Journal Cover Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.629]   [H-I: 41]   [1106 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3042 journals]
  • Equitable access: Information seeking behavior, information needs, and
           necessary library accommodations for transgender patrons
    • Authors: Aubri A. Drake; Arlene Bielefield
      Pages: 160 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Aubri A. Drake, Arlene Bielefield
      This study highlights the unique accommodations integral to welcoming transgender library patrons. Research shows transgender people have unique needs which differ from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) individuals, and experience substantial barriers to obtaining quality library service. Most studies in the past exploring the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender library users focused exclusively on LGBQ users. This study surveyed adult transgender individuals (n =102) with an online questionnaire. The majority of participants were white, designated female at birth, and under 40years old. Survey respondents needed libraries to make accommodations for them to feel safe (p <0.001). The top 5 accommodations needed were recent transgender literature, gender identity or expression as part of library nondiscrimination policy, gender neutral, single-stall bathrooms where a key did not need to be requested, recent LGBQ literature), and an established remote process for name change.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T11:29:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.06.002
       
  • Toward collaborator selection and determination of data ownership and
           publication authorship in research collaborations
    • Authors: Besiki Stvilia; Charles C. Hinnant; Shuheng Wu; Adam Worrall; Dong Joon Lee; Kathleen Burnett; Gary Burnett; Michelle M. Kazmer; Paul F. Marty
      Pages: 85 - 97
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Besiki Stvilia, Charles C. Hinnant, Shuheng Wu, Adam Worrall, Dong Joon Lee, Kathleen Burnett, Gary Burnett, Michelle M. Kazmer, Paul F. Marty
      This study examined factors that might affect researchers' willingness to collaborate with a specific researcher and the priorities given to those factors. In addition, it investigated how researchers determined the ownership of collaborative project data and how they determined the order of authorship on collaborative publications in condensed matter physics. In general, researchers rated their intrinsic motivations the highest, such as the quality of ideas a potential collaborator might have and their satisfaction with a past collaboration, followed by their extrinsic motivations, such as the complementary knowledge, skills, or resources the collaborator could provide. In addition, researchers who had a greater number of collaborative projects and researchers who had served as a project PI or co-PI valued the deep-level, personality-related characteristics of a collaborator higher than did those who had not. Younger researchers were more risk averse and more concerned with a collaborator's reputation and the possible cost of a collaboration decision. Additionally, younger researchers indicated more often than older researchers that they did not know whether their project teams followed any rules or norms or engaged in negotiation to determine the order of authorship on collaborative publications.

      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.004
       
  • Visual research in LIS: Complementary and alternative methods
    • Authors: Angela Pollak
      Pages: 98 - 106
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Angela Pollak


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.002
       
  • Caregivers' perceptions of emergent literacy programming in public
           libraries in relation to the National Research Councils' guidelines on
           quality environments for children
    • Authors: Laura K. Clark
      Pages: 107 - 115
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Laura K. Clark


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.001
       
  • The peritextual literacy framework: Using the functions of peritext to
           support critical thinking
    • Authors: Melissa Gross; Don Latham
      Pages: 116 - 123
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Melissa Gross, Don Latham


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.006
       
  • How academic librarians experience evidence-based practice: A grounded
           theory model
    • Authors: Faye Miller; Helen Partridge; Christine Bruce; Christine Yates; Alisa Howlett
      Pages: 124 - 130
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Faye Miller, Helen Partridge, Christine Bruce, Christine Yates, Alisa Howlett


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.003
       
  • Place, community and information behavior: Spatially oriented information
           seeking zones and information source preferences
    • Authors: Amelia N. Gibson; Samantha Kaplan
      Pages: 131 - 139
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amelia N. Gibson, Samantha Kaplan


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.001
       
  • Research agenda for social and collaborative information seeking
    • Authors: Chirag Shah; Rob Capra; Preben Hansen
      Pages: 140 - 146
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Chirag Shah, Rob Capra, Preben Hansen
      Scholars in diverse fields of inquiry have identified the need to expand individual-based information seeking and behavior models and systems to incorporate social as well as collaborative dimensions. However, the research areas of Social Information Seeking (SIS) and Collaborative Information Seeking (CIS) have been largely disconnected from one another despite a few notable attempts to study them under one umbrella. Researchers in these communities have recently realized the value of bringing SIS and CIS together for two main reasons: often it is impossible to separate social and collaborative dimensions in a project; and by considering these two aspects of information seeking, we may be able to support human information behavior in ways not previously possible. A brief synthesis of work in the domains of SIS and CIS is presented here. Then, an integrated view is presented to consider Social and Collaborative Information Seeking (SCIS) as an intersection and extension of SIS and CIS. Benefits of this approach are discussed and the integrated view is used as the basis to present a research agenda that outlines opportunities and challenges unique to SCIS.

      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.005
       
  • Editorial: Before you submit your manuscript
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.004
       
  • Information world mapping: A participatory arts-based elicitation method
           for information behavior interviews
    • Authors: Devon Greyson; Heather O'Brien; Jean Shoveller
      Pages: 149 - 157
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Devon Greyson, Heather O'Brien, Jean Shoveller


      PubDate: 2017-05-02T08:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.003
       
  • Auto-hermeneutics: A phenomenological approach to information experience
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tim Gorichanaz
      The need for methodologically rigorous approaches to the study of human experience in LIS has emerged in recent years. Auto-hermeneutics is a research approach that offers a systematic way to study one’s own experiences with information, allowing investigators to explore yet-undocumented contexts, setting precedents for further work in these areas and ultimately deepening our understanding of information experiences. This articulation of auto-hermeneutics is based on the phenomenological method of Heidegger and draws principles from systematic self-observation and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Similarities and differences among auto-hermeneutics and other automethodologies are discussed, along with guidelines for assessing auto-hermeneutic research. Finally, an example of an auto-hermeneutic study illustrates the unique contributions this approach affords.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.001
       
  • Auto-hermeneutics: A phenomenological approach to information experience
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tim Gorichanaz
      The need for methodologically rigorous approaches to the study of human experience in LIS has emerged in recent years. Auto-hermeneutics is a research approach that offers a systematic way to study one’s own experiences with information, allowing investigators to explore yet-undocumented contexts, setting precedents for further work in these areas and ultimately deepening our understanding of information experiences. This articulation of auto-hermeneutics is based on the phenomenological method of Heidegger and draws principles from systematic self-observation and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Similarities and differences among auto-hermeneutics and other automethodologies are discussed, along with guidelines for assessing auto-hermeneutic research. Finally, an example of an auto-hermeneutic study illustrates the unique contributions this approach affords.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.001
       
  • Comparative study of characteristics of authors between open access and
           non-open access journals in library and information science
    • Authors: Yu-Wei Chang
      Pages: 8 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Wei Chang


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.002
       
  • Comparative study of characteristics of authors between open access and
           non-open access journals in library and information science
    • Authors: Yu-Wei Chang
      Pages: 8 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Wei Chang


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.002
       
  • Marginalia in the digital age: Are digital reading devices meeting the
           needs of today's readers?
    • Authors: Melanie Ramdarshan Bold; Kiri L. Wagstaff
      Pages: 16 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Melanie Ramdarshan Bold, Kiri L. Wagstaff
      For centuries, readers have added marginal commentary to books for a variety of personal and public purposes. Historians have mined the marginalia of important historical figures to observe their sometimes raw, immediate responses to texts. Now, reading and annotation practices are changing with the migration of content to electronic books. A survey of reader attitudes and behavior related to marginalia for print and electronic books reveals that the majority of readers write in their books and want e-readers to support this feature. However, many readers report that annotating electronic books is too difficult, time-consuming, or awkward with current technology. In addition, the way readers annotate books depends on whether they are reading for pleasure or for work or education. These findings can guide the development of future devices to better satisfy reader needs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.004
       
  • Marginalia in the digital age: Are digital reading devices meeting the
           needs of today's readers?
    • Authors: Melanie Ramdarshan Bold; Kiri L. Wagstaff
      Pages: 16 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Melanie Ramdarshan Bold, Kiri L. Wagstaff
      For centuries, readers have added marginal commentary to books for a variety of personal and public purposes. Historians have mined the marginalia of important historical figures to observe their sometimes raw, immediate responses to texts. Now, reading and annotation practices are changing with the migration of content to electronic books. A survey of reader attitudes and behavior related to marginalia for print and electronic books reveals that the majority of readers write in their books and want e-readers to support this feature. However, many readers report that annotating electronic books is too difficult, time-consuming, or awkward with current technology. In addition, the way readers annotate books depends on whether they are reading for pleasure or for work or education. These findings can guide the development of future devices to better satisfy reader needs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.004
       
  • A communication system approach to the problem of public library
           legitimacy
    • Authors: Michael M. Widdersheim; Masanori Koizumi
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael M. Widdersheim, Masanori Koizumi
      Public library systems intersect with both public and private spheres of social life, but how they negotiate public legitimacy and private influence remains a mystery. To better understand this problem, this study adopts a communication system approach. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines data from three US public library systems. This study analyzes how private actors communicate with and through public library systems by parsing the signals into components: transmitter, receiver, medium, and message. The resulting signals form two dimensions: the Public Sphere dimension, where private actors govern, legitimate, and use the library, and the Private Sphere dimension, where private actors exchange personal services and exert economic power. A view of public and private signals in interaction reveals how public legitimacy is threatened and how public library systems can mitigate these threats. This study reveals how public/private conflicts in public libraries arise and how they might be resolved.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.003
       
  • A communication system approach to the problem of public library
           legitimacy
    • Authors: Michael M. Widdersheim; Masanori Koizumi
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael M. Widdersheim, Masanori Koizumi
      Public library systems intersect with both public and private spheres of social life, but how they negotiate public legitimacy and private influence remains a mystery. To better understand this problem, this study adopts a communication system approach. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines data from three US public library systems. This study analyzes how private actors communicate with and through public library systems by parsing the signals into components: transmitter, receiver, medium, and message. The resulting signals form two dimensions: the Public Sphere dimension, where private actors govern, legitimate, and use the library, and the Private Sphere dimension, where private actors exchange personal services and exert economic power. A view of public and private signals in interaction reveals how public legitimacy is threatened and how public library systems can mitigate these threats. This study reveals how public/private conflicts in public libraries arise and how they might be resolved.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.003
       
  • Contributing to social capital: An investigation of Asian immigrants' use
           of public library services
    • Authors: Safirotu Khoir; Jia Tina Du; Robert M. Davison; Andy Koronios
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Safirotu Khoir, Jia Tina Du, Robert M. Davison, Andy Koronios


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.005
       
  • Contributing to social capital: An investigation of Asian immigrants' use
           of public library services
    • Authors: Safirotu Khoir; Jia Tina Du; Robert M. Davison; Andy Koronios
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Safirotu Khoir, Jia Tina Du, Robert M. Davison, Andy Koronios


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.005
       
  • Incorporating technology in children's storytime: Cultural-historical
           activity theory as a means of reconciling contradictions
    • Authors: Hui-Yun Sung
      Pages: 46 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hui-Yun Sung


      PubDate: 2017-02-02T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.007
       
  • Studying information behavior of image users: An overview of research
           methodology in LIS literature, 2004–2015
    • Authors: Krystyna K. Matusiak
      Pages: 53 - 60
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Krystyna K. Matusiak


      PubDate: 2017-02-02T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.008
       
  • Library and information science research, then and now
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 61 - 62
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.010
       
  • An examination of social and informational support behavior codes on the
           Internet: The case of online health communities
    • Authors: Jenny Bronstein
      Pages: 63 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jenny Bronstein


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.006
       
  • Evaluation components of information literacy in undergraduate students in
           Slovenia: An experimental study
    • Authors: Zdenka Petermanec; Urban Šebjan
      Pages: 69 - 75
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zdenka Petermanec, Urban Šebjan


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.009
       
  • Research in the Archival Multiverse, A.J. Gilliland, S. McKemmish, A.J.
           Lau (Eds.). Monash University Publishing, Clayton, Australia (2017)
    • Authors: Katherine Wisser
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Katherine M. Wisser


      PubDate: 2017-07-12T10:21:55Z
       
  • Cover 2 - Editorial Board/Barcode
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-28T09:49:18Z
       
 
 
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