Journal Cover Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.629]   [H-I: 41]   [1086 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Diversity-related research reported in high-impact library and information
           science journal literature: A content analysis
    • Authors: Hui-Yun Sung; Paul Parboteeah
      Pages: 77 - 84
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Hui-Yun Sung, Paul Parboteeah
      This study reports a content analysis of the frequency distribution of diversity-related research in four high-impact Library and Information Science (LIS) journals published between 1995 and 2014. High-impact journals (with high rankings and impact factors) were chosen because empirically based articles from them are more likely to be able to influence future research direction. The journals chosen were published articles quarterly or bi-monthly, with an average of 5–6 articles per issue. A total of 1766 research articles were collected, with 28.71% determined to be related to diversity. Results show an increasing interest in diversity-related research in the LIS field, with a dramatic increase between 2010 and 2014. The majority of diversity-related research focuses on age, gender and ethnicity. Only a small portion of research discusses issues concerning specific populations and emphasizes diversity-related theoretical concepts. More efforts are needed to highlight the link in order to contribute to the diversity and inclusion agenda in LIS.

      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.002
       
  • Toward collaborator selection and determination of data ownership and
           publication authorship in research collaborations
    • Authors: Besiki Stvilia; Charles C. Hinnant; Shuheng Wu; Adam Worrall; Dong Joon Lee; Kathleen Burnett; Gary Burnett; Michelle M. Kazmer; Paul F. Marty
      Pages: 85 - 97
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Besiki Stvilia, Charles C. Hinnant, Shuheng Wu, Adam Worrall, Dong Joon Lee, Kathleen Burnett, Gary Burnett, Michelle M. Kazmer, Paul F. Marty
      This study examined factors that might affect researchers' willingness to collaborate with a specific researcher and the priorities given to those factors. In addition, it investigated how researchers determined the ownership of collaborative project data and how they determined the order of authorship on collaborative publications in condensed matter physics. In general, researchers rated their intrinsic motivations the highest, such as the quality of ideas a potential collaborator might have and their satisfaction with a past collaboration, followed by their extrinsic motivations, such as the complementary knowledge, skills, or resources the collaborator could provide. In addition, researchers who had a greater number of collaborative projects and researchers who had served as a project PI or co-PI valued the deep-level, personality-related characteristics of a collaborator higher than did those who had not. Younger researchers were more risk averse and more concerned with a collaborator's reputation and the possible cost of a collaboration decision. Additionally, younger researchers indicated more often than older researchers that they did not know whether their project teams followed any rules or norms or engaged in negotiation to determine the order of authorship on collaborative publications.

      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.004
       
  • Visual research in LIS: Complementary and alternative methods
    • Authors: Angela Pollak
      Pages: 98 - 106
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Angela Pollak


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.002
       
  • Caregivers' perceptions of emergent literacy programming in public
           libraries in relation to the National Research Councils' guidelines on
           quality environments for children
    • Authors: Laura K. Clark
      Pages: 107 - 115
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Laura K. Clark


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.001
       
  • The peritextual literacy framework: Using the functions of peritext to
           support critical thinking
    • Authors: Melissa Gross; Don Latham
      Pages: 116 - 123
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Melissa Gross, Don Latham


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.006
       
  • How academic librarians experience evidence-based practice: A grounded
           theory model
    • Authors: Faye Miller; Helen Partridge; Christine Bruce; Christine Yates; Alisa Howlett
      Pages: 124 - 130
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Faye Miller, Helen Partridge, Christine Bruce, Christine Yates, Alisa Howlett


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.003
       
  • Place, community and information behavior: Spatially oriented information
           seeking zones and information source preferences
    • Authors: Amelia N. Gibson; Samantha Kaplan
      Pages: 131 - 139
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amelia N. Gibson, Samantha Kaplan


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.001
       
  • Research agenda for social and collaborative information seeking
    • Authors: Chirag Shah; Rob Capra; Preben Hansen
      Pages: 140 - 146
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Chirag Shah, Rob Capra, Preben Hansen
      Scholars in diverse fields of inquiry have identified the need to expand individual-based information seeking and behavior models and systems to incorporate social as well as collaborative dimensions. However, the research areas of Social Information Seeking (SIS) and Collaborative Information Seeking (CIS) have been largely disconnected from one another despite a few notable attempts to study them under one umbrella. Researchers in these communities have recently realized the value of bringing SIS and CIS together for two main reasons: often it is impossible to separate social and collaborative dimensions in a project; and by considering these two aspects of information seeking, we may be able to support human information behavior in ways not previously possible. A brief synthesis of work in the domains of SIS and CIS is presented here. Then, an integrated view is presented to consider Social and Collaborative Information Seeking (SCIS) as an intersection and extension of SIS and CIS. Benefits of this approach are discussed and the integrated view is used as the basis to present a research agenda that outlines opportunities and challenges unique to SCIS.

      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.005
       
  • Editorial: Before you submit your manuscript
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.004
       
  • Information world mapping: A participatory arts-based elicitation method
           for information behavior interviews
    • Authors: Devon Greyson; Heather O'Brien; Jean Shoveller
      Pages: 149 - 157
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Devon Greyson, Heather O'Brien, Jean Shoveller


      PubDate: 2017-05-02T08:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.003
       
  • Auto-hermeneutics: A phenomenological approach to information experience
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tim Gorichanaz
      The need for methodologically rigorous approaches to the study of human experience in LIS has emerged in recent years. Auto-hermeneutics is a research approach that offers a systematic way to study one’s own experiences with information, allowing investigators to explore yet-undocumented contexts, setting precedents for further work in these areas and ultimately deepening our understanding of information experiences. This articulation of auto-hermeneutics is based on the phenomenological method of Heidegger and draws principles from systematic self-observation and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Similarities and differences among auto-hermeneutics and other automethodologies are discussed, along with guidelines for assessing auto-hermeneutic research. Finally, an example of an auto-hermeneutic study illustrates the unique contributions this approach affords.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.001
       
  • Auto-hermeneutics: A phenomenological approach to information experience
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tim Gorichanaz
      The need for methodologically rigorous approaches to the study of human experience in LIS has emerged in recent years. Auto-hermeneutics is a research approach that offers a systematic way to study one’s own experiences with information, allowing investigators to explore yet-undocumented contexts, setting precedents for further work in these areas and ultimately deepening our understanding of information experiences. This articulation of auto-hermeneutics is based on the phenomenological method of Heidegger and draws principles from systematic self-observation and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Similarities and differences among auto-hermeneutics and other automethodologies are discussed, along with guidelines for assessing auto-hermeneutic research. Finally, an example of an auto-hermeneutic study illustrates the unique contributions this approach affords.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.001
       
  • Comparative study of characteristics of authors between open access and
           non-open access journals in library and information science
    • Authors: Yu-Wei Chang
      Pages: 8 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Wei Chang


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.002
       
  • Comparative study of characteristics of authors between open access and
           non-open access journals in library and information science
    • Authors: Yu-Wei Chang
      Pages: 8 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Wei Chang


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.002
       
  • Marginalia in the digital age: Are digital reading devices meeting the
           needs of today's readers?
    • Authors: Melanie Ramdarshan Bold; Kiri L. Wagstaff
      Pages: 16 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Melanie Ramdarshan Bold, Kiri L. Wagstaff
      For centuries, readers have added marginal commentary to books for a variety of personal and public purposes. Historians have mined the marginalia of important historical figures to observe their sometimes raw, immediate responses to texts. Now, reading and annotation practices are changing with the migration of content to electronic books. A survey of reader attitudes and behavior related to marginalia for print and electronic books reveals that the majority of readers write in their books and want e-readers to support this feature. However, many readers report that annotating electronic books is too difficult, time-consuming, or awkward with current technology. In addition, the way readers annotate books depends on whether they are reading for pleasure or for work or education. These findings can guide the development of future devices to better satisfy reader needs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.004
       
  • Marginalia in the digital age: Are digital reading devices meeting the
           needs of today's readers?
    • Authors: Melanie Ramdarshan Bold; Kiri L. Wagstaff
      Pages: 16 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Melanie Ramdarshan Bold, Kiri L. Wagstaff
      For centuries, readers have added marginal commentary to books for a variety of personal and public purposes. Historians have mined the marginalia of important historical figures to observe their sometimes raw, immediate responses to texts. Now, reading and annotation practices are changing with the migration of content to electronic books. A survey of reader attitudes and behavior related to marginalia for print and electronic books reveals that the majority of readers write in their books and want e-readers to support this feature. However, many readers report that annotating electronic books is too difficult, time-consuming, or awkward with current technology. In addition, the way readers annotate books depends on whether they are reading for pleasure or for work or education. These findings can guide the development of future devices to better satisfy reader needs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.004
       
  • A communication system approach to the problem of public library
           legitimacy
    • Authors: Michael M. Widdersheim; Masanori Koizumi
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael M. Widdersheim, Masanori Koizumi
      Public library systems intersect with both public and private spheres of social life, but how they negotiate public legitimacy and private influence remains a mystery. To better understand this problem, this study adopts a communication system approach. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines data from three US public library systems. This study analyzes how private actors communicate with and through public library systems by parsing the signals into components: transmitter, receiver, medium, and message. The resulting signals form two dimensions: the Public Sphere dimension, where private actors govern, legitimate, and use the library, and the Private Sphere dimension, where private actors exchange personal services and exert economic power. A view of public and private signals in interaction reveals how public legitimacy is threatened and how public library systems can mitigate these threats. This study reveals how public/private conflicts in public libraries arise and how they might be resolved.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.003
       
  • A communication system approach to the problem of public library
           legitimacy
    • Authors: Michael M. Widdersheim; Masanori Koizumi
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael M. Widdersheim, Masanori Koizumi
      Public library systems intersect with both public and private spheres of social life, but how they negotiate public legitimacy and private influence remains a mystery. To better understand this problem, this study adopts a communication system approach. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines data from three US public library systems. This study analyzes how private actors communicate with and through public library systems by parsing the signals into components: transmitter, receiver, medium, and message. The resulting signals form two dimensions: the Public Sphere dimension, where private actors govern, legitimate, and use the library, and the Private Sphere dimension, where private actors exchange personal services and exert economic power. A view of public and private signals in interaction reveals how public legitimacy is threatened and how public library systems can mitigate these threats. This study reveals how public/private conflicts in public libraries arise and how they might be resolved.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.003
       
  • Contributing to social capital: An investigation of Asian immigrants' use
           of public library services
    • Authors: Safirotu Khoir; Jia Tina Du; Robert M. Davison; Andy Koronios
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Safirotu Khoir, Jia Tina Du, Robert M. Davison, Andy Koronios


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.005
       
  • Contributing to social capital: An investigation of Asian immigrants' use
           of public library services
    • Authors: Safirotu Khoir; Jia Tina Du; Robert M. Davison; Andy Koronios
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Safirotu Khoir, Jia Tina Du, Robert M. Davison, Andy Koronios


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.005
       
  • Incorporating technology in children's storytime: Cultural-historical
           activity theory as a means of reconciling contradictions
    • Authors: Hui-Yun Sung
      Pages: 46 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hui-Yun Sung


      PubDate: 2017-02-02T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.007
       
  • Studying information behavior of image users: An overview of research
           methodology in LIS literature, 2004–2015
    • Authors: Krystyna K. Matusiak
      Pages: 53 - 60
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Krystyna K. Matusiak


      PubDate: 2017-02-02T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.008
       
  • Library and information science research, then and now
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 61 - 62
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.010
       
  • An examination of social and informational support behavior codes on the
           Internet: The case of online health communities
    • Authors: Jenny Bronstein
      Pages: 63 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jenny Bronstein


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.006
       
  • Evaluation components of information literacy in undergraduate students in
           Slovenia: An experimental study
    • Authors: Zdenka Petermanec; Urban Šebjan
      Pages: 69 - 75
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zdenka Petermanec, Urban Šebjan


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.009
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
       
  • Collective memory
    • Authors: Peter Hernon; Candy Schwartz
      First page: 191
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2016-09-12T14:32:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.010
       
  • The role of inter-professional collaboration to support science learning:
           An exploratory study of the perceptions and experiences of science
           teachers, public librarians, and school librarians
    • Authors: Don Latham; Heidi Julien; Melissa Gross; Shelbie Witte
      Pages: 193 - 201
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Don Latham, Heidi Julien, Melissa Gross, Shelbie Witte
      This cross-disciplinary, cross-institutional exploratory study looks at school librarians', public librarians', and high school science teachers' perceptions of and experiences with inter-professional collaboration to support science learning. The research explores the perceptions and experiences of professional librarians and science teachers regarding 1) inter-professional collaboration, including barriers to collaboration; 2) the relevance of 21st century skills to the teaching of science; and, 3) collaborations that can support and foster the teaching and learning of 21st century skills in the content area of science. Results from focus groups conducted with science teachers, public librarians, and school librarians revealed great potential for, but also significant challenges to, inter-professional collaboration.

      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.002
       
  • Library research as collaborative information seeking
    • Authors: Chris Leeder; Chirag Shah
      Pages: 202 - 211
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Chris Leeder, Chirag Shah
      Today's students are accustomed to collaborative information behavior, with group work being a common requirement in educational settings. This research focuses on the collaborative information seeking behavior of college students through a library-based study of individuals and pairs conducting exploratory research for a class assignment. Participants used a collaborative search system when completing the study tasks. Findings showed that students working collaboratively found more useful sources and achieved greater information coverage, while individuals showed better results for query effectiveness and number of relevant sources. Challenges that students face when conducting library research were identified. The findings offer librarians, instructors, and learning technologists suggestions as to how to support group work, and how collaborative search systems can address the challenges faced by students doing group work using library resources.

      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.001
       
  • Professional participation in digital curation
    • Authors: Inna Kouper
      Pages: 212 - 223
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Inna Kouper
      Digital curation is being recognized as a new domain that demands its own skills and expertise. The perceived or occurring professionalization of digital curation calls for a deeper analysis of what it means to do digital curation. Drawing on the findings of an online survey of professionals, who identify themselves as digital curators, this research offers insight into who digital curators are, what they do, and how they describe their skills and the relevance of these skills to their jobs. Having synthesized definitions of digital curation and profiles of digital curators, the study distinguishes between top-down and bottom-up professionalization and identifies similarities and differences between them. While the top-down, agenda driven approach offers coherence and consistency for digital curation as a profession, the bottom-up, practitioners-driven approach thrives on inclusiveness and heterogeneity. The study concludes by pointing out the lack of certain themes in the professional discourses, such as the themes of user communities, open access, and advocacy.

      PubDate: 2016-09-20T07:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.009
       
  • Researchers' use of social network sites: A scoping review
    • Authors: Sara Kjellberg; Jutta Haider; Olof Sundin
      Pages: 224 - 234
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Sara Kjellberg, Jutta Haider, Olof Sundin
      This scoping review of 80 research articles in library and information science (LIS) and related fields, published between 2004 and 2014, focuses on the use of social network sites by researchers. The results show that social network sites are used as part of scholarly life, yet with disciplinary differences. It is also shown that the area lacks methodological, theoretical and empirical coherence and theoretical stringency. The most salient strands of research (general uptake, outreach, special tools/cases, assessing impact, practices/new modes of communication) are mapped and ways to improve research in the field are identified. This provides a first step toward a more comprehensive understanding of the roles of social network sites in scholarship.

      PubDate: 2016-09-20T07:44:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.008
       
  • Reading on the move: A study of reading behavior of undergraduate
           smartphone users in China
    • Authors: Ziming Liu; Xiaobin Huang
      Pages: 235 - 242
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Ziming Liu, Xiaobin Huang
      The wearability of smartphones enables communication while physically in motion. This research examines some key areas in reading behavior in light of the wide spread adoption and use of Internet-capable mobile phones, or smartphones. A survey of 205 undergraduate students was conducted in China. Reading behavior on smartphones was found to differ significantly from reading on desktop or laptop computers. Compared to reading on desktop or laptop computers, an increased reliance on smartphones for reading has raised a new set of challenges, and has shaped new behavior such as more browsing and scanning, more selective reading, less in-depth reading, and less concentrated reading. People interact with mobile information in varied and unpredictable locations or while in transit. The mobility of information engagement is an important issue that human information theory should embrace.

      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.007
       
  • Making sense of professional work: Metaphors for reference and information
           service
    • Authors: Amy VanScoy
      Pages: 243 - 249
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Amy VanScoy
      Information professionals' conceptualizations of reference and information service (RIS) are explored by examining the metaphors these professionals used in describing their work. Framed by Lakoff and Johnson's (1980) conceptual metaphor theory, explicit comparisons, figurative language and metaphorical jargon used by 20 information professionals in interviews about their work were analyzed. The conceptual categories developed from the analysis reveal a variety of conceptualizations of RIS, such as navigation, puzzle/mystery, and creation, which are generally positive and productive, but which tend to focus on information provision rather than communication and user relationships. This research contributes to self-awareness among RIS professionals, and is useful for those moving into the field. Further, it adds the voice of library and information science to the wider discourse on professional work.

      PubDate: 2016-09-12T14:32:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.003
       
  • An exploratory study of library website accessibility for visually
           impaired users
    • Authors: Kyunghye Yoon; Rachel Dols; Laura Hulscher; Tara Newberry
      Pages: 250 - 258
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Kyunghye Yoon, Rachel Dols, Laura Hulscher, Tara Newberry
      To extrapolate best practices for accessible library website design, the Web-browsing needs of users with visual impairments were investigated. Selected library websites were tested for usability and accessibility with six visually impaired persons who use screen readers. The results were analyzed in terms of accessible coding standards as well as high-level usability issues. The analysis results indicated that these library websites are not accessible for visually impaired screen reader users. The most common accessibility barriers encountered were issues of information architecture and usable Web design, rather than errors in coding. Suggestions to improve accessibility are proposed.

      PubDate: 2016-09-12T14:32:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.006
       
  • An evaluation of exponential random graph modeling and its use in library
           and information science studies
    • Authors: Ana Dubnjakovic
      Pages: 259 - 264
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Ana Dubnjakovic
      Social network analytical tools and theories have long been an accepted part of the research landscape in many social and physical sciences including: sociology, political science, psychology, communications, business, geography, biology, physics, and chemistry as well as library and information science (LIS). Given the level of activity in the social network analysis (SNA) area concerning LIS, it is important to review the latest trends in the SNA stochastic modeling, namely exponential random graph (ERG) models. Unlike previous SNA methods, ERG models offer insight into generative network properties through simultaneous inclusion of structural parameters and attributes in the analysis while accounting for the interdependent nature of network data. Additionally, when Monte Carlo Markov Chain Maximum Likelihood Estimator is used, ERG modeling results in parameter estimates superior to other methods (e.g., MRQAP). The current study will demonstrate the utility of ERG models in LIS through a brief overview of major concepts and techniques in SNA, followed by a detailed description of ERG modeling technique, a review of currently available software used in analysis and a brief examination of its current use in LIS studies.

      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.005
       
  • Farmers' access to poultry management information in selected rural areas
           of Tanzania
    • Authors: Grace Msoffe; Patrick Ngulube
      Pages: 265 - 271
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Grace Msoffe, Patrick Ngulube
      Poultry farming is important in improving rural livelihoods in Tanzania as it provides better nutrition and additional income. Information is a critical tool in any poultry farming activity. Access to poultry management information in three rural districts of Tanzania is explored. The findings show that information on disease control, poultry protection, breeds and breeding, and feeding and nutrition were the most accessed topics. Farmers relied on informal sources of information, mainly from family, friends, neighbors, extension officers, researchers, and radio. Information that had direct impact on poultry well-being was the most frequently accessed. The major challenges that limited farmers in information seeking were lack of availability of extension officers, lack of awareness, lack of availability of information, lack of electricity, and poor infrastructure. This suggests that more emphasis should be placed on increasing the number of extension officers, increasing awareness of existing information sources, facilitating reliable transport for information providers, subsidizing cost of information services, and providing adult education. The findings can provide valuable information to improve effectiveness of information dissemination in rural areas.

      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.004
       
  • Online health information seeking behaviors among Chinese elderly
    • Authors: Dan Wu; Yizhe Li
      Pages: 272 - 279
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Dan Wu, Yizhe Li
      The Internet has become an important source of health information for elderly people in China. A controlled user experiment was conducted to understand how Chinese elderly people search for online health information. Twenty elderly people completed three search tasks based on three different health information seeking contexts. Online health information seeking behavior patterns of the elderly were found to include reselecting from results pages, following hyperlinks, and using a query reformulation patter. There was no significant difference with respect to emotion and the three task contexts, as elderly people have positive attitudes regarding the health information seeking process, but cognition within the three task contexts displayed significant differences. There was a significant correlation between education and Internet search proficiency regarding task search performance, while health condition, familiarity with the Internet and credibility of online health information were found to be primary factors that influenced the decision of the elderly to search for online health information.

      PubDate: 2016-09-08T13:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.08.011
       
  • Research may be harder to conduct than some realize
    • Authors: Peter Hernon; Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 91 - 92
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2016-06-13T09:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.05.003
       
  • Everyday health information literacy in relation to health behavior and
           physical fitness: A population-based study among young men
    • Authors: Noora Hirvonen; Stefan Ek; Raimo Niemelä; Riitta Pyky; Riikka Ahola; Raija Korpelainen; Maija-Leena Huotari
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Noora Hirvonen, Stefan Ek, Raimo Niemelä, Riitta Pyky, Riikka Ahola, Raija Korpelainen, Maija-Leena Huotari


      PubDate: 2016-12-10T08:16:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.013
       
  • Web designers and developers experiences of information literacy: A
           phenomenographic study
    • Authors: Elham Sayyad Abdi; Helen Partridge; Christine Bruce
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Elham Sayyad Abdi, Helen Partridge, Christine Bruce
      The qualitative research reported here identifies how web designers and developers experience information literacy. Using a phenomenographic approach, this cohort's experience is presented through a map of variation, which includes four different ways of experiencing information literacy. Analysis of 23 in-depth interviews with web workers from different stages of the web design and development process suggested the four ways web workers experience information literacy: staying informed, building a successful website, solving a problem or participating in a community of practice. The study advances the existing understanding of the concept of information literacy, especially in a professional context and from a relational perspective. Additionally, using the web professionals' world as the context of the study, the research contributes to the field of website design and development by shedding light on less-researched information experiences of people involved in the web industry.

      PubDate: 2016-12-10T08:16:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.008
       
  • Watching young children “play” with information technology: Everyday
           life information seeking in the home
    • Authors: Lisa M. Given; Denise Cantrell Winkler; Rebekah Willson; Christina Davidson; Susan Danby; Karen Thorpe
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Lisa M. Given, Denise Cantrell Winkler, Rebekah Willson, Christina Davidson, Susan Danby, Karen Thorpe
      Research on how young children use information to orient themselves in daily life and to solve problems (known as everyday life information seeking or ELIS) has not been conducted, in-depth, in information science. This exploratory observation study examines how 15 Australian preschool children (aged three to five) used information technologies in their homes to orient themselves in daily life and to solve problems. Children engaged in various ways with the digital technologies available to them and with parents and siblings during play activities. The results explore the value of artistic play, sociodramatic play, and early literacy and numeracy activities in shaping young children's ‘way of life’ and ‘mastery of life’ as outlined in Savolainen's (1995) ELIS model. Observed technology engagement provided an opportunity to explore children's social worlds and the ways that they gathered information during technology play that will inform future learning activities and support child development. By using ELIS theory as an analytic lens, the results demonstrate how children's developmental play with technology tools helps them to internalize social and cultural norms. The data also point to the type of capital available to children and how that capital contributes to children's emerging information practices.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T19:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.007
       
  • As change occurs, challenges may arise
    • Authors: Peter Hernon; Candy Schwartz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2016-12-03T19:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.010
       
  • Announcement: Farewell
    • Authors: Peter Hernon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon


      PubDate: 2016-12-03T19:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.011
       
  • Web metrics for library and information professionals. By David Stuart.
           
    • Authors: Yijun Gao
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Yijun Gao


      PubDate: 2016-12-03T19:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.001
       
  • The role of the school library in college access and choice
    • Authors: Enyu Zhou; Denice Adkins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Enyu Zhou, Denice Adkins


      PubDate: 2016-11-26T05:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.009
       
  • How academic librarians, IT staff, and research administrators perceive
           and relate to research
    • Authors: Andrew M. Cox; Eddy Verbaan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Andrew M. Cox, Eddy Verbaan
      Academic libraries are changing how they support research. For example, their involvement in research data management (RDM) implies a much deeper relationship with researchers throughout the research lifecycle. Perhaps we are witnessing a shift from support to partnership. This study examines how librarians, IT staff, and research administrators see research and their own relation to it. Within an interpretative methodology, 20 semi-structured interviews with librarians, IT staff, and research administrators were analyzed thematically. Librarians often talked about research via the discourse of research-led teaching. They also conceived of it via notions of collection and to a lesser extent through reference work or copyright expertise. They saw some of their own continuing professional development or service development work as akin to the work of university researchers, but at the other end of a spectrum. Some saw a categorical difference and considered that research was only conducted by people who had a job title of researcher. IT managers tended to see research via infrastructure or specialist expertise. However, at least one IT staff member saw himself as both partly a researcher and a bridge between research and support. Research administrators tended to see research through the roles of administrative support and policy influence. In summary, seven broad narratives about research were identified: influencing researchers to align with policy; being a researcher; being a bridge with research; offering expertise; providing infrastructure; supporting a research/teaching nexus; and relieving researchers of administrative burdens. As institutions develop research partnerships, e.g., around RDM, training and curricula will need to expand existing conceptions and build deeper empathetic relationships with research.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T05:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.004
       
  • The effects of information overload on reference librarians
    • Authors: Orna Shacha; Noa Aharony; Shifra Baruchson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Orna Shacha, Noa Aharony, Shifra Baruchson
      Nowadays, librarians work in information environments characterized by information overload. This study uses a qualitative-phenomenological method to examine the way in which reference librarians in academic libraries in Israel view and deal with the information overload phenomenon. Fifteen reference librarians responded to questions in semi-structured interviews. Four strategies of coping with information overload were identified: filtering, avoiding, satisficing and selecting items from the top of the list. Further, findings reveal that participants have not experienced the full impact of information overload. The research findings expand the existing body of knowledge about how librarians deal with information overload, and provide new information on the particular perspective of reference librarians in academic libraries, an aspect that has not been researched extensively to date. The findings are relevant to library managers, to directors of training programs for new librarians, to LIS educators, and to professional organizations.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T05:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.005
       
  • The effect of online word of mouth on fantasy readers' preference
           stability: The moderating role of involvement and knowledge
    • Authors: Muh-Chyun Tang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Muh-Chyun Tang
      A study of the persuasive effect of positive versus negative online book reviews on readers' judgment suggests that readers with high involvement were less likely to be swayed by online reviews. An experiment was conducted to test the effects of two psychological constructs in the persuasion process, namely, user's knowledge of and involvement with a literary genre. A novel aspect of the study is that the participants were exposed to reviews contradictory to their initial impression. Contrary to negativity bias widely found in previous studies of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), a positivity effect of online reviews was found. High and low involvement readers were found to rely on different judgment cues. Furthermore, it is argued that when applied in cultural consumption, the measurement of these constructs demands special treatment because of its “infinite variety” and strong hedonistic character. Involvement at the genre level helped enhance preference stability. However, such effects were not found with users' subjective knowledge at the genre level. Instead, similarity became an important judgment heuristic when users encountered books by unknown authors.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T05:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.003
       
  • Research using job advertisements: A methodological assessment
    • Authors: Jeonghyun Kim; Putthachat Angnakoon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jeonghyun Kim, Putthachat Angnakoon


      PubDate: 2016-11-26T05:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.006
       
  • Constructing the information ground of the campus disability center
    • Authors: Rachel D. Williams; Catherine Arnott Smith
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 November 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Rachel D. Williams, Catherine Arnott Smith
      Higher education institutions are required to provide academic accommodations to students who need them. These services are typically available at campus disability centers, where disability counselors work with students to facilitate accommodations. Interviews were conducted to examine the health information behaviors of 17 disability counselors at two university disability centers by applying Fisher, Durrance, and Hinton's (2004) information grounds theory. Analysis of the interviews was performed to: 1) explore the information ground of the disability center, 2) better understand the ways in which health information is sought and used, and 3) consider the alternate ways in which health information is used by disability counselors. The perspectives of disability counselors' health information-seeking also point to ways in which information grounds theory can be applied to university staff who play a similar role in the lives of students at higher education institutions.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T05:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2016.11.002
       
  • New Member of the Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 3


      PubDate: 2016-09-26T03:24:12Z
       
 
 
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