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Journal of Pediatrics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.522
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 180  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-3476
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3181 journals]
  • Pediatric Heart Failure: An Evolving Public Health Concern
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Stephanie J. Nakano, Shelley D. Miyamoto, Jack F. Price, Joseph W. Rossano, Antonio G. Cabrera
       
  • Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection and Intractable
           Pulmonary Hemorrhage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jhuma Sankar, Samriti Gupta, Raghavendra Lingaiah
       
  • The Role of Healthy Lifestyle Promotion, Counseling, and Follow-up in
           Noncommunicable Diseases Prevention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Tudor Lucian Pop, Leyla Namazova-Baranova, Julije Mestrovic, Luigi Nigri, Mehmet Vural, Michele Sacco, Ida Giardino, Pietro Ferrara, Massimo Pettoello-Mantovani
       
  • Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Robert M. Haws, Andrew J. Olson, Uzoma C. Okorie, Anthony D. Krentz
       
  • Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension in
           Premature Infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Philip T. Levy, Amish Jain, Hythem Nawaytou, David Teitel, Roberta Keller, Jeffery Fineman, Robin Steinhorn, Steven H. Abman, Patrick J. McNamara, Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Network (PPHNet)
       
  • Parent Perspectives on Family-Based Psychosocial Interventions for
           Congenital Heart Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Colette Gramszlo, Allison Karpyn, Abigail C. Demianczyk, Amanda Shillingford, Erin Riegel, Anne E. Kazak, Erica SoodObjectivesTo identify parents' preferences for goals and structure of intervention programs to support the psychosocial needs of families impacted by congenital heart disease (CHD).Study designInformation about parent priorities for psychosocial programs was obtained in this mixed-methods study conducted at a pediatric hospital in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US. Participants were parents (N = 34; 20 mothers, 14 fathers) of children with CHD between the ages of 1 and 3 years who had cardiac surgery at less than 6 months of age. Qualitative data were excerpts from semistructured interviews. Quantitative data were participant choices regarding their ideal psychosocial program resulting from a card sort.ResultsParents reported that psychosocial interventions should support partnership in their child's care, promote self-care, facilitate communication with providers, prepare parents for challenges after hospitalization, provide education about child neurodevelopment, and help parents engage social support. Parents reported needing formalized support across care, brief intervention models, in-person individualized or small group support, and involvement of multidisciplinary providers and peer mentors in the delivery of interventions.ConclusionsParents of children with CHD need psychosocial interventions that empower them to act as primary caregivers and effective advocates for their child. Individualized, formalized, and multidisciplinary approaches to psychosocial care are necessary to best accommodate the dynamic stressors related to parenting a child with CHD and may mitigate the impact of parent mental health problems on child outcomes.
       
  • Newborn Screening for Mucopolysaccharidoses: Results of a Pilot Study with
           100 000 Dried Blood Spots
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Clifford Ronald Scott, Susan Elliott, Xinying Hong, Jie-Yu Huang, Arun Babu Kumar, Fan Yi, Nagendar Pendem, Naveen Kumar Chennamaneni, Michael H. GelbObjectiveTo test, in a newborn screening (NBS) laboratory, the performance of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to assay 5 enzymatic activities in dried blood spots (DBS) for NBS of 5 lysosomal storage diseases (mucopolysaccharidosis [MPS]-II, MPS-IIIB, MPS-IVA, MPS-VI, and MPS-VII).Study designThree mm punches from de-identified DBS were obtained from the Washington NBS laboratory and submitted to the 5-plex LC-MS/MS assay. Screen cut-offs were established by analyzing the enzymatic activity in patients confirmed to have the MPS disorder. DNA sequencing of the relevant gene was performed on a second DBS punch for all samples with enzyme activity below 10% of the mean daily activity.Results(1) For MPS-II, 18 below cut-off samples, 1 pathogenic genotype, and 2 “high risk” genotypes; (2) For MPS-IIIB, no below cut-off samples; (3) For MPS-IVA, 8 below cut-off samples, 4 non-pathogenic genotypes, 4 genotypes unobtainable; (4) For MPS-VI, 4 below cut-off samples and no high-risk genotypes; (5) For MPS-VII, 1 below cut-off sample confirmed by genotype and clinical report to be affected.ConclusionsThese results establish that the number of initial screen positive samples is low and manageable. Thus, population newborn screening for these conditions is feasible in a state newborn screening laboratory.
       
  • A Bayesian Analysis to Determine the Prevalence of Barth Syndrome in the
           Pediatric Population
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Paighton C. Miller, Mindong Ren, Michael Schlame, Matthew J. Toth, Colin K.L. PhoonObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of Barth syndrome in the pediatric population.Study designData were collected from the Barth Syndrome Foundation Registry and relevant literature. With the advent of genetic testing and whole-exome sequencing, a multipronged Bayesian analysis was used to estimate the prevalence of Barth syndrome based on published data on the incidence and prevalence of cardiomyopathy and neutropenia, and the respective subpopulations of patients with Barth syndrome indicated in these publications.ResultsBased on 7 published studies of cardiomyopathy and 2 published studies of neutropenia, the estimated prevalence of Barth syndrome is approximately 1 case per million male population. This contrasts with 99 cases in the Barth Syndrome Foundation Registry, 58 of which indicate a US location, and only 230-250 cases known worldwide.ConclusionsIt appears that Barth syndrome is greatly underdiagnosed. There is a need for better education and awareness of this rare disease to move toward early diagnosis and treatment.
       
  • Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Victoria L. Vetter, Sahil Khanna, V. Ramesh Iyer
       
  • Physiotherapy for Children with Functional Constipation: A Pragmatic
           Randomized Controlled Trial in Primary Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jojanneke J.G.T. van Summeren, Gea A. Holtman, Boudewijn J. Kollen, Yvonne Lisman-van Leeuwen, Alice H.C. van Ulsen-Rust, Merit M. Tabbers, Janny H. Dekker, Marjolein Y. BergerObjectiveTo determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy plus conventional treatment compared with conventional treatment alone for the treatment of functional constipation in children age 4-17 years in primary care.Study designPragmatic randomized controlled trial with 8 months follow-up. Primary care physicians recruited children diagnosed with functional constipation (n = 234), and pediatricians recruited newly referred children with a diagnosis of functional constipation (n = 11). Conventional treatment comprised toilet training, nutritional advice, and laxative prescribing, whereas physiotherapy focused on resolving dyssynergic defecation. The primary outcome was treatment success over 8 months, defined as the absence of functional constipation (Rome III criteria) without laxative use. Secondary outcomes included the absence of functional constipation irrespective of continuation of laxative use and global perceived treatment effect.ResultsChildren were allocated to conventional treatment plus physiotherapy or conventional treatment alone (67 per group), mean (SD) age was 7.6 (3.5) years. Results of longitudinal analyses in the intention-to-treat population showed that the treatment success percentage was not statistically improved by adding physiotherapy to conventional treatment (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 0.80, 95% CI 0.44-1.30). At 4 months, fewer children receiving physiotherapy had treatment success (17%) than children receiving conventional treatment alone (28%), but this had equalized by 8 months (42% and 41%, respectively). The percentage of children without functional constipation, irrespective of continuation of laxative use, was not statistically different between groups over 8 months (aRR 1.12, 95% CI 0.82-1.34). Notably, parents reported significantly more global symptom improvement after physiotherapy than after conventional treatment (aRR 1.40; 95% CI 1.00-1.73).ConclusionsWe find no evidence to recommend physiotherapy for all children with functional constipation in primary care.Trial registrationNetherlands Trial Registry: NTR4797.
       
  • Tracheomegaly among Extremely Preterm Infants on Prolonged Mechanical
           Ventilation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Hussnain Mirza, Laura Varich, William F. Sensakovic, Kharina Guruvadoo, Ivey Royall, Chelsea Britt, Rebecca Vicenti, William OhBy using phantom radiographs, the accuracy of tracheal measurements was established. Preterm infants (≤29 weeks) were enrolled in short (
       
  • Standardizing Safety Assessment and Reporting for Neonatal Clinical Trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jonathan M. Davis, Gerri R. Baer, Susan McCune, Agnes Klein, Junko Sato, Laura Fabbri, Alexandra Mangili, Mary A. Short, Susan Tansey, Barry Mangum, Isamu Hokuto, Hidefumi Nakamura, Thomas Salaets, Karel Allegaert, Lynne Yao, Michael Blum, Joseph Toerner, Mark Turner, Ron Portman, International Neonatal Consortium
       
  • Surrogate Decision Making for Children: Who Should Decide'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Michael Fishman, Erin Talati Paquette, Rupali Gandhi, Tricia Rae Pendergrast, Michelle Park, Erin Flanagan, Lainie Friedman RossObjectiveTo identify caregivers' views on preferred surrogate decision makers for their children.Study designA respondent-anonymous survey was distributed to a convenience sample of adults who accompanied a child to general and subspecialty pediatric care at 2 different institutions or were at the bedside of a child in the pediatric intensive care unit at a third institution in Chicago.ResultsWe collected 462 valid surveys. The average age of the legal guardian and accompanying child was 36.8 years and 6.6 years, respectively. Most legal guardians designated “other parent with legal authority” as their first choice surrogate decision maker (70%). Respondent's sex, respondent's age, child's age, and child's ethnicity had no effect on first choice surrogate decision maker. “Other parent with legal authority” was less likely to be first choice surrogate if respondents had Medicaid insurance, less than a college degree, or lived in a non-nuclear household (P
       
  • Association between Age and Umbilical Hernia Repair Outcomes in Children:
           A Multistate Population-Based Cohort Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Devin R. Halleran, Peter C. Minneci, Jennifer N. CooperObjectiveTo evaluate whether patient age or other sociodemographic and clinical characteristics are associated with recurrence or unplanned related hospital revisits after pediatric umbilical hernia repair.Study designWe performed a retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient, Emergency Department, and Ambulatory Surgery and Services Databases of 7 states. Pediatric umbilical hernia repairs performed at any hospital or surgery center in 2010-2014 were included. Hernia recurrences and occurrences of unplanned and related hospital revisits within 30 days were evaluated.ResultsOf 9809 included patients, 52.0% were female and 50.5% were black. The 3-year hernia recurrence rate was 0.57% (95% CI 0.42, 0.73). In multivariable analysis, the recurrence rate was higher in children
       
  • Correct interpretation of pediatric electrocardiograms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jaskiran K Sodhi, Samiha S Hussain
       
  • Correction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s):
       
  • Current and Future Perspectives of Child's Health Care in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Wenyan Jiao, Rui Li, Hua Guo, Jianping Chen, Fuyong Jiao, Jieming Wang, Alhaji Adam Abubakari, Eli Somekh
       
  • A Celiac Care Index Improves Care of Pediatric Patients Newly Diagnosed
           with Celiac Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Brandon Sparks, Salman Salman, Mary Shull, Anne Trout, Ashley Kiel, Ivor Hill, Tracy Ediger, Brendan BoyleObjectivesTo describe quality improvement efforts to reduce variability in the care of children diagnosed with celiac disease through use of an institutional patient registry and a chronic care index.Study designAn institutional patient registry tracked rates of follow-up visits and repeat serologic testing. A Celiac Care Index that included anthropometrics, biopsy expectations, dietician consultation, and baseline laboratory evaluation was developed to standardize evaluation at diagnosis. Provider education sessions communicated expectations for this standard of care and order sets within the electronic medical record simplified test collection. Data was recorded and reviewed weekly and structured communications with providers were provided biweekly.ResultsAdherence with follow-up expectations (77%-89% P = .03) and repeat serologic testing (50%-90% P 
       
  • Paradoxical Response of Parathyroid Hormone to Vitamin D–Calcium
           Supplementation in Indian Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Rubina M. Mandlik, Zulf M. Mughal, Anuradha V. Khadilkar, Veena H. Ekbote, Neha A. Kajale, Vivek G. Patwardhan, Vaman V. Khadilkar, Raja PadidelaObjectivesTo investigate the effect of oral vitamin D–calcium supplementation on serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium, phosphorous, and alkaline phosphatase (ALK-P) concentrations in children with habitually low calcium intakes.Study designIn this follow-up study to a randomized controlled trial that aimed to assess the effect of vitamin D–calcium supplementation on immunity, data related to dietary intake, anthropometry, and biochemistry [serum 25(OH)D and bone profile] were collected from 178 children—79 in the vitamin D group and 99 in the non-vitamin D group.ResultsDietary calcium to phosphorus intake ratio was 0.4:1. Baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration was 58.2 ± 10.9 nmol/L; 66% children were vitamin D sufficient and none deficient. After supplementation, vitamin D group, compared with the non-vitamin D group, had significantly (P 
       
  • Periventricular Hemorrhagic Infarction in Very Preterm Infants:
           Characteristic Sonographic Findings and Association with
           Neurodevelopmental Outcome at Age 2 Years
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Mehmet N. Cizmeci, Linda S. de Vries, Linh G. Ly, Ingrid C. van Haastert, Floris Groenendaal, Edmond N. Kelly, Jeffrey Traubici, Hilary E. Whyte, Lara M. LeijserObjectiveTo describe the sonographic characteristics of periventricular hemorrhagic infarction (PVHI) and their association with mortality and neurodevelopmental disability in very preterm infants born in 2008-2013.Study designRetrospective multicenter observational cohort study. Diagonal PVHI size was measured and severity score assessed. PVHI characteristics were scored and temporal trends were assessed. Neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of corrected age was assessed using either the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition or the Griffiths Mental Development Scales. Multigroup analyses were applied as appropriate.ResultsWe enrolled 160 infants with median gestational age of 26.6 weeks. PVHI was mostly unilateral (90%), associated with an ipsilateral grade III intraventricular hemorrhage (84%), and located in the parietal lobe (51%). Sixty-four (40%) infants with PVHI died in the neonatal period. Of the survivors assessed at 2 years of corrected age, 65% had normal cognitive and 69% had normal motor outcomes. The cerebral palsy rate was 42%. The composite outcome of death or severe neurodevelopmental disability was observed in 58%, with no trends over the study period (P = .6). Increasing PVHI severity score was associated with death (P 
       
  • Longitudinal Analysis of Pulmonary Function in Survivors of Congenital
           Diaphragmatic Hernia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Duy T. Dao, Lystra P. Hayden, Terry L. Buchmiller, Virginia S. Kharasch, Ali Kamran, Charles J. Smithers, Samuel E. Rice-Townsend, Jill M. Zalieckas, Ronald Becker, Donna Morash, Mollie Studley, Jay M. Wilson, Catherine A. SheilsObjectiveTo analyze longitudinal trends of pulmonary function testing in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) followed in our multidisciplinary clinic.Study designThis was a retrospective cohort study of CDH patients born between 1991 and 2013. A linear mixed effects model was fitted to estimate the trends of percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1pp), percent predicted forced vital capacity (FVCpp), and FEV1/FVC over time.ResultsOf 268 patients with CDH who survived to discharge, 119 had at least 1 pulmonary function test study. The FEV1pp (P 
       
  • A Stroke Alert Protocol Decreases the Time to Diagnosis of Brain Attack
           Symptoms in a Pediatric Emergency Department
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Dana B. Harrar, Catherine L. Salussolia, Kush Kapur, Amy Danehy, Monica E. Kleinman, Rebekah Mannix, Michael J. RivkinObjectiveTo determine whether a stroke alert system decreases the time to diagnosis of children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute-onset focal neurologic deficits.Study designWe performed a retrospective comparison of clinical and demographic information for patients who presented to the ED of a tertiary children's hospital with acute-onset focal neurologic deficits during the 2.5 years before (n = 14) and after (n = 65) the implementation of a stroke alert system. The primary outcome was the median time to neuroimaging analyzed using a Wilcoxon rank-sum test.ResultsThe median time from ED arrival to neuroimaging for patients with acute-onset focal neurologic deficits decreased significantly after implementation of a stroke alert system (196 minutes; IQR, 85-230 minutes before [n = 14] vs 82 minutes; IQR, 54-123 minutes after [n = 65]; P 
       
  • Let's fix it at the source! The disappearing clinician scientist
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Ryan Jayesinghe, Harriet Lewis
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s):
       
  • A Gentle Introduction to Mediation and Moderation
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Melvin D. Livingston, Regine Haardörfer
       
  • Immunosuppressive therapy for indeterminate acute hepatitis or pediatric
           acute liver failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Giuseppe Maggiore, Emmanuel Jacquemin, Olivier Bernard
       
  • Early increase in body mass index and cardiometabolic risk in adolescence
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Osamu Arisaka, Go Ichikawa, Satomi Koyama, Toshimi Sairenchi
       
  • Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Haribalakrishna Balasubramanian, Lakshmi Srinivasan
       
  • Cord blood sampling in preventing anemia in extremely preterm infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Paola Paganin, Francesca Galdo, Cristina Bibalo, Francesco Maria Risso
       
  • Foreign body ingestion may be increasing in the US
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Vigil James
       
  • Oral health problems associated with worse academic performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Molly A. Martin
       
  • Low-value radiographic imaging apparently less employed in Canada vs US
           emergency departments
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Arthur S. Hong
       
  • A rebound hyperbilirubinemia prediction rule
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): M. Jeffrey Maisels
       
  • High-flow nasal canula not noninferior to nasal CPAP
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Antonio Di Mauro, Nicola Laforgia
       
  • When Acute Stridor Is More Than Croup
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Marc R. Miller, Shannon F. Vitone, Eleanor P. Kiell, Nicholas M. Potisek
       
  • Fat Embolism Syndrome in a Child with Sickle Cell Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Arielle Maroni, Stéphane Dauger, Maryline Chomton
       
  • Parotitis: An Initial Manifestation of Kawasaki Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Chi-Chieh Lai, Wen-Terng Lin, Haung-Chi Lin
       
  • Ping-Pong Gaze in a Postictal State
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Takateru Ihara, Takaaki Mori, Osamu Nomura
       
  • Decompressive Fasciotomy in an Extremely Preterm Newborn with Compartment
           Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Gilda Belli, Giuseppe Cucca, Luca Filippi
       
  • Dancing Eyes
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Amrit Kaur, Chandana Bhagwat, Priyanka Madaan, Lokesh Saini, Anmol Bhatia, Harmandeep Singh, Naveen Sankhyan
       
  • Clinical Utility of Highly Purified 10% Liquid Intravenous Immunoglobulin
           in Kawasaki Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Takuya Oda, Hazumu Nagata, Yasutaka Nakashima, Etsuro Nanishi, Yui Takada, Manao Nishimura, Eiji Kubo, Ken Hatae, Shouichi OhgaCompared with a 5% intravenous immunoglobulin, a 10% intravenous immunoglobulin as the first-line treatment of Kawasaki disease significantly reduced the fever duration (10 vs 13 hours, P = .022) among the responders, and the interval to adjunctive therapy for nonresponders (47 vs 49 hours, P = .035). There were no severe adverse events.
       
  • Predictors of Early Extubation after Patent Ductus Arteriosus Ligation
           among Infants Born Extremely Preterm Dependent on Mechanical Ventilation
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Srinath Krishnappa, Prakesh S. Shah, Amish Jain, Maura H.F. Resende, Patrick J. McNamara, Dany E. WeiszWe conducted a retrospective study of 166 ventilator-dependent neonates born extremely preterm in whom patent ductus arteriosus was surgically ligated and evaluated the association of preoperative characteristics and time-to-successful postoperative extubation. Larger patent ductus arteriosus diameter ([>2.5 mm], adjusted hazard ratio 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.72) and left-ventricular dilatation (z score ≥2, adjusted hazard ratio 0.61, 95% CI 0.42-0.87) were associated with earlier extubation.
       
  • A Total Sarnat Score in Mild Hypoxic-ischemic Encephalopathy Can Detect
           Infants at Higher Risk of Disability
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Lina F. Chalak, Beverley Adams-Huet, Guilherme Sant'AnnaTo define mild hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and distinguish infants at risk of disability in the first 6 hours, this study stratified risk of disability by using early neurologic examination findings of infants enrolled in the Prospective Research for Infants with Mild Encephalopathy cohort. A total Sarnat score of ≥5 when performed at
       
  • Coordinating Care Across the Perinatal Continuum in Hemolytic Disease
           of the Fetus and Newborn: The Timely Handoff of a Positive Maternal
           Anti-Erythrocyte Antibody Screen
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Kalyani Vats, Jon F. Watchko
       
  • Strengthening the Evidence Base for Pediatric Medical Devices Using
           Real-World Data
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Rachael L. Fleurence, Christopher B. Forrest, Jeffrey Shuren
       
  • Discharge Instruction Comprehension and Adherence Errors:
           Interrelationship Between Plan Complexity and Parent Health Literacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Alexander F. Glick, Jonathan S. Farkas, Alan L. Mendelsohn, Arthur H. Fierman, Suzy Tomopoulos, Rebecca E. Rosenberg, Benard P. Dreyer, Jennifer Melgar, John Varriano, H. Shonna YinObjectiveTo examine associations between parent health literacy, discharge plan complexity, and parent comprehension of and adherence to inpatient discharge instructions.Study designThis was a prospective cohort study of English/Spanish-speaking parents (n = 165) of children ≤12 years discharged on ≥1 daily medication from an urban, public hospital. Outcome variables were parent comprehension (survey) of and adherence (survey, in-person dosing assessment, chart review) to discharge instructions. Predictor variables included low parent health literacy (Newest Vital Sign score 0-3) and plan complexity. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for the assessment of multiple types of comprehension and adherence errors for each subject, adjusting for ethnicity, language, child age, length of stay, and chronic disease status. Similar analyses were performed to assess for mediation and moderation.ResultsError rates were highest for comprehension of medication side effects (50%), adherence to medication dose (34%), and return precaution (78%) instructions. Comprehension errors were associated with adherence errors (aOR, 8.7; 95% CI, 5.9-12.9). Discharge plan complexity was associated with comprehension (aOR, 7.0; 95% CI, 5.4-9.1) and adherence (aOR, 5.5; 95% CI, 4.0-7.6) errors. Low health literacy was indirectly associated with adherence errors through comprehension errors. The association between plan complexity and comprehension errors was greater in parents with low (aOR, 8.3; 95% CI, 6.2-11.2) compared with adequate (aOR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.2-6.5) health literacy (interaction term P = .004).ConclusionsParent health literacy and discharge plan complexity play key roles in comprehension and adherence errors. Future work will focus on the development of health literacy-informed interventions to promote discharge plan comprehension.
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Roentgen+Examination+in+the+Evaluation+of+the+Newborn+Infant+with+Respiratory+Distress&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Roentgen Examination in
           the Evaluation of the Newborn Infant with Respiratory Distress
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Angie Milady Castillo Tarquino, Sara E. Ortega Alonzo
       
  • Longitudinal Changes in Weight Status from Childhood and Adolescence to
           Adulthood
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Justin R. Ryder, David R. Jacobs, Alan R. Sinaiko, Annabel P. Kornblum, Julia SteinbergerObjectivesTo study the change in body mass index (BMI) from childhood and adolescence and development of obesity into adulthood.Study designWe performed a longitudinal study of 480 individuals (49% male; 67% white) with height and weight measures in childhood (mean age 7 years), repeated in adolescence (mean age 16 years) and adulthood (mean age 39 years). Weight status in childhood was defined as low normal weight (0-
       
  • The Adaptive Effect of Illness-Specific Panic-Fear on Asthma Outcomes in
           Mexican and Puerto Rican Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Jonathan M. Feldman, Karenjot Kaur, Denise Serebrisky, Deepa Rastogi, Flavio F. Marsiglia, Kimberly J. ArcoleoObjectiveTo examine baseline measures of illness-specific panic-fear (ie, the level of anxiety experienced specifically during asthma exacerbations) as a protective factor in pediatric asthma outcomes over a 1-year period.Study designThe sample comprised 267 children (Mexican, n = 188; Puerto Rican, n = 79; age 5-12 years) from a longitudinal observational study conducted in Phoenix, AZ and Bronx, NY. Assessments were done at baseline and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The Childhood Asthma Symptom Checklist was administered at baseline to children and caregivers to assess children's illness-specific panic-fear. Asthma outcome variables quantified longitudinally included pulmonary function, the Asthma Control Test, acute healthcare utilization, and medication adherence, measured by devices attached to inhaled corticosteroids.ResultsChild report of illness-specific panic-fear at baseline predicted higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) % across 1-year follow-up in Mexican children (β = 0.17, P = .02), better asthma control in Puerto Rican children (β = 0.45, P = .007), and less acute healthcare utilization for asthma in both groups (Mexicans: β = −0.39, P = .03; Puerto Ricans: β = −0.47, P = .02). Caregiver report of child panic-fear predicted higher FEV1% in Mexican (β = 0.30; P = .02) and Puerto Rican (β = 0.19; P = .05) children. Panic-fear was not related to medication adherence.ConclusionsIllness-specific panic-fear had beneficial effects on asthma outcomes in both groups of Latino children. The heightened vigilance associated with illness-specific panic-fear may lead children to be more aware of their asthma symptoms and lead to better strategies for asthma management.
       
  • Can the Red Reflex Test Detect Unequal Refractive Error'
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Kara C. LaMattina, Aldo Vagge, Leonard B. NelsonObjectiveTo determine the accuracy of the red reflex test in the detection of anisometropia.Study designThis prospective, single-masked study enrolled new patients younger than the age of 18 years who had not undergone pharmacologic pupillary dilation. A fellow who was masked to all clinical information illuminated both eyes with a direct ophthalmoscope in a darkened room from a distance of 1 m, assessing whether the red reflex between the 2 eyes was symmetric or asymmetric. The patient was then dilated, and cylcoplegic refraction was performed by an attending pediatric ophthalmologist. Exclusion criteria included the presence of strabismus, anisocoria, previous intraocular surgery, media opacity, leukocoria, or nystagmus. Sensitivity was compared with a null hypothesized value of 50% using a 1-sided binomial test.ResultsNinety-two patients with a mean age of 7.3 years (range 3 months to 16 years) were enrolled. With spherical anisometropia greater than or equal to 0.125 diopters, the sensitivity of the red reflex test was 90.6% and the specificity was 58.3%. With cylindrical anisometropia greater than or equal to 0.25 diopters, the sensitivity of the red reflex test was 81.3% and the specificity was 70%. Anisometropia greater than 1.5 diopters in spherical equivalent (4 patients, range −10.625 to −2.625) or cylinder (3 patients, range 1.75-2.25) was accurately detected by red reflex testing in each case.ConclusionsThe red reflex test can be an accurate screening tool to detect anisometropia when performed by an ophthalmologist.
       
  • Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Perform Differently
           on Pediatric Concussion Assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Nathan E. Cook, Patricia M. Kelshaw, Shane V. Caswell, Grant L. IversonObjectiveTo compare Child Sport Concussion Assessment Tool Fifth Edition (Child SCAT5) performance between uninjured children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and precisely matched controls without ADHD.Study designA nested case-control study was conducted within a cohort of middle school athletes (age 11-12 years) who completed preseason testing. Students with ADHD were individually matched to students without ADHD based on age, sex, language spoken at home, number of prior concussions, sport, and school they attended. The final sample included 54 students (27 with ADHD and 27 controls), 38 (70.4%) boys and 16 (29.6%) girls (average age: 11.7 years, SD = 0.5).ResultsChildren with ADHD reported more symptoms (M = 13.33, SD = 5.69, P 
       
  • Population-Based Newborn Screening for Mucopolysaccharidosis Type II in
           Illinois: The First Year Experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Barbara K. Burton, George E. Hoganson, Julie Fleischer, Dorothy K. Grange, Stephen R. Braddock, Rachel Hickey, Lauren Hitchins, Daniel Groepper, Katherine M. Christensen, Amelia Kirby, Conny Moody, Heather Shryock, Laura Ashbaugh, Rong Shao, Khaja BasheeruddinObjectivesTo assess the outcome of population-based newborn screening for mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) during the first year of screening in Illinois.Study designTandem mass spectrometry was used to measure iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S) activity in dried blood spot specimens obtained from 162 000 infant samples sent to the Newborn Screening Laboratory of the Illinois Department of Public Health in Chicago.ResultsOne case of MPS II and 14 infants with pseudodeficiency for I2S were identified.ConclusionsNewborn screening for MPS II by measurement of I2S enzyme activity was successfully integrated into the statewide newborn screening program in Illinois.
       
  • he +J ournal + of +P ediatrics :+The+Diagnostic+Value+of+Gamma+Glutamyl+Transpeptidase+in+Children+and+Adolescents+with+Liver+Disease&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : The Diagnostic Value of
           Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase in Children and Adolescents with Liver
           Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Sharad I. Wadhwani
       
  • Quality of Life in Children with Functional Constipation: A Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Mana H. Vriesman, Shaman Rajindrajith, Ilan J.N. Koppen, Faridi S. van Etten- Jamaludin, Marieke van Dijk, Niranga M. Devanarayana, Merit M. Tabbers, Marc A. BenningaObjectiveTo systematically review the literature on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in children with functional constipation and to identify disease-related factors associated with HRQoL.Study designThe Pubmed, Embase, and PsycINFO database were searched. Studies were included if they prospectively assessed HRQoL in children with functional constipation according to the Rome criteria. Articles were excluded if patients had organic causes of constipation and if HRQoL was only assessed after successful therapeutic interventions. A meta-analysis was performed calculating sample size–weighted pooled mean and SD of HRQoL scores. The quality of the studies was also assessed.ResultsA total of 20 of 2658 studies were included, providing HRQoL data for 2344 children. Quality of evidence was considered to be poor in 9 of the 20 studies (45%); 13 of the 20 studies reported sufficient data to be included in the meta-analysis. Pooled total HRQoL scores of children with functional constipation were found to be lower compared with healthy reference samples (65.6 vs 86.1; P 
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Polycythemia+in+Small+for+Gestational+Age+Infants&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Polycythemia in Small
           for Gestational Age Infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Jannicke H. Andresen, Ola Didrik Saugstad
       
  • Cerebral Oxygenation During Respiratory Events in Children with
           Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Associated Disorders
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Laurence Tabone, Sonia Khirani, Jorge Olmo Arroyo, Alessandro Amaddeo, Abdelkebir Sabil, Brigitte FaurouxObjectivesTo evaluate changes in cerebral oxygenation by means of near-infrared spectroscopy during respiratory events in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and associated disorders.Study designSixty-five children suspected of having SDB underwent a respiratory polygraphy with simultaneous recording of cerebral oxygenation indices. Respiratory events were analyzed by type of event, duration, variations of pulse oximetry (oxygen saturation [SpO2]), cerebral tissue oxygenation index (TOI), and heart rate. Data were categorized according to the severity of SDB and age.ResultsThere were 540 obstructive and mixed apneas, 172 central apneas, and 393 obstructive hypopneas analyzed. The mean decreases in SpO2 and TOI were 4.1 ± 3.1% and 3.4 ± 2.8%, respectively. The mean TOI decrease was significantly smaller for obstructive hypopnea compared with apneas. The TOI decrease was significantly less in children with mild SDB as compared with those with moderate-to-severe SDB and in children>7 years as compared with those
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Antimicrobial+Therapy+in+Theory+and+Practice:+Clinical+Pharmacology&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Antimicrobial Therapy in
           Theory and Practice: Clinical Pharmacology
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Sarah S. Long
       
  • Complications of Serious Pediatric Conditions in the Emergency Department:
           Definitions, Prevalence, and Resource Utilization
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Kenneth A. Michelson, Richard G. Bachur, Prashant Mahajan, Jonathan A. FinkelsteinObjectivesTo define and measure complications across a broad set of acute pediatric conditions in emergency departments using administrative data, and to assess the validity of these definitions by comparing resource utilization between children with and without complications.Study designUsing local consensus, we predefined complications for 16 acute conditions including appendicitis, diabetic ketoacidosis, ovarian torsion, stroke, testicular torsion, and 11 others. We studied patients under age 18 years using 3 data years from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Statewide Databases of Maryland and New York. We measured complications by condition. Resource utilization was compared between patients with and without complications, including hospital length of stay, and charges.ResultsWe analyzed 27 087 emergency department visits for a serious condition. The most common was appendicitis (n = 16 794), with 24.3% of cases complicated by 1 or more of perforation (24.1%), abscess drainage (2.8%), bowel resection (0.3%), or sepsis (0.9%). Sepsis had the highest mortality (5.0%). Children with complications had higher resource utilization: condition-specific length of stay was longer when complications were present, except ovarian and testicular torsion. Hospital charges were higher among children with complications (P 
       
  • The Benefits of Oral Rehydration on Orthostatic Intolerance in Children
           with Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Marvin S. Medow, Kenneth Guber, Shilpan Chokshi, Courtney Terilli, Paul Visintainer, Julian M. StewartObjectiveTo evaluate whether equal volumes of oral rehydration solution (ORS) or intravenous (IV) saline provide similar improvements in cardiovascular status during controlled orthostatic challenge when administered to subjects with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) with orthostatic intolerance.Study designWe studied the neurovascular response to fluid loading during orthostatic stress using lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in 10 subjects with POTS with orthostatic intolerance and 15 controls, and on subsequent days before and 1 hour after IV saline infusion or ingestion of ORS.ResultsSubjects with POTS exhibited reduced tolerance to LBNP (P 
       
  • Postexercise Heart Rate Recovery in Adults Born Preterm
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Risto Karvonen, Marika Sipola, Antti M. Kiviniemi, Marjaana Tikanmäki, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Johan G. Eriksson, Mikko P. Tulppo, Marja Vääräsmäki, Eero KajantieObjectiveTo evaluate postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR) in adults born preterm.Study designWe studied the association between preterm birth and postexercise HRR in 545 adults (267 women) at 23.3 years of age (range 19.9-26.3 years). One hundred three participants were born early preterm (
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Idiopathic+Hypoglycemia:+A+Study+of+Twenty-Six+Children&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Idiopathic Hypoglycemia:
           A Study of Twenty-Six Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Ming Yeh Lee, David M. Maahs
       
  • Sex-Dependent Gene Expression in Infants with Neonatal Opioid Withdrawal
           Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Elizabeth Yen, Tomoko Kaneko-Tarui, Robin Ruthazer, Karen Harvey-Wilkes, Mona Hassaneen, Jill L. MaronObjectivesTo evaluate salivary biomarkers that elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which in utero opioid exposure exerts sex-specific effects on select hypothalamic and reward genes driving hyperphagia, a hallmark symptom of infants suffering from neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome (NOWS).Study designWe prospectively collected saliva from 50 newborns born at ≥34 weeks of gestational age with prenatal opioid exposure and 50 sex- and gestational age-matched infants without exposure. Saliva underwent transcriptomic analysis for 4 select genes involved in homeostatic and hedonic feeding regulation (neuropeptide Y2 receptor [NPY2R], proopiomelanocortin [POMC], leptin receptor [LEPR], dopamine type 2 receptor [DRD2]). Normalized gene expression data were stratified based on sex and correlated with feeding volume on day of life 7 and length of stay in infants with NOWS requiring pharmacotherapy.ResultsExpression of DRD2, a hedonistic/reward regulator, was significantly higher in male newborns compared with female newborns with NOWS (Δ threshold cycle 10.8 ± 3.8 vs 13.9 ± 3.7, P = .01). In NOWS requiring pharmacotherapy expression of leptin receptor, an appetite suppressor, was higher in male subjects than female subjects (Δ threshold cycle 8.4 ± 2.5 vs 12.4 ± 5.1, P = .05), DRD2 expression significantly correlated with intake volume on day of life 7 (r = 0.58, P = .02), and expression of NPY2R, an appetite regulator, negatively correlated with length of stay (r = −0.24, P = .05).ConclusionsPrenatal opioid exposure exerts sex-dependent effects on hypothalamic feeding regulatory genes with clinical correlations. Neonatal salivary gene expression analyses may predict hyperphagia, severity of withdrawal state, and length of stay in infants with NOWS.
       
  • Effect of Pooling Practices and Time Postpartum of Milk Donations on the
           Energy, Macronutrient, and Zinc Concentrations of Resultant Donor Human
           Milk Pools
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Bridget E. Young, Laraine L. Borman, Rebecca Heinrich, Julie Long, Sarah Pinney, Jamie Westcott, Nancy F. KrebsObjectiveTo characterize the macronutrient, energy, and zinc composition of pasteurized donor human milk pools and evaluate how composition varies based on pooling practices and “time postpartum” (ie, elapsed time from parturition to expression date) of individual milk donations.Study designThe Mothers' Milk Bank (Arvada, Colorado) donated 128 donor human milk pools. Caloric density was assessed via mid-infrared spectroscopy, and zinc concentration was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Pool time postpartum was calculated as the unweighted average of the time postpartum of all milk donations included in any given pool.ResultsTime postpartum of donor human milk pools ranged from 3 days to 9.8 months. The majority (91%) of donor human milk pools included milk from either 1 donor or 2 donors. Pool energy density ranged from 14.7 to 23.1 kcal/oz, and protein ranged from 0.52 to 1.43 g/dL. Milk zinc concentrations were higher in preterm pools and were negatively correlated with pool time postpartum. We present an equation that estimates donor human milk pool zinc content based on time postpartum and explains 49% of the variability in zinc concentrations (P 
       
  • Vascular Health of Children Conceived via In Vitro Fertilization
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Wendy Y. Zhang, Elif Seda Selamet Tierney, Angela C. Chen, Albee Y. Ling, Raquel R. Fleischmann, Valerie L. BakerObjectiveTo evaluate whether in vitro fertilization (IVF) has an effect on the cardiovascular health of offspring.Study designThis was a cross-sectional pilot study. We performed vascular health assessment for 17 children aged 10-14 years who were conceived via IVF with autologous oocytes at Stanford University. Carotid artery ultrasound evaluated intima-media thickness and stiffness, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity determined segmental arterial stiffness, and endothelial pulse amplitude testing assessed endothelial function. We compared IVF offspring with control adolescents assessed in the same laboratory, with all comparisons adjusted for age, sex, and race/ethnicity.ResultsAll participants had normal body mass index and blood pressure. Compared with controls, IVF children had thicker common carotid artery intima-media thickness (0.44 ± 0.03 mm vs 0.38 ± 0.03 mm; P 
       
  • Gastrostomy Tube Feeding in Extremely Low Birthweight Infants: Frequency,
           Associated Comorbidities, and Long-term Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Mollie G. Warren, Barbara Do, Abhik Das, P. Brian Smith, Ira Adams-Chapman, Sudarshan Jadcherla, Erik A. Jensen, Ricki F. Goldstein, Ronald N. Goldberg, C. Michael Cotten, Edward F. Bell, William F. Malcolm, Mollie Gross Warren, Barbara Do, Abhik Das, Phillip Brian Smith, Ira Adams-Chapman, Sudarshan Jadcherla, Erik A. Jensen, Ricki F. GoldsteinObjectiveTo assess the frequency of gastrostomy tube (GT) placement in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants, associated comorbidities, and long-term outcomes.Study designAnalysis of ELBW infants from 25 centers enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network's Generic Database and Follow-up Registry from 2006 to 2012. Frequency of GT placement before 18-22 months, demographic and medical factors associated with GT placement, and associated long-term outcomes at 18-22 months of corrected age were described. Associations between GT placement and neonatal morbidities and long-term outcomes were assessed with logistic regression after adjustment for center and common co-variables.ResultsOf the 4549 ELBW infants included in these analyses, 333 (7.3%) underwent GT placement; 76% had the GT placed postdischarge. Of infants with GTs, 11% had birth weights small for gestational age, 77% had bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and 29% severe intraventricular hemorrhage or periventricular leukomalacia. At follow-up, 56% of infants with a GT had weight
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+The+Prevalence+of+Congenital+Heart+Disease+in+United+States+College+Freshmen,+1956–1965&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : The Prevalence of
           Congenital Heart Disease in United States College Freshmen, 1956–1965
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Nicholas B. Zaban, Leon F. Przybylowski, Marcus S. Schamberger
       
  • Associations of Growth and Body Composition with Brain Size in
           Preterm Infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Katherine A. Bell, Lillian G. Matthews, Sara Cherkerzian, Caroline Palmer, Kaitlin Drouin, Hunter L. Pepin, Deirdre Ellard, Terrie E. Inder, Sara E. Ramel, Mandy B. BelfortObjectiveTo assess the association of very preterm infants' brain size at term-equivalent age with physical growth from birth to term and body composition at term.Study designWe studied 62 infants born at
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Antimicrobial+Treatment+of+Pertussis&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Antimicrobial Treatment
           of Pertussis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Nidhi Bedi, Piyush Gupta
       
  • Advancing a More Health-Literate Approach to Patient Safety
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Lee M. Sanders
       
  • The Anxiety-Asthma Relationship: Risk or Resilience'
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Andrea A. Pappalardo, Sally Weinstein
       
  • A Resident-Based, Educational Program to Drive Individual and
           Institutional Improvement in a Pediatric Training Hospital
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): James T. Gaensbauer, James Todd, Joseph A. Grubenhoff, Danielle E. Soranno, Douglas Scudamore, Alexandra Cheetham, Kevin Messacar
       
  • Cytomegalovirus intestinal disease in infants born very prematurely is
           likely under-recognized
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Sarah S. Long
       
  • Pediatric emergency care—A method to drive action
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Denise M. Goodman
       
  • How to evaluate concussion in all children'
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Paul G. Fisher
       
  • Parents can accurately observe the severity of respiratory illness in
           their infants born term and preterm
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Sarah S. Long
       
  • Could genetic variations explain variability in neonatal opiate withdrawal
           syndrome'
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Robin H. Steinhorn
       
  • Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 214Author(s): Catherine A. Chapin, Estella M. Alonso
       
 
 
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