for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Jurnals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover Library Review
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [645 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0024-2535
     Published by Emerald Homepage  [308 journals]   [SJR: 0.369]   [H-I: 10]
  • Museum Bodies: The Politics and Practices of Visiting and Viewing by Helen
           Rees Leahy.
    • Authors: Shannon Wellington et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:57 GMT
       
  • Perceived Usefulness, Perceived Ease-of-Use, and Faculty Acceptance of
           Electronic Books: An Empirical Investigation of Sultan Qaboos University,
           Oman
    • Authors: MOHAMMED NASSER AL-SUQRI et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose Electronic books (e-books) are becoming increasingly important in society and general and among academic faculty, concomitant with the growth of portable electronic devices that facilitate the reading of e-books. The objectives of this study are to extend the use of the technology acceptance model (TAM) to faculty acceptance of e-books at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in the Sultanate of Oman. Design/methodology/approach The effects of language and personal characteristics (gender, age, field of study) in relation to perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and usage of e-books for academic work among respondents are examined using data derived from a survey of 332 faculty members at SQU. Findings Findings were that participants who perceived that electronic books were easier to use also tended to be those who used them more; younger male faculty whose first language was Arabic tended to have higher levels of usage than females, older faculty, or faculty whose first language was not Arabic. Faculty in the Social Sciences and the Life and Health Sciences tended to have lower levels of usage behavior than those in the Arts and Humanities, Business or Law, or Physical Sciences or Engineering. Practical implications Implications are that e-book acceptance among faculty at SQU is similar to that of faculty in Western universities and that the TAM is a relatively good predictor of e-book usage regardless of geographical location. Originality/value The value of the present study is that identification of factors affecting scholars’ e-book usage behaviors may provide library managers with a better understanding of the way in which they can support faculty. Further, by focusing on e-book adoption by faculty in a non-Western country, results of the research help to fill a gap on an under-researched population.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:49 GMT
       
  • A Handbook of Digital Library Economics: Operations, collections and
           services
    • Authors: Alireza Isfandyari-Moghaddam et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:48 GMT
       
  • Global research status in leading Nuclear Science and Technology Journals
           during 2001–2010: A Bibliometric Analysis based on ISI Web of
           Science
    • Authors: Amir Hosein Mardani et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose The main purpose of this study is to make an assessment of the global status of research in the Nuclear Science and Technology (NST) publications Design/methodology/approach The present bibliometric study is based on the bibliographic data that were retrieved from the WOS during 2001 to 2010. 85198 records published by the 35 journals under the category of nuclear science and technology in the database of Journal Citation Reports were assessed in terms of many aspects. A further assessment has been made using advanced bibliometric indicators such as field citation scores and collaboration network analysis using the NetDraw software Findings Unlike research-prolific countries, the annual growth rates of publications for most developing countries have experienced an evident leap. The highest scientific impact and productivity among the publications belonged to the International Journal of Radiation Biology (10.46). A limited group of prolific authors produced a considerable portion of the publications, among whom Japanese authors had the most contributions. The USA is in the centre of the international collaborative network illustration and is also the main partner of most of the research-prolific countries. Nuclear physics has the greatest field normalised measured impact ratios (CPP/FCSm = 4.2) among the publications which signifies its inherent impact on NST research. In general, like the inter-institutional collaborative publications, the internationally collaborative publications are more frequently cited and therefore have a higher scientific impact. Originality/value The paper could aid to show the collaborative researches in the NST Journals and assess the research performance of the NST.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:35 GMT
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Judith Broady-Preston et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:31 GMT
       
  • Total Availability of Journal Articles to Internet Users
    • Authors: Bruce White et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose To determine the outcome of the different measures taken towards open access to peer-reviewed research by measuring aggregate availability of a sample of journal articles. This sample was then used to examine the factors contributing to the availability or non-availability of types of article. Design/methodology/approach A sample of articles was taken from the Scopus database based on a search by surname. This minimised any skew that would result from a dataset based on subject or source. The results were analysed to determine availability by subject and differences in availability based on source. Findings Less than 30% of articles are available in their year of publication, rising to nearly 40% in following years. Repositories are responsible for slightly less than 50% of available articles. Substantial differences exist between the practices of scholarly societies and commercial publishers. Practical implications Aggregate availability is dependent on a range of activities and current efforts need to be maintained to ensure its continuance. Moves towards open access by commercial publishers are not a major factor. Originality/value This study differs from similar work by looking at access from the users’ viewpoint. Rather than looking at the total amount of material to which access is provided, it looks at the proportion of high-value information which is available.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:28 GMT
       
  • Reference and Information Services: an introduction
    • Authors: Peta Wellstead et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:27 GMT
       
  • Expert Internet Searching, Ed.4
    • Authors: Anand Kochunny et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:27 GMT
       
  • Creating and Maintaining an Information Literacy Instruction Program in
           the Twenty-First Century. An ever-changing landscape.
    • Authors: Louise Ellis-Barrett et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:27 GMT
       
  • Map Cataloguing Training at the University of the West Indies, St.
           Augustine
    • Authors: Yacoob Hosein et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose This paper seeks to provide a study of a structured approach at map cataloguing training by a team of cataloguers at the Alma Jordan Library of the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago. Design/methodology/approach The methodology is a case study which underscores the value of the experiences of cataloguers at training themselves in a particular cartographic format. Findings The collaborative efforts of the cataloguers facilitated the further development of institutional expertise and provided the required skills set for increasing bibliographic access in a specialized format. Originality/value The paper brings to bear the uniqueness of the cataloguing of Caribbean cartographic materials in a team-teaching setting which serves as a model for other academic libraries and information centres.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 22:26:23 GMT
       
  • Guest Editorial
    • Authors: Georgios A. Giannakopoulos et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 21:44:13 GMT
       
  • Electronic Textbooks Advantages and Challenges for the Hellenic Higher
           Education and Publishing Community
    • Authors: DIMITRIOS KOUIS et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose In the higher education domain, the shift to electronic textbook adoption entails numerous benefits. However, reluctance is noted by the students as well as by the publishers, impeding the faster realization of this change. Decision makers (such as Ministry of Education and Universities Administrations) need actual survey data in order to plan and perform the best strategy plan for the transition to the e-textbook era. Design/methodology/approach Two different surveys took place among higher education students and academic textbook publishers in Greece. More specifically, the purpose of these surveys was twofold: First, to identify both students and local publishers’ views towards the e-textbooks as the near future successor of printed books. Second, the results of the in-depth study will enable propose certain solutions for the Hellenic higher education textbook system, which has reached an economic and functional deadlock. Our findings will easily adopted by other, similar educational system across Europe as well. Findings Our findings reflect a situation where e-textbooks will replace the printed, but not in the near future as both technology providers and publishers have to overcome many technical obstacles. Students are expecting the transition to occur soon, but still remain very reluctant about the inconvenience might caused to their reading habits. Originality/value The results are unique and in alignment with similar surveys in other educational systems.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 21:44:01 GMT
       
  • Library Bookbinding in Greece
    • Authors: Vassileia Grimani et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose The investigation of the current status of library bookbinding in Greece Design/methodology/approach Two surveys were circulated among libraries and bookbinders. They aimed at determining the extent of use of bookbinding, the necessary characteristics of a durable library bookbinding according to the respondents’ opinions and the relationship between bookbinders and libraries. Findings The gathered data reflect the attitudes of Greek librarians and bookbinders and outline the current status of library bookbinding in Greece. They showed that bookbinding is extensively used as part of the preservation strategy for the majority of the Greek libraries. Most libraries resort to outsourcing. The specifications set by libraries are usually minimal, and it is left to the bookbinders to recommend the best solutions. Both librarians and binders emphasized openability and durability as the most important qualities of the bound volumes, and quoted several relevant technical details. A model library binding technique is suggested. Originality/value Such an investigation has never been attempted before. This research can be useful to the Greek Libraries Central Administration but also to the whole Greek library community for the improvement of the current situation, and may help towards the development of a national standard. It may also be useful for the international library community as a case study, presenting the situation in Greece.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 21:43:40 GMT
       
  • School Libraries’ Impact on Secondary Education: A
           Users’ Study
    • Authors: Georgios Bikos et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose The paper offers an overview of students’ and teachers’ perceptions of school libraries’ impact on academic performance in secondary education in Greece, using sociological analysis to assess the data and contextualise it in the particular case and social context of Greece after the crisis. Design/methodology/approach We developed structured questionnaires for the key categories of users visiting school libraries, teachers and students, trying to explore a set of questions which would give us a better image of their behavior. Our results from our empirical study, following the creation and distribution of a purpose made questionnaire in secondary schools in the area of Athens, was then evaluated in the context of sociological analysis. Social factors may explain discrepancy in opinions regarding School Libraries’ (SLs) role, we argued. Findings The data which we present elucidates, not only the frequency and ways in which pupils of an age up to 14 years old use school libraries, but also theirs and their teachers’ assumptions as to the degree in which school libraries affect their performance. In this way the data documents currently dominant perceptions of key categories of users in the Greek context but also reveals, via its critical assessment, the kinds of social factors that enhanced or hindered its impact on learning and academic performance in secondary education in Greece. Research limitations/implications The paper consists of a study based on a limited sample of users from Greek schools in Athens, hence its results are indicative. Practical implications The paper considers possibilities in which educational and cultural policy in relation to SLs should shift attention following the findings and their interpretation. Originality/value This study focuses exclusively on the Greek context taking into consideration for the analysis of the data derived from the empirical survey undertaken in Greek schools sociological parameters tied to the Greek context after the crisis.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 21:43:33 GMT
       
  • Chinese librarianship in the digital era
    • Authors: Susan Henczel et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 21:43:31 GMT
       
  • Better Library and Learning Space: Projects, Trends and Ideas
    • Authors: Craig Robert Cherrie et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 21:43:29 GMT
       
  • Local community in the era of social media technologies: a global
           approach.
    • Authors: Nicole Marie Gaston et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:18:20 GMT
       
  • Multimedia Information Retrieval: Theory and Techniques Roberto Raieli
    • Authors: Lynley Stone et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:18:20 GMT
       
  • Research, Evaluation and Audit: Key steps in demonstrating your value
    • Authors: Eva Hornung et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:18:20 GMT
       
  • Practical digital preservation: a how-to guide for organizations of any
           size
    • Authors: Milena Dobreva et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:18:19 GMT
       
  • In transition: academic e-book reading in an institution without e-books
    • Authors: Irene Lopatovska et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose The paper reports the results of a study that examined the ways in which graduate-level library and information science students make use of e-books and e-readers at an institution that does not offer e-books through its library. The paper can be used as a case study in the adoption of emerging technology. Design/methodology/approach The study used three research methods -- a survey, focus groups, and interviews -- to investigate library and information science students’ reading habits and preferences. Findings The findings suggest that despite the barriers of access and usability, the students have generally incorporated e-books into their academic routines. The results also suggest the factors that contribute to reader preferences for e-book technology. Research limitations/implications The study sample was limited to one academic institution without e-book collection Originality/value The article presents one of the very few studies that examine e-book reading of an academic population that does not currently have access to e-books through their academic library. Understanding the ways in which such a population accesses, uses and values e-books would help many academic libraries make decisions with regard to the selection, integration and marketing of e-books. Additionally, such a study could serve as the basis of a case study that seeks to understand the ways in which people who do not have ready access to technology through their institutions find ways to work around that obstacle.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:18:07 GMT
       
  • BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF AFRICAN JOURNAL OF LIBRARY, ARCHIVES AND
           INFORMATION SCIENCE FROM 2000 – 2012
    • Authors: Adeyinka TELLA et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose This study examines the pattern of publications, using a bibliometric analysis, of the African Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science (AJLAIS) for the period between 2000 – 2012. Design/methodology/approach The study uses appropriate measures and techniques of bibliometric analysis. Keeping the objectives of the study in mind, the data were collected from the AJLAIS covering the thirteen (13) identified years. The analysis covers mainly the number of articles published per volume in each of the specified years, the authorship patterns, the subject areas covered, the length of articles, the citation pattern of articles and the article types. Findings The results of the study reveal that a total of 218 articles were published in the 13 year period with 21 (9.63%) articles being the highest total, in the year 2002. The study showed that the majority of the articles, i.e. 126 (57.8%), were published by single authors out of which a large number were on information retrieval. Of the total number of articles published, 86 (39.4%) of them were 6–10 pages in length. Volume 19 in 2009 had the highest number of citations with a total of 451 (12.4%). Also, the study revealed that the majority of the articles were theoretical papers, with a total of 108 (49.5%) while the others were empirical papers, book reviews and short communications. Practical implications This bibliometric study will enlarge the knowledge base of information professionals on the present condition of Library and Information Science research in the current African context and provide some basis for future projections of the discipline. The study will also be helpful for librarians in the process of collection development. This is because, due to increased journal costs and slim budgets for libraries, collection development specialists must make careful selections based on the qualities and standards of journals. Originality/value Researchers who shy away from this particular type of research owing to its rigorous and time consuming nature should gather the courage to do so. Further studies should focus on analysing journals that are published in the field of librarianship in Africa as it will create more awareness of the field of study among other professionals or researchers who are yet to know about it. The study has also revealed AJLAIS as one of the LIS standard journals in terms of its wider citation by contributors in the broader LIS literature.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:17:58 GMT
       
  • Problems of Scholar-Created, Synonymous Subject Terms in Buddhism
    • Authors: Glenn Norio Masuchika et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose In the research into world religions, there are transliterated words of a religious concept that can be used as subject terms. However, scholars in world religions have often not chosen the transliterated word, and instead have adopted words they believe are adequate synonyms of the transliterated word and use them to categorize their professional work. This paper shows how this practice severely lessens the ability to retrieve all pertinent work and causes problems for both world religion scholars wishing to perform comprehensive searches and librarian cataloger deciding on the proper subject terms to include in the construction of citations. Design/methodology/approach The Buddhist transliterated term into English “sunyata” and the scholarly-created, synomymous English subject terms “emptiness,” “nothingness,” “voidness,” and “openness” were searched in an international database of religious and theological works. The lists of retrieved Buddhist works were then compared to see if the results of each independent search were identical. Findings There is a very low rate of overlapping retrieval of Buddhist works when the term “sunyata” and each of the scholarly-created synonyms are searched independently of each other. The use of scholar-created, synonymous subject terms instead of the transliterated term have greatly diminished comprehensive retrievals. Originality/value There is a paucity of articles concerning the negative effects of scholarly-created, synonymous search terms in general, and in world religions in particular. These results present the dangers of this practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:17:52 GMT
       
  • INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AND KNOWLEDGE SHARING AMONG
           ACADEMIC LIBRARIANS IN SOUTH- WEST, NIGERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR PROFESSIONAL
           DEVELOPMENT
    • Authors: STELLA NGOZI ANASI et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014. Purpose This study seeks to investigate the degree and frequency of utilisation of ICT enabled platforms for knowledge sharing by academic librarians in South-West Nigeria. It also seeks to identify possible barriers as well as strategies that will promote efficient utilisation of these platforms. Design/methodology/approach This study adopted a descriptive survey design, using a researcher-developed questionnaire for data collection. Fifty two professional librarians from selected academic libraries in South-West Nigeria were surveyed. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Findings Finding from the investigation revealed that academic librarians in South-West Nigeria are increasingly utilising ICT platforms for knowledge sharing in preference to the traditional platforms. However, ignorance of existing ICT knowledge sharing platforms, limited ICT skills, and an unhealthy technology environment remain major challenges. Originality/value The findings of this study have far reaching implications for Nigerian academic librarians’ professional development. It advocates maximum utilisation of ICT platforms for enhance knowledge sharing and collaboration for professional development, scholarly communication and efficient service delivery.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:17:52 GMT
       
  • Linking Literacy and Libraries in Global Communities
    • Authors: Louise Ellis-Barrett et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:17:51 GMT
       
  • Library 2020: Today’s leading visionaries describe tomorrow’s
           library
    • Authors: David Bawden et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 4/5, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:17:51 GMT
       
  • Social media, online imagined communities and communication research
    • Authors: Androniki Kavoura et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose The paper examines social media’s communication that may consist of a database for online research and may create an online imagined community that follows special language symbols and shares common beliefs in a similar way to Anderson’s imagined communities. Design/methodology/approach Well-known databases were searched in the available literature for specific keywords which were associated with the imagined community, methodological tools such as online interviews, content analysis, archival analysis, social media. Findings The paper discusses the use of multiple measures, such as document and archival analysis, on line interviews and content analysis which may derive from the online imagined community that the social media create. Social media may in fact provide useful data that is available for research, yet, is relatively understudied and not fully used in communication research, not to mention in the archival services. Comparison takes place between online community’s characteristics and traditional communication research. Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and social media’s use of special language requirements, may categorize discussion of these potential data, based on specific symbols, topical threads, purposeful samples and cater for longitudinal studies. Practical implications Social media have not been fully implemented for online communication research yet. Online communication may offer significant implications for marketers, advertisers of a company or an organization to do research for their target groups. The role of libraries and information professionals can be significant in data gathering and dissemination of such information employing ICTs and renegotiating their role. Originality/value The theoretical contribution of this paper is the examination of the creation of an online community belonging, which may offer data that can be further examined and has all the credentials to do so, towards the enhancement of online communication research. The applications of social media to research and the use by and for information professionals and marketers may in fact contribute to the management of an online community with people sharing similar ideas. The connection of the online imagined community with social media for research has not been studied and it would further enhance understanding from organizations or marketers.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:01:16 GMT
       
  • The Patron-Driven Library : A Practical Guide for Managing Collections and
           Services in the Digital Age
    • Authors: Anand Kochunny et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:01:15 GMT
       
  • Personal Digital Libraries: a self-archiving approach
    • Authors: Nikitas N Karanikolas et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose Literature presents a wide range of perceptions to the term Personal Digital Libraries (PDL). In this paper we examine PDL as a self archiving approach mainly based on the individuals’ activities. The rationale of using PDL and the capabilities that PDL should offer are also discussed. The key questions, we focus on, are the following ones: “What are the critical features of the PDL'” and “Are there technologies that enable the implementation/incorporation of such capabilities in a low cost software product'”. Design/methodology/approach We focus on “a user centred view of information process”, and examine how PDL could assist individuals to “create, seek, share and manage the life of information” (Foster et al., 2010). The capabilities that PDL should support, and the related technologies, are also discussed. Then, we describe some experimentation with a prototype implemented and used to clarify our view for the creation of PDL supporting/providing the mentioned capabilities. Further discussion and conclusions are finally presented. Findings The technology is mature enough for building up Personal Digital Libraries (PDLs) with the specified features/capabilities. Originality/value A new perception to the term Personal Digital Libraries is presented. This perception try to combine the self archiving approach of information, based on a low-cost tool, and the user-centred approach to manage the “life of information”. This type o library is mainly used to cover personal needs. Users benefit from this type of PDL by: (a) personalised handling of information, (b) reduced time to search and seek specific documents in their personal collections, (c) less possibility for broken links or unavailable documents. We must also mention that, new opportunities seem to appear for offering PDL as services in the cloud.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:01:12 GMT
       
  • Enhanced OAI-PMH services for metadata sharing in heterogeneous
           environments
    • Authors: Nikos Houssos et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose Managers of repositories / digital collections face the challenge of exposing their data via OAI-PMH to multiple aggregators and conforming to their possibly differing requirements, for example on output metadata schemas and selective harvesting. The article proposes a toolset that enables individual digital collections owners to satisfy such requirements even in cases that their IT and software infrastructure is limited and does not support them inherently. Design/methodology/approach – We have developed a software server that is able to wrap existing systems or even metadata records in plain files as OAI-PMH sources. We analysed the functionality of OAI-PMH data providers in a flow of discrete steps and used a software library to modularize the software for these steps so that the whole process can be easily customized to the needs of each pair of OAI-PMH data provider and service provider. The developed server includes a mechanism for the implementation of schema mappings using an XML specification that can be defined by non-IT personnel, for example metadata experts. The server has been applied in various real-life use cases, in particular for providing content to Europeana. Findings It has been concluded through real-life use cases that it is indeed possible and feasible in practice to expose metadata records of digital collections via OAI-PMH even when the data sources do not support the required protocols and standards. Even advanced OAI-PMH features like selective harvesting can be supported. Mappings between input and output schemas in many practical cases can be implemented entirely or to a large extent as XML specifications by metadata experts instead of software developers. Practical implications Exposing data via OAI-PMH to aggregators like Europeana is made feasible / easier for digital collections owners, even when their software infrastructure does not inherently support the required protocols and standards. Originality/value The approach is original and applicable in practice to diverse technology environments, effectively addressing the indisputable fact of the heterogeneity of software and systems used to implement digital repositories and collections worldwide.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:01:11 GMT
       
  • Using digital corpora for preserving and processing cultural heritage
           texts: a case study
    • Authors: Eleni Galiotou et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe the creation and exploitation of a historical corpus in an attempt to contribute to the preservation and availability of cultural heritage documents. Design/methodology/approach At first, the digitization process and attempts to the availability and awareness of the books and manuscripts in a historical library in Greece are presented. Then, a processing and exploitation taking into account natural language processing techniques of the digitized corpus is discussed. Findings In the course of the project, methods that take into account the state of the documents and the particularities of the Greek language were developed. Practical implications In its present state, the use of the corpus facilitates the work of theologians, historians, philologists, paleographers etc and in the same time, prevents the original documents from further damage. Originality/value The results of this undertaking can give useful insights as for the creation of corpora of cultural heritage documents and as for the methods for the processing and exploitation of the digitized documents which take into account the language in which the documents are written.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:01:11 GMT
       
  • Designing the Greek Citation Index in the Humanities and the Social
           Sciences (GCI – H&SS)
    • Authors: Daphne Kyriaki-Manessi et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose This study aims at examining the major policy issues regarding the formation of a Greek Citation Index. Design/methodology/approach Literature search for determining international practices on the formation of citation indexes and applied inquiries on the major citation indices available today on line Goals, policies on inclusion of published research, issues on impact factor, major concerns on distribution and use were examined within the Greek parameters imposed by language barriers, readability and usability A blue print of scholarly Greek production in the humanities and the social sciences was made along with the development of a mechanism for assessing and incorporating journals to the index. Findings The study reports on the following issues: Selection of humanities and social sciences as a start of point for the citation index Setting of the index’s goals and objectives in view of the use of impact factor for the assessment of academics Comparison of international to national production of citation indices Development of a mechanism needed to establish policies regarding the use of standards, selection of material, the compliance with repository policies and open access practices Assessment of difficulties arising from language (and alphabet) differences, demographics, audience and scientific production Originality/value The paper presents the designing of an information tool in a unique language environment and in isolation from the international indexing community. In addition, it contributes to: The adoption of international indicators, such as impact factor, and their implementation within the Greek environment The specification of parameters arising from language, demographics and publishing practices of the country
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:01:06 GMT
       
  • Community, complexity, the public library and community orientation.
    • Authors: Barbara Sen et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose This paper presents a model of the complexity in public libraries based on a case study of Cumbria Libraries, a public library service in the North West of England. The model illustrates the complexity of the library as a societal organization with multiple stakeholder perspectives. The model is based on community orientation as a form of market orientation, in combination with other multiple strategic orientations that combine to add value for stakeholders within the community. Design/methodology/approach The study is based on a case study of Cumbria Libraries. The data were gathered during field via conversations, interviews, photographs, documents, and observations including 85 participants from multiple stakeholder groups. The analytical approach blended Thematic Analysis and Situational Analysis. Findings A key finding was the existence of multiple strategic orientations, and the criticality of the leadership roles in managing the complexity, and in motivating staff and community stakeholders towards offering a cohesive, and relevant service suitable for community needs. Originality/value There is currently no literature on strategic orientation in libraries. The paper present an original model illustrating the complexity of the strategic orientations identified within the case study.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:52 GMT
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Judith Broady-Preston et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:51 GMT
       
  • Archival Studies in Greece and the Emerging Field of Integrated
           Information
    • Authors: Georgios A. Giannakopoulos et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014. Purpose Literature presents a wide range of perceptions of the term Personal Digital Libraries (PDL). In this paper we examine PDL as a self-archiving approach, mainly based on individuals’ activities. The rationale of using PDL and the capabilities that PDL should offer are also discussed. The key questions we focus on are as follows: “What are the critical features of PDL'” and “Are there technologies that enable the implementation/incorporation of such capabilities in a low cost software product'”. Design/methodology/approach We focus on “a user centred view of information process”, and examine how PDL could assist individuals to “create, seek, share and manage the life of information” (Foster et al., 2010). The capabilities that PDL should support, and the related technologies, are also discussed. Then we describe experimentation with a prototype implemented and used to clarify our view for the creation of PDL supporting/providing the mentioned capabilities. Finally, further discussion and conclusions are presented. Findings The technology is mature enough for building up Personal Digital Libraries (PDLs) with the specified features/capabilities. Originality/value A new perception of the term Personal Digital Libraries is presented. This perception tries to combine the self-archiving approach of information, based on a low-cost tool, and the user-centred approach to manage the “life of information”. This type of library is mainly used to cover personal needs. Users benefit from this type of PDL by: (a) personalised handling of information, (b) reduced time to search and seek specific documents in their personal collections, and (c) less possibility for broken links or unavailable documents. We must also mention that new opportunities seem to appear for offering PDL as a service in the cloud.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:46 GMT
       
  • Theories, practices and examples for community and social informatics
    • Authors: Gillian C Oliver et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:45 GMT
       
  • A Practical Guide to Metadata for Cultural Heritage Institutions
    • Authors: Marc Kosciejew et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:44 GMT
       
  • Eco-Library Design by John A. Flannery and Karen M. Smith
    • Authors: Charlotte Clements et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:44 GMT
       
  • Reading Groups, Libraries and Social Inclusion: experiences of blind and
           partially sighted people
    • Authors: Greg Morgan et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:43 GMT
       
  • Ailsa C. Holland and Elizabeth Mullins (eds): Archives and Archivists 2:
           Current Trends, New Voices
    • Authors: Sally IRVINE-SMITH et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 6/7, August 2014.
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Jul 2014 20:00:43 GMT
       
  • RDA perceptions among Malaysian catalogers
    • Authors: Yushiana Mansor et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 176-188, May 2014. Purpose – This study aims to investigate Malaysian catalogers’ awareness, familiarity and understanding of the new bibliographic content standard, i.e. Resource Description and Access (RDA). Design/methodology/approach – The survey method was adopted in this study. Questionnaires were used to gather data from respondents. The study included catalogers from higher education institutions in the area of Klang Valley, Malaysia. Purposive sampling method was used to identify the respondents. Findings – The results revealed that, in general, though Malaysian catalogers were aware of the RDA, they were only familiar with the basics of RDA and its related topics. They were mainly aware of topics regarding the overview and development of RDA, and indicated low understanding of other topics, such as Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR), related to RDA. The study found that respondents acknowledged the inadequacy of their basic understanding of RDA. The study also identified the catalogers’ needs and preference for RDA training. Most of the catalogers favored learning more about RDA context topics which include FRBR, Functional Requirements for Authority Data and International Cataloging Principles. They indicated willingness to undergo a two- to three-day intensive workshop to learn more about RDA. Practical implications – Like in other countries, catalogers in Malaysia may also encounter problems when implementing the new RDA. Findings of this study would be useful in designing RDA trainings for catalogers. Originality/value – No study has been done to investigate Malaysian catalogers’ awareness and understanding of RDA.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Records and information management
    • Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 242-243, May 2014.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:47:19 GMT
       
  • Library software in Pakistan
    • Authors: Nadeem Siddique et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 224-240, May 2014. Purpose – This paper is the part of PhD research of the principal researcher. This paper aims to describe current status of library software being used in the libraries of Pakistan, role of national and foreign agencies in the development of library software in Pakistan, problems faced by the libraries in implementation and to highlight the recommendations by the experts in the field to overcome the problems. It also attempts to provide a bibliography on the topic to researchers in the field of library and information science. Design/methodology/approach – Available literature was reviewed. The articles were usually published in national and international journals of library and information science and contributed by Pakistani authors. Other sources consulted were books, conference proceedings, theses and dissertations and websites of libraries and professionals’ organisations. Findings – The situation in Pakistan regarding library software cannot be compared with the that in advanced countries. Lack of standard library software, the multilingual nature of the library collections, poor budgets, computer illiteracy, software piracy and unavailability of support from local vendors are the main hindrances in the effective implementation of library software. In the available literature, experts have recommended the formulation of a consortium or a body under the umbrella of the Government of Pakistan which could provide standard library software, along with technical support, innovation and upgrades of the software, to meet the needs of Pakistani libraries. Originality/value – This is the first paper that presents the current status of library software in Pakistan, problems faced by the libraries in implementation of library software and recommendations suggested by the experts to overcome the problems.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:47:11 GMT
       
  • Organising archival records: A practical method of arrangement and
           description for small archives (3rd ed.)
    • Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 245-247, May 2014.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:47:11 GMT
       
  • Knowledge sharing of academic staff
    • Authors: Chin Wei Chong et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 203-223, May 2014. Purpose – The aim of this study is to build upon Jain et al.'s (2007) work by investigating the knowledge-sharing barriers and strategies of academic staff in public and private universities in Malaysia which have received relatively little research attention to date. Design/methodology/approach – A survey of 502 questionnaires was collected on both public and private universities in Malaysia. Data were analysed using SPSS. Findings – The overall findings show that private universities are more effective and are more willing to share knowledge. Linking knowledge sharing with non-monetary rewards and fair performance appraisals are strongly recommended in private universities, while monetary rewards, recognitions, publication of knowledge on websites and newsletters and the use of appropriate technology tools and systems are strongly recommended in public universities. Practical implications – Top management in Malaysian public and private universities must play their role and put in more effort to ensure academics have the proper platform and support to share their knowledge. Originality/value – This study is perhaps one of the first to address the comparison between knowledge sharing among lecturers in private and public universities in Malaysia.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:46:58 GMT
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Judith Broady-Preston
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, May 2014.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:46:58 GMT
       
  • Faculty members’ perceptions towards institutional repository at a
           medium-sized university
    • Authors: Fatih Oguz et al
      Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 189-202, May 2014. Purpose – The study aimed to investigate the perceptions of faculty members at a medium-sized university towards self-archiving and participation in institutional repositories (IRs). Design/methodology/approach – The research participants were from a medium-sized university. An online survey was distributed and a total of 217 responses were received which yielded a 40 per cent overall response rate. Faculty perceptions of the IR were measured through nine dimensions, the results of which were later summarised using principal component factor analysis. Findings – Faculty members’ perception of IRs and willingness to contribute to the IRs were closely associated with scholarly productivity rather than prior knowledge of and experience with IRs. Those who possessed scholarly materials were significantly more likely to have a positive perception of IRs and, therefore, were more likely to contribute to IRs than those who did not. Seniority in faculty rank contributed negatively to faculty members’ perception of the repository. Research limitations/implications – The study used a non-probability sampling technique to collect data about the faculty’s perception of IRs at a single institution of higher education. Variables for faculty background were limited to rank and academic discipline. Originality/value – In three ways: First, the study contributed to research on faculty perception of IRs in academia and approached the issue from the perspective of a teaching-oriented institution. Second, the relationship between faculty's willingness to participate in and their perception of IRs was measured. Third, a binary logistic regression model was used to estimate factors that influence faculty's perception of the institution's IRs.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:46:57 GMT
       
  • Catalogue 2.0: The future of the library catalogue
    • Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 241-242, May 2014.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:46:56 GMT
       
  • Archives for the lay person: A guide to managing cultural collections
    • Abstract: Library Review, Volume 63, Issue 3, Page 244-245, May 2014.
      PubDate: Sun, 27 Jul 2014 11:46:56 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014