovation to improve firm performance.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.08.003
       
  • Evolution of the impact of e-business technology on operational competence
           and firm profitability: A panel data investigation
    • Authors: Jose Benitez; Yang Chen; Thompson S.H. Teo; Aseel Ajamieh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Jose Benitez, Yang Chen, Thompson S.H. Teo, Aseel Ajamieh
      This study examines the evolution of the impact of e-business technology on operational competence and profitability using a panel dataset of 154 Spanish firms. We find that (1) e-business technology has a positive effect on operational competence that decreases over time and (2) the firm’s proficiency in exploiting a portfolio of operational capabilities has a positive impact on profitability that becomes more substantial over time. The findings provide some insights on how the initial and subsequent IT investments affect operational competence and profitability over time. This study methodologically illustrates how to perform a partial least squares estimation using panel data.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.08.002
       
  • An investigation into the antecedents of prepurchase online search
    • Authors: Jingguo Wang; Zhiyong Yang; E. Deanne Brocato
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Jingguo Wang, Zhiyong Yang, E. Deanne Brocato
      This study investigates what influences consumers' extent of online search (i.e., the number of relevant web stores visited) before a purchase. A dataset containing website visitation and transaction activities from a panel of US consumers is used to test the hypotheses developed in the study. The results indicate a diminishing effect of competitive density on the extent of search, and the use of advanced information technologies induces more searches. Consumers also search more for experience products than for search products in contrast to the prediction in the nonelectronic market. Furthermore, online purchase experience increases, while product-specific experience reduces, prepurchase search.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.08.001
       
  • Differential effects of formal and self-control in mobile platform
           ecosystems: Multi-method findings on third-party developers’ continuance
           intentions and application quality
    • Authors: Tobias Goldbach; Alexander Benlian; Peter Buxmann
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Tobias Goldbach, Alexander Benlian, Peter Buxmann
      Although control modes have been studied extensively in traditional IS contexts, minimal attention has been directed toward understanding how different control modes operate in platform ecosystems. Drawing on the IS control and self-determination literatures, we examined the differential effects of formal and self-control on third-party developers’ continuance intentions and application quality on mobile software platforms. Two studies from a laboratory experiment (N =138) and a follow-up field survey with Android app developers (N =230) show that self-control is superior to formal control because it allows for higher perceived autonomy that in turn promotes continuance intentions and application quality.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T04:52:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.07.003
       
  • Effects of entrepreneurship and IT fashion on SMEs’ transformation
           toward cloud service through mediation of trust
    • Authors: Yan Yu; Min Li; Xin Li; Jianliang Leon Zhao; Dingtao Zhao
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Yan Yu, Min Li, Xin Li, Jianliang Leon Zhao, Dingtao Zhao
      This study draws from strategic choice theory, management fashion theory, and trust research to investigate organizational transformation toward cloud service. Considering organizations’ substantive rationality, this study proposes that SMEs’ entrepreneurial orientation and the institutional pressures received from the marketplace provide motives for their cloud transformation intention. These influences are mediated by a complex trust-building process. A survey involving 107 Chinese SMEs was conducted to validate our research model. The results illustrate that SMEs’ trust building toward the cloud-related situation and artifact plays a critical role in mediating the effects of strategic orientation and institutional pressures on their cloud transformation.

      PubDate: 2017-07-12T07:25:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.07.001
       
  • Community engagement and online word of mouth: An empirical investigation
    • Authors: Ji Wu; Shaokun Fan; J. Leon Zhao
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Ji Wu, Shaokun Fan, J. Leon Zhao
      How customer engagement in a firm’s social media marketing platform − online brand community − might affect word-of-mouth behavior is an open research issue as well as a vital business problem in e-commerce. To this end, we collected a set of longitudinal data that include community engagement behavior, e-commerce transactions, and customers’ post-purchase reviews. Using a control function approach, we find that consumer engagement in a brand community not only increases the likelihood of generating post-purchase reviews but also increases the likelihood of posting positive online reviews. Furthermore, we find that customer tenure has a positive moderating effect.

      PubDate: 2017-07-12T07:25:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.07.002
       
  • From traditional education technologies to student satisfaction in
           Management education: A theory of the role of social media applications
    • Authors: Laura Rueda; Jose Benitez; Jessica Braojos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 June 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Laura Rueda, Jose Benitez, Jessica Braojos
      Understanding how information technology (IT) resources create value in Management education requires new and more powerful theories. This research examines the impact of IT resources on Management education using the case method. We theorize that traditional education technologies enable instructors to engage students to increase learning performance, which in turn leads to greater student satisfaction, and that social media applications can amplify these relationships. The empirical analysis, partial least squares path modeling performed on survey and secondary data from 94 Spanish students in a Management course, supports our theory.

      PubDate: 2017-07-03T07:16:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.06.002
       
  • Relational affordances of information processing on Facebook
    • Authors: Ksenia Koroleva; Gerald Kane
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Ksenia Koroleva, Gerald C. Kane
      Facebook is increasingly considered as a trusted medium for obtaining news, but the abundance of information on the platform often leads users to experience information overload. Consequently, users need to develop strategies to process information. A survey conducted through a Facebook application reveals that the tie strength of Facebook friends influences how users perceive information on Facebook. Specifically, they appear to rely on heuristic cues (e.g., Facebook “likes” and comments) to process information from weak ties, but these cues are not used when processing information from strong ties. These so-called relational affordances have significant implications for platform design and marketing.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
       
  • Roles and politeness behavior in community-based free/libre open source
           software development
    • Authors: Kangning Wei; Kevin Crowston U.Yeliz Eseryel Robert Heckman
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Kangning Wei, Kevin Crowston, U.Yeliz Eseryel, Robert Heckman
      Community-based Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) development relies on contributions from both core and peripheral members. Prior research on core–periphery has focused on software coding-related behaviors. We study how core–periphery roles are related to social-relational behavior in terms of politeness behavior. Data from two FLOSS projects suggest that both core and peripheral members use more positive politeness strategies than negative strategies. Further, core and peripheral members use different strategies to protect positive face in positive politeness, which we term respect and intimacy, respectively. Our results contribute to FLOSS research and politeness theory.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
       
  • Expectations of patient-centred care: Investigating IS-related and other
           antecedents
    • Authors: Zhou Atreyi; Kankanhalli Zhenbin Yang Jieqiong Lei
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Ya Zhou, Atreyi Kankanhalli, Zhenbin Yang, Jieqiong Lei
      Patient-centered care (PCC) can improve healthcare quality and efficiency. However, it is unclear what constitutes PCC and which individual (including information system (IS) related) factors influence people’s PCC expectations. This study identifies the dimensions of PCC and draws on empowerment theory to model the antecedents of PCC expectations. The test results of the model, based on surveying 171 individuals, indicate that internal health locus of control, information technology (IT) self-efficacy, medical outcome expectancy, and trust in healthcare providers affect people’s expectations of PCC. In addition, the current state of PCC does not meet people’s expectations along all dimensions. This study contributes to research and practice on PCC and healthcare IS.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
       
  • Factors influencing online shoppers’ repurchase intentions: The roles of
           satisfaction and regret
    • Authors: Chechen Liao; Hong-Nan Lin Margaret Meiling Luo Sophea Chea
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 5
      Author(s): Chechen Liao, Hong-Nan Lin, Margaret Meiling Luo, Sophea Chea
      This study adopts the expectancy confirmation theory and regret theory to investigate the effects of external reference points on repurchase behaviors and explore how customers’ search effort influences satisfaction and regret. The model was tested using data from 268 customers of an online store. Partial least squares analysis results suggest that confirmation of expectation, search effort, and alternative attractiveness are predictors of regret, which in turn influences satisfaction and repurchase intention; confirmation of expectation and search effort also exhibited considerable positive effects on satisfaction, which in turn influenced repurchase intention. In addition, prior loyalty negatively moderates the relationship between satisfaction and repurchase intention.

      PubDate: 2017-06-22T03:50:21Z
       
  • Likes—the key to my happiness: The moderating effect of social
           influence on travel experience
    • Authors: Darshana Sedera; Sachithra Lokuge; Maura Atapattu; Ulrike Gretzel
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Darshana Sedera, Sachithra Lokuge, Maura Atapattu, Ulrike Gretzel
      Increasingly travelers engage in social media for travel activities. Prior to travelling, a traveler would post intended travel plans on social media seeking views from family and friends. While traveling, the same traveler would post photographs and comments on social media, seeking affirmation. This paper investigates this aforementioned phenomenon where social influence is sought and acquired through social media using the expectation confirmation theory. Using longitudinal survey data gathered from 156 respondents, prior and during their travels, this research assesses the moderating role of social influence on two of the well-established relationships in consumer marketing.

      PubDate: 2017-05-08T07:23:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.04.003
       
  • Smart Tourism: Traveler, Business, and Organizational Perspectives
    • Authors: Chulmo Koo; Jaehyun Park; Jae-Nam Lee
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Chulmo Koo, Jaehyun Park, Jae-Nam Lee


      PubDate: 2017-05-02T10:18:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.04.005
       
 
 
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