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Library & Information Science Research    [711 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2556 journals]   [SJR: 1.754]   [H-I: 29]
  • The Cynefin framework: A tool for analyzing qualitative data in
           information science?
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Julie McLeod , Sue Childs
      Interpreting qualitative research data and presenting it in ways that enable potential beneficiaries of the research to use it readily and appropriately is increasingly important in the context of the research impact agenda. One way of doing uses the Cynefin framework. Cynefin, which is rooted in knowledge management and complexity science, has been used in a range of contexts to support decision-making and strategy development in dynamic and challenging situations. However, it has not been widely used as a data analysis technique or in the information science discipline. An exploratory evaluation uses it to interpret the rich, nuanced qualitative data from a three-year research project that engaged people worldwide to explore issues and practical strategies for managing electronic records, a significant information management challenge. The evaluation demonstrates that the Cynefin framework provides a strategic lens through which to view electronic records management (ERM). Cynefin prompts new questions to be asked, leading to new insights and a deeper understanding of the ERM challenge. Most significantly, it provides a new construct for re-perceiving the challenge in a holistic way and offers a strategic approach to taking action for change. This evaluation suggests that it is an appropriate and effective framework for use in qualitative research on challenging information management problems, with the potential to support the transfer of research into practice.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Health answer quality evaluation by librarians, nurses, and users in
           social Q&A
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Sanghee Oh , Adam Worrall
      Health information consumers and patients increasingly take an active role in seeking health information online and in sharing their health problems and concerns in online support groups and social media venues. However, they may risk being influenced by unreliable and misleading information in such environments, as no intermediaries monitor the quality of this information. This study focuses on evaluating the quality of health information exchanged in one of the social media venues, by investigating how librarians, nurses, and users assessed the quality of health answers in Yahoo! Answers, a social question-and-answering (Q&A) service. Through statistical analysis differences among the three participant groups, how the background characteristics influenced their assessments, and the relationships between characteristics of the content of answers and quality evaluation criteria were each considered in detail. Librarians and nurses shared similar ratings of answer quality, but had differences in their level of medical knowledge and the types of services they offer, resulting in minor differences across criteria. Users perceived the quality of health answers in social Q&A to be higher than librarians and nurses for almost all criteria. Depending on the sources of information presented in health answers, librarians, nurses, and users gave different quality assessments. Implications exist for research into and practice of evaluating the quality of health information, which need to address both search and domain expertise along with the sharing of socioemotional values preferred by users.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Photovoi A promising method for studies of individuals' information
           practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Heidi Julien , Lisa M. Given , Anna Opryshko



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Finding their way: How public library users wayfind
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lauren H. Mandel
      A multi-method case study research design, guided by Passini's conceptual framework of wayfinding, was employed to investigate library user wayfinding behavior within the entry area of a medium-sized public library facility. The case study research design included document review of the library's wayfinding information system; unobtrusive observation of library user wayfinding behavior; intensive interviews with library users to discuss their views on wayfinding in the library; and an expert review with library staff and a library wayfinding and signage expert to validate research findings. Overall, the study found library users' wayfinding behavior to be generally inconsistent over time, but that there are users who stick to predominant segments (those segments used heavily to connect two particular nodes, or stops). Those segments tend to be the straightest or most direct segments connecting two given nodes. Also, users appear to employ Passini's wayfinding styles more often than his wayfinding strategies, but additional research is needed that delves more deeply into these cognitive processes.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Twenty years on
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Fully engaged practice and emotional connection: Aspects of the
           practitioner perspective of reference and information service
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Amy VanScoy



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Information literacy self-efficacy: The effect of juggling work and study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mitchell Ross , Helen Perkins , Kelli Bodey
      Information literacy self-efficacy and academic motivation are both argued to play important roles in student academic development. The former is considered to be a predictor of student academic achievement while the latter is considered a key factor in developing information literacy self-efficacy. Today, many students undertake paid employment in conjunction with their academic studies and little is known about the effect this may have on their information literacy self-efficacy and academic motivation. As such, the relationship between information literacy self-efficacy, academic motivation, and employment has been unexplored. Data were collected via a questionnaire, comprised of existing scales, which was administered to undergraduate business students in an Australian higher education (HE) institution. A response rate of 58% resulted in 585 completed questionnaires. Findings suggest that whether or not students were engaged in paid employment did not appear to influence information literacy self-efficacy, although students in paid employment did exhibit significantly lower intrinsic motivation than students not in paid employment. Additionally, for students not in paid employment a significant relationship was found between amount of time spent on study and information literacy self-efficacy. Of some concern, the small amount of time students reported spending in academic pursuits outside of scheduled classes raises issues regarding the placement of information literacy instruction. For information literacy practitioners this study contributes to awareness regarding the conceptualization of information literacy instruction and its placement in the HE environment.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Three ways of knowing: Agricultural knowledge systems of small-scale
           farmers in Africa with reference to Kenya
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Hilda M. Munyua , Christine Stilwell
      Research carried out in 2011 in Kirinyaga district, Kenya, shows how sense-making theory and methodology can be used to assess the use of local agricultural and external knowledge by small-scale farmers and its effects on small-scale agriculture. Two knowledge systems, the local knowledge system and the external or scientific knowledge system, are considered dominant. The two systems can be synergistic and small-scale farmers have mixed them in their farming activities. Blending systems improve communication, livelihoods, and economies within local communities, and increases their participation in development. Data were collected in focus group discussions with farmers' groups and interviews with individual farmers. Results show that most farmers in Kirinyaga use external agricultural information in their farming practices. A significant number use combined external agricultural information and local knowledge, which forms a third knowledge system. This third system requires the validation of the farmers' innovations and documentation of the knowledge for wider dissemination. Information providers should adopt policies that promote the use of the three knowledge systems by small-scale farmers.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Search markets and search results: The case of Bing
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): David Wilkinson , Mike Thelwall
      Bing and Google customize their results to target people with different geographic locations and languages but, despite the importance of search engines for web users and webometric research, the extent and nature of these differences are unknown. This study compares the results of seventeen random queries submitted automatically to Bing for thirteen different English geographic search markets at monthly intervals. Search market choice alters a small majority of the top 10 results but less than a third of the complete sets of results. Variation in the top 10 results over a month was about the same as variation between search markets but variation over time was greater for the complete results sets. Most worryingly for users, there were almost no ubiquitous authoritative results: only one URL was always returned in the top 10 for all search markets and points in time, and Wikipedia was almost completely absent from the most common top 10 results. Most importantly for webometrics, results from at least three different search markets should be combined to give more reliable and comprehensive results, even for queries that return fewer than the maximum number of URLs.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Preparing public librarians for consumer health information servi A
           nationwide study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lili Luo , Van Ta Park
      A nationwide survey study was conducted to gain understanding as to how to prepare public librarians for consumer health information service. Findings indicate that the popular health information needs encountered by public librarians cover a wide variety of topics, including the human body, a medical/health condition, a disease, a medical concept, and fitness/diet/nutrition. The top two challenges faced by public librarians when providing consumer health information service are difficulty in interpreting patrons' questions and lack of knowledge about available and trusted/appropriate medical/health information sources. Public librarians wish to receive training on a number of topics that could help address the challenges they face, and the most favorable training format for them, among all the options provided in the survey, is the self-paced online tutorial. This study constitutes the basis for establishing training requirements and developing training programs to meet the needs of public librarians. Their mastery of the necessary skills, knowledge and competencies via training will lead to effective and efficient delivery of consumer health information service in public libraries, and ultimately generate optimal patron experiences.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • The new digital scholar: Exploring and enriching the research and writing
           practices of NextGen studentsRandallMcClure &James
           P.Purdy2013Information TodayMedford, NJ400 pp. $59.50 (hardcover). ISBN
           978-1573874755 (hardcover). (ASIS&T Monograph Series)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Melissa Scanlan



      PubDate: 2013-08-23T07:34:04Z
       
  • Advice to researchers
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 3
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-08-03T01:42:30Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2013-08-03T01:42:30Z
       
  • Changes to the Board of Editors/In Memory of Niels Ole Pors
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2013-08-03T01:42:30Z
       
  • Standard Opening to Book Review Section
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2013-08-03T01:42:30Z
       
  • Looking for Information: A Survey of Research on Information Seeking,
           Needs, and Behavior By Donald O. Case. 3rd ed. Bingley, UK: Emerald
           Publishing Group, 2012. xvi, 491 p. $83.95 ISBN 978-1-78052-654-6
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Reijo Savolainen



      PubDate: 2013-07-17T21:53:54Z
       
  • JamshidBeheshtiAndrewLargeThe Information Behavior of a New
           Generation2012Scarecrow PressLanham, MD978-0810885943(262 pp. $55 (pbk))
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Kathleen Schreurs



      PubDate: 2013-07-13T21:31:09Z
       
  • DouglasCookLesleyFarmerUsing Qualitative Methods in Action Research: How
           Librarians Can Get to the Why of Data2011Association of College and
           Research LibrariesChicago, IL978-0838985762264 pp. $60 (pbk)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Matthew Griffis



      PubDate: 2013-06-28T04:19:47Z
       
  • Information and culture: Cultural differences in the perception and recall
           of information
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Ji-Hyun Kim
      Culture is found to play an important role in the perception and recall of information. Hypotheses based on the two cultural models (individualism and context) were tested using a 2×2 factorial between-subject experimental design: individualism/collectivism and high/low-context conditions. The subjects consisted of 82 American students and 82 Korean students. The cultural tests confirm that the American culture represents individualism, whereas the Korean culture represents collectivism. The results indicate that Koreans tend to be more comfortable with a high-context culture that uses indirect and ambiguous messages. The Korean subjects show higher ratings for perceptions of information in a high-context design compared to the American subjects. There was no statistically significant difference in recall of information from high- and low-context conditions between the American and the Korean subjects. The findings of this study may benefit information professionals who are looking for effective ways of conveying information to intended audiences.


      PubDate: 2013-06-24T03:40:03Z
       
  • Addressing below proficient information literacy skills: Evaluating the
           efficacy of an evidence-based educational intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Melissa Gross , Don Latham
      Over the course of three years, an educational intervention was developed to teach information literacy (IL) skills, change perceptions of IL, and to recalibrate self views of the abilities of first year college students who demonstrate below proficient information literacy skills. The intervention is a modular workshop designed around the three-step analyze, search, evaluate (ASE) model of information literacy, which is easy to remember, easy to adapt to multiple instructional situations, and can provide a foundation for building information literacy skills. Summative evaluation of the intervention demonstrates that students who attend the workshop see an increase in skills and awareness of information literacy as a skill set. Increases in skills, however, were not sufficient to move participants into the proficient range. While workshop participants were able to reassess preworkshop skills, skills gained in the workshop did not result in recalibrated self-views of ability. Like the development of skills, the recalibration of self-assessments may require multiple exposures to information literacy instruction.


      PubDate: 2013-06-24T03:40:03Z
       
  • Learning to use information: Informed learning in the undergraduate
           classroom
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Clarence Maybee , Christine S. Bruce , Mandy Lupton , Kristen Rebmann
      Informed learning is a pedagogy that focuses on learning subject content through engaging with academic or professional information practices. Adopting the position that more powerful learning is achieved where students are taught how to use information and subject content simultaneously, the research reported here investigated an informed learning lesson. Using phenomenographic methods, students' experiences of the lesson were compared with observations of how the lesson was enacted in the classroom. Based on an analysis of student interviews using variation theory, different ways of experiencing the informed learning lesson emerged. Some students understood the lesson to be about learning to use information, i.e., researching and writing an academic paper, while others understood it as focusing on understanding both subject content and information use simultaneously. Although the results of this study are highly contextualized, the findings suggest criteria to consider when designing informed learning lessons.


      PubDate: 2013-06-24T03:40:03Z
       
  • Theory talk in the library science scholarly literature: An exploratory
           analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Kafi D. Kumasi , Deborah H. Charbonneau , Dian Walster
      In the discipline of library and information science (LIS), a qualitative analysis of the meaningful use of theory in contemporary scholarly literature is critical to helping scholars expand their repertoire of knowledge about various theories and helping them make informed decisions about how to skillfully integrate theory in their research. This study explored how theory was presented and talked about in seven prominent library science-focused journals from 2009 to 2011. Through a process of analytic induction, categories representing a continuum of theory talk were identified and their relationships examined. Three main types of theory talk in library research are defined, ranging from minimal (theory dropping), moderate (theory conversation), to major (theory generation). The categories and their relationships generate a rich discussion about the intensity and degree to which theory is being discussed and used in a less-examined subset of library and information science research journals. This research contributes both an explanatory structure and substantive discussion regarding theory use in library science to the professional literature.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2013-06-19T13:18:00Z
       
  • Information use environments of African-American dementia caregivers over
           the course of cognitive–behavioral therapy for depression
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Michelle M. Kazmer , Robert L. Glueckauf , Jinxuan Ma , Kathleen Burnett
      Caregivers of older adults with dementia face significant challenges associated with their care recipients' condition and with their own mental and physical wellbeing. Qualitative research data were collected via interviews with caregivers who participated in the African-American Alzheimer's Caregiver Training and Support (ACTS) research project. Analysis of these data with a focus on information use indicated that participating caregivers' information use environments were shaped by key individuals, settings, and information sources. These included the ACTS counselors, ACTS intervention guidebook, fellow caregivers, use of a personal calendar/datebook, and the identification of key problems and development of goals to help ameliorate those problems. CBT groups fostered sharing, synthesizing, and validating information about dementia caregiving and dementia care resources; the ACTS CBT guidebook served as an important physical touchstone of reliable and portable information. Understanding the specific needs, behaviors, and constraints of African-American caregivers is important to the future development of information components of tailored, depression–reduction interventions.


      PubDate: 2013-06-15T12:54:06Z
       
  • A case study on the appropriateness of using quick response (QR) codes in
           libraries and museums
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Michelle Kelly Schultz
      Libraries and museums are increasingly looking to mobile technologies, including quick response (QR) codes, to better serve their visitors and achieve their overall institutional goals; however, there is a lack of information regarding patrons' perceptions of QR codes — information essential to successful implementations. This case study explored staff members' and patrons' perceptions of QR codes at Ryerson University Library and the Museum of Inuit Art in order to determine the extent to which QR codes are appropriate for use in libraries and museums. Observations and 56 patron and staff interviews were conducted to obtain data on usage, knowledge, reactions and expectations regarding QR codes in these institutions. It was found that QR code usage was low, but that there was potential for use, with patrons' reactions being generally positive. Three themes were identified from an analysis of the results: an assumption that young people and smartphone owners use QR codes; that QR codes are only used for one-way provision of information, not to initiate a conversation; and that QR codes can be used to personalize a visit to an institution. Libraries and museums are advised that based on these findings, QR codes can provide a cost effective and potentially powerful tool, but patrons should be first surveyed to tailor these initiatives to their wants and needs.


      PubDate: 2013-06-15T12:54:06Z
       
  • Understanding the moderating effect of tie on the transfer of ease of use
           and usefulness from print resources to electronic resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Xianjin Zha , Jing Li , Yalan Yan
      Chinese university libraries are transitioning from traditional print collections to hybrid collections, resulting in collections which may be print-only, electronic-only, or contain both formats. This leads to many challenges in the management of electronic library resources. This study explores the moderating effect of tie (perceived similarity) on the transfer of ease of use (amount of effort required to use library resources) and usefulness (the degree to which using library resources would improve performance) from print resources to electronic resources, with the view in mind of facilitating the effective use of online electronic resources in Chinese university libraries. Drawing upon self-perception theory and the technology acceptance model (TAM), a research model is developed and tested using questionnaires and, partial least squares (PLS) structural equation modeling (SEM). The results suggest that the perceived tie by users between print resources and electronic resources positively moderates the transfer of ease of use from print to electronic, while negatively moderating the transfer of usefulness from print to electronic.


      PubDate: 2013-06-15T12:54:06Z
       
  • Secondary teachers and information literacy (IL): Teacher understanding
           and perceptions of IL in the classroom
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jorden K. Smith
      Secondary teachers have the opportunity and the curriculum mandates to teach information literacy skills, yet students enter post-secondary studies with low information literacy proficiency. In many cases, teachers present the only opportunity for students to develop information literacy proficiency. With semi-structured interviews, this study explored eight secondary teachers' perceptions of information literacy and their experiences with IL as educational professionals. Confusion around the phrase information literacy was a dominant theme as participants were unfamiliar with the term and were inconsistent in defining the scope of what it might mean. Although there are references to information literacy skills in the core curriculum and support documents, participants varied in their instruction and understanding of this skill set. Participants unanimously agreed that information literacy skills, as explained using the Association of College and Research Libraries Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education (ACRL, 2000), were important for their students. However, the extent of IL skills required varied by student. Pursuing post-secondary studies warranted advanced IL, and these students were more likely to be taught higher-level skills. IL skill development was also assumed to be the responsibility of the student, and passive acquisition was anticipated. Assumptions regarding student need and ability informed instruction. These results suggest that the current curricular mandates are insufficient to ensure IL is incorporated into instruction and that teachers are ill-prepared to instruct IL effectively.


      PubDate: 2013-06-12T01:22:37Z
       
  • Hiding in plain sight: Paratextual utterances as tools for
           information-related research and practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jen Pecoskie , Nadine Desrochers
      Through a qualitative content analysis of a purposive sample (the 2010 finalists of the Canadian Governor General's Literary Awards in both French and English), this study investigates what information can be gleaned from the book-as-object using peritext as a research tool. Using the theories of Gérard Genette, who defined the paratext, and Pierre Bourdieu, this research posits that paratextual utterances serve as an expression and tool of the cultural realm of publication and can be used for informational purposes in library and information science (LIS) research and practice. Findings indicate that the peritext is a rich source for gathering information about authorship and publishing as it reveals contextually relevant information, shares the author's informational tools, constructs the author, markets titles, and provides relevant information for specific age groups and genres. Discussion centers on the impact for libraries and the LIS community, with a focus on readers' advisory.


      PubDate: 2013-06-12T01:22:37Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: April 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2013-03-16T00:54:38Z
       
  • Erratum to “Online health information in South Korean public
           libraries: Developing evaluation criteria” [Library &
           Information Science Research 35 (2013) 78–84]
    • Abstract: April 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2013-03-16T00:54:38Z
       
  • Hypotheses—An overview
    • Abstract: Available online 23 February 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research




      PubDate: 2013-02-23T13:28:48Z
       
  • Information literacy proficiency: Assessing the gap in high school
           students' readiness for undergraduate academic work
    • Abstract: Available online 8 February 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      This study examines how high school students' information literacy (IL) skills prepare them for academic work in the digital age. The project included: (a) an audit of university IL practices; and (b) the administration of the James Madison University (JMU) Information Literacy Test (ILT) to 103 twelfth grade students in Alberta, Canada. Due to the low stakes of the test, there was concern about the reliability of the results. Rapid guessing, response time effort, and motivation filters were applied to confirm the reliability of the results. Results indicate a gap between expectations of high school students and their skills. Using a standardized test, potential incoming undergraduate IL proficiency was identified, including student strengths and weaknesses. The audit identified IL policies and practices at the university, indicating discrepancies in the IL instruction students may receive. Findings indicate that students lack the IL proficiency required to succeed in the post-secondary educational environment, and the libraries are not prepared to effectively address this gap.
      Highlights ► An information literacy (IL) audit was conducted at a Canadian research university. ► The James Madison University IL Test was administered to high school students. ► Results indicated low participant IL proficiency. ► Students entering post-secondary studies are not prepared for academic work.

      PubDate: 2013-02-11T10:13:51Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2013-02-11T10:13:51Z
       
  • The development of users' mental models of MedlinePlus in information
           searching
    • Abstract: Available online 4 February 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      This study investigated the dynamic process of people constructing mental models of MedlinePlus, a medical information web space, during their interaction with the system. Thirty-eight participants participated in the study. Their mental models of MedlinePlus were measured by a concept listing protocol and an interview method at three time points: after they freely explored the system for 5min (T1), after the first search session (T2), and after the second search session (T3). The analysis revealed that participants constructed their mental models of MedlinePlus based on the schemas that they have of information-rich web spaces. The model construction process involved changes and development in three parallel dimensions: cognition, emotion, and behavior. The development is enabled and coordinated by three mental activities: assimilating new concepts, modifying existing concepts, and phasing out previously perceived concepts. Furthermore, mental model construction is not only a function of users' internal cognition, but also affected by external cognitive structures, including the system, system feedback, and tasks. Mental model construction is also a process distributed over time. The results suggested that mental models could serve as a framework for guiding user research and system design. The dynamic nature of the mental models indicated that an iterative approach needs to be adopted.
      Highlights ► This study looks at users' construction of mental models (MM) of MedlinePlus. ► MM construction involves perception, cognition, and emotion. ► Construction is coordinated by internal cognitive structures and external contexts. ► MM construction is distributed over time.

      PubDate: 2013-02-07T07:09:31Z
       
  • International students' everyday life information seeking: The
           informational value of social networking sites
    • Abstract: Available online 29 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Sojourns to other countries, such as for studying abroad, are increasingly common. However, adjusting to life in a different country can be stressful and require significant effort. Sojourners need to not only maintain and expand their social networks, but they also continuously seek information about their new environment. While international students are a sizable group, their daily information behavior is not well understood. This study posits that social networking sites (SNS), such as Facebook, may play an important role in international students' everyday life information seeking (ELIS). Using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and structural equation modeling (SEM), the study analyzed international students' everyday life information needs, their usage of SNS for ELIS, and the relationships among demographics, personality traits, SNS usage, and perceived usefulness of the acquired everyday life information. Findings indicate that a majority of the respondents frequently used SNS for ELIS. Younger students, undergraduates, and extroverts were more likely to use SNS for ELIS, while no gender difference was found. Notably, among the nine user characteristics and behavior factors, SNS usage emerged as the only positive predictor of perceived usefulness of acquired information in meeting daily needs. This indicates that SNS serve as a valuable channel for purposeful everyday life information seeking. Beyond its social support value, the ELIS value of SNS is a fruitful area for future research.
      Highlights ► 97% of surveyed students used social networking for information seeking. ► Top daily life information needs were finance, health, and home country news. ► Extroverts and undergraduates used social networking more frequently. ► Frequent users were more likely to rate acquired information as useful.

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • Academic library use and student retention: A quantitative analysis
    • Abstract: Available online 29 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      A key component of Vincent Tinto's model of retention is the importance of student integration in the academic institution. Library use can be regarded as a form of integration within such institutions. A quantitative approach was applied to demonstrate how institutional data can be combined to examine library use and retention at a single institution. Undergraduate student and library use data were analyzed to identify results that suggested associations between library use and student retention. Library use was measured by log-ins to electronic resources, as well as borrowing from the library. The undergraduate students enrolled for the first time in 2010 comprised the population, Sub-group student characteristics, age and socioeconomic status, underwent further analysis. The findings show retained students log-in to authenticated resources and borrow from the library at higher rates than withdrawn students. Mature age students withdraw from the university at higher rates than younger students. Log-ins to authenticated resources increase as students progress over time through their university programs. No notable associations were found among socioeconomic background, library use, and retention. For the institution, these findings can inform the development of library services to target specific student groups on the basis that higher library use may lead to improved integration and retention. In addition, the study describes a research design that is replicable in other institutions and contributes to library use and retention literature.
      Highlights ► Approximately 20% of retained undergraduates do not access authenticated resources. ► Mature age students access authenticated resources less than younger students. ► Retained students tend to have higher rates of library use than withdrawn students. ► Retained students use the library less in their second year of enrolment. ► This study method framework can be applied to understanding library value.

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • Two representations of the research process: The preparing, searching, and
           using (PSU) and the beginning, acting and telling (BAT) models
    • Abstract: Available online 29 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Two representations of a three-stage diagrammatic model that holistically depicts the research process are presented. The representations incorporate elements culled from existing information-seeking behavior and information literacy instruction research, as well as evidence gathered from a study of third grade elementary school students, as they worked to fulfill a class project's requirements. Both representations are content independent, attribute equal importance to each of the three stages, and target the K-12 educational environment. The full representation, the preparing, searching, using (PSU) model, is intended for use by instructors and more advanced students. The model identifies elements inherent within the three stages of the research process including actions, affective behaviors, impact factors, learning, and reflection. The simpler representation, the beginning, acting, telling (BAT) model, which is embedded into the PSU, presents only the three main stages and the actions associated with those stages using a familiar graphic (a bat) and a mnemonic device to visually present the basic elements of the research process to younger elementary school students. The PSU model is designed to identify and address the unique information behaviors of students (affective, cognitive, and physical) and factors that may impact the research process. As a result, the representations can be used by educators, including information professionals and teachers, to inform instruction, such as lesson planning, development of assignments, resource location and evaluation, and the use of information, to fully exploit all aspects of the research process. The PSU model can also be used to teach more sophisticated concepts to older students by introducing more complex features gradually to the BAT model.
      Highlights ► A conceptual framework is developed depicting the research process. ► Elements of information-seeking behavior and information literacy are included. ► Affective behaviors and impact factors are identified. ► Equal emphasis is given to all stages (preparation, search, use).

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • Library return on investment: Defending the contingent valuation method
           for public benefits estimation
    • Abstract: Available online 29 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Many library return on investment (ROI) studies have been conducted in the United States. Most rely on “cost savings” approaches to determine the marginal benefits of library services. These methods fail to logically have a meaningful relationship to theoretical benefits estimation. Adaptations of the contingent valuation method (CVM) to this application are discussed in reference to the well-known National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration panel guidelines and recent literature. A CVM technique is used to estimate median annual household benefits for Minnesota public library services. Results indicate that CVM likely leads to more conservative estimates than “cost savings” approaches, which is probably due to the realities of available substitutes and low patron marginal benefits from additional transactions. Evidence is provided to limit the usual concerns of the utilized methodology. Focusing on programs for low income and education households may create higher returns more directly attributable to these services.
      Highlights ► “Cost savings” approaches fail logically in benefits estimation. ► A learning design contingent valuation method (CVM) is more appropriate. ► The CVM likely leads to more conservative and consistent estimates. ► Evidence is provided to limit the usual concerns of the used methodology. ► Options to increase societal benefits from library services are discussed.

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • Perceived self-efficacy of library and information science professionals
           regarding their information retrieval skills
    • Abstract: Available online 30 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      This research investigated self-efficacy perceptions of Israeli library and information science (LIS) professionals regarding their information retrieval skills, examining the judgments that participants make about their own searching abilities. The study was based on Bandura's four sources of self-efficacy information: (a) past performance or mastery experiences; (b) vicarious observation of others' experiences; (c) verbal or social feedback; and, (d) affective states. An online survey presenting the Information Retrieval Self-Efficacy Scale was distributed among three existing Israeli LIS discussion groups. The questionnaire was completed by 201 LIS professionals. Findings show that participants reported a high level of self-efficacy regarding information retrieval and all four sources of self-efficacy information influenced the construction of self-efficacy beliefs. Correlations between self-efficacy perceptions and several socio-demographic variables were investigated. The data analysis revealed that men and women are impacted differently by self-efficacy information; women reported a higher score for affective states and men are more prone to frustration. Also, a significant relation was found between age and years of experience, as well as the sources that exerted more influence on participants. Older and more experienced participants reported being more impacted by their mastery experiences and their affective states. Participants in the middle of their careers reported a greater influence of social feedback on their self-perception of self-efficacy.
      Highlights ► The study investigated self-perceptions of efficacy in information retrieval. ► Bandura's four sources of self-efficacy information were explored. ► Participants reported a high level of information retrieval self-efficacy. ► Men and women are impacted differently by self-efficacy information. ► Information source use was related to age and years of experience.

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • Disability and accessibility in the library and information science
           literature: A content analysis
    • Abstract: Available online 29 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      The library profession is a strong and vocal proponent of increased information access for people with disabilities. With the discipline's longstanding interest in the subject of services to people with disabilities, questions arise about how the profession perceives the phenomenon. How is library and information science (LIS), as a discipline, conceptualizing disability and accessibility' A content analysis of the LIS literature was conducted to examine this question. The literature provides a fertile ground for study as it reflects the profession's approaches to, and perceptions of, a topic. This research identifies the major issues and trends in the research about accessibility and disability in the LIS literature throughout a 10-year period, 2000–2010. The strongest theme in the literature is accessibility as it relates to web, database, and software, while the prevailing disability of focus is visual disabilities. The overall environment emphasizes technology more than attitudinal aspects associated with disabilities. The research could benefit from increased direct participation of people with disabilities.
      Highlights ► Content analysis was performed on accessibility and disability in the LIS literature. ► Coded themes included disability types and participation of those with disabilities. ► The literature focuses on electronic accessibility and visual disabilities. ► People with disabilities are rarely active participants in the literature.

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • Examining the measurement and structural invariance of LibQUAL+®
           across user groups
    • Abstract: Available online 29 January 2013
      Publication year: 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      The LibQUAL+® instrument measures users' perceptions of library service quality; three factors are evaluated: Affect of Service, Information Control, and Library as Place. Although previous studies have assessed the factorial invariance of LibQUAL+®, factorial invariance by itself is insufficient for score comparability across groups. Stronger levels of measurement invariance need to be established. This study systematically tested the measurement and structural invariance of LibQUAL+® scores in a sample of 1551 undergraduate students, 707 graduate students, and 134 faculty members. Multi-group confirmatory factor analyses showed that full measurement invariance did hold between students and faculty for the complete instrument. Building on the measurement invariance, structural invariance models showed that factor variances were equivalent across user groups, but factor covariances and means differed. Faculty had higher perceptions of Affect of Service and undergraduate students had higher perceptions of Library as Place compared to the other groups.
      Highlights ► Measurement invariance of LibQUAL+® was systematically tested across 3 user groups. ► Full measurement invariance held across undergraduates, graduates, and faculty. ► After establishing measurement invariance, structural invariance was investigated. ► Factor variances were equal across groups, but covariances and means differed.

      PubDate: 2013-01-31T07:41:49Z
       
  • The author as promoter
    • Abstract: Available online 22 October 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • Approaching the motivators for information seeking: The viewpoint of
           attribution theories
    • Abstract: Available online 30 October 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Psychological attribution theories can be applied to understanding the motivators of information seeking. Attribution theory, which was developed by Bernard Weiner in the 1970s and subsequently updated, suggests that an individual's willingness to engage in information seeking in a current situation is dependent on how the person attributes the causes of past success or failure of information seeking efforts. The main causal factors affecting information seeking efforts are ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck. Motivation to seek information depends on whether the causal factors are seen as internal or external, stable or unstable, and controllable or uncontrollable. Weiner's ideas can be used to examine the motivators for information seeking and information avoidance. The theory can also be used in information literacy education approaches.
      Highlights ► Attribution theories open new perspectives on the motivators for information seeking. ► Motivation depends on how causal factors are attributed to past success or failure. ► The main causal factors are ability, effort, task difficulty, and luck. ► Weiner's attribution theory can be applied to information literacy education. ► Information literacy education should look to alter controllable causal factors.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • Not dead yet! A longitudinal study of query type and ready reference
           accuracy in live chat and IM reference
    • Abstract: Available online 31 October 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Research reveals that users of virtual reference services (VRS) value accurate answers to their queries and a pleasant interpersonal encounter. Findings from a longitudinal study compare two sets of randomly selected VRS transcripts, one of 850 live chat sessions from 2004 to 2006, and the second of 560 live chat and instant messaging (Qwidget) sessions from 2010. The investigation of the international QuestionPoint (OCLC, 2012) transcripts includes comparisons by query type (e.g., ready reference, policy and procedural, subject search) and by accuracy of answers to the subset identified as ready reference (e.g., fact-based queries). Findings indicate that percentages of ready reference queries are remaining stable, having increased slightly from 27% (243 of 915 queries found in 850 transcripts) in 2004–2006 to 31% (179 of 575 queries found in 560 transcripts) in the 2010 dataset. Additionally, accuracy of answers was found to have improved. The percentage of correct and complete responses with citations given by VRS librarians or staff members answering ready reference questions was found to have increased from 78% (141) in 2004–2006 to 90% (151) in 2010.
      Highlights ► Virtual reference service data are compared between 2004–06 and 2010. ► Nearly one-third of questions are ready reference and have slightly increased. ► Accuracy in VRS ready reference has improved from 78% to 90%. ► Frequency and types of queries have undergone change. ► Subject search questions have declined and procedural questions have increased.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • Text reference servi Teens' perception and use
    • Abstract: Available online 1 November 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Focus group interviews were conducted to investigate how teen library users perceive and use text reference service. Findings indicate that teens have a mixed attitude toward the service, and they anticipate using it primarily for imposed queries. Teens' perception of three aspects of the service is also discussed: response time, librarians' use of texting abbreviations, and the impact of texting constraints. Strategies are provided to increase awareness, motivate use, and meet expectations. Findings will help inform libraries' text reference practice, providing them with a clear understanding of how teens can benefit from the service, and how their information needs can be fulfilled to their satisfaction. Such an understanding will then lead libraries to develop more effective strategies to promote and deliver library services to teens, strengthen the role libraries play in teens' information-seeking process, and establish a positive and sustaining relationship between teens and libraries.
      Highlights ► Teen library users lack awareness of text reference service. ► Willingness to use text reference is contingent on better understanding of it. ► Teens expect to use text reference primarily for formal imposed information needs. ► They consider text reference to be good for quick specific questions and responses. ► They feel text reference should not be constrained by cost, character limit, etc.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • Theory-to-research-to-theory strategy: A research-based expansion of
           radical change theory
    • Abstract: Available online 13 November 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Theory use and development in research are significant to all disciplines. Scholarly literature serves as a venue to share the diverse and detailed methods about how theories are used and developed in research. This research study, which investigated information behavior of digital age youth, applied and further developed radical change theory by adopting the theory-to-research-to-theory strategy. Radical change theory guided development of the research questions. The research design incorporated radical change theory to provide structure to the systematic data collection and analysis. Finally, radical change theory was further developed by the study's results. The study's primary finding is the development of a typology of youth information behavior in the digital age. The typology presents innovative information behaviors that operationalize radical change theory's concepts. The typology creation contributes to the expansion of the theory and lays the groundwork for future research.
      Highlights ► Theory-research-theory provides a framework for research and theory modification. ► Radical change theory was applied to youth information behavior in the digital age. ► Radical change theory was tested and refined. ► The enhanced theory serves as a framework for youth information behaviors.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • A study of emotional labor in librarianship
    • Abstract: Available online 13 November 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Librarianship, like many occupations, requires emotional labor, which is an awareness of job requirements for emotional expression and the strategies used to express those emotions. Research on emotional labor suggests that performing emotional labor results in both positive and negative effects on individual outcomes, such as job satisfaction and job burnout. Since affective events are prevalent in library work and evidence suggests positive outcomes from emotional labor can be fostered, the ways emotional labor is performed in libraries should be studied. This research explores the key components of emotional labor: perceptions of display rules and the emotion regulation strategies of surface and deep acting. Data were collected from a sample of American librarians in 46 states from public, academic, special, and K–12 libraries who completed a survey. Bi-variate and multi-variate correlations, as well as ANOVAs, were used to test relationships among emotional labor constructs, job satisfaction, and job burnout. Results show evidence of significant associations with emotional labor among library employees in both the perception of display rules, as well as in surface and deep acting. Perception of display rules showed mixed results with job burnout and job satisfaction. Surface acting was found to be associated consistently with job burnout and decreased job satisfaction, while deep acting strategies were less strongly associated with negative outcomes. Findings suggest that library managers should clearly communicate display rule expectations to employees and work to build staff support to help meet those expectations. Library employees should be aware of occasions when they use surface acting and work to develop stronger deep acting techniques. The study contributes to an understanding of the influence of emotion management in the library workplace.
      Highlights ► All types of librarians report performing emotional labor. ► Display rules were associated with emotional exhaustion. ► Display rules were associated with cynicism and job dissatisfaction. ► Surface acting predicted emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and job dissatisfaction. ► Deep acting predicted emotional exhaustion and professional efficacy.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • Teachers and librarians collaborating on inquiry-based science
           instruction: A longitudinal study
    • Abstract: Available online 15 November 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      The qualitative, longitudinal study suggests how teachers and librarians learn to collaborate on inquiry-based science lessons that link science, information literacy, and structured English immersion standards for Latino elementary students. Teachers and librarians in the study received extensive professional development training about teacher and librarian collaboration (TLC), information literacy, inquiry-based science, as well as language and culture. In addition, expert peer mentors provided background information to teachers and librarians, as well as modeled high end TLC recommended by school librarian professional guidelines. Although increased interest and high motivation are generated by TLC, findings indicate that considerable time and experience are needed to prepare teachers and librarians to collaborate on instruction. Study results also indicate that there is an apparent lack of experience with inquiry-based science, particularly in schools with a culture of direct instruction. The study highlights teachers' lack of awareness of librarians' role as instructional partners. Greater communication between the professions is urged if TLC is to be successfully implemented as a way to bolster student achievement and stay updated in important fields, such as science, where instruction appears to be lagging behind.
      Highlights ► Teachers do not draw on librarians' skills to provide inquiry-based instruction. ► Teachers and librarians lack adequate preparation for inquiry-based collaboration. ► Greater communication between educators and librarians improves collaboration. ► Peer mentors and workshops improve collaboration between educators and librarians. ► Collaboration between educators and librarians improves student outcomes.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
  • Investigating variations in the provision of digital services in public
           libraries using network-based GIS models
    • Abstract: Available online 13 November 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:Library & Information Science Research

      Public libraries have been seen to have an important role in providing digital services to potentially excluded groups in order to help meet government targets regarding the delivery of digital services. Geographical information systems (GIS) have been used to investigate library service areas, to aid initial location decisions, and to model the implications of the opening and closure of library services. Recent studies have promoted the use of GIS-based techniques to investigate spatial variations in accessibility to public and private services in relation to socio-economic characteristics of population groups. One such technique, based on floating catchment area (FCA) approaches, has been primarily used to investigate potential inequalities in health services, access to employment and leisure opportunities, as well as planning public transport. In this study, FCA techniques are used to research variations in accessibility to public library facilities using bespoke application tools developed within a commercial GIS package. Drawing on a preliminary analysis of variations in accessibility to library services in a local authority area in south Wales, UK, a case study is presented whereby GIS-based models can be used to investigate spatial variations in digital services provision. As a result, provision gaps of such services can be identified. This study's findings help guide national government delivery programs to promote digital inclusion.
      Highlights ► Public library services help address the UK government's digital inclusion agenda. ► GIS has been used to investigate spatial variations in access to library services. ► Access to libraries for one local authority in Wales is explored in a case study. ► GIS tools are demonstrated to be of use in informing digital engagement strategies.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T04:40:22Z
       
 
 
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