for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.781]   [H-I: 31]   [900 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2970 journals]
  • How reference and information service is studied: Research approaches and
           methods
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Amy VanScoy, Cady Fontana
      There is a need for a robust research base for reference and information service (RIS), both for scholarship in the field and for effective decision-making in practice. While a number of studies have been conducted about the research of library and information science (LIS) in general, no analysis has been conducted on RIS research. Focusing specifically on research approach and methods, this study analyzes the journal literature for the decade 2000 to 2009. Of the 24% of papers that were research studies, most were quantitative descriptions of data. Qualitative approaches were rarely used. The results suggest that RIS is being studied from a limited perspective and could benefit from a greater diversity of approaches and methods.


      PubDate: 2016-05-08T18:51:32Z
       
  • Student misidentification of online genres
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Chris Leeder
      In the online information environment, new hybrid genres are emerging that resist easy classification into the traditional categories of print formats. However, students are often not equipped with adequate knowledge of online genres, particularly when it comes to finding scholarly sources. Understanding genre provides students a significant advantage in conducting effective research online, because it reduces the cognitive load of information seeking, improves the ability to judge relevance, and helps identify documents whose purpose matches the users' intent. This research explores how well students identify the information genres that they encounter in their real-life online research. 204 undergraduate students were asked to identify the genres of 15 online sources. 60% of the responses were misidentifications, and 64% of scholarly sources were incorrectly identified. Students were also inaccurate in judging which genres were most difficult to correctly identify. However, students who had received prior IL instruction showed significantly higher accuracy in identifying online genres. Suggestions are made for information literacy instruction to better help students identify, understand, and use online genres.


      PubDate: 2016-05-03T18:42:29Z
       
  • From Google to MedlinePlus: The wide range of authoritative health
           information provision in public libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mary Grace Flaherty
      Public library staff throughout the United States are providing assistance on a variety of health topics. To better understand health information provision in this setting, unobtrusive visits were completed in a total of 73 randomly selected sites in three different states. The query, “Do vaccines cause autism?” was posed to library staff. In 59% of encounters, material provided did not answer the question. In more than half of visits, public library staff referred to the libraries' print collections, and 69% of the time when print was provided it did not answer the question or it addressed the question with information contradictory to prevailing medical evidence. Referral was made to electronic resources in a quarter of visits, with answers ranging from “Just Google it” to “MedlinePlus is my favorite go-to”. When staff referred to or used electronic resources, authoritative medical information on the topic was supplied 79% of the time. It appears that there was no standardization on handling health queries in most libraries that were visited. Given public libraries are trusted institutions providing community access to health information, it is imperative that staff are using appropriate health information tools which are readily and freely available.


      PubDate: 2016-05-03T18:42:29Z
       
  • Libraries, human rights, and social justice: Enabling access and promoting
           inclusion, Paul T. Jaeger, Natalie Greene Taylor, Ursula Gorham (Eds.).
           Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-1442250512
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 1
      Author(s): Laura Saunders



      PubDate: 2016-03-11T13:55:22Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 38, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2016-03-11T13:55:22Z
       
  • Making connections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T07:52:29Z
       
  • “If it computes, patrons have brought it in”: Personal
           information management and personal technology assistance in public
           libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Amber L. Cushing
      All public libraries in a single US state were surveyed in order to explore the types of personal technology assistance requests the staff received and how they responded to such requests. Staff at each library that reported having received patron requests for assistance with personal digital technology or content were invited for a 30-minute follow-up phone interview in which they were asked to provide more detail about their interactions with patrons and their opinions about this aspect of library work. In total, 130 of the 234 libraries (55.5%) in the state responded to the survey and representatives from 10 of those libraries participated in follow-up phone interviews. While public librarians are willing to tackle these patron requests, they have little preparation or specific continuing education in this area to provide them with support. Although many public librarians categorize technology assistance as reference work, official Reference and User Services Association guidelines do not consider it within the scope of reference work. The growing body of patron requests suggests that, as work in public libraries continues to evolve in order to meet patron needs, so too should the guidelines for reference work.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Can library users distinguish between minimum, perceived, and desired
           levels of service quality? Validating LibQUAL+® using multitrait
           multimethod analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Prathiba Natesan, Xing Aerts
      LibQUAL+® is a widely used measure of library service quality. Based on SERVQUAL's gap theory, LibQUAL+® measures items on three levels of service quality: minimum, perceived, and desired levels. Differences between user evaluations of service quality on these levels indicate the types of gaps in service quality. Gap theory has been criticized due to the possible inability of users to distinguish between different levels. However no study has investigated this claim using statistical analysis. A multitrait multimethod (MTMM) framework was used to evaluate the validity of using three levels of measurement to measure customer satisfaction in LibQUAL+®. Measurement errors across levels of measurement are correlated, indicating that simple score differences are inaccurate estimates of gaps. Users are able to distinguish between the three levels of measurement indicating support for validity of using gap theory in measuring library service quality.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Driven adaptation: A grounded theory study of licensing electronic
           resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Xiaohua Zhu
      Using the grounded theory approach, this study generated a substantive theory of driven adaptation that explains and theorizes the basic social process of licensing as an emerging specialization in the library field that is driven by three major forces: imposed changes, tensions, and dialog. Licensing librarians use three major strategies to adapt to licensing work: coping, positioning, and aligning. Each strategy includes multiple dimensions. As the outcome of the driven adaptation, licensing work has emerged as a new specialization in academic librarianship. The theory explains the major concerns in the licensing work: how licensing librarians adapt to licensing work and how they handle the challenges in this relatively new specialization. It also identifies the behaviors practitioners engage in as they cope with licensing work. Findings of this study can help new electronic resources librarians to adapt to licensing more effectively. This theory can also be expanded and generalized to explain the creation and assimilation of any new specialization of work.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Finding fiction: Search moves and success in two online catalogs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Anna Mikkonen, Pertti Vakkari
      Search moves for finding novels in five search tasks and two catalogs were analyzed. Search tasks reflected the following search tactics: known-author search, topical search, open-ended browsing, search by analogy, and searching without a query. The most used search moves in both catalogs across all tasks were querying, search results inspection, and book page examination. In a traditional catalog, more effort was needed in the form of queries, search moves, and opened book pages to gain equivalent average book scores when compared with an enriched catalog. In a traditional catalog, a typical search strategy for interesting titles seemed to involve issuing queries and considering suitable entry terms carefully, and devoting more attention to search results instead of book pages. In an enriched catalog, a common approach involved time devoted to exploring the catalog's enriched front page and multiple entry points together with attention to the enriched results list.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Approaches to socio-cultural barriers to information seeking
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Reijo Savolainen
      A conceptual analysis derived from the literature on sociocultural barriers to information seeking focuses on the features of such barriers and their impact on information seeking in diverse contexts. A typology is presented that identifies six main types of socio-cultural barriers: barriers due to language problems, barriers related to social stigma and cultural taboo, small-world related barriers, institutional arriers, organizational barriers, and barriers due to the lack of social and economic capital. Socio-cultural barriers are man-made constructs originating from social norms and cultural values. They have mainly an adverse impact on information seeking by restricting access to information sources and giving rise to negative emotions.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • SciELO suggester: An intelligent support tool for cataloging library
           resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Natalia L. Mitzig, Mónica S. Mitzig, Fernando A. Martínez, Ricardo A. Piriz, Víctor M. Ferracutti, María Paula González, Ana G. Maguitman
      Existing cataloging interfaces are designed to reduce the bottleneck of creating, editing, and refining bibliographic records by offering a convenient framework for data entry. However, the cataloger still has to deal with the difficult task of deciding what information to include. The SciELO Suggester system is an innovative tool developed to overcome certain general limitations encountered in current mechanisms for entering descriptions of library records. The proposed tool provides useful suggestions about what information to include in newly created records. Thus, it assists catalogers with their task, as they are typically unfamiliar with the heterogeneous nature of the incoming material. The suggester tool applies case-based reasoning to generate suggestions taken from material previously cataloged in the SciELO scientific electronic library. The system is implemented as a web service and it can be easily used by installing an add-on for the Mozilla Firefox browser. The tool has been evaluated through a human-subject study with catalogers and through an automatic test using a collection consisting of 5742 training examples and 120 test cases from 12 different subject areas. In both experiments the system has shown very good performance. These evaluations indicate that the use of case-based reasoning provides a powerful alternative to traditional ways of identifying subject areas and keywords in library resources. In addition, a heuristic evaluation of the tool was carried out by taking as a starting point the Sirius heuristic-based framework, resulting in a very good score. Finally, a specially designed cognitive walk was completed with catalogers, providing additional insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the tool.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • An examination of North American Library and Information Studies faculty
           perceptions of and experience with open-access scholarly publishing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Wilhelm Peekhaus, Nicholas Proferes
      Open-access (OA) scholarly publishing has grown steadily in academia for the past few decades as an alternative to traditional, subscription-based journal publishing. This research presents the descriptive analysis of a systematic survey of North American library and information science (LIS) faculty about their attitudes toward and experience with OA publishing. The study reveals that LIS faculty tend to be more experienced with and knowledgeable about open access than their colleagues in other disciplines. A majority of LIS faculty is very critical of what is perceived to be detrimental control exercised by publishers over the scholarly communication system and agrees that major changes need to be made to this system. Although a majority of LIS faculty considers OA journals to be comparable to traditional journals, a sizable minority remains unconvinced of the purported benefits of open-access journals. The perceived constraints of the tenure and promotion system within the academy tend to limit LIS faculty engagement with open-access publishing in ways similar to other academic disciplines. There thus exists a disconnect between proclaimed support for and actual engagement with open access.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Conversation-based programming and newcomer integration: A case study of
           the Språkhörnan program at Malmö City Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jamilla (Jamie) Johnston
      The potential of conversation-based programming (i.e., language cafés and conversation groups) for supporting immigrant integration is explored in a case-based study on the Språkhörnan (“language corner”) program at the City Library in Malmö, Sweden. The methodology includes participant observation, interviews with program participants, a focus group with program volunteers, and a questionnaire. The basis of the study's theoretical framework is social capital theory, information grounds theory, and a multi-dimensional model of integration. Results indicate that, first, such a program offers a unique opportunity for many participants to use their Swedish language skills and gain conversational competence. Second, the program supports integration through information exchange during the informal conversations. Third, it offers participants a space for social interaction with Swedes and other immigrants. Conversation-based programming in libraries can foster integration by supporting language learning, facilitating the expansion of participants' social networks, and increasing social capital in the form of increased knowledge and information about the new country.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Academic motivation and information literacy self-efficacy: The importance
           of a simple desire to know
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2016
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mitchell Ross, Helen Perkins, Kelli Bodey
      Considered essential to lifelong learning, information literacy skills and information literacy self-efficacy are associated with higher levels of student academic motivation. However, little is known about the interrelationships between the different types of academic motivation and information literacy self-efficacy. This study investigates the relationships between these constructs. Data were collected using a questionnaire comprising existing scales. The questionnaire was administered to undergraduate students in an Australian higher education institution with a response rate of 58%, resulting in 585 completed questionnaires. Both intrinsic and extrinsic academic motivation were found to be positively related to information literacy self-efficacy, while amotivation was negatively related. The most important predictor of information literacy self-efficacy was intrinsic motivation to know. Overall, all academic motivation types increased over time, including, unexpectedly, amotivation. Differences were apparent by gender. The need for higher education institutions to actively identify academically amotivated students and facilitate intrinsic academic motivation is discussed.


      PubDate: 2016-02-23T20:04:47Z
       
  • Changes to the Board of Editors and Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 4
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2015-12-18T08:37:31Z
       
  • A view of success, or, advice to developing scholars
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2015-12-18T08:37:31Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-12-18T08:37:31Z
       
  • Beyond Bibliometrics: Harnessing Multidimensional Indicators of Scholarly
           Impact, Blaise Cronin, Cassidy R. Sugimoto (Eds.). MIT Press, Cambridge,
           MA (2014)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Maria Forsman



      PubDate: 2015-12-09T07:54:37Z
       
  • Peer-based information literacy training: Insights from the NICE Evidence
           Search Student Champion Scheme
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jennifer Rowley, Frances Johnson, Laura Sbaffi, Anne Weist
      There is a widespread acknowledgement that with ever-increasing levels of access to digital information sources, students need to be supported in the development of their information literacies. Academic libraries and librarians have taken the lead in the development of information literacy programmes. Whilst there has been much sharing of good practise, there has been less consideration of alternative models of the outcomes of information literacy programmes. To contribute to addressing this gap, this article reports on an evaluation of student peer delivery of an information literacy scheme in the specific context of a medical and health information portal. The Student Champion Scheme (SCS) is an initiative designed to promote the use of a national specialist health and social care information portal, Evidence Search, amongst students in the health professions, and thereby to further embed evidence-based practise. The SCS run by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, UK), uses a model of training, in which student champions are first trained by NICE staff, and then the champions train their peers. This study evaluates the scheme on the basis of secondary data gathered by NICE during the evaluation processes associated with two annual cycles of the SCS, together with focus groups with champions, and interviews with prospective university-based co-facilitators of the scheme. Findings suggest that the scheme is successful in promoting use of the portal, Evidence Search, and in developing advocates amongst champions. The evaluation offers a range of insights into the benefits and challenges associated with such a scheme, whose interest and implications extend beyond this specific scheme. To be successful the quality of peer training and peers' identification with and belief in the value of both the training they deliver, and specific information sources is pivotal. In addition, training is strengthened by contributions from librarians and academics, and a climate in which all participants are clear about their specific contribution. It is recommended that academic libraries should seek to develop a range of differentiated information literacy programmes, each with specific objectives, to suit different audiences, and undertake regular evaluation as a basis for improvement and innovation.


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T17:56:14Z
       
  • Studying a boundary-defying group: An analytical review of the literature
           surrounding the information habits of writers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Nadine Desrochers, Jen Pecoskie
      This study presents an analytical literature review of the research surrounding the information behavior of writers, understood here as people whose written output is creative in nature and produced outside of the academia or the traditional news media realm. This group is understudied in library and information science, despite its obvious cultural and enduring link to libraries and archives. A qualitative content analysis reveals that part of the problem lies in establishing the boundaries of the literary field in order to operationalize writers as a group for study. The work of Pierre Bourdieu, cited in the literature itself, provides insight into how the concepts of legitimation, consecration, and professionalism influence methods and findings. However, while approaches differ, researchers tend to discuss similar information-related topics. Using literature pertaining to "sister populations", such as other artists or other types of writers, can help support the design of further research. Professional literature and mainstream media are also suggested as avenues for the study of the relationship between writers, information sources, and information professionals.


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T17:56:14Z
       
  • Knowledge management and organizational culture in higher educational
           libraries in Qatar: An empirical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Kumaresan Chidambaranathan, Swarooprani BS Rani
      This empirical research examined the relationship between knowledge management (KM) and organizational culture (OC) in higher educational libraries in Qatar using the competing values framework. Various research studies suggest that it is highly important for managers and leaders of establishments to understand their organizational culture types for organizational effectiveness and long-term success. This study reveals how culture profiles affect knowledge management activities and how culture profile is conducive to a successful knowledge management program. The study surveys 122 library employees from 16 higher education libraries. The findings of this study suggest that knowledge management activities are not affected by the demographic profile of the employees. Clan, adhocracy, and market culture are positively correlated to knowledge management and hierarchy culture is negatively correlated. The study also reveals that clan and market culture types are conducive to the success of knowledge management in the higher educational libraries in Qatar.


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T17:56:14Z
       
  • Using open records laws for research purposes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Shannon M. Oltmann, Emily J.M. Knox, Chris Peterson, Shawn Musgrave
      This article describes how to use state-level open records laws as a research tool. Similar to the federal-level Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), state open records laws allow individuals to access records and information held by state agencies. This has the potential to be a potent research tool, though it has been rarely used in library and information science to date. This article provides an overview of the federal and state laws pertaining to accessing government information, and then describes an ongoing research project that used these laws to collect data. Two pilot studies were conducted (one in Massachusetts and one in Alabama) to evaluate the potential of using of state open records laws for research purposes. The article concludes with several suggestions for other researchers who wish to use open records laws to obtain government information for research purposes.


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T17:56:14Z
       
  • Applications of meta-analysis to library and information science research:
           Content analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Qing Ke, Ying Cheng
      Content analysis was conducted to provide a framework for studying the current state of and problems in the application of meta-analysis in the field of library and information science (LIS). The content of 35 meta-analysis application articles published in LIS-oriented journals was analyzed for their bibliometric information, reasons for conducting a meta-analysis, literature searches, criteria for selecting studies, meta-analysis procedures, quality control mechanisms, and results. Although meta-analysis appears to be underappreciated in the LIS domain, the findings demonstrate that meta-analysis holds strong prospects as an LIS research method. However, there are a number of problems that must be solved, one being the misunderstanding of meta-analysis as compared with other similar systematic review methods. Suggestions are offered for developing meta-analysis. An informed understanding of the role of the meta-analysis method in LIS will be helpful for future research and practice.


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T17:56:14Z
       
  • Regional variations in average distance to public libraries in the United
           States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Francis P. Donnelly
      There are substantive regional variations in public library accessibility in the United States, which is a concern considering the civic and educational roles that libraries play in communities. Average population-weighted distances and the total population living within one mile segments of the nearest public library were calculated at a regional level for metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas, and at a state level. The findings demonstrate significant regional variations in accessibility that have been persistent over time and cannot be explained by simple population distribution measures alone. Distances to the nearest public library are higher in the South compared to other regions, with statistically significant clusters of states with lower accessibility than average. The national average population-weighted distance to the nearest public library is 2.1 miles. While this supports the use of a two-mile buffer employed in many LIS studies to measure library service areas, the degree of variation that exists between regions and states suggests that local measures should be applied to local areas.


      PubDate: 2015-11-30T03:25:49Z
       
  • Productivity of U.S. LIS and ischool faculty
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): John M. Budd
      This examination is the latest in a series of analyses of scholarly productivity by individuals and library and information science programs and ischools (limited to those with master's programs accredited by the American Library Association). Productivity is defined as numbers of publications authored and numbers of citations received in the years 2008 through 2013. The most productive individuals according to each measure are presented. Data are also collected for institutions (by adding the publications and the citations for all of the program's full-time tenured or tenure-track faculty). The institutional data are aggregated and the most productive programs are ranked. A principal result is that both individuals and programs are responsible for many more publications and citations than in the past.


      PubDate: 2015-11-26T08:17:31Z
       
  • User assessment of search task difficulty: Relationships between reasons
           and ratings
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jingjing Liu
      There is an increasing research interest in search task difficulty. A recent study developed a user-perceived task difficulty reason scheme including 21 reasons (two of which arise prior to searching). Interesting questions arose as to whether the many difficulty reasons in the scheme were correlated or whether the difficulty reasons were related to task difficulty levels. Using a dataset collected from 48 participants searching on four tasks, this study examined these questions while also validating the task difficulty reason scheme. Results suggest that the 19 difficulty reasons elicited after a search task are rarely correlated, and are, instead, independent. Several difficulty reasons, such as “task requirements too specific” and “low topic knowledge,” contribute significantly to difficulty levels. The large discrepancy in the frequency of some reasons' appearance in high, mid, and low difficulty rating groups may be explained by task type features. These findings help develop an in-depth explanation of search task difficulty and contribute to task-related information retrieval research and system design.


      PubDate: 2015-11-26T08:17:31Z
       
  • Effectiveness of digital library services as a basis for decision-making
           in public organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jan Stejskal, Petr Hajek
      In practise, public organizations often provide basic and widespread access to digital services to citizens and to varying degrees. For the effective use of public funds it is necessary for there to be an objective method for the assessment of the effectiveness of the public services (i.e. including digital services). A methodology that can analyse the effectiveness of the digital services provided by public organizations is proposed. The methodology was applied to the digital services provided by the Municipal Library of Prague (MLP). This methodology allows comparison of the effectiveness of the different services provided. This contributes to the effectiveness of the decisions of public representatives and overall social effectiveness of the digital services provided. The results show that the effectiveness of digital services (provided by remote access) at the MLP in 2012 is 4.02 (this means that each unit of financial investment brings benefits in the amount of 4.02units). In contrast, digital services provided directly in the library have a very low effectiveness, i.e. 1:0.89, thus they are clearly ineffective. In addition, when compared to all the services that are provided, digital services have the highest effectiveness of all. The proposed methodology can therefore help economic decision-making but also to improve the quality and range of services. It can be used in other organizations and various public sectors.


      PubDate: 2015-11-26T08:17:31Z
       
  • Rituals of introduction and revolving roles: Socialization in an online
           breast cancer community
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Ellen L. Rubenstein
      This research sought to understand the role of information exchange and social support in an online breast cancer community relative to healthcare decisions and participants' everyday lives. Through a two-year ethnographic analysis comprising archives analysis, participant-observation, and 31 interviews, the data revealed that the forum's structure illustrated characteristics of a community of practice (CoP), a construct that has rarely been used in examining online health communities. Newcomers began as legitimate peripheral participants who progressed through the community from being novices, to novice/mentors, to mentor/experts. This progression represented a cycle of identification with three phases: a) an introductory phase, where novices made themselves known to the community and began to wrestle with breast cancer; b) learning the community's social practices and building identity as they evolved into novice/mentors who became more knowledgeable; and c) becoming mentor/experts who were looked up to and could provide information and support to others. Attaining mentor/expert status indicated a completion of the cycle in that mentor/experts were identified as being central to the community, and were also participating in the introduction phase by welcoming novices. Analyzing online health communities using a CoP perspective offers a lens that provides insights into the mechanisms that assist patients as they navigate through illness and treatment.


      PubDate: 2015-11-26T08:17:31Z
       
  • The current state of systematic reviews in library and information studies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Jianhua Xu, Qi Kang, Zhiqiang Song
      Although the systematic review method has, in the past, been applied infrequently in library and information science (LIS) research, its use appears to be increasing. However, the relatively low quantity and poor quality of systematic reviews demonstrate the need for further research in this area. A critical appraisal framework is presented that can be used to guide the conduct and reporting of systematic reviews, at the same time increasing researchers and practitioners' awareness of the importance of such reviews in LIS research. Methods and tools used by scholars who have applied this method are reviewed, and criteria that are essential to achieving high quality systematic review are discussed in depth.


      PubDate: 2015-11-26T08:17:31Z
       
  • Cover 2 - Editorial Board/Barcode
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-09-09T08:34:59Z
       
  • Testing the impact of an information literacy course: Undergraduates'
           perceptions and use of the university libraries' web portal
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 3
      Author(s): Yu-Hui Chen
      Numerous sources have observed that undergraduates tend to use Internet search engines, predominantly Google, instead of library electronic resources for their course work. Thus, academic librarians have expressed concern about the under-utilization of resources provided through library Web portals. Studies of technology acceptance and success indicate that user training can positively influence individuals' use of information systems. Even so, there has been no investigation of the longterm effects of user education on the use of library Web portals. This longitudinal study fills this gap in the literature by determining whether a semester-long, credit-bearing, general education course integrated with an information literacy component positively alters undergraduate students' perceptions and increases their use of the university libraries' web portal at a mid-size research institution. A mixed methods approach was employed, collecting data through three rounds of survey (pre-course, post-course, and follow-up) as well as one-on-one interviews. Results from the quantitative analysis indicated variance in participants' perceptions and use of the libraries' portal from the short-term to a longer term. The positive influence of the course was validated through a manipulation check. The outcome of interviews also confirmed the findings derived from the quantitative data.


      PubDate: 2015-09-09T08:34:59Z
       
  • School library advocacy literature in the United States: An exploratory
           content analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Ann Dutton Ewbank, Ja Youn Kwon
      This exploratory conceptual content analysis describes the published school library advocacy literature in the United States from 2001–2011. In 47 articles, the advocacy efforts undertaken, the responsible parties, the target populations, and goals and reasons for advocacy were examined. In all, 372 separate advocacy efforts were found. Of these, 168 efforts outlined tangible results of advocacy efforts while 204 efforts described strategies or techniques for advocacy but did not identify an outcome. The general school community was the most predominant target population for advocacy. Advocacy efforts specifically targeting school administrators and teachers were an infrequent target. The advocacy goal mentioned most frequently in the literature was enhancing awareness. Most (83%) advocacy activities were initiated by school librarians or an individual in the school library field. School library researchers should address the dearth of empirical and theoretical work on both the practice and impact of advocacy on the profession.


      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Perceived outcomes of public libraries in the U.S.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Sei-Ching Joanna Sin, Pertti Vakkari
      Public libraries are under constant pressure to demonstrate their worth. Outcome measures can present the benefits public libraries bring to individuals in terms that are relevant to them. Beyond service-specific outcome assessments, however, few nationwide studies have examined the benefits of public libraries as a whole. Following the Finnish national survey conducted by Vakkari and Serola (2012), this study surveyed more than 1000 U.S. respondents on 22 areas of benefits. The benefits were reduced by factor analysis to three dimensions. ANOVAs were used to test demographic differences in these benefit dimensions. The findings show that most respondents viewed the impact of public libraries on their lives positively. The most frequently perceived benefit was in the reading and self-education dimension. Significant gender and education attainment differences were found for this dimension, with women and more educated respondents giving more positive responses. In contrast, age and race/ethnicity differences were significant in the work and formal education dimension and in the everyday activities and interests dimension. In both dimensions, younger respondents and ethnic minorities reported more positive responses. For the everyday activities dimension, higher-income respondents reported more frequent benefits. Overall, the public library was perceived by different demographic groups as contributing to different dimensions of their lives. There are still areas for further improvement, such as reaching lower-income individuals and seniors in the everyday activities dimension. Continual efforts are needed to measure and communicate the value of public libraries, so that funders and the public will support public libraries with the resources needed to provide quality services to all.


      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Croatian university students' use and perception of electronic resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Darko Dukić, Jelena Strišković



      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Dual use beyond the life sciences: An LIS perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Shannon M. Oltmann
      Dual use research is used to describe research, conducted for benign purposes, which could be used for malevolent purposes. Most recent studies of dual use research have focused on the life sciences, although some researchers have suggested that dual use research occurs across many disciplines. This study is an initial investigation into the prevalence of dual use research in other scientific disciplines through surveying senior editors of scientific journals. Survey results show that some journal editors in nearly every discipline reported some experience with dual use research. This suggests that broader conceptualizations of dual use research are needed. The publication—or withholding—of dual use research has implications for norms of scholarly communication.


      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Exploring variation in the ways of experiencing health information
           literacy: A phenomenographic study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Christine Yates
      From a relational perspective of information literacy, health information literacy is interpreted as the different ways in which people experience using information to learn about health. Phenomenography was used as a research approach to explore variation in people's experience of using information to learn about health from data collected through semi-structured interviews. The findings identify seven categories that describe the qualitatively different ways in which people experience health information literacy: building a new knowledge base; weighing up information; discerning valid information; paying attention to bodily information; staying informed about health; Participating in learning communities, and envisaging health. These findings can be used to enhance awareness about the different ways of experiencing health information literacy, and to contribute to a nascent trajectory of research that has explored information literacy within the context of everyday life.


      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Mobile wellness application-seeking behavior by college students—An
           exploratory study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Besiki Stvilia, Wonchan Choi



      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Two geographic information system-linked bibliometric indices to quantify
           the knowledge flow: A case of Qinghai-Tibet plateau research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Wang Xuemei, Li Xin, Ma Mingguo, Zhang Zhiqiang
      Cited information is an important pathway of scientific influence. It can reflect the knowledge flows among research units. This study develops two new bibliometric indices—the Citation Flow Index (CFI) and the Normalized Citation Flow Index (NCFI)—to measure knowledge flows based on scientific literature citations. The CFI measures the interactions of knowledge flows among different research units. The NCFI measures the number of papers that a research unit cited and the number of papers by a research unit that are cited. The newly developed indices were tested on a country-wide scale using the literature on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) as an example. The results indicate that the worldwide flow of knowledge on the QTP can be quantitatively measured and spatially displayed. Additionally, the annual NCFI change trend is analyzed for each research unit.


      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Understanding data sharing behaviors of STEM researchers: The roles of
           attitudes, norms, and data repositories
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Youngseek Kim, Ping Zhang
      A number of factors influence STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) researchers' data sharing behaviors. Based on the theory of planned behavior, a research model focusing on beliefs, attitudes, norms, and resource factors was proposed. The research model was tested with a total of 1298 responses from a national survey in the United States (US). The data analysis results, using the partial least squares (PLS) technique, show that attitudinal beliefs (including perceived career benefit, risk, and perceived effort), disciplinary norms, and perceived availability of data repositories all have significant impacts on STEM researchers' attitudes toward data sharing, and further, both the attitude toward data sharing and the availability of data repositories have strong influences on researchers' data sharing behaviors. These results demonstrate that the theory of planned behavior is a useful theoretical framework for explaining STEM researchers' data sharing behaviors. From the practical perspective, this research suggests that information professionals can better serve STEM researchers by allocating their efforts in two ways: (1) Providing appropriate data services and tools to reduce researchers' efforts involved in data sharing, and (2) providing data repositories to facilitate researchers' data sharing behaviors.


      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Library Analytics and Metrics: Using Data to Drive Decisions and Services,
           Ben Showers (Ed.). Facet, London, UK (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Robert E. Dugan



      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • Descriptions in job ads sometimes equal “Huh?”, or
           “Do you know what you are asking for?”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon, Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2015-09-05T03:20:47Z
       
  • New members of the Board of Editors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research




      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:51:25Z
       
  • The Portable Document Format (PDF) accessibility practice of four journal
           publishers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Julius T. Nganji
      People with disabilities, especially those who are blind, rely on assistive technologies to read information on the web. When this information does not conform to accessibility standards, assistive technologies experience significant difficulties trying to interpret it. Journal publishers prefer to publish articles online in the portable document format (PDF), which may pose accessibility challenges when guidelines such as WCAG 2.0 are not adhered to. So far, no studies have been carried out to evaluate the accessibility of published versions of journal articles in PDF format. A total of 200 articles, 50 articles each from Taylor & Francis' Disability & Society, Springer's Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, Hammill Institute on Disabilities/SAGE's Journal of Learning Disabilities and Elsevier's Research in Developmental Disabilities, which are all ISI Web of Science indexed journals published from 2009 to 2013, were analyzed manually, automatically, and with screen readers for accessibility. The results reveal that 97% did not provide an alternative text for images; 95.5% were not tagged; only 13.5% had meaningful titles which were not displayed when the document was opened; 67% did not have a defined document language; 50% bookmarks, which help in navigation; all had accessibility permissions, enabling assistive technologies to interact with them; 99.5% did not have a logical reading order; none had a consistent heading structure; and all, including untagged documents which were not image-only PDFs documents could be read with screen readers such as NVDA if the correct accessibility settings in Adobe Acrobat XI Pro were chosen. Research in Developmental Disabilities documents were generally more accessible.


      PubDate: 2015-06-18T17:24:37Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 37, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-06-10T20:42:16Z
       
  • Collaboration and synergy in hybrid Q&A: Participatory design
           method and results
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Chirag Shah , Marie L. Radford , Lynn Silipigni Connaway



      PubDate: 2015-06-06T20:35:47Z
       
  • The characteristics and motivations of library open source software
           developers: An empirical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Namjoo Choi , Joseph A. Pruett
      Although there is an abundance of literature regarding the motivations of open source software (OSS) developers, researchers have not examined the specific motivations and characteristics of developers participating in library open source software (LOSS) projects. The characteristics and motivations of 126 LOSS developers associated with SourceForge, Foss4Lib, and Code4Lib are explored through an online survey. The questionnaire included items measuring select demographic attributes; scaled items measuring intrinsic, extrinsic, and internalized-extrinsic motivations; and open-ended questions. In comparison with the general OSS community, the results indicate that LOSS developers have high levels of intrinsic (i.e., altruism and fun) and internalized-extrinsic (i.e., learning and personal needs) motivations, higher diversity in gender, higher levels of formal education, previous library-related work experience, and a strong library ethos. Using this research, stakeholders can devise strategies to improve participation in LOSS projects.


      PubDate: 2015-06-01T14:05:37Z
       
  • Visual traffic sweeps (VTS): A research method for mapping user activities
           in the library space
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Lisa M. Given , Heather Archibald
      The visual traffic sweeps (VTS) approach combines traditional observational methods for assessing library space with geographic information system (GIS) visualization techniques. This unique approach to spatial analysis can be used across library and information settings (or in other spaces with large amounts of human traffic) to map patterns in user behavior. Results of the visual analyses can be triangulated with other methods (e.g., questionnaires or interviews) to better inform library policy and space planning decisions. Findings from a study that used VTS in the business library of a large, urban university illustrate the potential application of this technique across library settings. Specific findings (e.g., patrons' preferences for certain spaces for laptop use, despite the library reserving other space for laptops) demonstrate the power of visualization techniques for analyzing results in ways that are not possible with standard statistical analysis approaches. In addition, the visual maps that result from the analysis process are useful for the presentation of visual data in conference presentations and/or to library stakeholders. Overall, this approach provides evidence for space planning decisions that are grounded in users' real activities within the library space.


      PubDate: 2015-05-27T13:56:34Z
       
  • Exploring the library's contribution to the academic institution: Research
           agenda
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Peter Hernon , Candy Schwartz



      PubDate: 2015-05-27T13:56:34Z
       
  • Libraries as transitory workspaces and spatial incubators
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 May 2015
      Source:Library & Information Science Research
      Author(s): Mina Di Marino , Kimmo Lapintie
      Growing flexibility in work arrangements, particularly in the knowledge industries, and the ensuing possibilities for teleworking are challenging the traditional ways of conceptualizing and designing public spaces and public services. As an example of this development, public and university libraries are studied from the point of view of teleworking. Although work still only accounts for a small amount of the activities that take place in libraries, its transformations can be seen as a ‘weak signal’ of newly emerging spatial arrangements. In addition to the home and workplace, teleworkers are using a network of public, semi-public and private spaces (so-called third places) for different types of working. The research used the concept “spatial portfolio” to address this phenomenon of spatial modalities. The new role of public libraries within this context is discussed. In addition to their traditional functions of lending books and providing spaces for reading newspapers and magazines, libraries are now becoming more multifunctional, providing space for different activities, including work. This new phenomenon has been studied empirically by conducting a qualitative interview and observing teleworkers in two public libraries and one university library in the City of Helsinki, Finland. The objective was to find and analyze different profiles of workers in libraries, thus providing input for future planning and design of these spaces, as well as the urban fabric around them. The results show that a considerable range of activities within research and education, art and culture, information technology, business and finance, and social services and government are performed in the libraries, all of which are in part supported by the new concepts and policies of the city. Libraries can be seen as ‘transitory workspaces’ where people work at least a couple of hours per week and for different reasons such as free wifi connection and location. Also, libraries might be considered ‘spatial incubators’ or rather places able to attract people who start up their own activities. These concepts contribute to define a new way of appropriating libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-05-14T14:40:23Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2015