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Journal Cover Library & Information Science Research
   [962 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2575 journals]   [SJR: 1.754]   [H-I: 29]
  • Research engagement in health librarianship: Outcomes of a focus group
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Hannah Spring , Patrick Doherty , Chris Boyes , Kim Wilshaw
      It is widely recognised that there is a lack of research engagement in librarianship. Anecdotal and editorial based observations express concerns regarding this situation but there is a lack of research exploring it. The research which does exist has been conducted at a generic level with little relevance to specific disciplines of librarianship therefore weakening its impact and applicability at discipline level. To date, there have been no studies that examine issues of research engagement exclusively within the context of UK health librarianship. This study reports on the findings of a focus group conducted as part of a larger study which attempted to redress this current gap in the evidence base. The focus group aimed specifically to gain consensus on the top five key barriers and top five key priorities for research engagement in the UK health librarianship. The main findings suggest that barriers to research engagement are mainly contextualised within research addressing key matters for the profession of health librarianship, whilst priorities are mainly contextualised within the role health librarians have in supporting the research of the health professionals to whom they provide library services. Outcomes of the focus group provide early empirical evidence to confirm that whilst there is considerable goodwill towards research and the development of the evidence base in health librarianship, there are existing challenges between working for the interests of both the library service user and development of the evidence base in healthcare, and the evidence based progression of the health librarianship profession.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • The dangers of unlimited access: Fiction, the Internet and the social
           construction of childhood
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Suzanne M. Stauffer
      At the beginning of the twentieth century, librarians, teachers, and parents wrote about the dangers to children of unlimited access to what was termed “sensational literature.” At the beginning of the next century, they struggled to deal with the dangers to children of unlimited access to the Internet. Although separated by a hundred years, they appear to be making much the same argument about the much the same issue, that of the public library providing unlimited access to minors to what some view as inappropriate or dangerous materials. However, a closer analysis of the discourse in the professional media regarding these two controversies, one that investigates the mechanisms underlying the changes in attitudes and practice, reveals that any similarities are primarily cosmetic. Such an analysis reveals that different issues were addressed and debated utilizing different social constructions of childhood and different social constructions of the public library and public librarians held by society as a whole and by librarians at the turn of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Connecting: Adding an affective domain to the information intents theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Nicole A. Cooke
      The information intents theory strives to explain how and why information is used. In this research the theory was used to discover what happens when online LIS graduate students exchange and use information in threaded discussions. The primary source of data was 33 discussion threads, in which students exhibited cognitive and affective intents and were influenced by their instructor's immediacy in the online classroom. This research provides insight for LIS education, instructional design, and other disciplines that utilize distance education technologies.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • How scholars implement trust in their reading, citing and publishing
           activities: Geographical differences
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Hamid R. Jamali , David Nicholas , Anthony Watkinson , Eti Herman , Carol Tenopir , Kenneth Levine , Suzie Allard , Lisa Christian , Rachel Volentine , Reid Boehm , Frances Nichols
      In an increasingly digital environment, many factors influence how academic researchers decide what to read, what to cite, where to publish their work, and how they assign trust when making these decisions. This study focuses on how this differs according to the geographical location of the researcher, specifically in terms of the country's level of development. Data were collected by a questionnaire survey of 3650 authors who had published articles in international journals. The human development index (HDI) was used to compare authors' scholarly behavior. The findings show that researchers from less developed countries such as India and China (medium HDI) compared to those in developed countries, such as the USA and UK (very high HDI) are more reliant on external factors and those criteria that are related to authority, brand and reputation, such as authors' names, affiliation, country and journal name. Even when deciding where to publish, the publisher of the journal is more important for developing countries than it is for researchers from the US and UK. Scholars from high HDI countries also differ in these aspects: a) they are less discriminatory than authors from developing countries in their citation practices; b) for them the fact that a source is peer reviewed is the most important factor when deciding where to publish; c) they are more negative towards the use of repositories and social media for publishing and more skeptical about their potential for increasing usage or reaching a wider audience.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • T.P.MackeyT.E.JacobsonMetaliteracy: Reinventing information literacy to
           empower learners2014Neal-SchumanChicago, IL
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Laura Saunders



      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • An empirical study of factors influencing user perception of university
           digital libraries in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Chang-Ping Hu , Yuan Hu , Wei-Wei Yan
      Studies of the resources and services provided through university digital libraries have focused on evaluation criteria which consider usability, content, technology, and context. The factors influencing user perception of university digital libraries have not been explored and discussed from the perspective of specific library service types. Structural equation modeling was used to explore influencing factors and the relationships among them, based on 353 responses to survey questionnaires regarding academic DLs in China. Findings show that information providing services, information retrieval services, and individual services are direct influencing factors, while information organizing services affect user perception indirectly through information retrieval services and individual services. Various services also demonstrate interactions.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • A joker in the class: Teenage readers' attitudes and preferences to
           reading on different devices
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Åse Kristine Tveit , Anne Mangen
      A comparison of 10th graders' reading of a narrative, literary text on a Sony e-reader and in print showed that preferences for reading devices are related to gender and to general reading habits. One hundred forty-three students participated in the study. In a school setting, students were asked to begin reading a novel on one device and then continue reading the same novel on the other device. A survey was administered before and after the reading session, measuring reading habits in general, device preferences, and experiences with screen and paper reading. Results showed that, overall, most students preferred reading on the e-reader. This preference was particularly strong among boys and reluctant readers, whereas avid readers were more in favor of print. Implications of these findings to library policies and priorities are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Concept analysis for library and information science: Exploring usage
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Rachel A. Fleming-May
      Although several library and information science (LIS) and information needs, seeking, and use (INSU) scholars have called for improving the discipline's conceptual and theoretical foundation, the LIS literature presents surprisingly few models for exploring and clarifying central concepts. While models for concept exploration such as the treatise or explication focus on determining “the” definition of a concept, other approaches, such as discourse analysis, have clear methodological and theoretical premises but lack sufficiently identifiable methods for application. The purpose of this paper is to describe, a collection of innovative approaches of concept analysis (CA) from nursing scholarship. While individual approaches to CA differ slightly from each other in terms of theoretical standpoint and method, all share the goal of clarifying individual concepts to establish a foundation for empirical research. This paper describes the theoretical foundations and application of CA approaches from nursing scholarship and presents an abbreviated case of its application to usage, a concept of interest to the LIS community. CA holds a great deal of potential for LIS scholars who seek to clarify the discipline's concepts, whether foundational and basic, or more obscure and specific.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Benchmarking local public libraries using non-parametric frontier methods:
           A case study of Flanders
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Jesse Stroobants , Geert Bouckaert
      Being faced with significant budget cuts and continual pressure to do more with less, issues of efficiency and effectiveness became a priority for local governments in most countries. In this context, benchmarking is widely acknowledged as a powerful tool for local performance management and for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of local service delivery. Performance benchmarking exercises are regularly carried out using ratio analysis, by comparing single indicators. Since this approach offers only limited assessments in absolute terms, it is difficult for decision-makers to track and improve overall performance. Therefore, the use of non-parametric frontier methods, namely free disposal hull (FDH) and data envelopment analysis (DEA) is presented as an alternative technique for benchmarking the performance of organizations in relative terms. The potential applications and strengths of these non-parametric frontier methods for benchmarking the efficiency of local public services are highlighted by applying FDH and DEA techniques to the local public libraries in Flanders. Incorporating all possible paths of expansion – both in space and in time – enables a focus on sustainability within efficiency benchmarking.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • What do academic libraries tweet about, and what makes a library tweet
           useful?
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Besiki Stvilia , Leila Gibradze
      People spend an increasing amount of time using social media systems to network, share information, learn, or engage in leisure activities (e.g., gaming). Libraries too are establishing a social media presence to promote the library and provide services to user populations through the social media systems the users frequent. This study explores Twitter uses by six large academic libraries and factors that make library tweets useful. 752 tweets were analyzed by topic to develop a subject typology of library tweets. In addition, tweets and Twitter user characteristics were analyzed to explore what makes library tweets useful, as measured by the number of retweets and favorites received. Content analysis of the samples of library tweets revealed nine content types, with the event and resource categories being the most frequent. In addition, the analysis showed that tweets related to study support services and building and maintaining connections with the library community were the most frequently retweeted and selected as favorites. The presence of a URL in the tweet was positively associated with the number of retweets, and the number of users followed was positively associated with the number of favorites received. Finally, a negative correlation was found between the account age and number of favorites.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Society, institutions, and common sense: Themes in the discourse of book
           challengers in 21st century United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Emily J.M. Knox
      Understanding why people attempt to remove, relocate, or restrict books in an age of ubiquitous access is one of the more puzzling aspects of contemporary challenge cases. In order to better comprehend this largely symbolic phenomenon, this study focused on the arguments that book challengers employed to justify the removal, relocation, or restriction of books in 13 challenge cases in public libraries and schools across the United States between 2007 and 2011. Three sources of discourse, which were coded for common themes, were analyzed. The first consisted of a variety of documents, obtained via state open record requests to governing bodies, which were produced in the course of challenge cases. Recordings of book challenge public hearings constituted the second source of data. The third source of discourse consisted of interviews with challengers. The study found the following common themes in challengers' worldviews: First, they saw contemporary society as being in a state of decline and were concerned with preserving the innocence of children in the midst of this decay. Second, they constructed public institutions as symbols of the community that must represent their values and aid parents in their difficult role as boundary setters. Finally, challengers demonstrated a reverence for the books as a material object and employed common sense interpretive strategies. It is hoped that this analysis will offer a starting point for comparing the discourse of challengers to the discourse of other social actors and aid librarians and other information professionals in providing effective responses to challengers to materials in their respective institutions.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • The preferences of authors of Chinese library and information science
           journal articles in citing Internet sources
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Chuanfu Chen , Bo Luo , Kuei Chiu , Ruihan Zhao , Ping Wang
      The preferences of the authors of Chinese library and information science (LIS) journal articles in citing Internet sources were investigated using eight premium Chinese LIS journals from Chinese Social Sciences Citation Index (the observation group) and 10 journals in other disciplines (the control group) from the same database from 1999 to 2008. A total of 252,881 citations were analyzed in terms of count, domain name, and citing purposes. The results show that (a) in comparison to the disciplines in the control group, LIS articles in Chinese journals indicated a strong preference for citing Internet sources, and this preference is increasing; (b) LIS articles did not seem to discriminate against domain names when citing Internet sources; and (c) LIS articles cited more Internet sources as evidence to support research results and conclusions. Excessive dependency on Internet sources may raise concerns over the quality, research ethics, and credibility of research publications. Chinese LIS researchers should place more emphasis on the disadvantages of Internet sources as supporting material. Guidelines and criteria to help researchers, journal editors, students, and librarians assess information on the Web need to be developed.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Announcements and Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4




      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4




      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Information literacy: Time to move beyond more of the same?
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:36:01Z
       
  • Confusion in the profession: Contribution of the research framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:36:01Z
       
  • Research methods: Information, systems and
           contextsKirstyWilliamsonGraemeJohanson2013Tilde University PressMelbourne,
           Australia978-0734611482(578 pp. $41.55 (pbk))
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Laura Saunders



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:01:26Z
       
  • What's in a virtual hug' A transdisciplinary review of methods in
           online health discussion forum research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Annie T. Chen



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:01:26Z
       
  • Following the red thread of information in information literacy research:
           Recovering local knowledge through interview to the double
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Annemaree Lloyd
      To understand a complex social practice such as workplace information literacy and capture the nonnormative and nuanced local knowledges that are specific to the performance in a setting, requires that additional tools be added to information literacy researchers' methodological toolbox. One such tool, interview to the double (ITTD), is introduced and explored through a study that focused on understanding how aged-care workers developed their understanding of safety in the workplace. The addition of the ITTD technique was to recover local knowledges that are present in the daily routines of workers or available only at the moment of practice. The ITTD technique is described and its potential and limitations are also considered in relation to information literacy research.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Subject dispersion of LIS research in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mirza Muhammad Naseer , Khalid Mahmood
      A subject analysis of 5195 publications in library and information science (LIS) research in Pakistan over a period of 62years revealed that the majority of Pakistani LIS research focused on a few subject areas. Pakistani LIS researchers gave little attention to many subjects and completely ignored others. More than a quarter (26.72%) of the total items focused on “information treatment for information services” while 22% were related to “libraries as physical collections.” Other areas with some attention included “industry, profession and education” (12.32%) and “theoretical and general aspects of libraries and information” (11.40%). Researchers paid little attention to “housing technologies,” “technical services in libraries, archives and museums,” and “management.”


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Research data management services in academic research libraries and
           perceptions of librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Carol Tenopir , Robert J. Sandusky , Suzie Allard , Ben Birch
      The emergence of data intensive science and the establishment of data management mandates have motivated academic libraries to develop research data services (RDS) for their faculty and students. Here the results of two studies are reported: librarians' RDS practices in U.S. and Canadian academic research libraries, and the RDS-related library policies in those or similar libraries. Results show that RDS are currently not frequently employed in libraries, but many services are in the planning stages. Technical RDS are less common than informational RDS, RDS are performed more often for faculty than for students, and more library directors believe they offer opportunities for staff to develop RDS-related skills than the percentage of librarians who perceive such opportunities to be available. Librarians need opportunities to learn more about these services either on campus or through attendance at workshops and professional conferences.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • The effect of personal and situational factors on LIS students' and
           professionals' intentions to use e-books
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Noa Aharony
      Due to the growth in both the number and use of e-books, the question arises as to which factors may influence information professionals and library and information science (LIS) students when considering adopting e-books in their organizations. This study uses the technology acceptance model (TAM), a well-known theory for explaining individuals' technology behaviors, and cognitive appraisal theory as theoretical bases from which to predict factors that may influence information professionals and LIS students in their adoption of e-books in their organizations. This study explored two main themes: whether there are differences between information professionals' and LIS students' perspectives towards e-books, and to what extent the TAM, as well as other personal characteristics such as threat, challenge, and motivation, explain information professionals' and LIS students' perspectives. Researchers used questionnaires to gather data on computer competence, attitudes to ebooks, motivation, and cognitive appraisal. Findings reveal that there are major differences between the two groups concerning computer competence, motivation, and challenge. In addition, the TAM, as well as other personal characteristics, can predict the likelihood of e-book adoption, and highlights the importance of individual characteristics when considering technology acceptance.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Digital Libraries Information
           AccessG.G.ChowdhurySchubertFoo2012Neal-SchumanChicago,
           IL978-1555709143(256 pp. $99.95 (pbk).)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Dan Albertson



      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Museum Web search behavior of special interest visitors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mette Skov , Peter Ingwersen
      There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. The present study takes a user perspective and explores the characteristics of online museum visitors' web search behaviour. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was deployed in a case study at a National Museum of Military History. Quantitatively, data from a web questionnaire survey and a user study of interactive searching behaviour were collected and analysed. Qualitatively, observation protocols were coded and analysed based on inductive content analysis. It was found that metadata elements on factual object related information, provenience, and historic context was indicated to be relevant by the majority of the respondents, characterising the group of special interest museum visitors as information hungry. Further, four main characteristics of online museum visitors' searching behaviour were identified: (a) searching behaviour has a strong visual aspect, (b) topical searching is predominantly exploratory, (c) users apply broad known item searches, and (d) meaning making is central to the search process.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Emotions as motivators for information seeking: A conceptual analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Reijo Savolainen
      This conceptual analysis of how emotions and feelings are characterized as motivators for information seeking draws on the appraisal theories suggesting that emotions motivate individuals by triggering action readiness to approach or avoid sources of information. The findings indicate that emotions and feelings motivate in five major ways: they start, expand, limit, or terminate the information-seeking process, or they lead to information avoidance. Information scientists have mainly characterized the motivational aspects of negatively colored emotions such as anxiety and fear while the role of positive emotions such as joy has remained secondary.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Academic social bookmarking: An empirical analysis of Connotea users
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Helen S. Du , Samuel K.W. Chu , Gary E. Gorman , Felix L.C. Siu
      Three groups of social bookmarking users, namely experienced users, users with moderate level of experience, and novice users, were investigated, in terms of their reported tagging behaviors, perceived usefulness of social bookmarking in information discovery and management, and perceived usefulness of the bookmarking features provided. Based on the empirical analysis of the Connotea users, who are primarily in academia, the study shows that experienced academic users generally prefer to use social bookmarking while moderately experienced and novice users still prefer to use the traditional bookmarking methods, such as creating and using bookmarks on a dedicated computer. Experienced academic users were also found to create more tags per bookmark comparing to the other two groups. Most novice academic users, however, only created one tag per bookmark, which just met Connotea's minimum requirement. Surprisingly different from the collaborative design nature of the social bookmarking systems, the study finds that our participants, particularly experienced academic users, prefer to create and use their own bookmarks rather than sharing bookmarks created by others. In fact, experienced users have significantly higher frequency (once every two weeks) of creating bookmarks than the other two groups (once a month or less). In addition, website design features and functions, such as automatic collection of bibliographic information, are regarded by all participants as helpful for information discovery. The in-depth examination and discussion of the opinions of Connotea users may be useful for further improvement of the design features and usage applications, particularly for academic social bookmarking websites. The results may also have potential implications to the future development of social bookmarking services in general.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • The dimensions of library service quality: A confirmatory factor analysis
           of the LibQUAL+ instrument
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jody Condit Fagan
      The LibQUAL+ instrument has been widely adopted by libraries to evaluate user perceptions of library service quality. Studies combining groups (e.g., Lane et al., 2012) have shown high correlations between two factors, suggesting the possibility that a two-factor model may fit as well as the three-factor model theorized by the developers. Also, previous studies have not closely examined residuals to analyze local misfit in the context of theory but instead have often correlated error terms to improve model fit. This study uses LibQUAL+ responses from undergraduates at a public, comprehensive university to test three-factor, two-factor, and one-factor models of user perceptions of library service quality. Global fit indices indicated that both two-factor and three-factor models were empirically supported, but the three-factor model had better theoretical support. Furthermore, this article adds to the literature the unique perspective of residual analysis and builds theoretical arguments in the interpretation of the final model. Areas of local misfit suggest the need for independent studies to examine residuals. If areas of misfit repeat across institutional populations, that could suggest the potential for further instrument development, while if areas of misfit are unique to institutional populations, this could target areas for institutions to investigate more closely.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Personal experience as social capital in online investor forums
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lisa G. O'Connor , Lindsay L. Dillingham
      Research demonstrates that information disseminated and circulated in online forums may have a significant impact on investors and on the securities market. Therefore, an understanding of that environment is critical. This research uses social capital theory as a framework for understanding how information exchange is facilitated in online investor forums. Specifically, it explores whether or not personal experience may generate social capital in the online environment. This work reports on the relationships between sharing personal experience and information sharing and use in three investor discussion forums. Four hundred forty threads containing 2405 posts were analyzed for this study. Thread starter posts and responses were quantified and coded for statements of personal experience. Citations to information sources were also measured. Results demonstrate that explicitly stating personal experience or lack of personal experience affects the quantity and quality of ensuing discussion and information exchange. Possible implications of this work on both the study of online investor forums and the study of social capital are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Devising and implementing a card-sorting technique for a longitudinal
           investigation of the information behavior of people with type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Beth St. Jean
      Information behavior research has been conducted predominantly using single-method (often interviews or surveys/questionnaires), cross-sectional research designs. However, there are important benefits to triangulation and the use of longitudinal methods. In preparing to conduct an investigation into the information needs and information seeking and use practices of people with type 2 diabetes, a longitudinal research design was developed that included traditional data collection methods, such as questionnaires and interviews. However, an additional method was developed specifically for this study — a new type of card-sorting technique that would permit the elicitation of participants' judgments regarding the relative usefulness of different sources and types of diabetes related information at different points in time along their journeys with the disease. This technique was well-received by the study participants and it yielded quantitative data that could be analyzed to identify whether any statistically significant changes took place in participants' judgments across time. Furthermore, the incorporation of a think-aloud protocol within this technique yielded invaluable qualitative data that helped to shed light on the reasoning behind participants' usefulness judgments. This new data collection tool has many potential applications within LIS research and practice.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Stakeholders as researchers: A multiple case study of using cooperative
           inquiry to develop and document the formative leadership experiences of
           new school library professionals
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Marcia A. Mardis , Nancy Everhart
      Cooperative inquiry, a form of qualitative research used in community building, has not often been applied in educational contexts. Through the lens of formative leadership theory, the researchers studied the abilities of three new school librarians trained in cooperative inquiry and leadership to engage in collaborative problem solving for technology-related school challenges. Due to internal and external factors, participants experienced various levels of success with their challengers, but cooperative inquiry proved to be a viable methodology to evaluate the outcomes of library education for school librarians' formative leadership.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Some new research opportunities
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Job satisfaction and job performance of university librarians: A
           disaggregated examination
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Ping Peng
      University librarians are required to continuously adjust to keep up with changing customers' needs. The study uses structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the effects of different facets of job satisfaction on the task performance and contextual performance of university librarians. Specifically, the study breaks down the overall measure of job satisfaction first into its intrinsic and extrinsic components, and then into sub-facets of these components, in order to isolate in detail how they influence job performance. Findings from competing statistical models demonstrate that certain facets of intrinsic job satisfaction strongly predict both task performance and contextual performance. The findings can be particularly useful for providing a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance in the university library context. Finally, the study considers managerial implications.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Measuring social capital through network analysis and its influence on
           individual performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alireza Abbasi , Rolf T. Wigand , Liaquat Hossain
      Studies of social networks highlight the importance of network structure or structural properties of a given network and its impact on performance outcome. One of the important properties of this network structure is referred to as social capital, which is the network of contacts and the associated values attached to these networks of contacts. This study provides empirical evidence of the influence of social capital and performance within the context of academic collaboration (coauthorship) and suggests that the collaborative process involves social capital embedded within relationships and network structures among direct coauthors. Association between scholars' social capital and their citation-based performance measures is examined. To overcome the limitations of traditional social network metrics for measuring the influence of scholars' social capital within coauthorship networks, the traditional social network metrics is extended by proposing two new measures, of which one is non-weighted (the power–diversity index) and the other (power–tie–diversity index) is weighted by the number of collaboration instances. The Spearman's correlation rank test is used to examine the association between scholars' social capital measures and their citation-based performance. Results suggest that research performance of authors is positively correlated with their social capital measures. The power–diversity index and power–tie–diversity index serve as indicators of power and influence of an individual's ability to control communication and information.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • The Cynefin framework: A tool for analyzing qualitative data in
           information science?
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Julie McLeod , Sue Childs
      Interpreting qualitative research data and presenting it in ways that enable potential beneficiaries of the research to use it readily and appropriately is increasingly important in the context of the research impact agenda. One way of doing uses the Cynefin framework. Cynefin, which is rooted in knowledge management and complexity science, has been used in a range of contexts to support decision-making and strategy development in dynamic and challenging situations. However, it has not been widely used as a data analysis technique or in the information science discipline. An exploratory evaluation uses it to interpret the rich, nuanced qualitative data from a three-year research project that engaged people worldwide to explore issues and practical strategies for managing electronic records, a significant information management challenge. The evaluation demonstrates that the Cynefin framework provides a strategic lens through which to view electronic records management (ERM). Cynefin prompts new questions to be asked, leading to new insights and a deeper understanding of the ERM challenge. Most significantly, it provides a new construct for re-perceiving the challenge in a holistic way and offers a strategic approach to taking action for change. This evaluation suggests that it is an appropriate and effective framework for use in qualitative research on challenging information management problems, with the potential to support the transfer of research into practice.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Health answer quality evaluation by librarians, nurses, and users in
           social Q&A
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Sanghee Oh , Adam Worrall
      Health information consumers and patients increasingly take an active role in seeking health information online and in sharing their health problems and concerns in online support groups and social media venues. However, they may risk being influenced by unreliable and misleading information in such environments, as no intermediaries monitor the quality of this information. This study focuses on evaluating the quality of health information exchanged in one of the social media venues, by investigating how librarians, nurses, and users assessed the quality of health answers in Yahoo! Answers, a social question-and-answering (Q&A) service. Through statistical analysis differences among the three participant groups, how the background characteristics influenced their assessments, and the relationships between characteristics of the content of answers and quality evaluation criteria were each considered in detail. Librarians and nurses shared similar ratings of answer quality, but had differences in their level of medical knowledge and the types of services they offer, resulting in minor differences across criteria. Users perceived the quality of health answers in social Q&A to be higher than librarians and nurses for almost all criteria. Depending on the sources of information presented in health answers, librarians, nurses, and users gave different quality assessments. Implications exist for research into and practice of evaluating the quality of health information, which need to address both search and domain expertise along with the sharing of socioemotional values preferred by users.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Photovoi A promising method for studies of individuals' information
           practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Heidi Julien , Lisa M. Given , Anna Opryshko



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Finding their way: How public library users wayfind
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lauren H. Mandel
      A multi-method case study research design, guided by Passini's conceptual framework of wayfinding, was employed to investigate library user wayfinding behavior within the entry area of a medium-sized public library facility. The case study research design included document review of the library's wayfinding information system; unobtrusive observation of library user wayfinding behavior; intensive interviews with library users to discuss their views on wayfinding in the library; and an expert review with library staff and a library wayfinding and signage expert to validate research findings. Overall, the study found library users' wayfinding behavior to be generally inconsistent over time, but that there are users who stick to predominant segments (those segments used heavily to connect two particular nodes, or stops). Those segments tend to be the straightest or most direct segments connecting two given nodes. Also, users appear to employ Passini's wayfinding styles more often than his wayfinding strategies, but additional research is needed that delves more deeply into these cognitive processes.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Twenty years on
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Fully engaged practice and emotional connection: Aspects of the
           practitioner perspective of reference and information service
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Amy VanScoy



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Information literacy self-efficacy: The effect of juggling work and study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mitchell Ross , Helen Perkins , Kelli Bodey
      Information literacy self-efficacy and academic motivation are both argued to play important roles in student academic development. The former is considered to be a predictor of student academic achievement while the latter is considered a key factor in developing information literacy self-efficacy. Today, many students undertake paid employment in conjunction with their academic studies and little is known about the effect this may have on their information literacy self-efficacy and academic motivation. As such, the relationship between information literacy self-efficacy, academic motivation, and employment has been unexplored. Data were collected via a questionnaire, comprised of existing scales, which was administered to undergraduate business students in an Australian higher education (HE) institution. A response rate of 58% resulted in 585 completed questionnaires. Findings suggest that whether or not students were engaged in paid employment did not appear to influence information literacy self-efficacy, although students in paid employment did exhibit significantly lower intrinsic motivation than students not in paid employment. Additionally, for students not in paid employment a significant relationship was found between amount of time spent on study and information literacy self-efficacy. Of some concern, the small amount of time students reported spending in academic pursuits outside of scheduled classes raises issues regarding the placement of information literacy instruction. For information literacy practitioners this study contributes to awareness regarding the conceptualization of information literacy instruction and its placement in the HE environment.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Three ways of knowing: Agricultural knowledge systems of small-scale
           farmers in Africa with reference to Kenya
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Hilda M. Munyua , Christine Stilwell
      Research carried out in 2011 in Kirinyaga district, Kenya, shows how sense-making theory and methodology can be used to assess the use of local agricultural and external knowledge by small-scale farmers and its effects on small-scale agriculture. Two knowledge systems, the local knowledge system and the external or scientific knowledge system, are considered dominant. The two systems can be synergistic and small-scale farmers have mixed them in their farming activities. Blending systems improve communication, livelihoods, and economies within local communities, and increases their participation in development. Data were collected in focus group discussions with farmers' groups and interviews with individual farmers. Results show that most farmers in Kirinyaga use external agricultural information in their farming practices. A significant number use combined external agricultural information and local knowledge, which forms a third knowledge system. This third system requires the validation of the farmers' innovations and documentation of the knowledge for wider dissemination. Information providers should adopt policies that promote the use of the three knowledge systems by small-scale farmers.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Search markets and search results: The case of Bing
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): David Wilkinson , Mike Thelwall
      Bing and Google customize their results to target people with different geographic locations and languages but, despite the importance of search engines for web users and webometric research, the extent and nature of these differences are unknown. This study compares the results of seventeen random queries submitted automatically to Bing for thirteen different English geographic search markets at monthly intervals. Search market choice alters a small majority of the top 10 results but less than a third of the complete sets of results. Variation in the top 10 results over a month was about the same as variation between search markets but variation over time was greater for the complete results sets. Most worryingly for users, there were almost no ubiquitous authoritative results: only one URL was always returned in the top 10 for all search markets and points in time, and Wikipedia was almost completely absent from the most common top 10 results. Most importantly for webometrics, results from at least three different search markets should be combined to give more reliable and comprehensive results, even for queries that return fewer than the maximum number of URLs.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Preparing public librarians for consumer health information servi A
           nationwide study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lili Luo , Van Ta Park
      A nationwide survey study was conducted to gain understanding as to how to prepare public librarians for consumer health information service. Findings indicate that the popular health information needs encountered by public librarians cover a wide variety of topics, including the human body, a medical/health condition, a disease, a medical concept, and fitness/diet/nutrition. The top two challenges faced by public librarians when providing consumer health information service are difficulty in interpreting patrons' questions and lack of knowledge about available and trusted/appropriate medical/health information sources. Public librarians wish to receive training on a number of topics that could help address the challenges they face, and the most favorable training format for them, among all the options provided in the survey, is the self-paced online tutorial. This study constitutes the basis for establishing training requirements and developing training programs to meet the needs of public librarians. Their mastery of the necessary skills, knowledge and competencies via training will lead to effective and efficient delivery of consumer health information service in public libraries, and ultimately generate optimal patron experiences.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • The new digital scholar: Exploring and enriching the research and writing
           practices of NextGen studentsRandallMcClure &James
           P.Purdy2013Information TodayMedford, NJ400 pp. $59.50 (hardcover). ISBN
           978-1573874755 (hardcover). (ASIS&T Monograph Series)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Melissa Scanlan



      PubDate: 2013-08-23T07:34:04Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2013-08-03T01:42:30Z
       
  • JamshidBeheshtiAndrewLargeThe Information Behavior of a New
           Generation2012Scarecrow PressLanham, MD978-0810885943(262 pp. $55 (pbk))
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Kathleen Schreurs



      PubDate: 2013-07-13T21:31:09Z
       
 
 
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