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Library & Information Science Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.188
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1512  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0740-8188 - ISSN (Online) 0740-8188
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • An analysis of the online information searching strategies and
           metacognitive skills exhibited by university students during argumentation
           activities
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2020Source: Library & Information Science Research, Volume 42, Issue 3Author(s): İlknur Reisoğlu, Seyhan Eryılmaz Toksoy, Sümeyye Erenler
       
  • Spatial modeling of areas suitable for public libraries construction by
           integration of GIS and multi-attribute decision making: Case study Tehran,
           Iran
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Saman Nadizadeh Shorabeh, Ahmadreza Varnaseri, Mohammad Karimi Firozjaei, Fatemeh Nickravesh, Najmeh Neysani Samany
       
  • Added value of secondary school education toward development of
           information literacy of adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Danica Dolničar, Bojana Boh Podgornik, Tomaž Bartol, Andrej Šorgo
       
  • An ethical quandary that dare not speak its name: Archival privacy and
           access to queer erotica
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Alex H. Poole
       
  • Rational actions or institutional actions: A study on the rationality in
           academic librarians' decision-making processes when purchasing e-book
           products
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Mei Zhang
       
  • Towards effective collaboration between academics and library staff: A
           comparative Australian/Vietnamese study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 April 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Hue Pham, Kirsty Williamson
       
  • Agent-based geographical modeling of public library locations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Franc J. Zakrajšek, Vlasta Vodeb
       
  • “I'm in sheer survival mode”: Information behaviour and affective
           experiences of early career academics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Rebekah Willson, Lisa M. Given
       
  • Households' public library use across the school calendar
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Gregory Gilpin, Anton Bekkerman
       
  • The competitive intelligence diamond model with the approach to standing
           on the shoulders of giants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Narges Oraee, Azam Sanatjoo, Mohamad Reza Ahanchian
       
  • Mixed methods research in library and information science: A
           methodological review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Vera Granikov, Quan Nha Hong, Emily Crist, Pierre Pluye
       
  • LISR: Your source for innovative methods and theoretical frameworks in LIS
           research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s):
       
  • Towards better information services: A framework for immigrant information
           needs and library services
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Chunying Wang, Ruhua Huang, Jiyuan Li, Jiangping Chen Immigrants are among the populations in modern society that libraries are striving to serve. This study aims to develop a framework on immigrants, their information needs, and library services. Using a systematic literature review based on the grounded theory approach, 28 related articles were reviewed to identify the causes, characteristics, and the content of the information needs of immigrants. Also explored were the possible sources to satisfy these information needs and the barriers to accessing needed information. Findings indicate that personal social networks, the Internet, media sources, and institutions are the main information sources for immigrants; language, cultural differences, the digital divide, unfamiliar information systems, and psychological factors are the five major challenges for immigrants obtaining information. Based on the findings, a unified framework about immigrants, their information needs, sources to satisfy those needs, and library information services is, therefore, proposed. This framework may provide guidance for libraries and other information service agencies to better develop services and information systems for immigrants.
       
  • Play-and-learn spaces: Leveraging library spaces to promote caregiver and
           child interaction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Brenna Hassinger-Das, Jennifer M. Zosh, Nicole Hansen, Meghan Talarowski, Kate Zmich, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek Modern libraries are reimagining their spaces as more than repositories for books. The Play-and-Learn Spaces project married developmental science with the changing nature of 21st century libraries. The study asked if it is possible to augment learning in informal spaces using the built environment to encourage discourse and interaction. For this project, the library space was reconstructed such that a corner became a climbing wall on which children could create words by following varied paths up the wall's letter-filled surface. Seating was transformed into large movable “Tangram”-type pieces and a stage, complete with magnetic words, invited children to create stories on the wall and complete story-related activities through socio-dramatic play. Using naturalistic observation, results demonstrated that the use of the Play-and-Learn spaces was associated with increases in the kinds of caregiver and child conversation and interaction known to support language, literacy and STEM skills. These results suggest that libraries can become part of a new learning culture that impacts city residents at the places they naturally go.
       
  • The influence of information cascades on online reading behaviors of free
           and paid e-books
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Qihua Liu, Xiaoyu Zhang, Yiran Li Online reading platforms offer an ideal environment for the emergence of information cascades, a phenomenon where user selection is heavily driven by the information inferred from others' behavior. Prior research has mainly focused on the effect of information cascades on free e-books. The purpose of this study is to empirically test and compare the effect of informational cascades on online reading behaviors of free and paid e-books. Two 114-day panel data sets covering 1548 free e-books and 362 paid e-books were collected from Zongheng.com, a well-known online reading platform in China. Results suggest that online users' choice was significantly affected by book ranking after controlling for cumulative clicks and word-of-mouth (WOM) volume, whether they are free e-books or paid e-books, as predicted by information cascades theory. Review volume has no effect on the clicks of free and paid e-books with higher ranking, whereas it does exert a positive effect on the clicks of free and paid e-books with lower ranking. Information cascades are more salient for paid e-books than for free e-books. These findings not only offer important theoretical contributions for library and information science research, but also provide practical implications for online readers, content creators and managers.
       
  • Developing the tasks-toward-transparency (T3) model for research
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2020Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Liz Lyon, Wei Jeng, Eleanor Mattern An increasingly data-intensive research environment has highlighted the need for greater research transparency to facilitate integrity and trust in open science and in the conduct of research more widely. The initial findings of faculty researchers' behaviors and practices toward research transparency, using the research data lifecycle as a grounding framework are reported. Four focus group sessions were conducted with faculty researchers in different disciplines, including natural sciences, social sciences, engineering, and different transparency practices were captured using the researchers' own language. Four generic transparency components were identified: action verb, object, task, and stage in the research lifecycle. The inter-relationships between specific transparency components were visualized using network visualizations. The network visualizations suggest that the lifecycle stages of Process/Visualize/Analyze and Publish/Preserve/Archive are key points for transparency, where ‘data’ play a critical role demonstrated by the multiple node-edge relationships. Based on the findings, a conceptual model, termed the Tasks-Toward-Transparency (T3) Model, was developed. This model may inform researcher practices and support research stakeholders whose role is to articulate and deliver transparency advocacy, policy, training programs, and services.Graphical abstractUnlabelled Image
       
  • Understanding librarians’ knowledge sharing behavior: The role of
           organizational climate, motivational drives and leadership empowerment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2019Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Mojtaba Kaffashan Kakhki, Alireza Hadadian, Ehsan Namdar Joyame, Nargess Malakooti Asl Library managers in Iran have always been concerned with a low level of knowledge sharing among librarians. Identifying effective factors on librarians' knowledge sharing behavior helps us to understand and improve the situation. Organizational factors are one group of these factors. The effect of organizational climate, employees' motivational drives, and leadership empowerment on the subjective norms, attitude, intention, and knowledge sharing behavior among librarians in public libraries in Iran was studied. A conceptual model was designed in light of the Theory of Reasoned Action. Ten hypotheses were formulated. Data were collected by using a questionnaire and were analyzed using structural equations models. The findings showed that constructive organizational climate and positive motivational drives in public libraries, as well as personal and organizational knowledge sources strengthened by the librarians' ability of leadership have a positive and significant effect on subjective norms, attitude, intention, and knowledge sharing behavior. Such conditions facilitate the process of knowledge sharing in public library environments. Moreover, the study highlights the effect of the librarians' leadership empowerment on their attitude to knowledge sharing behavior by motivational drives.
       
  • Heigh-ho, heigh-ho, to the rural libraries we go! - a systematic
           literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2019Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Samsul Farid Samsuddin, Hayrol Azril Mohamed Shaffril, Ali Fauzi As a learning center, rural library initiatives aim to provide rural communities with access to a wealth of reliable and readily available information. Changes in user behavior correspond with the changes in the way instructional programs are delivered to meet the rural library users' needs. Guided by the RAMESES review method, a systematic review identified 30 related studies throughout Scopus and Web of Science databases. Seven main themes emerged: roles, services, use, sources, activities, challenges, and impacts. The seven themes produced a total of 30 sub-themes. In-depth qualitative studies of rural library services, and needs analyses of rural communities are recommended.
       
  • Managing the “backend” of LIS research projects: A project
           management perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2019Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Devendra Dilip Potnis, Bhakti Gala There is very little guidance in library and information science (LIS) literature about how researchers should manage the scope, time, costs, quality, human resources, communications, and risks associated with LIS research projects. To fill this gap, researchers tested the utility of project management principles (PMP) for planning and managing a project designed to enhance the information, digital, and financial literacy of the people earning less than $2 per day in India. The customization of PMP through 29 mechanisms and 60 action items was used to conduct focus groups and in-person surveys with over 150 participants, in their native language, at 10 public libraries. PMP were most helpful for managing risks (13 solutions), communications (11 solutions), and human resources (10 solutions) of the project and treating participants ethically. PMP developed in the West were helpful before, during, and after data collection in the LIS research project in a developing country.
       
  • Nonprofit public libraries and technical efficiency: An application of
           data envelopment analysis to technology-based outputs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2019Source: Library & Information Science ResearchAuthor(s): Salomon Alcocer Guajardo Nonprofit public libraries (NPPLs) with technically efficient production functions attain greater program and service outputs per registered user in comparison to peers with less efficient production functions. An output-oriented nondiscretionary data envelopment analysis (DEA) model with variable returns-to-scale is used to assess the technical efficiency of 339 NPPLs in the United States (US) in attaining electronic-, physical-, and Internet-based program and service outputs. Based on the output-oriented DEA analysis, 46% of the NPPLs are technically efficient in producing program and service outputs per registered user. On average, US NPPLs are moderately inefficient in attaining their program and service outputs. The DEA analysis also reveals that the inefficient NPPLs should increase their electronic, physical, and Internet service levels per registered user to achieve technical efficiency as annual input levels are held constant.
       
 
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