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Journal Cover Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.781]   [H-I: 31]   [930 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2969 journals]
  • The uses of phenomenology and phenomenography: A critical review
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sylvain K. Cibangu, Mark Hepworth
      In recent decades, phenomenology and phenomenography have gained traction in a wide range of scholarly journals just as confusion has increased about them. Meanwhile, inquiry examining both approaches has been given far less attention. Each of these approaches considers variation, namely, the qualitatively different ways of experiencing, as a central point of research. This paper examines the characteristics of phenomenology and sketches its rapports with phenomenography. The information science literature in six major scholarly journals of information research is examined to appraise the accounts of phenomenology and phenomenography. For the sake of clarity, uses of phenomenology and phenomenography are discussed in light of the concept positivism. It is observed that phenomenography is a subset of phenomenology. In addition, phenomenographic discourse is shown to relay positivism. Under-utilized areas of phenomenology are identified, and paths of future work for information research are proposed.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Scholarly communication and academic librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Liat Klain-Gabbay, Snunith Shoham
      It is generally accepted among library and information science scholars that academic librarians can potentially assist faculty members with formal and informal scholarly communication processes. However, it is not clear to what extent faculty members and academic librarians are indeed aware of this potential and materialize it in the field. Following interviews with 20 faculty members and 15 academic librarians employed by a university or an academic college in Israel, questionnaires were constructed and delivered to 191 faculty members and 50 librarians. Qualitative and quantitative analyses revealed that both the faculty members and librarians believed that academic librarians are potentially capable of contributing to scholarly communication processes. However, more faculty members than librarians expressed the expectation that librarians should be involved in scholarly communication, and were willing for this to be the case. Bridging this gap—for example by appointing designated “research librarians”—may contribute to the increased involvement of academic librarians in scholarly communication processes, which will benefit both the faculty members and the academic library.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Performance evaluation as a tool for strategic decisions about serving
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Zinaida Manžuch, Elena Macevičiūtė
      The complexity of serving diverse and dispersed target audiences of visually impaired persons suggest that there is a need to analyse the performance of libraries for the blind. This issue is currently neglected in library and information science research. Library managers and policy-makers can employ performance data for developing new strategies for service delivery and sustainability. The balanced scorecard and historical benchmarking approaches were applied to analyse the performance of the Lithuanian Library for the Blind (LLB) in 2008–2012. The concepts of strategic issues and strategies were employed to demonstrate how performance evaluation findings may be used for the purposes of strategic planning. The findings revealed the attractiveness and sufficiency of cultural services, but also the inability of the LLB to reach its target audiences, the inefficiency of internal processes, low use of information resources and electronic services, and a lack of sustainability in organisational learning. A model of service provision in collaboration with public and academic libraries for publishing and distribution of literature in accessible formats was suggested to the LLB. It is in line with the policy and legal decisions necessary for achieving the Library's main goals.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • The actuality of determining information need in geographic information
           systems and science (GIS): A context-to-concept approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Maryam Nazari
      Although context has been identified as the key to the manifestation of information literacy (IL), little is known about the actual context of IL in disciplinary areas. This is because disciplinary studies of IL have focused mainly on people's conceptions of IL, not on their lived teaching and learning practices. Introducing university assignments as a contextual construct for disciplinary studies of IL, this study demonstrates how students' and educators' conceptions and experiences of real university assignments and their constructive participation in conceptualization of IL helped to uncover the actual nature of information need in the discipline of geographic information science/systems (GIS) and to gain a better understanding of the concept of, and requirements for, determining information need in this discipline. Adopting an embedded case study design and a participatory approach for fieldwork, the data were mainly gathered from 27 semistructured interviews focused on GIS students' and educators' lived experiences of university assignments and their reflections on various aspects of IL in a master's degree GIS program jointly delivered by universities in the UK and USA. Each learning and teaching experience was treated as a unit of analysis. GIS assignments were found to be geospatial, technology mediated, subject free, and unique in requirements. Each characteristic uncovered a new facet for the concept of information need in GIS. Findings indicate that unless students have understood the multi-faceted nature of information need, they may fail to distinguish the various ways in which gaps may be addressed when dealing with GIS assignments. The context-to-concept approach proposed in this study can be of value to both IL researchers and practitioners who seek deeper insights into the nature of IL, especially those interested in the customization of generic models of IL to the actual needs of university programs.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Mindful makers: Question prompts to help guide young peoples' critical
           technical practices in maker spaces in libraries, museums, and
           community-based youth organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Leanne Bowler, Ryan Champagne
      This study examines question prompts as a means to scaffold reflection and reflexivity in the design, development, and use of technological artifacts in maker spaces for youth at public libraries, museums, and community-based organizations. Qualitative analysis is applied to data gathered in four focus groups with teens, three semi-structured interviews with adults who facilitate maker spaces, and six observation sessions. Outcomes include a rich description of critical thinking in the context of technology practice, and secondly, a set of eight activation questions that serve as a tool kit to encourage reflection and scaffold mindful and critical practices in community-based maker spaces for youth. Results from this study support the development of nstruments and practices to support mindful making and critical technical practice in maker spaces for youth.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Undergraduates' information literacy competency: A pilot study of
           assessment tools based on a latent trait model
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Maria Pinto, Rosaura Fernandez-Pascual, Susana Puertas
      This study of information literacy focuses on opinions, evidence, reviews, and data analysis from a sample of Spanish university students from three major fields of study (information/documentation, psychology, and translation/interpretation). The results have been tabulated from the subject area of documentation alone, as this subject is shared in the students' curricular planning. This study highlights students' attitudes, motivation, and evidence with regard to information literacy (IL) competencies. The standardized statistical model for evaluating latent traits was used to capture the structure of such capabilities. Data collection was performed using the IL-HUMASS (subjective) and the EVALCI-K (objective) questionnaires. The purpose is to achieve a better understanding of how IL competencies—approached from both objective and subjective perspectives, and grouped into the categories of searching, evaluation, processing, and communication/dissemination of information—are interrelated. In this way, by combining objective (knowledge and skills) and subjective (belief-inimportance and self-efficacy) values with regard to IL competencies, the processes of teaching and learning may be better understood and therefore better integrated within the curriculum framework. Patterns of correlation and/or causality between observed and latent competencies are explored.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Linguists as newspaper users: Perceptions and experiences
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Maja Krtalić, Sanjica Faletar Tanacković, Damir Hasenay
      To explore humanities scholars' perceptions and uses of newspapers as an information source, a study was conducted with Croatian researchers and academics in history and linguistic departments at universities and research institutes. This paper presents only a portion of the findings: those from respondents in the field of linguistics. The study began with the general assumption that newspapers are a relevant information source for scientific research in the humanities, but their potential is not fully exploited because of limited access to newspaper collections and search options. An additional assumption was that newspapers are especially important in linguistics research because they reflect the evolution of and changes in a language and provide information on the relations between a language and its socio-political context in a certain place and time. The results partially confirmed these assumptions, showing a clear divide between those who perceive newspapers as an important research source and those who do not. In addition, respondents expressed the need for better technological solutions, but they do not always use those already available to them. The results also show perceptions of the value of and actual use of newspapers; information behavior related to newspapers (e.g., type and format of newspapers used, type of information need in newspapers, motivation for newspaper use, employed search strategies, and approaches to managing information from newspapers); and the challenges researchers face in using newspapers. The results contribute to analyzing the information needs and behavior of a specific newspaper user group, and provide data which can aid in the development of innovative services based on newspaper collections.


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Changes to the Board of Editors
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Research may be harder to conduct than some realize
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
       
  • How reference and information service is studied: Research approaches and
           methods
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Amy VanScoy, Cady Fontana
      There is a need for a robust research base for reference and information service (RIS), both for scholarship in the field and for effective decision-making in practice. While a number of studies have been conducted about the research of library and information science (LIS) in general, no analysis has been conducted on RIS research. Focusing specifically on research approach and methods, this study analyzes the journal literature for the decade 2000 to 2009. Of the 24% of papers that were research studies, most were quantitative descriptions of data. Qualitative approaches were rarely used. The results suggest that RIS is being studied from a limited perspective and could benefit from a greater diversity of approaches and methods.


      PubDate: 2016-05-08T18:51:32Z
       
  • Student misidentification of online genres
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Chris Leeder
      In the online information environment, new hybrid genres are emerging that resist easy classification into the traditional categories of print formats. However, students are often not equipped with adequate knowledge of online genres, particularly when it comes to finding scholarly sources. Understanding genre provides students a significant advantage in conducting effective research online, because it reduces the cognitive load of information seeking, improves the ability to judge relevance, and helps identify documents whose purpose matches the users' intent. This research explores how well students identify the information genres that they encounter in their real-life online research. 204 undergraduate students were asked to identify the genres of 15 online sources. 60% of the responses were misidentifications, and 64% of scholarly sources were incorrectly identified. Students were also inaccurate in judging which genres were most difficult to correctly identify. However, students who had received prior IL instruction showed significantly higher accuracy in identifying online genres. Suggestions are made for information literacy instruction to better help students identify, understand, and use online genres.


      PubDate: 2016-05-03T18:42:29Z
       
  • From Google to MedlinePlus: The wide range of authoritative health
           information provision in public libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mary Grace Flaherty
      Public library staff throughout the United States are providing assistance on a variety of health topics. To better understand health information provision in this setting, unobtrusive visits were completed in a total of 73 randomly selected sites in three different states. The query, “Do vaccines cause autism?” was posed to library staff. In 59% of encounters, material provided did not answer the question. In more than half of visits, public library staff referred to the libraries' print collections, and 69% of the time when print was provided it did not answer the question or it addressed the question with information contradictory to prevailing medical evidence. Referral was made to electronic resources in a quarter of visits, with answers ranging from “Just Google it” to “MedlinePlus is my favorite go-to”. When staff referred to or used electronic resources, authoritative medical information on the topic was supplied 79% of the time. It appears that there was no standardization on handling health queries in most libraries that were visited. Given public libraries are trusted institutions providing community access to health information, it is imperative that staff are using appropriate health information tools which are readily and freely available.


      PubDate: 2016-05-03T18:42:29Z
       
  • Libraries, human rights, and social justice: Enabling access and promoting
           inclusion, Paul T. Jaeger, Natalie Greene Taylor, Ursula Gorham (Eds.).
           Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-1442250512
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Laura Saunders



      PubDate: 2016-03-11T13:55:22Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2016-03-11T13:55:22Z
       
  • Making connections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T07:52:29Z
       
  • “If it computes, patrons have brought it in”: Personal
           information management and personal technology assistance in public
           libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Amber L. Cushing
      All public libraries in a single US state were surveyed in order to explore the types of personal technology assistance requests the staff received and how they responded to such requests. Staff at each library that reported having received patron requests for assistance with personal digital technology or content were invited for a 30-minute follow-up phone interview in which they were asked to provide more detail about their interactions with patrons and their opinions about this aspect of library work. In total, 130 of the 234 libraries (55.5%) in the state responded to the survey and representatives from 10 of those libraries participated in follow-up phone interviews. While public librarians are willing to tackle these patron requests, they have little preparation or specific continuing education in this area to provide them with support. Although many public librarians categorize technology assistance as reference work, official Reference and User Services Association guidelines do not consider it within the scope of reference work. The growing body of patron requests suggests that, as work in public libraries continues to evolve in order to meet patron needs, so too should the guidelines for reference work.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Can library users distinguish between minimum, perceived, and desired
           levels of service quality? Validating LibQUAL+® using multitrait
           multimethod analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Prathiba Natesan, Xing Aerts
      LibQUAL+® is a widely used measure of library service quality. Based on SERVQUAL's gap theory, LibQUAL+® measures items on three levels of service quality: minimum, perceived, and desired levels. Differences between user evaluations of service quality on these levels indicate the types of gaps in service quality. Gap theory has been criticized due to the possible inability of users to distinguish between different levels. However no study has investigated this claim using statistical analysis. A multitrait multimethod (MTMM) framework was used to evaluate the validity of using three levels of measurement to measure customer satisfaction in LibQUAL+®. Measurement errors across levels of measurement are correlated, indicating that simple score differences are inaccurate estimates of gaps. Users are able to distinguish between the three levels of measurement indicating support for validity of using gap theory in measuring library service quality.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Driven adaptation: A grounded theory study of licensing electronic
           resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Xiaohua Zhu
      Using the grounded theory approach, this study generated a substantive theory of driven adaptation that explains and theorizes the basic social process of licensing as an emerging specialization in the library field that is driven by three major forces: imposed changes, tensions, and dialog. Licensing librarians use three major strategies to adapt to licensing work: coping, positioning, and aligning. Each strategy includes multiple dimensions. As the outcome of the driven adaptation, licensing work has emerged as a new specialization in academic librarianship. The theory explains the major concerns in the licensing work: how licensing librarians adapt to licensing work and how they handle the challenges in this relatively new specialization. It also identifies the behaviors practitioners engage in as they cope with licensing work. Findings of this study can help new electronic resources librarians to adapt to licensing more effectively. This theory can also be expanded and generalized to explain the creation and assimilation of any new specialization of work.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Finding fiction: Search moves and success in two online catalogs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Anna Mikkonen, Pertti Vakkari
      Search moves for finding novels in five search tasks and two catalogs were analyzed. Search tasks reflected the following search tactics: known-author search, topical search, open-ended browsing, search by analogy, and searching without a query. The most used search moves in both catalogs across all tasks were querying, search results inspection, and book page examination. In a traditional catalog, more effort was needed in the form of queries, search moves, and opened book pages to gain equivalent average book scores when compared with an enriched catalog. In a traditional catalog, a typical search strategy for interesting titles seemed to involve issuing queries and considering suitable entry terms carefully, and devoting more attention to search results instead of book pages. In an enriched catalog, a common approach involved time devoted to exploring the catalog's enriched front page and multiple entry points together with attention to the enriched results list.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Approaches to socio-cultural barriers to information seeking
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Reijo Savolainen
      A conceptual analysis derived from the literature on sociocultural barriers to information seeking focuses on the features of such barriers and their impact on information seeking in diverse contexts. A typology is presented that identifies six main types of socio-cultural barriers: barriers due to language problems, barriers related to social stigma and cultural taboo, small-world related barriers, institutional arriers, organizational barriers, and barriers due to the lack of social and economic capital. Socio-cultural barriers are man-made constructs originating from social norms and cultural values. They have mainly an adverse impact on information seeking by restricting access to information sources and giving rise to negative emotions.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • SciELO suggester: An intelligent support tool for cataloging library
           resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Natalia L. Mitzig, Mónica S. Mitzig, Fernando A. Martínez, Ricardo A. Piriz, Víctor M. Ferracutti, María Paula González, Ana G. Maguitman
      Existing cataloging interfaces are designed to reduce the bottleneck of creating, editing, and refining bibliographic records by offering a convenient framework for data entry. However, the cataloger still has to deal with the difficult task of deciding what information to include. The SciELO Suggester system is an innovative tool developed to overcome certain general limitations encountered in current mechanisms for entering descriptions of library records. The proposed tool provides useful suggestions about what information to include in newly created records. Thus, it assists catalogers with their task, as they are typically unfamiliar with the heterogeneous nature of the incoming material. The suggester tool applies case-based reasoning to generate suggestions taken from material previously cataloged in the SciELO scientific electronic library. The system is implemented as a web service and it can be easily used by installing an add-on for the Mozilla Firefox browser. The tool has been evaluated through a human-subject study with catalogers and through an automatic test using a collection consisting of 5742 training examples and 120 test cases from 12 different subject areas. In both experiments the system has shown very good performance. These evaluations indicate that the use of case-based reasoning provides a powerful alternative to traditional ways of identifying subject areas and keywords in library resources. In addition, a heuristic evaluation of the tool was carried out by taking as a starting point the Sirius heuristic-based framework, resulting in a very good score. Finally, a specially designed cognitive walk was completed with catalogers, providing additional insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the tool.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • An examination of North American Library and Information Studies faculty
           perceptions of and experience with open-access scholarly publishing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Wilhelm Peekhaus, Nicholas Proferes
      Open-access (OA) scholarly publishing has grown steadily in academia for the past few decades as an alternative to traditional, subscription-based journal publishing. This research presents the descriptive analysis of a systematic survey of North American library and information science (LIS) faculty about their attitudes toward and experience with OA publishing. The study reveals that LIS faculty tend to be more experienced with and knowledgeable about open access than their colleagues in other disciplines. A majority of LIS faculty is very critical of what is perceived to be detrimental control exercised by publishers over the scholarly communication system and agrees that major changes need to be made to this system. Although a majority of LIS faculty considers OA journals to be comparable to traditional journals, a sizable minority remains unconvinced of the purported benefits of open-access journals. The perceived constraints of the tenure and promotion system within the academy tend to limit LIS faculty engagement with open-access publishing in ways similar to other academic disciplines. There thus exists a disconnect between proclaimed support for and actual engagement with open access.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Conversation-based programming and newcomer integration: A case study of
           the Språkhörnan program at Malmö City Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jamilla (Jamie) Johnston
      The potential of conversation-based programming (i.e., language cafés and conversation groups) for supporting immigrant integration is explored in a case-based study on the Språkhörnan (“language corner”) program at the City Library in Malmö, Sweden. The methodology includes participant observation, interviews with program participants, a focus group with program volunteers, and a questionnaire. The basis of the study's theoretical framework is social capital theory, information grounds theory, and a multi-dimensional model of integration. Results indicate that, first, such a program offers a unique opportunity for many participants to use their Swedish language skills and gain conversational competence. Second, the program supports integration through information exchange during the informal conversations. Third, it offers participants a space for social interaction with Swedes and other immigrants. Conversation-based programming in libraries can foster integration by supporting language learning, facilitating the expansion of participants' social networks, and increasing social capital in the form of increased knowledge and information about the new country.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Academic motivation and information literacy self-efficacy: The importance
           of a simple desire to know
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mitchell Ross, Helen Perkins, Kelli Bodey
      Considered essential to lifelong learning, information literacy skills and information literacy self-efficacy are associated with higher levels of student academic motivation. However, little is known about the interrelationships between the different types of academic motivation and information literacy self-efficacy. This study investigates the relationships between these constructs. Data were collected using a questionnaire comprising existing scales. The questionnaire was administered to undergraduate students in an Australian higher education institution with a response rate of 58%, resulting in 585 completed questionnaires. Both intrinsic and extrinsic academic motivation were found to be positively related to information literacy self-efficacy, while amotivation was negatively related. The most important predictor of information literacy self-efficacy was intrinsic motivation to know. Overall, all academic motivation types increased over time, including, unexpectedly, amotivation. Differences were apparent by gender. The need for higher education institutions to actively identify academically amotivated students and facilitate intrinsic academic motivation is discussed.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
 
 
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