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Journal Cover   Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.781]   [H-I: 31]   [924 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2812 journals]
  • New members of the Board of Editors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research




      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:51:25Z
       
  • The Portable Document Format (PDF) accessibility practice of four journal
           publishers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Julius T. Nganji
      People with disabilities, especially those who are blind, rely on assistive technologies to read information on the web. When this information does not conform to accessibility standards, assistive technologies experience significant difficulties trying to interpret it. Journal publishers prefer to publish articles online in the portable document format (PDF), which may pose accessibility challenges when guidelines such as WCAG 2.0 are not adhered to. So far, no studies have been carried out to evaluate the accessibility of published versions of journal articles in PDF format. A total of 200 articles, 50 articles each from Taylor & Francis' Disability & Society, Springer's Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, Hammill Institute on Disabilities/SAGE's Journal of Learning Disabilities and Elsevier's Research in Developmental Disabilities, which are all ISI Web of Science indexed journals published from 2009 to 2013, were analyzed manually, automatically, and with screen readers for accessibility. The results reveal that 97% did not provide an alternative text for images; 95.5% were not tagged; only 13.5% had meaningful titles which were not displayed when the document was opened; 67% did not have a defined document language; 50% bookmarks, which help in navigation; all had accessibility permissions, enabling assistive technologies to interact with them; 99.5% did not have a logical reading order; none had a consistent heading structure; and all, including untagged documents which were not image-only PDFs documents could be read with screen readers such as NVDA if the correct accessibility settings in Adobe Acrobat XI Pro were chosen. Research in Developmental Disabilities documents were generally more accessible.


      PubDate: 2015-06-18T17:24:37Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-06-10T20:42:16Z
       
  • Collaboration and synergy in hybrid Q&A: Participatory design
           method and results
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Chirag Shah , Marie L. Radford , Lynn Silipigni Connaway



      PubDate: 2015-06-06T20:35:47Z
       
  • Measuring the gap between perceived importance and actual performance of
           institutional repositories
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Fatemeh Lagzian , A. Abrizah , Mee-Chin Wee
      Identifying the critical success factors (CSFs) of institutional repositories can influence their successful implementation. This study investigates the perceived importance of the success factors and the actual performance of institutional repositories worldwide. A web-based questionnaire was distributed to 354 repository managers via the OpenDOAR email distribution service and achieved a response rate of 83.3%. Factor analysis indicated the possibility of 46 variables under six factors being important for the success of institutional repository implementation. The six factors are Management, Services, Technology, Self-archive practices, People, and Resources. A gap analysis was conducted to identify the importance and actual performance of the factors. The major finding was that several of the factors are not fully realised by the institutional repositories despite their relative importance. Institutional repositories are still in development; this study may help to guide their implementation and further development.


      PubDate: 2015-06-06T20:35:47Z
       
  • Job satisfaction and work values: Investigating sources of job
           satisfaction with respect to information professionals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Valentini Moniarou-Papaconstantinou , Kalliopi Triantafyllou
      Job satisfaction is critical to life satisfaction, to the quality of employees' working life, and to their performance and organizational commitment. Using the theory of work values, job satisfaction of information professionals working in academic, special, public and school libraries as well as in archives and private companies is examined. Data were obtained through a questionnaire distributed to different types of information organizations. The results showed that the information professionals were satisfied with their jobs. Job satisfaction was predicted by intrinsic work values, namely the opportunities for learning, expression of creativity, autonomy, use of knowledge and abilities, and adoption of innovative technological developments. The analysis also indicated significant differences in the sources of job satisfaction (extrinsic, social and prestige work values) among professionals employed in four types of information organizations (academic libraries, public libraries, special libraries and archives). Professionals in special libraries were more satisfied with extrinsic work values than those in public libraries and archives. Professionals working in public libraries were more satisfied with prestige work values than those employed in academic libraries and archives. Finally, it was indicated that professionals in archives were less satisfied with social work values than their colleagues in public and special libraries. A relationship between job satisfaction and years of experience was also examined.


      PubDate: 2015-06-06T20:35:47Z
       
  • An exploration of the library and information science professional skills
           and personal competencies: An Israeli perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jenny Bronstein
      The skills and competencies required of library and information science (LIS) professionals working in libraries and information centers have been greatly affected by rapidly evolving information and communication technologies. To understand the effects that change has brought to the LIS profession, a typology of skills and competencies required of LIS professionals in Israel was developed. This typology resulted from the analysis of three different sets of data: job advertisements, course descriptions from LIS departments, and data collected from a survey administered to directors of libraries and information centers in Israel. The content analysis resulted in a typology of 49 skills that were divided into four different clusters: provision of information services, organization of information, technological skills, and personal competencies. Job listings were found to emphasize skills related to the provision of information services as well as personal competencies, while results from the survey revealed that skills related to the organization of information were perceived as essential by library directors. Data collected from course descriptions suggested that LIS departments prepared students to work in advanced technological environments but they did not develop their personal competencies. Traditional LIS skills that support design and provision of information services and making information accessible are still relevant today, while being flexible enough to adapt to changing information environments based on user-centered philosophies of service.


      PubDate: 2015-06-06T20:35:47Z
       
  • The characteristics and motivations of library open source software
           developers: An empirical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Namjoo Choi , Joseph A. Pruett
      Although there is an abundance of literature regarding the motivations of open source software (OSS) developers, researchers have not examined the specific motivations and characteristics of developers participating in library open source software (LOSS) projects. The characteristics and motivations of 126 LOSS developers associated with SourceForge, Foss4Lib, and Code4Lib are explored through an online survey. The questionnaire included items measuring select demographic attributes; scaled items measuring intrinsic, extrinsic, and internalized-extrinsic motivations; and open-ended questions. In comparison with the general OSS community, the results indicate that LOSS developers have high levels of intrinsic (i.e., altruism and fun) and internalized-extrinsic (i.e., learning and personal needs) motivations, higher diversity in gender, higher levels of formal education, previous library-related work experience, and a strong library ethos. Using this research, stakeholders can devise strategies to improve participation in LOSS projects.


      PubDate: 2015-06-01T14:05:37Z
       
  • Visual traffic sweeps (VTS): A research method for mapping user activities
           in the library space
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Lisa M. Given , Heather Archibald
      The visual traffic sweeps (VTS) approach combines traditional observational methods for assessing library space with geographic information system (GIS) visualization techniques. This unique approach to spatial analysis can be used across library and information settings (or in other spaces with large amounts of human traffic) to map patterns in user behavior. Results of the visual analyses can be triangulated with other methods (e.g., questionnaires or interviews) to better inform library policy and space planning decisions. Findings from a study that used VTS in the business library of a large, urban university illustrate the potential application of this technique across library settings. Specific findings (e.g., patrons' preferences for certain spaces for laptop use, despite the library reserving other space for laptops) demonstrate the power of visualization techniques for analyzing results in ways that are not possible with standard statistical analysis approaches. In addition, the visual maps that result from the analysis process are useful for the presentation of visual data in conference presentations and/or to library stakeholders. Overall, this approach provides evidence for space planning decisions that are grounded in users' real activities within the library space.


      PubDate: 2015-05-27T13:56:34Z
       
  • Exploring the library's contribution to the academic institution: Research
           agenda
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2015-05-27T13:56:34Z
       
  • “Ask a librarian”: Comparing virtual reference services in an
           Israeli academic library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Riki Greenberg , Judit Bar-Ilan
      This study considered two Web-based virtual reference services (VRS) at an academic library in Israel: chat (116 interactions) and email (213 exchanges). The contents of a set of questions and answers in both VRS services were analyzed, along with an open-ended questionnaire administered to the library's reference team (n=16). Differences were found in the question and answer distributions. Face-to-face reference is preferred by the librarians although they acknowledge that the best fitting service is dependent on the users' preferences and their information needs.


      PubDate: 2015-05-14T14:40:23Z
       
  • ‘Unearthing farmers' information seeking contexts and challenges in
           digital, local and industry environments’
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Ann Starasts
      The information seeking contexts of Australian grain and cotton growers were explored as they undertook self-directed learning to make farming system changes. This investigation provided insights into information seeking and what constitutes ‘information’ that supported learning. Growers' information seeking contexts were individual, personalised, situated within experiential practices, bounded by locales, and facilitated by social practices. Farmers are agents who must personalise both information content and processes to produce relevant meanings and to progress their own learning agendas and pathways. Information seeking in online, local, and industry environments highlighted differences between available content and farmers' individual information needs. Information and communications systems that facilitate and empower individual farmer knowledge processes and onfarm outcomes are a necessary strategy of agricultural development.


      PubDate: 2015-05-14T14:40:23Z
       
  • Libraries as transitory workspaces and spatial incubators
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mina Di Marino , Kimmo Lapintie
      Growing flexibility in work arrangements, particularly in the knowledge industries, and the ensuing possibilities for teleworking are challenging the traditional ways of conceptualizing and designing public spaces and public services. As an example of this development, public and university libraries are studied from the point of view of teleworking. Although work still only accounts for a small amount of the activities that take place in libraries, its transformations can be seen as a ‘weak signal’ of newly emerging spatial arrangements. In addition to the home and workplace, teleworkers are using a network of public, semi-public and private spaces (so-called third places) for different types of working. The research used the concept “spatial portfolio” to address this phenomenon of spatial modalities. The new role of public libraries within this context is discussed. In addition to their traditional functions of lending books and providing spaces for reading newspapers and magazines, libraries are now becoming more multifunctional, providing space for different activities, including work. This new phenomenon has been studied empirically by conducting a qualitative interview and observing teleworkers in two public libraries and one university library in the City of Helsinki, Finland. The objective was to find and analyze different profiles of workers in libraries, thus providing input for future planning and design of these spaces, as well as the urban fabric around them. The results show that a considerable range of activities within research and education, art and culture, information technology, business and finance, and social services and government are performed in the libraries, all of which are in part supported by the new concepts and policies of the city. Libraries can be seen as ‘transitory workspaces’ where people work at least a couple of hours per week and for different reasons such as free wifi connection and location. Also, libraries might be considered ‘spatial incubators’ or rather places able to attract people who start up their own activities. These concepts contribute to define a new way of appropriating libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-05-14T14:40:23Z
       
  • Studying the relevance of libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 1
      Author(s): Peter Hernon (Emeritus) , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2015-04-02T05:55:13Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-04-02T05:55:13Z
       
  • The use of grounded theory in identifying the user experience during
           search
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Evgenia Vassilakaki , Frances Johnson
      Grounded theory offers a useful method for gaining an understanding of the context of the user experience when searching on an experimental multilingual image retrieval system. Observational, cognitive and affective data were collected while users searched for images in a multilingual environment. Straussian grounded theory was used to identify the elements of the dynamic process of information searching behaviour. The stages in which the data were coded are outlined to show how users' thoughts and actions were integrated in the analysis and to present and visualise the emerging concepts as representative of the context of the user experience.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Genomics data curation roles, skills and perception of data quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Hong Huang , Corinne Jörgensen , Besiki Stvilia
      Compared to a decade ago, genomics scientists, driven by technical changes and availability of massive genomics data, are performing a wider plurality of curation roles, including end user, curator, and dual-role user. Scientists with different curation roles (including that of end user) may focus on different data quality aspects and skill requirements in a community curation environment. This study examines how genomics scientists' perceived priorities for data quality and data quality skills differ when assuming different roles played in genomics data curation work. The analysis of survey data collected from 147 genomics scientists found that curators of genomics data valued quality criteria that can be assessed through direct examination of the data more highly, while end users placed a high value on the quality criteria that can be assessed indirectly, such as believability. With regard to data quality skills, curators appeared to care more about understanding user's requirements and specific data management skills than end users, while end users valued the skills needed to deal with information overload more highly — those needed to identify useful, relevant information from large amounts of data. Scientists with different curation roles, given common curation tasks with the same skill requirements, prioritized different data quality criteria. The data quality, skill priorities, and tradeoffs identified by this study can inform the development of effective data curation mandates and policies, data quality assurance planning and training, and the design of curation role specific tool dashboards and visualization interfaces for genomics data.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Average evaluation intensity: A quality-oriented indicator for the
           evaluation of research performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Zhiqiang Wu
      A variety of indicators have been created to measure the research performance of journals, scientists, and institutions. There has been a long-running debate on the use of indicators based on citation counts to measure research quality. The key argument is that using indicators based on raw citation counts to evaluate research quality lacks measurement validity. Traditional reference formats do not present any quality related evaluations of the citing authors toward their references. It can be argued that the strength of peer evaluation to a research output, which is taken to represent its quality, is the elementary unit in the evaluation and comparison of research performance. A good candidate for evaluating a piece of research is a researcher who cites the research and knows it well. By accumulating different citing authors' evaluations of their references based on a uniform evaluation scheme and synthesizing the evaluations into a single indicator, the qualities of research works, scientists, journals, research groups, and institutions in different disciplines can be assessed and compared. A method consisting of three components is proposed: a reference evaluation scheme, a new reference format, and a new indicator, called the average evaluation intensity. This method combines the advantages of citation count analysis, citation motivation analysis, and peer review, and may help to advance the debate. The potential advantages of and main concerns about the proposed method are discussed. The proposed method may serve as a preliminary theoretical framework that can inspire and advance a quality-oriented approach to the evaluation of research performance. At the current stage, it is best to treat the proposed method as speculation and inspiration rather than as a blueprint for practical implementation.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • The image of an institution: Politicians and the urban library project
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Sunniva Evjen
      In terms of political perceptions, library building projects appear to be similar across different contexts. Qualitative interviews with local politicians were employed to examine attitudes towards public libraries and library development in three cities building new central libraries: Aarhus, Denmark; Birmingham, UK; and Oslo, Norway. Applying an institutional perspective, the analysis focuses on norms, legitimization, and organizational change. Findings show shared views on the role and mission of the library. The informants primarily pointed to citizens' democratic rights and their country's democratic tradition when legitimizing public funding for libraries in general. However, argumentation for local library building projects was connected to city development and the desire to portray a city as oriented towards knowledge and culture.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Research methods in library and information science: A content analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Heting Chu
      A total of 1162 research articles, published from 2001 to 2010 in three major journals of library and information science (LIS), are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to address some recurring themes about research method selection and application in the scholarly domain. This study shows that LIS scholars utilize a greater number and wider variety of research methods than before. Replacing the dominant positions that questionnaire survey and historical method previously held, content analysis, experiment, and theoretical approach have become the top choices of research methods in the field. This study also examines two recurring themes regarding research methods in the LIS field, namely, use of multiple methods in one study and adoption of the qualitative approach, but finds no conclusive evidence of increased implementation of either practice. More efforts in the form of education, training and advocacy are therefore needed to help LIS scholars gain a better understanding of research methods and make more informed decisions on research method selection and implementation in their scholarly endeavors.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • The problem with problematic situations: Differences between practices,
           tasks, and situations as units of analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Sanna Talja , James M. Nyce
      It is generally agreed that information activities should be studied within the work and everyday-life contexts, which provide the reasons for and aims of information seeking and use activities. Situation, task, and practice are some of the ways of conceptualizing the context of information activities. Differences between these concepts are rarely discussed, and their theoretical underpinnings are not necessarily well understood. This analysis describes the historical background of the person-in-situation approach, task theory, and practice theory. The underlying assumptions are brought into view and analyzed in detail. Practice theory, task theory, and person-in-situation theories guide researchers to carve out and define their research foci in divergent and incompatible ways. It is argued that it would also be possible to understand and define these concepts within an integrated theoretical framework. Practice theory is a theoretical framework within which both situations and tasks can be understood as distinct parts of a situated activity setting. Discussing the intellectual history of some of the key theoretical constructs of information science clarifies differences between research streams and their key premises.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Reflections of affect in studies of information behavior in HIV/AIDS
           contexts: An exploratory quantitative content analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Heidi Julien , Ina Fourie
      Information seeking and use are critically important for people living with HIV/AIDS and for those who care for people with HIV/AIDS. In addition, the HIV/AIDS context is characterized by significant affective or emotional aspects including stigma, fear, and coping. Thus, studies of information behavior in this context should be expected to take account of emotional variables. In information behavior scholarship, emotional variables have been marginalized in favor of a focus on cognitive aspects, although in recent years greater attention has been paid to the affective realm. This study used quantitative content analysis to explore the degree to which information behavior studies across a range of disciplines actually include affect or emotion in their analyses. Findings suggest that most studies pay little or no attention to these variables, and that attention has not changed over the past 20years. Those studies that do account for emotion, however, provide excellent examples of information behavior research that can lead the way for future work.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Does affinity matter? Slow effects of e-quality on information seeking
           in virtual communities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Xianjin Zha , Jinchao Zhang , Yalan Yan , Zhiliang Xiao
      Virtual communities function not only as social settings, but also as information neighborhoods. In this study, the term e-quality was used to refer to information quality, system quality, and service quality. Following the updated information systems (IS) success model, a research model was developed to explore the effects of e-quality on information seeking as well as the direct and mediating effects of affinity with virtual communities (the degree of importance that users place on virtual communities) on information seeking. Data collected from users of virtual communities were used to test the model. Affinity with virtual communities not only had a large and direct impact on information seeking in virtual communities but also fully mediated the effects of information quality and service quality on information seeking and partially mediated the effect of system quality on information seeking. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • How important is computing technology for library and information science
           research?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mike Thelwall , Nabeil Maflahi
      Computers in library and information science (LIS) research have been an object of study or a tool for research for at least fifty years, but how central are computers to the discipline now? This research analyses the titles, abstracts, and keywords of forty years of articles in LIS-classified journals for trends related to computing technologies. The proportion of Scopus LIS articles mentioning some aspect of computing in their title, abstract, or keywords increased steadily from 1986 to 2000, then stabilised at about two thirds, indicating a continuing dominance of computers in most LIS research. Within this general trend, many computer-related terms have peaked and then declined in popularity. For example, the proportion of Scopus LIS article titles, abstracts, or keywords that included the terms “computer” or “computing” decreased fairly steadily from about 20% in 1975 to 5% in 2013, and the proportion explicitly mentioning the web peaked at 18% in 2002. Parallel analyses suggest that computing is substantially less important in two related disciplines: education and communication, and so it should be seen as a key aspect of the LIS identity.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • When are LibQUAL+® and LibQUAL+® Lite scores psychometrically
           comparable?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Prathiba Natesan , Hector F. Ponce , Armando Chavez
      Planned missingness in commonly administered proportions of LibQUAL+® and Lite instruments may lead to loss of information. Data from three previous administrations of LibQUAL+® protocol were used to simulate data representing five proportions of administration. Statistics of interest (i.e., means, adequacy and superiority gaps, standard deviations, and Pearson and polychoric correlations) and their confidence intervals (CIs) from simulated and real data were compared. All CIs for the statistics of interest for simulated data contained the original values. Root mean squared errors, and absolute and relative biases showed that accuracy in the estimates decreased with increase in Lite proportion. The recommendation is to administer the Lite version to not more than 20% of the respondents if the purpose of the data collection is to conduct any inferential analysis. If researchers are interested in calculating means alone, up to 80% Lite version may be used to capture the true values adequately. However, standard deviations need to be interpreted to understand the quality of the means. Loss of accuracy in estimates may be compounded in analyses that use at least two statistics of interest.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
 
 
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