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Journal Cover   Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.781]   [H-I: 31]   [1052 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2588 journals]
  • The use of grounded theory in identifying the user experience during
           search
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Evgenia Vassilakaki , Frances Johnson
      Grounded theory offers a useful method for gaining an understanding of the context of the user experience when searching on an experimental multilingual image retrieval system. Observational, cognitive and affective data were collected while users searched for images in a multilingual environment. Straussian grounded theory was used to identify the elements of the dynamic process of information searching behaviour. The stages in which the data were coded are outlined to show how users' thoughts and actions were integrated in the analysis and to present and visualise the emerging concepts as representative of the context of the user experience.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Genomics data curation roles, skills and perception of data quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Hong Huang , Corinne Jörgensen , Besiki Stvilia
      Compared to a decade ago, genomics scientists, driven by technical changes and availability of massive genomics data, are performing a wider plurality of curation roles, including end user, curator, and dual-role user. Scientists with different curation roles (including that of end user) may focus on different data quality aspects and skill requirements in a community curation environment. This study examines how genomics scientists' perceived priorities for data quality and data quality skills differ when assuming different roles played in genomics data curation work. The analysis of survey data collected from 147 genomics scientists found that curators of genomics data valued quality criteria that can be assessed through direct examination of the data more highly, while end users placed a high value on the quality criteria that can be assessed indirectly, such as believability. With regard to data quality skills, curators appeared to care more about understanding user's requirements and specific data management skills than end users, while end users valued the skills needed to deal with information overload more highly — those needed to identify useful, relevant information from large amounts of data. Scientists with different curation roles, given common curation tasks with the same skill requirements, prioritized different data quality criteria. The data quality, skill priorities, and tradeoffs identified by this study can inform the development of effective data curation mandates and policies, data quality assurance planning and training, and the design of curation role specific tool dashboards and visualization interfaces for genomics data.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Average evaluation intensity: A quality-oriented indicator for the
           evaluation of research performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Zhiqiang Wu
      A variety of indicators have been created to measure the research performance of journals, scientists, and institutions. There has been a long-running debate on the use of indicators based on citation counts to measure research quality. The key argument is that using indicators based on raw citation counts to evaluate research quality lacks measurement validity. Traditional reference formats do not present any quality related evaluations of the citing authors toward their references. It can be argued that the strength of peer evaluation to a research output, which is taken to represent its quality, is the elementary unit in the evaluation and comparison of research performance. A good candidate for evaluating a piece of research is a researcher who cites the research and knows it well. By accumulating different citing authors' evaluations of their references based on a uniform evaluation scheme and synthesizing the evaluations into a single indicator, the qualities of research works, scientists, journals, research groups, and institutions in different disciplines can be assessed and compared. A method consisting of three components is proposed: a reference evaluation scheme, a new reference format, and a new indicator, called the average evaluation intensity. This method combines the advantages of citation count analysis, citation motivation analysis, and peer review, and may help to advance the debate. The potential advantages of and main concerns about the proposed method are discussed. The proposed method may serve as a preliminary theoretical framework that can inspire and advance a quality-oriented approach to the evaluation of research performance. At the current stage, it is best to treat the proposed method as speculation and inspiration rather than as a blueprint for practical implementation.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • The image of an institution: Politicians and the urban library project
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Sunniva Evjen
      In terms of political perceptions, library building projects appear to be similar across different contexts. Qualitative interviews with local politicians were employed to examine attitudes towards public libraries and library development in three cities building new central libraries: Aarhus, Denmark; Birmingham, UK; and Oslo, Norway. Applying an institutional perspective, the analysis focuses on norms, legitimization, and organizational change. Findings show shared views on the role and mission of the library. The informants primarily pointed to citizens' democratic rights and their country's democratic tradition when legitimizing public funding for libraries in general. However, argumentation for local library building projects was connected to city development and the desire to portray a city as oriented towards knowledge and culture.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Research methods in library and information science: A content analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Heting Chu
      A total of 1162 research articles, published from 2001 to 2010 in three major journals of library and information science (LIS), are analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively in order to address some recurring themes about research method selection and application in the scholarly domain. This study shows that LIS scholars utilize a greater number and wider variety of research methods than before. Replacing the dominant positions that questionnaire survey and historical method previously held, content analysis, experiment, and theoretical approach have become the top choices of research methods in the field. This study also examines two recurring themes regarding research methods in the LIS field, namely, use of multiple methods in one study and adoption of the qualitative approach, but finds no conclusive evidence of increased implementation of either practice. More efforts in the form of education, training and advocacy are therefore needed to help LIS scholars gain a better understanding of research methods and make more informed decisions on research method selection and implementation in their scholarly endeavors.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • The problem with problematic situations: Differences between practices,
           tasks, and situations as units of analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Sanna Talja , James M. Nyce
      It is generally agreed that information activities should be studied within the work and everyday-life contexts, which provide the reasons for and aims of information seeking and use activities. Situation, task, and practice are some of the ways of conceptualizing the context of information activities. Differences between these concepts are rarely discussed, and their theoretical underpinnings are not necessarily well understood. This analysis describes the historical background of the person-in-situation approach, task theory, and practice theory. The underlying assumptions are brought into view and analyzed in detail. Practice theory, task theory, and person-in-situation theories guide researchers to carve out and define their research foci in divergent and incompatible ways. It is argued that it would also be possible to understand and define these concepts within an integrated theoretical framework. Practice theory is a theoretical framework within which both situations and tasks can be understood as distinct parts of a situated activity setting. Discussing the intellectual history of some of the key theoretical constructs of information science clarifies differences between research streams and their key premises.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Reflections of affect in studies of information behavior in HIV/AIDS
           contexts: An exploratory quantitative content analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Heidi Julien , Ina Fourie
      Information seeking and use are critically important for people living with HIV/AIDS and for those who care for people with HIV/AIDS. In addition, the HIV/AIDS context is characterized by significant affective or emotional aspects including stigma, fear, and coping. Thus, studies of information behavior in this context should be expected to take account of emotional variables. In information behavior scholarship, emotional variables have been marginalized in favor of a focus on cognitive aspects, although in recent years greater attention has been paid to the affective realm. This study used quantitative content analysis to explore the degree to which information behavior studies across a range of disciplines actually include affect or emotion in their analyses. Findings suggest that most studies pay little or no attention to these variables, and that attention has not changed over the past 20years. Those studies that do account for emotion, however, provide excellent examples of information behavior research that can lead the way for future work.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Does affinity matter? Slow effects of e-quality on information seeking
           in virtual communities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Xianjin Zha , Jinchao Zhang , Yalan Yan , Zhiliang Xiao
      Virtual communities function not only as social settings, but also as information neighborhoods. In this study, the term e-quality was used to refer to information quality, system quality, and service quality. Following the updated information systems (IS) success model, a research model was developed to explore the effects of e-quality on information seeking as well as the direct and mediating effects of affinity with virtual communities (the degree of importance that users place on virtual communities) on information seeking. Data collected from users of virtual communities were used to test the model. Affinity with virtual communities not only had a large and direct impact on information seeking in virtual communities but also fully mediated the effects of information quality and service quality on information seeking and partially mediated the effect of system quality on information seeking. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • How important is computing technology for library and information science
           research?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mike Thelwall , Nabeil Maflahi
      Computers in library and information science (LIS) research have been an object of study or a tool for research for at least fifty years, but how central are computers to the discipline now? This research analyses the titles, abstracts, and keywords of forty years of articles in LIS-classified journals for trends related to computing technologies. The proportion of Scopus LIS articles mentioning some aspect of computing in their title, abstract, or keywords increased steadily from 1986 to 2000, then stabilised at about two thirds, indicating a continuing dominance of computers in most LIS research. Within this general trend, many computer-related terms have peaked and then declined in popularity. For example, the proportion of Scopus LIS article titles, abstracts, or keywords that included the terms “computer” or “computing” decreased fairly steadily from about 20% in 1975 to 5% in 2013, and the proportion explicitly mentioning the web peaked at 18% in 2002. Parallel analyses suggest that computing is substantially less important in two related disciplines: education and communication, and so it should be seen as a key aspect of the LIS identity.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • When are LibQUAL+® and LibQUAL+® Lite scores psychometrically
           comparable?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Prathiba Natesan , Hector F. Ponce , Armando Chavez
      Planned missingness in commonly administered proportions of LibQUAL+® and Lite instruments may lead to loss of information. Data from three previous administrations of LibQUAL+® protocol were used to simulate data representing five proportions of administration. Statistics of interest (i.e., means, adequacy and superiority gaps, standard deviations, and Pearson and polychoric correlations) and their confidence intervals (CIs) from simulated and real data were compared. All CIs for the statistics of interest for simulated data contained the original values. Root mean squared errors, and absolute and relative biases showed that accuracy in the estimates decreased with increase in Lite proportion. The recommendation is to administer the Lite version to not more than 20% of the respondents if the purpose of the data collection is to conduct any inferential analysis. If researchers are interested in calculating means alone, up to 80% Lite version may be used to capture the true values adequately. However, standard deviations need to be interpreted to understand the quality of the means. Loss of accuracy in estimates may be compounded in analyses that use at least two statistics of interest.


      PubDate: 2015-02-23T08:45:30Z
       
  • Research engagement in health librarianship: Outcomes of a focus group
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Hannah Spring , Patrick Doherty , Chris Boyes , Kim Wilshaw
      It is widely recognised that there is a lack of research engagement in librarianship. Anecdotal and editorial based observations express concerns regarding this situation but there is a lack of research exploring it. The research which does exist has been conducted at a generic level with little relevance to specific disciplines of librarianship therefore weakening its impact and applicability at discipline level. To date, there have been no studies that examine issues of research engagement exclusively within the context of UK health librarianship. This study reports on the findings of a focus group conducted as part of a larger study which attempted to redress this current gap in the evidence base. The focus group aimed specifically to gain consensus on the top five key barriers and top five key priorities for research engagement in the UK health librarianship. The main findings suggest that barriers to research engagement are mainly contextualised within research addressing key matters for the profession of health librarianship, whilst priorities are mainly contextualised within the role health librarians have in supporting the research of the health professionals to whom they provide library services. Outcomes of the focus group provide early empirical evidence to confirm that whilst there is considerable goodwill towards research and the development of the evidence base in health librarianship, there are existing challenges between working for the interests of both the library service user and development of the evidence base in healthcare, and the evidence based progression of the health librarianship profession.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • The dangers of unlimited access: Fiction, the Internet and the social
           construction of childhood
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Suzanne M. Stauffer
      At the beginning of the twentieth century, librarians, teachers, and parents wrote about the dangers to children of unlimited access to what was termed “sensational literature.” At the beginning of the next century, they struggled to deal with the dangers to children of unlimited access to the Internet. Although separated by a hundred years, they appear to be making much the same argument about the much the same issue, that of the public library providing unlimited access to minors to what some view as inappropriate or dangerous materials. However, a closer analysis of the discourse in the professional media regarding these two controversies, one that investigates the mechanisms underlying the changes in attitudes and practice, reveals that any similarities are primarily cosmetic. Such an analysis reveals that different issues were addressed and debated utilizing different social constructions of childhood and different social constructions of the public library and public librarians held by society as a whole and by librarians at the turn of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Connecting: Adding an affective domain to the information intents theory
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Nicole A. Cooke
      The information intents theory strives to explain how and why information is used. In this research the theory was used to discover what happens when online LIS graduate students exchange and use information in threaded discussions. The primary source of data was 33 discussion threads, in which students exhibited cognitive and affective intents and were influenced by their instructor's immediacy in the online classroom. This research provides insight for LIS education, instructional design, and other disciplines that utilize distance education technologies.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • How scholars implement trust in their reading, citing and publishing
           activities: Geographical differences
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Hamid R. Jamali , David Nicholas , Anthony Watkinson , Eti Herman , Carol Tenopir , Kenneth Levine , Suzie Allard , Lisa Christian , Rachel Volentine , Reid Boehm , Frances Nichols
      In an increasingly digital environment, many factors influence how academic researchers decide what to read, what to cite, where to publish their work, and how they assign trust when making these decisions. This study focuses on how this differs according to the geographical location of the researcher, specifically in terms of the country's level of development. Data were collected by a questionnaire survey of 3650 authors who had published articles in international journals. The human development index (HDI) was used to compare authors' scholarly behavior. The findings show that researchers from less developed countries such as India and China (medium HDI) compared to those in developed countries, such as the USA and UK (very high HDI) are more reliant on external factors and those criteria that are related to authority, brand and reputation, such as authors' names, affiliation, country and journal name. Even when deciding where to publish, the publisher of the journal is more important for developing countries than it is for researchers from the US and UK. Scholars from high HDI countries also differ in these aspects: a) they are less discriminatory than authors from developing countries in their citation practices; b) for them the fact that a source is peer reviewed is the most important factor when deciding where to publish; c) they are more negative towards the use of repositories and social media for publishing and more skeptical about their potential for increasing usage or reaching a wider audience.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • T.P.MackeyT.E.JacobsonMetaliteracy: Reinventing information literacy to
           empower learners2014Neal-SchumanChicago, IL
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Laura Saunders



      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • An empirical study of factors influencing user perception of university
           digital libraries in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Chang-Ping Hu , Yuan Hu , Wei-Wei Yan
      Studies of the resources and services provided through university digital libraries have focused on evaluation criteria which consider usability, content, technology, and context. The factors influencing user perception of university digital libraries have not been explored and discussed from the perspective of specific library service types. Structural equation modeling was used to explore influencing factors and the relationships among them, based on 353 responses to survey questionnaires regarding academic DLs in China. Findings show that information providing services, information retrieval services, and individual services are direct influencing factors, while information organizing services affect user perception indirectly through information retrieval services and individual services. Various services also demonstrate interactions.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • A joker in the class: Teenage readers' attitudes and preferences to
           reading on different devices
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Åse Kristine Tveit , Anne Mangen
      A comparison of 10th graders' reading of a narrative, literary text on a Sony e-reader and in print showed that preferences for reading devices are related to gender and to general reading habits. One hundred forty-three students participated in the study. In a school setting, students were asked to begin reading a novel on one device and then continue reading the same novel on the other device. A survey was administered before and after the reading session, measuring reading habits in general, device preferences, and experiences with screen and paper reading. Results showed that, overall, most students preferred reading on the e-reader. This preference was particularly strong among boys and reluctant readers, whereas avid readers were more in favor of print. Implications of these findings to library policies and priorities are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Concept analysis for library and information science: Exploring usage
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Rachel A. Fleming-May
      Although several library and information science (LIS) and information needs, seeking, and use (INSU) scholars have called for improving the discipline's conceptual and theoretical foundation, the LIS literature presents surprisingly few models for exploring and clarifying central concepts. While models for concept exploration such as the treatise or explication focus on determining “the” definition of a concept, other approaches, such as discourse analysis, have clear methodological and theoretical premises but lack sufficiently identifiable methods for application. The purpose of this paper is to describe, a collection of innovative approaches of concept analysis (CA) from nursing scholarship. While individual approaches to CA differ slightly from each other in terms of theoretical standpoint and method, all share the goal of clarifying individual concepts to establish a foundation for empirical research. This paper describes the theoretical foundations and application of CA approaches from nursing scholarship and presents an abbreviated case of its application to usage, a concept of interest to the LIS community. CA holds a great deal of potential for LIS scholars who seek to clarify the discipline's concepts, whether foundational and basic, or more obscure and specific.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Benchmarking local public libraries using non-parametric frontier methods:
           A case study of Flanders
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Jesse Stroobants , Geert Bouckaert
      Being faced with significant budget cuts and continual pressure to do more with less, issues of efficiency and effectiveness became a priority for local governments in most countries. In this context, benchmarking is widely acknowledged as a powerful tool for local performance management and for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of local service delivery. Performance benchmarking exercises are regularly carried out using ratio analysis, by comparing single indicators. Since this approach offers only limited assessments in absolute terms, it is difficult for decision-makers to track and improve overall performance. Therefore, the use of non-parametric frontier methods, namely free disposal hull (FDH) and data envelopment analysis (DEA) is presented as an alternative technique for benchmarking the performance of organizations in relative terms. The potential applications and strengths of these non-parametric frontier methods for benchmarking the efficiency of local public services are highlighted by applying FDH and DEA techniques to the local public libraries in Flanders. Incorporating all possible paths of expansion – both in space and in time – enables a focus on sustainability within efficiency benchmarking.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • What do academic libraries tweet about, and what makes a library tweet
           useful?
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Besiki Stvilia , Leila Gibradze
      People spend an increasing amount of time using social media systems to network, share information, learn, or engage in leisure activities (e.g., gaming). Libraries too are establishing a social media presence to promote the library and provide services to user populations through the social media systems the users frequent. This study explores Twitter uses by six large academic libraries and factors that make library tweets useful. 752 tweets were analyzed by topic to develop a subject typology of library tweets. In addition, tweets and Twitter user characteristics were analyzed to explore what makes library tweets useful, as measured by the number of retweets and favorites received. Content analysis of the samples of library tweets revealed nine content types, with the event and resource categories being the most frequent. In addition, the analysis showed that tweets related to study support services and building and maintaining connections with the library community were the most frequently retweeted and selected as favorites. The presence of a URL in the tweet was positively associated with the number of retweets, and the number of users followed was positively associated with the number of favorites received. Finally, a negative correlation was found between the account age and number of favorites.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Society, institutions, and common sense: Themes in the discourse of book
           challengers in 21st century United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Emily J.M. Knox
      Understanding why people attempt to remove, relocate, or restrict books in an age of ubiquitous access is one of the more puzzling aspects of contemporary challenge cases. In order to better comprehend this largely symbolic phenomenon, this study focused on the arguments that book challengers employed to justify the removal, relocation, or restriction of books in 13 challenge cases in public libraries and schools across the United States between 2007 and 2011. Three sources of discourse, which were coded for common themes, were analyzed. The first consisted of a variety of documents, obtained via state open record requests to governing bodies, which were produced in the course of challenge cases. Recordings of book challenge public hearings constituted the second source of data. The third source of discourse consisted of interviews with challengers. The study found the following common themes in challengers' worldviews: First, they saw contemporary society as being in a state of decline and were concerned with preserving the innocence of children in the midst of this decay. Second, they constructed public institutions as symbols of the community that must represent their values and aid parents in their difficult role as boundary setters. Finally, challengers demonstrated a reverence for the books as a material object and employed common sense interpretive strategies. It is hoped that this analysis will offer a starting point for comparing the discourse of challengers to the discourse of other social actors and aid librarians and other information professionals in providing effective responses to challengers to materials in their respective institutions.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • The preferences of authors of Chinese library and information science
           journal articles in citing Internet sources
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Chuanfu Chen , Bo Luo , Kuei Chiu , Ruihan Zhao , Ping Wang
      The preferences of the authors of Chinese library and information science (LIS) journal articles in citing Internet sources were investigated using eight premium Chinese LIS journals from Chinese Social Sciences Citation Index (the observation group) and 10 journals in other disciplines (the control group) from the same database from 1999 to 2008. A total of 252,881 citations were analyzed in terms of count, domain name, and citing purposes. The results show that (a) in comparison to the disciplines in the control group, LIS articles in Chinese journals indicated a strong preference for citing Internet sources, and this preference is increasing; (b) LIS articles did not seem to discriminate against domain names when citing Internet sources; and (c) LIS articles cited more Internet sources as evidence to support research results and conclusions. Excessive dependency on Internet sources may raise concerns over the quality, research ethics, and credibility of research publications. Chinese LIS researchers should place more emphasis on the disadvantages of Internet sources as supporting material. Guidelines and criteria to help researchers, journal editors, students, and librarians assess information on the Web need to be developed.


      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Announcements and Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4




      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4




      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Information literacy: Time to move beyond more of the same?
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2014-12-15T19:06:41Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:36:01Z
       
  • Confusion in the profession: Contribution of the research framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 2
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:36:01Z
       
  • Research methods: Information, systems and
           contextsKirstyWilliamsonGraemeJohanson2013Tilde University PressMelbourne,
           Australia978-0734611482(578 pp. $41.55 (pbk))
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Laura Saunders



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:01:26Z
       
  • What's in a virtual hug' A transdisciplinary review of methods in
           online health discussion forum research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Annie T. Chen



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T15:01:26Z
       
  • Following the red thread of information in information literacy research:
           Recovering local knowledge through interview to the double
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Annemaree Lloyd
      To understand a complex social practice such as workplace information literacy and capture the nonnormative and nuanced local knowledges that are specific to the performance in a setting, requires that additional tools be added to information literacy researchers' methodological toolbox. One such tool, interview to the double (ITTD), is introduced and explored through a study that focused on understanding how aged-care workers developed their understanding of safety in the workplace. The addition of the ITTD technique was to recover local knowledges that are present in the daily routines of workers or available only at the moment of practice. The ITTD technique is described and its potential and limitations are also considered in relation to information literacy research.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Subject dispersion of LIS research in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mirza Muhammad Naseer , Khalid Mahmood
      A subject analysis of 5195 publications in library and information science (LIS) research in Pakistan over a period of 62years revealed that the majority of Pakistani LIS research focused on a few subject areas. Pakistani LIS researchers gave little attention to many subjects and completely ignored others. More than a quarter (26.72%) of the total items focused on “information treatment for information services” while 22% were related to “libraries as physical collections.” Other areas with some attention included “industry, profession and education” (12.32%) and “theoretical and general aspects of libraries and information” (11.40%). Researchers paid little attention to “housing technologies,” “technical services in libraries, archives and museums,” and “management.”


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Research data management services in academic research libraries and
           perceptions of librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Carol Tenopir , Robert J. Sandusky , Suzie Allard , Ben Birch
      The emergence of data intensive science and the establishment of data management mandates have motivated academic libraries to develop research data services (RDS) for their faculty and students. Here the results of two studies are reported: librarians' RDS practices in U.S. and Canadian academic research libraries, and the RDS-related library policies in those or similar libraries. Results show that RDS are currently not frequently employed in libraries, but many services are in the planning stages. Technical RDS are less common than informational RDS, RDS are performed more often for faculty than for students, and more library directors believe they offer opportunities for staff to develop RDS-related skills than the percentage of librarians who perceive such opportunities to be available. Librarians need opportunities to learn more about these services either on campus or through attendance at workshops and professional conferences.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • The effect of personal and situational factors on LIS students' and
           professionals' intentions to use e-books
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Noa Aharony
      Due to the growth in both the number and use of e-books, the question arises as to which factors may influence information professionals and library and information science (LIS) students when considering adopting e-books in their organizations. This study uses the technology acceptance model (TAM), a well-known theory for explaining individuals' technology behaviors, and cognitive appraisal theory as theoretical bases from which to predict factors that may influence information professionals and LIS students in their adoption of e-books in their organizations. This study explored two main themes: whether there are differences between information professionals' and LIS students' perspectives towards e-books, and to what extent the TAM, as well as other personal characteristics such as threat, challenge, and motivation, explain information professionals' and LIS students' perspectives. Researchers used questionnaires to gather data on computer competence, attitudes to ebooks, motivation, and cognitive appraisal. Findings reveal that there are major differences between the two groups concerning computer competence, motivation, and challenge. In addition, the TAM, as well as other personal characteristics, can predict the likelihood of e-book adoption, and highlights the importance of individual characteristics when considering technology acceptance.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Digital Libraries Information
           AccessG.G.ChowdhurySchubertFoo2012Neal-SchumanChicago,
           IL978-1555709143(256 pp. $99.95 (pbk).)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Dan Albertson



      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Museum Web search behavior of special interest visitors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 May 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mette Skov , Peter Ingwersen
      There is a current trend to make museum collections widely accessible by digitising cultural heritage collections for the Internet. The present study takes a user perspective and explores the characteristics of online museum visitors' web search behaviour. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was deployed in a case study at a National Museum of Military History. Quantitatively, data from a web questionnaire survey and a user study of interactive searching behaviour were collected and analysed. Qualitatively, observation protocols were coded and analysed based on inductive content analysis. It was found that metadata elements on factual object related information, provenience, and historic context was indicated to be relevant by the majority of the respondents, characterising the group of special interest museum visitors as information hungry. Further, four main characteristics of online museum visitors' searching behaviour were identified: (a) searching behaviour has a strong visual aspect, (b) topical searching is predominantly exploratory, (c) users apply broad known item searches, and (d) meaning making is central to the search process.


      PubDate: 2014-05-27T09:28:02Z
       
  • Emotions as motivators for information seeking: A conceptual analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Reijo Savolainen
      This conceptual analysis of how emotions and feelings are characterized as motivators for information seeking draws on the appraisal theories suggesting that emotions motivate individuals by triggering action readiness to approach or avoid sources of information. The findings indicate that emotions and feelings motivate in five major ways: they start, expand, limit, or terminate the information-seeking process, or they lead to information avoidance. Information scientists have mainly characterized the motivational aspects of negatively colored emotions such as anxiety and fear while the role of positive emotions such as joy has remained secondary.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Academic social bookmarking: An empirical analysis of Connotea users
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Helen S. Du , Samuel K.W. Chu , Gary E. Gorman , Felix L.C. Siu
      Three groups of social bookmarking users, namely experienced users, users with moderate level of experience, and novice users, were investigated, in terms of their reported tagging behaviors, perceived usefulness of social bookmarking in information discovery and management, and perceived usefulness of the bookmarking features provided. Based on the empirical analysis of the Connotea users, who are primarily in academia, the study shows that experienced academic users generally prefer to use social bookmarking while moderately experienced and novice users still prefer to use the traditional bookmarking methods, such as creating and using bookmarks on a dedicated computer. Experienced academic users were also found to create more tags per bookmark comparing to the other two groups. Most novice academic users, however, only created one tag per bookmark, which just met Connotea's minimum requirement. Surprisingly different from the collaborative design nature of the social bookmarking systems, the study finds that our participants, particularly experienced academic users, prefer to create and use their own bookmarks rather than sharing bookmarks created by others. In fact, experienced users have significantly higher frequency (once every two weeks) of creating bookmarks than the other two groups (once a month or less). In addition, website design features and functions, such as automatic collection of bibliographic information, are regarded by all participants as helpful for information discovery. The in-depth examination and discussion of the opinions of Connotea users may be useful for further improvement of the design features and usage applications, particularly for academic social bookmarking websites. The results may also have potential implications to the future development of social bookmarking services in general.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • The dimensions of library service quality: A confirmatory factor analysis
           of the LibQUAL+ instrument
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jody Condit Fagan
      The LibQUAL+ instrument has been widely adopted by libraries to evaluate user perceptions of library service quality. Studies combining groups (e.g., Lane et al., 2012) have shown high correlations between two factors, suggesting the possibility that a two-factor model may fit as well as the three-factor model theorized by the developers. Also, previous studies have not closely examined residuals to analyze local misfit in the context of theory but instead have often correlated error terms to improve model fit. This study uses LibQUAL+ responses from undergraduates at a public, comprehensive university to test three-factor, two-factor, and one-factor models of user perceptions of library service quality. Global fit indices indicated that both two-factor and three-factor models were empirically supported, but the three-factor model had better theoretical support. Furthermore, this article adds to the literature the unique perspective of residual analysis and builds theoretical arguments in the interpretation of the final model. Areas of local misfit suggest the need for independent studies to examine residuals. If areas of misfit repeat across institutional populations, that could suggest the potential for further instrument development, while if areas of misfit are unique to institutional populations, this could target areas for institutions to investigate more closely.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Personal experience as social capital in online investor forums
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lisa G. O'Connor , Lindsay L. Dillingham
      Research demonstrates that information disseminated and circulated in online forums may have a significant impact on investors and on the securities market. Therefore, an understanding of that environment is critical. This research uses social capital theory as a framework for understanding how information exchange is facilitated in online investor forums. Specifically, it explores whether or not personal experience may generate social capital in the online environment. This work reports on the relationships between sharing personal experience and information sharing and use in three investor discussion forums. Four hundred forty threads containing 2405 posts were analyzed for this study. Thread starter posts and responses were quantified and coded for statements of personal experience. Citations to information sources were also measured. Results demonstrate that explicitly stating personal experience or lack of personal experience affects the quantity and quality of ensuing discussion and information exchange. Possible implications of this work on both the study of online investor forums and the study of social capital are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Devising and implementing a card-sorting technique for a longitudinal
           investigation of the information behavior of people with type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Beth St. Jean
      Information behavior research has been conducted predominantly using single-method (often interviews or surveys/questionnaires), cross-sectional research designs. However, there are important benefits to triangulation and the use of longitudinal methods. In preparing to conduct an investigation into the information needs and information seeking and use practices of people with type 2 diabetes, a longitudinal research design was developed that included traditional data collection methods, such as questionnaires and interviews. However, an additional method was developed specifically for this study — a new type of card-sorting technique that would permit the elicitation of participants' judgments regarding the relative usefulness of different sources and types of diabetes related information at different points in time along their journeys with the disease. This technique was well-received by the study participants and it yielded quantitative data that could be analyzed to identify whether any statistically significant changes took place in participants' judgments across time. Furthermore, the incorporation of a think-aloud protocol within this technique yielded invaluable qualitative data that helped to shed light on the reasoning behind participants' usefulness judgments. This new data collection tool has many potential applications within LIS research and practice.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Stakeholders as researchers: A multiple case study of using cooperative
           inquiry to develop and document the formative leadership experiences of
           new school library professionals
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Marcia A. Mardis , Nancy Everhart
      Cooperative inquiry, a form of qualitative research used in community building, has not often been applied in educational contexts. Through the lens of formative leadership theory, the researchers studied the abilities of three new school librarians trained in cooperative inquiry and leadership to engage in collaborative problem solving for technology-related school challenges. Due to internal and external factors, participants experienced various levels of success with their challengers, but cooperative inquiry proved to be a viable methodology to evaluate the outcomes of library education for school librarians' formative leadership.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Some new research opportunities
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Job satisfaction and job performance of university librarians: A
           disaggregated examination
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Ping Peng
      University librarians are required to continuously adjust to keep up with changing customers' needs. The study uses structural equation modeling (SEM) to examine the effects of different facets of job satisfaction on the task performance and contextual performance of university librarians. Specifically, the study breaks down the overall measure of job satisfaction first into its intrinsic and extrinsic components, and then into sub-facets of these components, in order to isolate in detail how they influence job performance. Findings from competing statistical models demonstrate that certain facets of intrinsic job satisfaction strongly predict both task performance and contextual performance. The findings can be particularly useful for providing a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between job satisfaction and job performance in the university library context. Finally, the study considers managerial implications.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Measuring social capital through network analysis and its influence on
           individual performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alireza Abbasi , Rolf T. Wigand , Liaquat Hossain
      Studies of social networks highlight the importance of network structure or structural properties of a given network and its impact on performance outcome. One of the important properties of this network structure is referred to as social capital, which is the network of contacts and the associated values attached to these networks of contacts. This study provides empirical evidence of the influence of social capital and performance within the context of academic collaboration (coauthorship) and suggests that the collaborative process involves social capital embedded within relationships and network structures among direct coauthors. Association between scholars' social capital and their citation-based performance measures is examined. To overcome the limitations of traditional social network metrics for measuring the influence of scholars' social capital within coauthorship networks, the traditional social network metrics is extended by proposing two new measures, of which one is non-weighted (the power–diversity index) and the other (power–tie–diversity index) is weighted by the number of collaboration instances. The Spearman's correlation rank test is used to examine the association between scholars' social capital measures and their citation-based performance. Results suggest that research performance of authors is positively correlated with their social capital measures. The power–diversity index and power–tie–diversity index serve as indicators of power and influence of an individual's ability to control communication and information.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2014
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 36, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2014-04-29T13:49:56Z
       
  • Photovoi A promising method for studies of individuals' information
           practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Heidi Julien , Lisa M. Given , Anna Opryshko



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Finding their way: How public library users wayfind
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lauren H. Mandel
      A multi-method case study research design, guided by Passini's conceptual framework of wayfinding, was employed to investigate library user wayfinding behavior within the entry area of a medium-sized public library facility. The case study research design included document review of the library's wayfinding information system; unobtrusive observation of library user wayfinding behavior; intensive interviews with library users to discuss their views on wayfinding in the library; and an expert review with library staff and a library wayfinding and signage expert to validate research findings. Overall, the study found library users' wayfinding behavior to be generally inconsistent over time, but that there are users who stick to predominant segments (those segments used heavily to connect two particular nodes, or stops). Those segments tend to be the straightest or most direct segments connecting two given nodes. Also, users appear to employ Passini's wayfinding styles more often than his wayfinding strategies, but additional research is needed that delves more deeply into these cognitive processes.


      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
  • Twenty years on
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2013
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 35, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2013-12-10T13:32:58Z
       
 
 
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