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Journal Cover Information & Management
  [SJR: 1.381]   [H-I: 119]   [54 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0378-7206
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • Exploring the inhibitors of online health service use intention: A status
           quo bias perspective
    • Authors: Xiaofei Zhang; Xitong Guo; Yi Wu; Kee-hung Lai; Doug Vogel
      Pages: 987 - 997
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Xiaofei Zhang, Xitong Guo, Yi Wu, Kee-hung Lai, Doug Vogel
      Why do online health services (OHSs) have a relatively low visit-use rate' Drawing on the status quo bias (SQB) theory and the rational choice theory, we developed an integrated research model to explore this phenomenon. To test the model, an online-survey was conducted in China with 339 valid responses for analysis. There are three insightful theoretical implications of the results: (1) Inhibitors in traditional healthcare hinder OHS use intention; (2) The rational choice theory can be used to measure the effects of the SQB on behavioral intentions, indicating that the SQB is capable of influencing behavioral intention from a rational decision process; and (3) The rational choice theory can be used in less rational situations.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.001
       
  • Conceptualizing and measuring quality of experience of the internet of
           things: Exploring how quality is perceived by users
    • Authors: Dong-Hee Shin
      Pages: 998 - 1011
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Dong-Hee Shin
      The exponential development of the Internet of Things (IoT) makes it essential to cater to the quality expectations of end users. Quality of experience (QoE) can become the guiding paradigm for managing quality provisions and application designs in the IoT. This study examines the relationship between consumer experiences, the quality perception of IoT, and subsequently develops a conceptual model for QoE in personal informatics. Using an ethnographic observation, the study first characterizes the quality of service (QoS) and subjective evaluations to compare QoS with QoE. Then, a user survey is conducted to identify user behavior factors in personal informatics. Finally, a user experience model is proposed, conceptualizing QoE specific to personal informatics and highlighting its relationships with other factors. The model establishes a foundation for IoT service categories through a heuristic quality assessment tool from a user-centered perspective. The results overall provide the groundwork for developing future IoT services with QoE requirements and for dimensioning the underlying network provisioning infrastructures, particularly with regard to wearable technologies.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.006
       
  • Resolving the privacy paradox: Toward a cognitive appraisal and emotion
           approach to online privacy behaviors
    • Authors: Han Li; Xin (Robert) Luo; Jie Zhang; Heng Xu
      Pages: 1012 - 1022
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Han Li, Xin (Robert) Luo, Jie Zhang, Heng Xu
      The rich context of the website interactions of online shoppers is underexplored in the research on online information privacy. This study draws on multidimensional development theory to examine the effects of general privacy concerns, cognitive appraisals, and emotions formed during actual website interactions. The results suggest that cognitive appraisals and emotions are dominant determinants of privacy behaviors. Online consumers are more likely to disclose personal information when they have positive cognitive appraisals and liking toward the website. The findings provide a novel perspective, which helps understand the so-called privacy paradox phenomenon beyond the commodity view based on the privacy calculus.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.005
       
  • A new perspective on neutralization and deterrence: Predicting shadow IT
           usage
    • Authors: Mario Silic; Jordan B. Barlow; Andrea Back
      Pages: 1023 - 1037
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Mario Silic, Jordan B. Barlow, Andrea Back
      This study examines the role of neutralization and deterrence in discouraging employees from using Shadow IT: tools, services and systems used in an organization but not authorized by the IT department. Our study provides a unique contribution to the IT security literature by studying effects of neutralization on both intentions (self-reported) and actual behavior, as well as examining the role of shame as a mediator. We surveyed employees from four organizations and found that the “metaphor of the ledger” neutralization technique predicts Shadow IT intention and actual Shadow IT usage. We also find that neutralization and deterrence effects influence shame.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.007
       
  • Role of local presence in online impulse buying
    • Authors: Charlotte Vonkeman; Tibert Verhagen; Willemijn van Dolen
      Pages: 1038 - 1048
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Charlotte Vonkeman, Tibert Verhagen, Willemijn van Dolen
      This paper proposes and tests a model to explain how consumers’ perceptions of product presentation technologies may affect online impulse buying. Data from a laboratory experiment (N=212), which were analyzed using a structural equation modeling approach, showed that vividness and interactivity of online product presentations increased the participants’ perceptions of local presence, which refers to the sense of a product being present with a consumer in his or her own environment. Local presence, in turn, influenced the urge to buy impulsively by generating both cognitive (perceived risk) and affective (product affect) product responses. The implications of these results are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.008
       
  • Strategic risk analysis for information technology outsourcing in
           hospitals
    • Authors: Jinhyung Lee
      Pages: 1049 - 1058
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Jinhyung Lee
      This study examines the effects of outsourced information technology (IT) on hospital productivity by using California hospital data from 1997 to 2007. I estimated the parameters of a value-added hospital production function, correcting for endogenous input choices. I found that in comparison to in-house IT, outsourced IT has a more considerable impact on hospital productivity in the short run. However, in the long run, in-house IT has a more substantial impact on productivity than outsourced IT. I also found that hospitals that do not engage in “too much” IT outsourcing have considerable productivity gains from their outsourced IT. Moreover, hospital characteristics play an important role in the effects of outsourced IT on hospital productivity; for example, hospitals with a small number of beds and early adopters experience productivity gains from outsourced IT.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.010
       
  • From traditional education technologies to student satisfaction in
           Management education: A theory of the role of social media applications
    • Authors: Laura Rueda; Jose Benitez; Jessica Braojos
      Pages: 1059 - 1071
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Laura Rueda, Jose Benitez, Jessica Braojos
      Understanding how information technology (IT) resources create value in Management education requires new and more powerful theories. This research examines the impact of IT resources on Management education using the case method. We theorize that traditional education technologies enable instructors to engage students to increase learning performance, which in turn leads to greater student satisfaction, and that social media applications can amplify these relationships. The empirical analysis, partial least squares path modeling performed on survey and secondary data from 94 Spanish students in a Management course, supports our theory.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.06.002
       
  • Whose recommendations do you follow' An investigation of tie strength,
           shopping stage, and deal scarcity
    • Authors: Tingting Song; Cheng Yi; Jinghua Huang
      Pages: 1072 - 1083
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Tingting Song, Cheng Yi, Jinghua Huang
      This paper examines the effects of recommendations from different social ties on online consumers’ purchase intentions and how such effects change as consumers proceed in the shopping process and are exposed to scarcity-related promotional information. Results from a laboratory experiment indicate that when the degree of deal scarcity is low, recommendations from weak ties are more persuasive than those from strong ties for consumers at the initial shopping stage, whereas the opposite occurs for consumers at the later shopping stage. At both shopping stages, the differences in the effects of social recommendations disappear when the deals are highly scarce.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.03.003
       
  • Healthcare financialisation and the digital divide in the European Union:
           Narrative and numbers
    • Authors: Jonathan J.J.M. Seddon; Wendy L. Currie
      Pages: 1084 - 1096
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Jonathan J.J.M. Seddon, Wendy L. Currie
      Financialization in health care considers the exchange of goods and services as financial instruments. This paper uses multivariate statistical methods to provide comparative cross-country health analysis in two dimensions: ICT infrastructure (availability and access) and Health data (usage and sharing). Based on the quantitative indicators/metrics used in our study, our results reveal three distinct country grouping emerge: Frontrunners, Followers and Laggards. These groupings highlight vastly different socio-political and economic conditions facing national health systems, where health inequalities will only partially be alleviated by building capacity in ICT infrastructure and eHealth.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.03.002
       
  • Analyzing consumer goal structure in online group buying: A means-end
           chain approach
    • Authors: Lin Xiao; Zixiu Guo; John D’Ambra
      Pages: 1097 - 1119
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 8
      Author(s): Lin Xiao, Zixiu Guo, John D’Ambra
      Given the enormous growth and significant impacts of group buying on Internet business marketplaces, this study aims to understand consumer goal structure in online group buying (OGB) contexts using a means-end chain approach. Using the laddering interview technique, 52 OGB consumers were interviewed. From the interview data, we identified 27 goals consumers pursued and their goal striving paths that are summarized in the hierarchical goal structure. This study has the potential to make significant contributions to both information systems research and e-commerce by utilizing a different approach to explain consumer technology adoption behavior.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T21:15:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.03.001
       
  • How attachment influences users’ willingness to donate to content
           creators in social media: A socio-technical systems perspective
    • Authors: Jinlin Wan; Yaobin Lu; Bin Wang; Ling Zhao
      Pages: 837 - 850
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Jinlin Wan, Yaobin Lu, Bin Wang, Ling Zhao
      As a relatively new behavior, donation to content creators in social media has become very popular in the last few years. Different from traditional donation to nonprofit organization or victims, donation to content creators in social media has received little attention from academic researchers. On the basis of the socio-technical systems framework and attachment theory, this study develops a model to investigate the effects of social and technological factors on users’ donation behavior. Our results indicate that donation intention is determined by the emotional attachment to the content creator and functional dependence on social media, which are influenced by both social factors (identification, interaction, and information value) and technical factors (sociability and personalization).

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.007
       
  • Exposing others’ information on online social networks (OSNs): Perceived
           shared risk, its determinants, and its influence on OSN privacy control
           use
    • Authors: Tabitha L. James; Linda Wallace; Merrill Warkentin; Byung Cho Kim; Stéphane E. Collignon
      Pages: 851 - 865
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Tabitha L. James, Linda Wallace, Merrill Warkentin, Byung Cho Kim, Stéphane E. Collignon
      People using online social networks (OSNs) exchange information through posts of multimedia content, which may contain others’ information. Our study contributes to the privacy literature by examining individuals’ perceptions of the risk their OSN activity poses to others’ information. We introduce the concept “perceived shared risk,” which includes OSN users’ perceived severity and susceptibility of exposing others’ information. Results indicate culture, concerns regarding one’s own information, and Facebook information disclosure self-efficacy influence both risk components. We also identify a correlation between perceived shared risk and the use of OSN privacy controls.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.001
       
  • Expert or peer' Understanding the implications of virtual advisor
           identity on emergency rescuer empowerment in mobile psychological
           self-help services
    • Authors: Manning Li; Zhenhui (Jack) Jiang; Zhiping Fan; Jie Hou
      Pages: 866 - 886
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Manning Li, Zhenhui (Jack) Jiang, Zhiping Fan, Jie Hou
      Psychological self-help services on mobile devices play a vital role in supporting emergency rescuers who engage in highly stressful and self-devoting careers with frequent exposure to dangers and traumatic scenes right after disaster strikes. In this study, we propose and design a low-cost and widely deployable strategy for empowering emergency rescuers through an intelligent mobile psychological self-help tool. This tool will help reduce the gap between the limited number of qualified professional counsellors and the high demand for timely psychological support by rescuers. We start with a thorough investigation of user requirements, extant work, and relevant IS design theories to inform our system design choices, among which we identified that “virtual advisor identity” (VAI) needs further research. We then empirically examined how VAI influences the empowerment effect of ERMS. Involving 120 emergency rescuers who have just finished rescue tasks, our experiment shows that VAI has important effects on a user’s cognitive and emotional routes, which are significant empowering enablers that lead to positive empowerment outcomes. Interestingly, virtual peer advisor empowers users mostly through evoking emotional resonance from them, whereas virtual expert advisor is better at empowering users through cognitive channels. Important theoretical and practical implications of the findings are then discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.002
       
  • Determinants of early conformance with information security policies
    • Authors: France Bélanger; Stéphane Collignon; Kathryn Enget; Eric Negangard
      Pages: 887 - 901
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): France Bélanger, Stéphane Collignon, Kathryn Enget, Eric Negangard
      Individuals often fail to perform the security behaviors their organizations request to protect informational assets. However, forcing individuals into the compliance can trigger undesired behaviors. We propose a model grounded in Theory of Planned Behavior and information security literature to study determinants of early conformance toward technology-enforced security policies. The model was tested with 535 respondents from a university that implemented new password policies. The results show support for all the proposed relationships, except that subjective norm does not affect intentions. This important finding is explained by the leading role of early conformers, which highlights the importance of context-specific theorizing by researchers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.003
       
  • Impact of top management leadership styles on ERP assimilation and the
           role of organizational learning
    • Authors: Zhen Shao; Yuqiang Feng; Qing Hu
      Pages: 902 - 919
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Zhen Shao, Yuqiang Feng, Qing Hu
      We developed a theoretical model of how leadership style and organizational learning culture impact ERP assimilation and tested this model with data collected from organizations that have used ERP systems for at least 1year. We found that the influence of transformational leadership on organizational learning was strong but mediated by the learning culture and that of transactional leadership on organizational learning was weak but direct. These results offer new perspectives on ERP assimilation theory and provide guidance for top management to exercise specific leadership behavior to achieve ERP assimilation and long-term ERP success.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.005
       
  • Reflexivity: A third essential ‘R’ to enhance interpretive
           field studies
    • Authors: Julien Malaurent; David Avison
      Pages: 920 - 933
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Julien Malaurent, David Avison
      In this paper, we argue that reflexivity should be as essential a component of interpretive studies as the much vaunted rigour and relevance. We propose a classification of three forms of reflexivity for interpretive studies: self-reflexivity, domain reflexivity and collaborative reflexivity. We use a case study of a project from a French public organization supporting organic farming to illustrate reflexivity in action, highlighting its positive contribution. We suggest quality criteria to enhance reflexive studies and show how these can be incorporated into the well-known Klein and Myers’ principles for interpretive field studies in information systems.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.007
       
  • Decision support system (DSS) use and decision performance: DSS motivation
           and its antecedents
    • Authors: Siew H. Chan; Qian Song; Saonee Sarker; R. David Plumlee
      Pages: 934 - 947
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Siew H. Chan, Qian Song, Saonee Sarker, R. David Plumlee
      We developed an experimental decision support system (DSS) that enabled us to manipulate DSS performance feedback and response time, measure task motivation and DSS motivation, track the usage of the DSS, and obtain essential information for assessing decision performance through conjoint analysis. The results suggest the mediating role of DSS use in the relationship between DSS motivation and decision performance. Further, DSS motivation is highest in the presence of high task motivation, more positive DSS performance feedback, and fast DSS response time. The findings have important implications for both DSS research and practice.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.006
       
  • An analytical framework for online privacy research: What is missing'
    • Authors: Avshalom Ginosar; Yaron Ariel
      Pages: 948 - 957
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Avshalom Ginosar, Yaron Ariel
      The study of online privacy addresses three separated domains: user privacy concerns and behavior, website privacy notices and practices, and state privacy policies and regulations. This study suggests an analytical framework which combines these domains. While most of the framework's variables are addressed in current literature, one is missing: views of websites' managers. Our survey reveals that managers share users' concerns but report that their own websites do not violate users' privacy although asking them to provide personal information. The younger the website managers were, the less they were concerned, but the more they acted to safeguard user privacy.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.004
       
  • Design patterns for emergency management: An exercise in reflective
           practice
    • Authors: Daniela Fogli; Claudio Greppi; Giovanni Guida
      Pages: 971 - 986
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 7
      Author(s): Daniela Fogli, Claudio Greppi, Giovanni Guida
      The design of a decision support system (DSS) for emergency management is an important and recurrent task in several application domains. However, despite several approaches and systems are reported in the literature, reusing such experiences is not easy. Starting from the experience gained through three concrete projects carried out by the authors in the last 10 years, in this paper, we suggest an approach based on design patterns, which can be used for the conceptual design of DSSs for emergency management. The validity of the proposed collection of design patterns has been assessed through an evaluation exercise with expert designers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T09:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.002
       
  • Effects of tourism information quality in social media on destination
           image formation: The case of Sina Weibo
    • Authors: Sung-Eun Kim; Kyung Young Lee; Soo Il Shin; Sung-Byung Yang
      Pages: 687 - 702
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sung-Eun Kim, Kyung Young Lee, Soo Il Shin, Sung-Byung Yang
      This study investigates the role of content and noncontent cues of tourism information quality in forming users’ destination image in social media. Empirical analysis based on data collected from Sina Weibo users suggests that several content cues and web page design as a noncontent cue are positively related with cognitive and affective images, which lead to a conative image. This study contributes to the body of knowledge on the role of tourism information quality in social media by providing empirical evidence on destination image formation. It also helps tourism managers build their marketing strategies to attract more tourists through social media.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.02.009
       
  • Social media analytics and value creation in urban smart tourism
           ecosystems
    • Authors: Tobias Brandt; Johannes Bendler; Dirk Neumann
      Pages: 703 - 713
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Tobias Brandt, Johannes Bendler, Dirk Neumann
      In this article, we demonstrate the potential value that the spatial and semantic analysis of social media messages can provide to smart tourism ecosystems. Building upon a showcase of 600,000 Twitter messages in San Francisco, we illustrate insights for stakeholders within the tourism sector from various analyses, including kernel density estimation and latent Dirichlet allocation. We show that social media analytics captures spatial patterns within the city that relate to the presence of users and the environmental and topical engagement. Furthermore, we outline how these patterns serve as an input to value creation for smart urban tourism.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.01.004
       
  • Shared experience in pretrip and experience sharing in posttrip: A survey
           of Airbnb users
    • Authors: Sung Joo Bae; Hyeonsuh Lee; Eung-Kyo Suh; Kil-Soo Suh
      Pages: 714 - 727
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sung Joo Bae, Hyeonsuh Lee, Eung-Kyo Suh, Kil-Soo Suh
      This research focuses on travelers’ use of shared experiences during their pretrip decision-making and their posttrip behavior in sharing their experiences. On the basis of information processing and literature on experience sharing, we developed hypotheses on how travelers make their purchase decisions on a smart tourism platform, adopting the experiences shared by others (pretrip), and how the quality of their travel experience and perceived information discrepancy affected their behavior in sharing their experience (posttrip). By testing these hypotheses using survey data from 411 Korean users of Airbnb, we draw conclusions on how firms should manage the flow of travelers’ experience information and design smart tourism platforms.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.008
       
  • The effect of user-controllable filters on the prediction of online hotel
           reviews
    • Authors: Ya-Han Hu; Kuanchin Chen; Pei-Ju Lee
      Pages: 728 - 744
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ya-Han Hu, Kuanchin Chen, Pei-Ju Lee
      Product reviews have gained much popularity in recent years. This study examines the theoretical foundation of review helpfulness and reports how the interactions among three user-controllable filters together with three groups of predictors affect review helpfulness. Reviews from TripAdvisor.com were analyzed against three analytical models. The results show that these groups of variables have a varying effect on different user-controllable filters. Review rating and number of words are key predictors of helpfulness across all three filters. The recency, frequency, and monetary (RFM) model has received a consistent support across all filters as well. Managerial implications are provided.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.12.009
       
  • Smart tourism technologies in travel planning: The role of exploration and
           exploitation
    • Authors: C. Derrick Huang; Jahyun Goo; Kichan Nam; Chul Woo Yoo
      Pages: 757 - 770
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): C. Derrick Huang, Jahyun Goo, Kichan Nam, Chul Woo Yoo
      The use of smart tourism technologies such as travel-related websites, social media, and smartphones in travel planning has been pervasive and growing. This study examines the mechanism of how travelers use these technologies to enhance travel satisfaction. By adopting the framework of exploration and exploitation and identifying the antecedents that advance and prohibit such uses, we find that the attributes of smart tourism technologies promote both explorative and exploitative use, while user’s security and privacy concerns have a negative effect. In addition, explorative use has a strong influence on overall travel experience satisfaction, and exploitative use mainly enhances the transaction satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.11.010
       
  • A Big Data Analytics Method for Tourist Behaviour Analysis
    • Authors: Shah Jahan Miah; Huy Quan Vu; John Gammack; Michael McGrath
      Pages: 771 - 785
      Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Information & Management, Volume 54, Issue 6
      Author(s): Shah Jahan Miah, Huy Quan Vu, John Gammack, Michael McGrath
      Big data generated across social media sites have created numerous opportunities for bringing more insights to decision-makers. Few studies on big data analytics, however, have demonstrated the support for strategic decision-making. Moreover, a formal method for analysing social media-generated big data for decision support is yet to be developed, particularly in the tourism sector. Using a design science research approach, this study aims to design and evaluate a ‘big data analytics’ method to support strategic decision-making in tourism destination management. Using geotagged photos uploaded by tourists to the photo-sharing social media site, Flickr, the applicability of the method in assisting destination management organisations to analyse and predict tourist behavioural patterns at specific destinations is shown, using Melbourne, Australia, as a representative case. Utility was confirmed using both another destination and directly with stakeholder audiences. The developed artefact demonstrates a method for analysing unstructured big data to enhance strategic decision making within a real problem domain. The proposed method is generic, and its applicability to other big data streams is discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:04:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2016.11.011
       
  • EXPLORING IDEATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OPENNESS IN OPEN INNOVATION
           PROJECTS: IT-ENABLED ABSORPTIVE CAPACITY PERSPECTIVE
    • Authors: Tingru Cui; Yi Wu; Yu Tomg
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Tingru Cui, Yi Wu, Yu Tomg
      Advancements in information technology (IT) have made organizational boundaries so porous, thereby resulting in a trend toward leveraging external knowledge for innovation. However, firms experience significant obstacles in drawing external knowledge. This study aims to disentangle the role of IT-enabled absorptive capacity in new product development performance. The research model was tested with survey data of open innovation projects from 152 firms. Our findings indicate that IT-enabled absorptive capability improves open innovation project performance in terms of new product innovativeness and product speed to market, but we do not detect a significant direct influence of openness on performance. Our findings also show that the interaction of IT-enabled absorptive capacity and ideation openness significantly amplifies new product innovativeness while the interaction of IT-enabled absorptive capacity and implementation openness accelerates the product speed to market. This study theoretically contributes by building an IT-enabled absorptive capacity theory in the open innovation context and uncovering the effects of two dimensions of openness. In practice, it offers managers strategies to successfully conduct open innovation projects in deploying effective ITs and leveraging various types of openness during the two phases.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.12.002
       
  • Managing online wait: Designing effective waiting screens across cultures
    • Authors: Andrew N.K. Chen; Younghwa Lee; Yujong Hwang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Andrew N.K. Chen, Younghwa Lee, Yujong Hwang
      We investigate how to effectively manage online wait using a waiting screen with progress cues in different cultures. A research model is developed based on uncertainty reduction model, resource allocation model, color psychology, and Hofstede’s cultural model. Two controlled lab experiments (n=269 subjects each) were conducted in U.S. and Taiwan. We found that high hedonic valence and high time affordance were more effective to induce greater enjoyment and less uncertainty respectively, resulting in shorter perceived waiting time. We also found the significant background color effect and interaction effects between culture and progress cue design.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.12.001
       
  • Cyberbullying impacts on victims’ satisfaction with information and
           communication technologies: The role of Perceived Cyberbullying Severity
    • Authors: Sonia Camacho; Khaled Hassanein; Milena Head
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Sonia Camacho, Khaled Hassanein, Milena Head
      This study aims to understand how individuals’ perceptions of the severity of cyberbullying they endure affects their experience with the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) medium through which cyberbullying occurs. To this end, it proposes a theoretical model based on Transactional Theory of Stress and Coping and Expectation-Confirmation Theory. A survey-based study involving 115 cyberbullying victims is employed to empirically validate the proposed model. Results indicate that victims’ perceptions of the severity of a cyberbullying episode negatively impact their satisfaction with ICT. Implications of these results for academics and practitioners are discussed and directions for future research are outlined.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.11.004
       
  • Knowledge sharing in a global logistics provider: An action research
           project
    • Authors: Louie H.M. Wong; Robert M. Davison
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Louie H.M. Wong, Robert M. Davison
      We report on an Action Research investigation into knowledge-sharing practices in Velox, a global logistics organisation and in particular its operations in Guangzhou, China. Our study is premised on Work Systems Theory and Punctuated Equilibrium Theory. Following a description of background and context, we describe two linked Action Research cycles, following the principles and criteria for Canonical Action Research. Our interventions were successful, with both managers and employees at Velox expressing satisfaction with the outcomes, which included radical changes to operational procedures. We discuss the implications and contributions for theory, practice and method.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.11.005
       
  • Connecto ergo sum! an exploratory study of the motivations behind the
           usage of connected objects
    • Authors: Mourad Touzani; Ahmed Anis Charfi; Philippe Boistel; Marie-Claire Niort
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Mourad Touzani, Ahmed Anis Charfi, Philippe Boistel, Marie-Claire Niort
      The Internet of Things seems about to revolutionize individuals' attitudinal and behavioral patterns and their habits. Increasingly, everyday objects will come with connected features and functions. In this context, it is crucial for companies to study motivations to use connected products and to understand the specific role played by user’s connectedness. On the basis of individual interviews with 43 users of various connected objects, this research explores such motivations and proposes a theoretical framework in which desirable attributes, perceived value, and psychological traits play a key role. The results are then discussed from both theoretical and managerial perspectives.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.11.002
       
  • Health information privacy concerns, antecedents, and information
           disclosure intention in online health communities
    • Authors: Xing Zhang; Shan Liu; Xing Chen; Lin Wang; Baojun Gao; Qing Zhu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Xing Zhang, Shan Liu, Xing Chen, Lin Wang, Baojun Gao, Qing Zhu
      This study explores the antecedents and consequences of health information privacy concerns in online health communities by integrating the dual calculus and protection motivation theories. On the basis of survey data from 337 users, health information privacy concerns, together with informational and emotional support, significantly influence personal health information (PHI) disclosure intention. Privacy concerns are negatively influenced by two coping appraisals (i.e., response efficacy and self-efficacy) and positively affected by two threat appraisals (i.e., perceived vulnerability and perceived severity). The perceived health status differentially moderates the effects of privacy concerns and informational support on the PHI disclosure intention.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.11.003
       
  • Modelling continued use of information systems from a forward-looking
           perspective: Antecedents and consequences of hope and anticipated regret
    • Authors: Ding
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Yi Ding
      This study focuses on two future-oriented emotions, hope and anticipated regret, to predict continued use of information systems. Empirical results based on two studies show that these emotions can exert independent and additive effects on continued use, controlling for previous use behaviour and satisfaction. Interestingly, the effect of hope on continued use is insignificant during initial use but becomes significant at the later stage. Furthermore, disconfirmation and involvement are identified as antecedents of hope and anticipated regret. These findings suggest that incorporating forward-looking variables into models of continued use is necessary and that their influence can be dynamic in nature.

      PubDate: 2017-12-13T05:30:46Z
       
  • Extending the Model of Internet Standards Adoption: A Cross-Country
           Comparison of IPv6 Adoption
    • Authors: Xuequn Wang; Sebastian Zander
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Xuequn Wang, Sebastian Zander
      Internet standards are very important for the effective operation of organizations. This study extends on the model of Internet standards adoption by examining the effect of organizational factors on adoption of Internet standards across different cultures. We propose attitude, top management support, and participation as important organizational factors influencing Internet standards adoption. Surveys were conducted in Australia and China, and the results show that organizational factors indeed play an important role in Internet standards adoption. Moreover, the effects of organizational factors are significantly different between the two countries. Discussion and implications of these findings are provided to conclude this study.

      PubDate: 2017-11-03T01:36:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.10.005
       
  • Effects of group arguments on rumor belief and transmission in online
           communities: An information cascade and group polarization perspective
    • Authors: Quansheng Wang; Xue Yang; Wanyu Xi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Quansheng Wang, Xue Yang, Wanyu Xi
      The proliferation of the Internet and online communities has greatly increased the number and transmission speed of online rumors. To take more effective measures to counter the negative effects of these rumors, researchers and companies should understand the underlying mechanism of online rumor transmission. Therefore, this study takes an early initiative by focusing on users’ arguments in online discussion forums on the rumors and their effects on an individual’s belief in rumor and belief change, which is guided by the informational cascade and group polarization theories. In turn, belief and belief change on the online rumor lead to intention to spread the rumor. A lab experiment was conducted to test research hypotheses that support most of the key hypotheses. The results, implications, limitations of the study, and conclusion are presented.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T12:04:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.10.004
       
  • Real-Time Business Data Acquisition: How Frequent is Frequent Enough'
    • Authors: Malcolm Townsend; Thanh Le; Gaurav Kapoor; Hao Hu; Wei Zhou; Selwyn Piramuthu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Malcolm Townsend, Thanh Le, Gaurav Kapoor, Hao Hu, Wei Zhou, Selwyn Piramuthu
      Effective data acquisition for business process monitoring has become a critical element in today’s business world. While the need for monitoring is generally agreed upon by both re- searchers and practitioners alike, the means and mechanisms are often vague. This is especially salient with the fast growing availability of various technologies to monitor in real-time through recent advances such as the Internet of Things (IoT) with specific emphasis on Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID) and associated sensor networks. This study is motivated by the lack of published literature in data acquisition and analytics that specifically addresses sufficient real-time data acquisition for effective managerial monitoring. As a step in addressing this void, we review and extend existing literature in this general area by studying various requirements and information sources that relate to effective management monitoring. We then design an exploratory study to evaluate current managerial monitoring needs and the importance of automated data collection technologies. Results from this study show that the most important latent factor that influences an organization’s information need is its dynamic competitiveness, and consequently, companies with a dynamic supply chain would need a faster transaction and operations data system. The second important latent factor is the behavioral performance, which renders it essential to have a human-centric data system. This study provides evidence for the significance in adopting technologies such as RFID and other IoT systems for real-time monitoring in highly dynamic organizations and offers guidelines for analytical technology adoption for various industries.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T12:04:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.10.002
       
  • Online customer reviews and consumer evaluation: The role of review font
    • Authors: Yunhui Huang; Changxin Li; Jiang Wu; Zhijie Lin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Yunhui Huang, Changxin Li, Jiang Wu, Zhijie Lin
      Inspired by the literature on processing fluency and the practical question of how to choose fonts for website design, we investigated the impact of customer reviews on consumer evaluation under an easy-to-read (vs. difficult-to-read) review font. We found that the feeling of ease in reading led consumers to judge the reviewers as more credible, thus increasing the impact of the reviews. Moreover, the effect of font diminished when consumers elaborated information more thoroughly (i.e., when high in need for cognition, or in an accountable situation) and thus did not use simple heuristics (reading ease) to make judgment.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T12:04:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.10.003
       
  • Strategic Effort Allocation in Online Innovation Tournaments
    • Authors: Indika Dissanayake; Jie Zhang Mahmut Yasar Sridhar Nerur
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Indika Dissanayake, Jie Zhang, Mahmut Yasar, Sridhar P. Nerur
      Online innovation tournaments, such as those hosted by crowdsourcing platforms (e.g., Kaggle), have been widely adopted by firms to evolve creative solutions to various problems. Solvers compete in these tournaments to earn rewards. In such competitive environments, it is imperative that solvers provide creative solutions with minimum effort. This article explores the factors that influence the solvers’ effort allocation decisions in a dynamic tournament setting. Specifically, comprehensive time variant data of teams that participated in crowdsourcing competitions on Kaggle were analyzed to gain insight into how solvers continually formulate strategies in light of performance feedback obtained through interim ranking. The results suggest that solvers strategically allocate their efforts throughout the contest to dynamically optimize their payoffs through balancing the probability of winning and the cost of expending effort. In particular, solvers tend to increase their efforts toward the end of tournaments or when they get closer to winning positions. Furthermore, our findings indicate that a last-minute surge in effort is more prevalent among high-skill solvers than in those with lower skill levels. In addition to providing insights that may help solvers develop strategies to improve their performance, the study has implications for the design of online crowdsourcing platforms, particularly in terms of incentivizing solvers to put forth their best effort.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T14:04:45Z
       
  • Understanding the Role of Competition in Video Gameplay Satisfaction
    • Authors: Sepandar Sepehr; Milena Head
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Sepandar Sepehr, Milena Head
      One of the key elements in many video games is competition. Based on Self-Determination and Flow theories, this paper explores the process through which competition makes a video game satisfying. A structural model that examines the impacts of Situational Competitiveness (manipulated via modes of competition) and Dispositional Competitiveness (as a personality trait) on gameplay experience is proposed and validated. The results show that the perception of video game competitiveness has a strong effect on Flow experience and Satisfaction. While an individual’s personality impacts the perception of a game’s competitiveness, this perception can also be influenced by the mode of competition.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T14:04:45Z
       
  • IT-enabled knowledge ambidexterity and innovation performance in small
           U.S. firms: The moderator role of social media capability
    • Authors: Jose Benitez; Ana Castillo; Javier Llorens; Jessica Braojos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Jose Benitez, Ana Castillo, Javier Llorens, Jessica Braojos
      This study examines the impact of information technology (IT)-enabled knowledge ambidexterity on innovation performance, and the potential moderator role of social media capability on a sample composed of 100 small U.S. firms. The empirical analysis suggests that IT infrastructure enables the firm to explore new knowledge and exploit existing/new knowledge to innovate more and better. We also find that social media capability has a positive moderator role in this equation: IT infrastructure and social media capabilities work together to enable knowledge ambidexterity.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T03:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.004
       
  • The Power of a Thumbs-Up: Will E-commerce Switch to Social Commerce'
    • Authors: Chia-Ying Li; Yi-Cheng Ku
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Chia-Ying Li, Yi-Cheng Ku
      By taking advantage of social networking capabilities, social commerce provides features that encourage customers to share their personal experiences. The popularity of online social networks has driven the purchase decisions of buyers on social commerce sites, but few studies have explored why consumers switch between e-commerce (product-centered) and social (social-centered) commerce sites. In applying the push–pull–mooring model, the objective of this study was to gain an understanding of specifically how push, pull, and mooring factors shape their switching intentions. The findings revealed that push effect, in terms of low transaction efficiency, drives customers away from e-commerce sites, whereas the pull effects, including social presence, social support, social benefit, and self-presentation, attract customers to social commerce sites. Moreover, mooring effects, including conformity and personal experience, strengthened consumers’ behavior in switching between e-commerce and social commerce sites. Besides, conformity was also found to moderate the influences of social presence, social support, social benefit, and efficiency on switching intention, whereas personal experience moderated the effects of social benefit, self-presentation, and efficiency on switching intention. Such an understanding assists online retailers in understanding online shoppers’ switching behaviors, and thus turning social interactions into profits and sales.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T03:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.001
       
  • Explaining IT Governance Disclosure through the Constructs of IT
           Governance Maturity and IT Strategic Role
    • Authors: Anant Joshi; Laury Bollen; Harold Hassink; Steven De Haes; Wim Van Grembergen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Anant Joshi, Laury Bollen, Harold Hassink, Steven De Haes, Wim Van Grembergen
      This study investigates the relation between the maturity of IT governance processes and the IT governance disclosure of firms. Furthermore, it examines whether the strategic role of IT in an industry induces systematic variation in IT governance disclosure. Based on a content analysis of annual reports and a field survey on the maturity of the implementation of COBIT processes, the results demonstrate a role of IT governance frameworks in stimulating accountability and transparency via enhanced external reporting of relevant IT information to external stakeholders, in particular in settings where the strategic role of IT is high.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T03:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.003
       
  • Self-Control, Organizational Context, and Rational Choice in Internet
           Abuses at Work
    • Authors: Han Li; Xin (Robert) Luo; Jie Zhang; Rathindra Sarathy
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Han Li, Xin (Robert) Luo, Jie Zhang, Rathindra Sarathy
      Cyber criminals use the Internet as a major platform to launch malware and social engineering attacks. Employees’ violation of Internet use policy (IUP) elevates a firm’s security risks from cyber-attacks. In the literature, such deviant behavior is generally considered to be the result of a cost-benefit calculus. However, this study shows that dispositional factors such as self-control and procedural justice moderate the cost-benefit calculus. We conclude that self-control and procedural justice need to be integrated with the Rational Choice Theory to better explain Internet abuses at work.

      PubDate: 2017-09-08T03:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.09.002
       
  • Smart Tourism: Traveler, Business, and Organizational Perspectives
    • Authors: Chulmo Koo; Jaehyun Park; Jae-Nam Lee
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2017
      Source:Information & Management
      Author(s): Chulmo Koo, Jaehyun Park, Jae-Nam Lee


      PubDate: 2017-05-02T10:18:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.im.2017.04.005
       
 
 
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