Journal Cover
Journal of Pediatrics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.522
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 195  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-3476
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Effect of Early-Onset Preeclampsia on Offspring's Blood Pressure during
           the First Month of Life
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Emmanouil Chourdakis, Sotirios Fouzas, Chrysanthi Papadopoulou, Nikoleta Oikonomou, George Hahalis, Gabriel Dimitriou, Ageliki A. KaratzaObjectiveTo explore the effect of early-onset preeclampsia on the blood pressure of offspring during the first month of life.Study designThis prospective case-control study included 106 neonates of mothers with early-onset preeclampsia (developing at
       
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Sheetanshu Kumar, Vishal Thakur, Rajat Choudhary, Keshavamurthy Vinay
       
  • Nail Deformity in a Young Girl
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Abheek Sil, Avik Panigrahi, Dibyendu Bikash Bhanja, Sayantani Chakraborty
       
  • Gestational Age, Perinatal Characteristics, and Autism Spectrum Disorder:
           A Birth Cohort Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jane E. Brumbaugh, Amy L. Weaver, Scott M. Myers, Robert G. Voigt, Slavica K. KatusicObjectiveTo determine how gestational age relates to research-identified autism spectrum disorder (ASD-R) in the context of perinatal risk factors.Study designThis is a population-based cohort study using the 1994-2000 Olmsted County Birth Cohort. Children included were born and remained in Olmsted County after age 3 years. ASD-R status was determined from signs and symptoms abstracted from medical and educational records. Cox proportional hazards models were fit to identify associations between perinatal characteristics and ASD-R.ResultsThe incidence of preterm birth (
       
  • Reverse Sequence Syphilis Screening and Discordant Results in Pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jessica E.P. Williams, José A. Bazan, Abigail Norris Turner, Stephen F. Thung, Cory Hanlon, Tanisha R. Pettus, Pablo J. SánchezA “reverse sequence syphilis screening” algorithm is widely used for syphilis testing. This retrospective study showed that most (65%) pregnant women with discordant screening results (treponemal multiplex flow immunoassay IgG+/rapid plasma reagin-) had a nonreactive confirmatory Treponema pallidum-particle agglutination assay, likely indicative of a false-positive reaction.
       
  • Glucose, Insulin, and Lipids in Cord Blood of Neonates and Their
           Association with Birthweight: Differential Metabolic Risk of Large for
           Gestational Age and Small for Gestational Age Babies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Jingya Wang, Songying Shen, Malcolm James Price, Jinhua Lu, Dana Sumilo, Yashu Kuang, Konstantinos Manolopoulos, Huimin Xia, Xiu Qiu, Kar Keung Cheng, Krishnarajah NirantharakumarObjectivesTo investigate the association of birthweight percentile with cord blood glucose, lipids, and insulin levels.Study designData obtained from 1522 newborns were included in the Born in Guangzhou Cohort study. The generalized additive model and multivariable linear regression model were used to explore the nonlinear and linear relationships between birthweight and cord blood metabolic measures, and to evaluate the differences of metabolic measures Z-scores among small for gestational age, appropriate for gestational age, and large for gestational age babies.ResultsBirthweight Z-score was linearly associated with increased cord blood insulin Z-score (adjusted β = 0.30; 95% CI, 0.22-0.37). Compared with appropriate for gestational age babies, neonates born small for gestational age had significantly higher cord blood triglycerides Z-score (adjusted mean difference [MDadj], 0.60; 95% CI, 0.40-0.79) and lower cord blood insulin (MDadj, −0.37; 95% CI, −0.57 to −0.16), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MDadj, −0.34; 95% CI, −0.55 to −0.13), total cholesterol (MDadj, −0.26; 95% CI, −0.47 to −0.05), and low-density lipoprotein (MDadj, −0.23; 95% CI, −0.43 to −0.02) Z-scores, and neonates born large for gestational age had higher cord blood insulin Z-score (MDadj, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.09 to 0.52).ConclusionsOur findings support the hypothesis that babies born small for gestational age and large for gestational age are exposed to different intrauterine environments, which may contribute to altered fat accumulation patterns with implications for the risk of metabolic dysfunction later in life. There is a need to consider the development of tailored intervention strategies to prevent metabolic dysfunction in adult life for these babies.
       
  • Pets Are Associated with Fewer Peer Problems and Emotional Symptoms, and
           Better Prosocial Behavior: Findings from the Longitudinal Study of
           Australian Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Hayley Christian, Francis Mitrou, Rebecca Cunneen, Stephen R. ZubrickObjectiveTo investigate the longitudinal association between pet ownership and children's social-emotional development.Study designTwo time-points of data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children were analyzed for children at ages 5 (n = 4242) and 7 (n = 4431) years. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) measured children's social-emotional development. Pet ownership status and type (dog, cat, other) as well as sociodemographic and other potential confounders were collected. Longitudinal panel regression models were used.ResultsOverall, 27% of children had abnormal scores on 1 or more SDQ scales. By age 7, 75% of children had pets with ownership highest in single-child households. Owning any type of pet was associated with decreased odds of abnormal scores for emotional symptoms (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.99), peer problems (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60-0.84), and prosocial behavior (OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.38-0.70), compared with non-pet owners. Dog ownership was associated with decreased odds of abnormal scores on any of the SDQ scales (OR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.71-0.93). For children without any siblings, only the prosocial behavior scale was significantly associated with pet ownership (OR, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07-0.66). In longitudinal models, cat-only and dog-only groups were associated with fewer emotional symptoms and peer problems compared with non-pet owners.ConclusionsEarly school age is an important period for family pet acquisition. Pets may protect children from developing social-emotional problems and should be taken into account when assessing child development and school readiness. Children without siblings may benefit most in terms of their prosocial behavior.
       
  • Never Exposed to Nicotine - But Still Impacting Executive Function
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Brian J. Piper, Brian D. Wilcox
       
  • Home Oxygen Use and 1-Year Readmission among Infants Born Preterm with
           Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia Discharged from Children's Hospital Neonatal
           Intensive Care Units
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Joanne Lagatta, Karna Murthy, Isabella Zaniletti, Stephanie Bourque, William Engle, Rebecca Rose, Namasivayam Ambalavanan, David BrousseauObjectiveTo determine associations between home oxygen use and 1-year readmissions for preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) discharged from regional neonatal intensive care units.Study designWe performed a secondary analysis of the Children's Hospitals Neonatal Database, with readmission data via the Pediatric Hospital Information System and demographics using ZIP-code–linked census data. We included infants born
       
  • A Centralized Research Hub in a Pediatric Academic Center
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Lindsay A. Thompson, Rebeccah E. Mercado, Matthew J. Gurka, Scott A. Rivkees
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s):
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s):
       
  • The Burden of Depression in Adolescents and the Importance of Early
           Recognition
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Annamaria Petito, Tudor Lucian Pop, Leyla Namazova-Baranova, Julije Mestrovic, Luigi Nigri, Mehmet Vural, Michele Sacco, Ida Giardino, Pietro Ferrara, Massimo Pettoello-Mantovani
       
  • Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Robert M. Haws, Andrew J. Olson, Uzoma C. Okorie, Anthony D. Krentz
       
  • Atrioventricular canal defect as partial expression of heterotaxia in
           patients with Bardet-Biedl syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): M. Cristina Digilio, Giulio Calcagni, Alessandro De Luca, Valentina Guida, Bruno Marino
       
  • Variability among bronchiolitis guidelines
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Philip N. Britton
       
  • Sepsis prediction model derived from hospital-arrival clinical data
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Fran Balamuth
       
  • Closed-loop insulin delivery system enhances type 1 diabetes glycemic
           control
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Julia Fuchs, Roman Hovorka
       
  • Measles infection leads to long-term immune suppression, not noted with
           MMR vaccine
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Michelle Science, Shelly Bolotin
       
  • Most babies born preterm survive into adulthood without comorbidities
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Tonse N.K. Raju
       
  • Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection and Intractable
           Pulmonary Hemorrhage
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Jhuma Sankar, Samriti Gupta, Raghavendra Lingaiah
       
  • A Child with Whorls and Streaks: Look Beyond the Skin!
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Prateek Kumar Panda, Indar Kumar Sharawat
       
  • Hiatal Hernia Presenting as Difficulty in Inserting Feeding Tube in a
           Neonate Born Preterm
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Sunil Joghee, Amuchou Singh Soraisham
       
  • Tracheal Tugging
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Anna Otani, Kazuki Iio, Takateru Ihara
       
  • Congenital Onychodysplasia of Index Fingers: Iso-Kikuchi Syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Nima Milani-Nejad, Joy Mosser-Goldfarb
       
  • Aplasia Cutis Congenita in an Infant with Very Low Birth Weight
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Nana Kawaguchi, Toru Kuboi, Satoshi Yamato, Saeko Okabe, Kohichiroh Nii, Takaaki Sadamura, Akiko Nakano, Mikio Morine, Hidekazu Taniguchi
       
  • Just Say No to iNO in Preterms—Really'
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Satyan Lakshminrusimha, John P. Kinsella, Usha S. Krishnan, Krisa Van Meurs, Erika M. Edwards, Dilip R. Bhatt, Praveen Chandrasekharan, Ju-Lee Oei, Veena Manja, Rangasamy Ramanathan, Steven H. Abman
       
  • The Association of Concomitant Maternal Marijuana Use on Health Outcomes
           for Opioid Exposed Newborns in Massachusetts, 2003-2009
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Yin Stein, Sunah Hwang, Chia-Ling Liu, Hafsatou Diop, Erica WymoreThis population-based study showed that maternal opioid plus marijuana use during pregnancy was associated with increased odds of prematurity and low birth weight but lower odds of neonatal abstinence syndrome and prolonged hospitalization compared with opioid exposure without marijuana use. Further research should evaluate the biologic mechanisms responsible for these outcomes.
       
  • Scurvy Masquerading as Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis or Vasculitis with
           Elevated Inflammatory Markers: A Case Series
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Alexandra Perkins, Clay Sontheimer, Jeffrey P. Otjen, Susan ShenoiTen patients with scurvy were evaluated by rheumatology; we review their clinical, laboratory, and dietary presentations. Eight patients had developmental delay or autism. All had elevated inflammatory markers. These clinical and laboratory features with imaging findings can mimic rheumatic conditions such as arthritis, vasculitis, and chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO).
       
  • Tracheomegaly among Extremely Preterm Infants on Prolonged Mechanical
           Ventilation
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Hussnain Mirza, Laura Varich, William F. Sensakovic, Kharina Guruvadoo, Ivey Royall, Chelsea Britt, Rebecca Vicenti, William OhBy using phantom radiographs, the accuracy of tracheal measurements was established. Preterm infants (≤29 weeks) were enrolled in short (
       
  • Alagille Syndrome and Chronic Arthritis: An International Case Series
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Giovanna Ferrara, Teresa Giani, Scott M. Lieberman, Courtney Kremer, Sandy Hong, Giuseppe Indolfi, Grant Schulert, Randy Q. Cron, Melissa L. Mannion, Sivia Lapidus, Wineke Armbrust, Emmanuel Gonzales, Emmanuel Jacquemin, Isabelle Koné-Paut, Rolando CimazWe describe 10 children with Alagille syndrome and inflammatory arthritis. In our centers, the prevalence of chronic arthritis in patients with Alagille syndrome is approximately 50 times higher compared with the general population. Arthritis was refractory to most treatment. Patients with Alagille syndrome should routinely be screened for musculoskeletal symptoms.
       
  • Progressive Splenomegaly and Hypersplenism: An Unusual Case of Splenic
           Vein Stenosis with Histologic Findings of Hepatoportal Sclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Ben Freiberg, Sukru Emre, Raffaella Morotti, Brian Dillon, Alexander Koral, Shilpa M. Hattangadi, Pamela L. Valentino
       
  • Pediatric Heart Failure: An Evolving Public Health Concern
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Stephanie J. Nakano, Shelley D. Miyamoto, Jack F. Price, Joseph W. Rossano, Antonio G. Cabrera
       
  • Statewide Pediatric Facility Recognition Programs and Their Association
           with Pediatric Readiness in Emergency Departments in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Travis M. Whitfill, Katherine E. Remick, Lenora M. Olson, Rachel Richards, Kathleen M. Brown, Marc A. Auerbach, Marianne Gausche-HillObjectiveTo describe the relationship between statewide pediatric facility recognition (PFR) programs and pediatric readiness in emergency departments (EDs) in the US.Study designData were extracted from the 2013 National Pediatric Readiness Project assessment (4083 EDs). Pediatric readiness was assessed using the weighted pediatric readiness score (WPRS) based on a 100-point scale. Descriptive statistics were used to compare WPRS between recognized and nonrecognized EDs and between states with or without a PFR program. A linear mixed model with WPRS was used to evaluate state PFR programs on pediatric readiness.ResultsEight states were identified with a PFR program. EDs in states with a PFR program had a higher WPRS compared with states without a PFR program (overall a 9.1-point higher median WPRS; P 
       
  • Age-Specific Estimates and Comparisons of Youth Tri-Ponderal Mass Index
           and Body Mass Index in Predicting Adult Obesity-Related Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Feitong Wu, Marie-Jeanne Buscot, Harri Niinikoski, Suvi P. Rovio, Markus Juonala, Matthew A. Sabin, Antti Jula, Tapani Rönnemaa, Jorma S.A. Viikari, Olli T. Raitakari, Costan G. Magnussen, Katja PahkalaObjectivesTo estimate and compare tri-ponderal mass index (TMI) and body mass index (BMI) at each age from childhood to young adulthood in the prediction of adulthood obesity-related outcomes.Study designParticipants of this observational study (n = 432) were from a 20-year infancy-onset randomized atherosclerosis prevention trial. BMI and TMI were calculated using weight and height measured annually from participants between ages 2 and 20 years. Outcomes were aortic intima-media thickness (at the age of 15, 17, or 19 years), impaired fasting glucose and elevated insulin levels, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, serum lipids, and hypertension at the age of 20 years. Poisson regressions, Pearson correlation, logistic regression, and area under the curve (AUC) were used to estimate and/or compare associations and predictive utilities between BMI and TMI with all outcomes.ResultsThe associations and predictive utilities of BMI and TMI with all outcomes were stronger at older ages. BMI had significantly stronger correlations than TMI with insulin (at age 16 years), systolic blood pressure (age 5-20 years), and triglycerides (age 18 years). BMI had significantly greater predictive utilities than TMI for insulin resistance (at age 14-16 years; difference in AUC = 0.018-0.024), elevated insulin levels (age 14-16 years; difference in AUC = 0.018 and 0.025), and hypertension (age 16 to 20 years; difference in AUC = 0.017-0.022) but they were similar for other outcomes.ConclusionsTMI is not superior to BMI at any ages from childhood to young adulthood in the prediction of obesity-related outcomes in young adulthood.
       
  • Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis in Children without Obesity
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Kyle K. Obana, Ali A. Siddiqui, Alexander M. Broom, Kody Barrett, Lindsay M. Andras, Michael B. Millis, Rachel Y. GoldsteinObjectiveTo evaluate rates and characteristics of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in children who are not obese to prevent missed diagnoses and subsequent complications.Study designA multicenter, retrospective review identified all patients with SCFE from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2012. Patients were excluded if they received previous surgery at an outside institution, had no recorded height and weight, or had medical co-morbidity associated with increased risk of SCFE. Body mass index (BMI) percentile for age was calculated and categorized for each patient (patients without obesity vs with obesity).ResultsIn total, 275 patients met inclusion criteria. Average BMI was 91.2 percentile (range: 8.4-99.7). Thirteen percent (34 patients) were considered “normal weight” (BMI 5%-85%), 17% (48 patients) were considered “overweight” (BMI 85%- 95%), and 70% (193 patients) were considered “obese” (BMI>95%). Average BMI percentile was higher in male than female patients (93.2 ± 12.7 vs 88.5 ± 21.4, P = .034). Patients without obesity were older compared with patients with obesity (12.2 ± 1.7 vs 11.7 ± 1.6 years, P = .015). Fewer patients without obesity were seen at the hospital in the southwest. The southwest had fewer patients without obesity than the northeast (18.3% vs 36.1%, P = .002). Patients without obesity were more likely to present with a severe slip as graded by Wilson percent displacement (27.2% vs 11.4%, P = .007) and an unstable slip (32.9% vs 14.7%, P = .001).ConclusionRates of nonobese SCFE in this study are higher than reported in the previous literature. Normal weight patients with SCFE are more likely to be older, female, and present with a severe and unstable SCFE.
       
  • Differences in Early Childhood Maltreatment by Maternal Birthplace and
           Child Sex
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Ariel Pulver, Astrid Guttmann, Joel G. Ray, Patricia O'Campo, Marcelo L. UrquiaObjectiveTo identify patterns of health system-identified early childhood maltreatment by maternal birthplace and child sex, within a multicultural society with universal access to healthcare.Study designThis retrospective population-based cohort study included 1240946 children born in Ontario, Canada, between 2002 and 2012, and followed from birth to age 5 years using administrative data. Modified Poisson regression was used to estimate adjusted rate ratios for maltreatment—physical abuse or neglect—among the children of immigrant vs nonimmigrant mothers. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate further the odds of maltreatment comparing a daughter vs son of the same mother.ResultsMaltreatment rates were 36% lower (adjusted rate ratio, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.61-0.66) among children of immigrant mothers (10 per 1000) than those of nonimmigrant mothers (16 per 1000). Maltreatment rates were 27%-48% lower among children of maternal immigrant groups relative to that among Canadian-born mothers, except children of Caribbean-born mothers (16 per 1000). No significant differences were seen between daughters and sons in the odds of early childhood health system-identified maltreatment by maternal birthplace.ConclusionsHealth system-identified maltreatment in early childhood is highest among children of Canadian- and Caribbean-born mothers. Maltreatment did not differ between daughters and sons of the same mother. These data may inform strategies aimed at decreasing maltreatment among vulnerable groups.
       
  • Estimating the Relevance of Historical Red Flags in the Diagnosis of
           Abusive Head Trauma
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Kent P. Hymel, Gloria Lee, Stephen Boos, Wouter A. Karst, Andrew Sirotnak, Suzanne B. Haney, Antoinette Laskey, Ming Wang, Bruce E. Herman, Douglas F. Willson, Robin Foster, Veronica Armijo-Garcia, Sandeep K. Narang, Deborah A. Pullin, Jeanine M. Graf, Reena Isaac, Terra N. Frazier, Kelly S. Tieves, Edward Truemper, Christopher L. CarrollObjectiveTo replicate the previously published finding that the absence of a history of trauma in a child with obvious traumatic head injuries demonstrates high specificity and high positive predictive value (PPV) for abusive head trauma.Study designThis was a secondary analysis of a deidentified, cross-sectional dataset containing prospective data on 346 young children with acute head injury hospitalized for intensive care across 18 sites between 2010 and 2013, to estimate the diagnostic relevance of a caregiver's specific denial of any trauma, changing history of accidental trauma, or history of accidental trauma inconsistent with the child's gross motor skills. Cases were categorized as definite or not definite abusive head trauma based solely on patients' clinical and radiologic findings. For each presumptive historical “red flag,” we calculated sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratio (LR) with 95% CI for definite abusive head trauma in all patients and also in cohorts with normal, abnormal, or persistent abnormal neurologic status.ResultsA caregiver's specific denial of any trauma demonstrated a specificity of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.84-0.94), PPV of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.71-0.88), and a positive LR (LR+) of 4.83 (95% CI, 3.07-7.61) for definite abusive head trauma in all patients. Specificity and LR+ were lowest—not highest—in patients with persistent neurologic abnormalities. The 2 other historical red flags showed similar trends.ConclusionsA caregiver's specific denial of any trauma, changing history of accidental trauma, or history of accidental trauma that is developmentally inconsistent are each highly specific (>0.90) but may provide weaker support than previously reported for a diagnosis of abusive head trauma in patients with persistent neurologic abnormalities.
       
  • The +J ournal + of +P ediatrics :+Neonatal+HSV:+Many+Advances+and+the+Elusive+Promise+of+an+Effective+Vaccine&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in The J ournal of P ediatrics : Neonatal HSV: Many
           Advances and the Elusive Promise of an Effective Vaccine
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Michal Paret, Rebecca Pellett Madan
       
  • A Cross-Sectional Study of Caregiver Perceptions of Congenital
           Cytomegalovirus Infection: Knowledge and Attitudes about Screening
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Marissa L. Diener, Kevin Shi, Albert H. ParkObjectivesTo understand caregiver knowledge of and attitudes toward congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) testing in Utah.Study designWe surveyed 365 caregivers whose children were being seen in an otolaryngology clinic at a tertiary pediatric hospital about their knowledge of and attitudes toward cCMV and cCMV screening. Descriptive statistics and cluster analysis were used to examine their responses.ResultsThe majority of caregivers were unsure how cCMV was spread, the symptoms of cCMV, and why cCMV screening of infants was important. Most caregivers did not know that cCMV screening was required by law in Utah if an infant is referred after newborn hearing screening. A majority wanted to know if their child had cCMV even if asymptomatic and were willing to pay $20 for cCMV screening. Caregivers of children who had been tested for cCMV were significantly more likely to be strongly in favor of cCMV screening than expected by chance. Caregivers in the highly knowledgeable cluster were more likely to be strongly in favor of cCMV screening.ConclusionsCaregivers frequently were unaware of cCMV and its implications. Attitudes toward cCMV screening generally were positive. Education on epidemiology and impact of cCMV may benefit both prevention of infection and attitudes toward screening.
       
  • Geospatial Analyses of Accessibility to Down Syndrome Specialty Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Nicholas Joslyn, Heidi Berger, Brian G. SkotkoObjectiveTo assess whether the location of 71 Down syndrome specialty care clinics in the US make them inaccessible to a considerable portion of the American population.Study designUsing a population-based representative sample of 64 761 individuals with Down syndrome and a Google Maps Application Programming Interface Python program, we calculated the distance each patient with Down syndrome would need to travel to reach the nearest clinic. Two conceptualizations were used—the state fluidity method, which allowed an individual to cross state lines for care and the state boundary method, which required individuals receive care in their state of residence.ResultsAlmost 1 in 5 US individuals face significant geographic obstacles to receiving specialty care. This finding is especially prominent in the South, where>33% of patients with Down syndrome must travel>2 hours to reach their nearest clinic.ConclusionsDown syndrome specialty care clinics are inaccessible to a considerable portion of American society. Innovative usage of technology might be useful to minimize these disparities in healthcare accessibility.
       
  • Mortality Among Children with Down syndrome in Hong Kong: A
           Population-Based Cohort Study from Birth
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Gilbert T. Chua, Keith T.S. Tung, Ian C.K. Wong, Terry Y.S. Lum, Wilfred H.S. Wong, Chun-Bong Chow, Frederick K. Ho, Rosa S. Wong, Patrick IpObjectivesTo describe the mortality patterns, comorbidities, and attendance at accident and emergency departments among children with Down syndrome in Hong Kong.Study designThis is a population-based, retrospective cohort study of live births of children with Down syndrome delivered between 1995 and 2014, as identified from territory-wide hospitalization data in Hong Kong. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was adopted to estimate the survival probabilities of children with Down syndrome by selected demographic and clinical characteristics. Cox regression analyses were conducted to examine associations of comorbidities and accident and emergency department accident and emergency departments attendances with mortality patterns.ResultsThere were 1010 live births of children with Down syndrome in Hong Kong within the study period and the average rate of live births with Down syndrome was 8.0 per 10 000 live births (95% CI, 6.8-9.30). The rate of live births with Down syndrome over the past 2 decades decreased from 11.8 per 10 000 live births in 1995 to 3.4 per 10 000 in 2014. Eighty-three patients with Down syndrome died during this period. The overall 6-month and 1- and 5-year survival probabilities were 95.8%, 94.4%, and 92.6%, respectively. There was a significant decrease in mortality rates over the study period, particularly among those born between 2000-2004 and 2005-2009 compared with those born between 1995 and 1999 (P 
       
  • Nutritional Status in Adolescents with Esophageal Atresia
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Kjersti Birketvedt, Audun Mikkelsen, Louise L. Klingen, Christine Henriksen, Ingrid B. Helland, Ragnhild EmblemObjectivesTo examine factors that may affect nutritional status in adolescents with esophageal atresia.Study designAnthropometric measurements, blood samples, pH measuring, mapping of dysphagia with a modified Easting Assessment Test questionnaire, 4-day dietary record, and a semistructured interview about eating habits and nutrition counseling were performed in a cross-sectional cohort of adolescents with esophageal atresia.ResultsOut of 102 eligible patients, 68 (67%) participated. The median height-for-age Z score was −0.6 (−4.6 to 1.8). Ten (15%) were classified as stunted (height-for-age Z score
       
  • Seamless Management of Juvenile Autoimmune Liver Disease: Long-Term
           Medical and Social Outcome
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Angelo Di Giorgio, Nedim Hadzic, Anil Dhawan, Maesha Deheragoda, Michael A. Heneghan, Diego Vergani, Giorgina Mieli-Vergani, Marianne SamynObjectivesTo report baseline features and long-term medical/social outcomes of juvenile autoimmune liver disease, including autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC), managed in a single tertiary center.Study designRetrospective study of children diagnosed in 2000-2004 with AIH/ASC followed up to date. Patients with abnormal cholangiogram were classified as ASC. Presentation and outcome features were compared.ResultsEighty-three children were included (42 female, median age 12.1 years [8.5-14.1 years], AIH = 54, ASC = 29). Most (65%) had antinuclear and/or anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies; 6% presented with acute liver failure; 29% had histologic evidence of cirrhosis. The 1999 and simplified International Autoimmune Hepatitis Group criteria failed to diagnose up to 26% of patients with AIH and 48% with ASC, and the proposed the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition criteria were accurate. Response to treatment was excellent with 95% achieving normal transaminase levels. During follow-up, 31% had at least 1 relapse episode; 3 patients with AIH developed cholangiopathy and 5 patients with ASC developed progressive bile duct injury. At last follow-up (median of 14.5 years, 10.4-16.8), 99% were alive, 11 underwent transplantation and 1 is listed for transplant. Five-, 10-, and 15-year transplant-free survival rates were 95%, 88%, and 83%; patients with ASC and those relapsing being more likely to require transplant. Social outcome was excellent with 93% in employment/education.ConclusionsSeamless management of juvenile autoimmune liver disease leads to excellent clinical and social outcomes. Despite good response to immunosuppressive treatment, patients with ASC have a worse prognosis than those with AIH. Diagnostic models developed for adults are unsatisfactory to correctly diagnose juvenile autoimmune liver disease.
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+50+years+of+progress+in+renal+cell+carcinoma:+From+case+reports+to+targeted+therapy&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : 50 years of progress in
           renal cell carcinoma: From case reports to targeted therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Kevin Campbell, Elizabeth Mullen
       
  • Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Autonomic Nervous System
           Dysfunction, and Joint Hypermobility in Children: Are They Related'
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Carlos Alberto Velasco-Benitez, Cara Axelrod, Lilibet Fernandez Valdes, Miguel SapsObjectivesTo evaluate the prevalence of orthostatic intolerance and joint hypermobility in schoolchildren with and without functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and to assess autonomic nervous system dysfunction in children with FGIDs and joint hypermobility.Study designSchoolchildren (10-18 years) attending public schools from 3 Colombian cities (Cali, Palmira, and Bucaramanga) completed validated questionnaires for FGIDs and underwent testing for hypermobility and autonomic nervous system dysfunction. Heart rate and blood pressure were assessed in recumbency and upright position at regular intervals. The differences in characteristics between schoolchildren with and without FGIDs were compared with a t-test for continuous variables and with a Fisher exact test (2 × 2 contingency tables) for categorical variables.ResultsIn total, 155 children with FGIDs were matched with 151 healthy controls. Children with FGIDs had historically significant greater frequency of 10 of 12 symptoms of orthostatic intolerance, no significant difference in any symptoms of orthostatic intolerance during recumbency, significantly greater frequency in 6 of 12 symptoms of orthostatic intolerance during orthostasis, trend toward statistical significance for orthostatic intolerance (P = .0509), and no significant difference in prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). There was no significant difference in prevalence of orthostatic intolerance, OH, and POTS between those with joint hypermobility and those without.ConclusionsChildren with FGIDs have a greater prevalence of symptoms of orthostatic intolerance but were not more likely to have OH and POTS as compared with children without FGIDs. Children with joint hypermobility did not have a greater prevalence of orthostatic intolerance, OH, and POTS.
       
  • Dysbiosis Signatures of Fecal Microbiota in South African Infants with
           Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, and Other Diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Srinivasan Krishnamoorthy, Vinet Coetzee, Johanita Kruger, Hanneke Potgieter, Elna M. BuysObjectiveTo determine the association between the fecal microbiota diversity of the infants with different disease conditions, and vitamin A supplementation, antibiotic, and deworming therapies.Study designIn this case-control study, the bacterial community variations and the potential pathogens were identified through 16S ribosomal RNA gene-based amplicon sequencing and quantitative insights into microbial ecology pipeline in fecal samples. The participants were South African infants (mean age, 16 ± 8 months; 17 male and 17 female) hospitalized and diagnosed with gastrointestinal, respiratory, and other diseases.ResultsThe top phyla of the infants with respiratory disease were Proteobacteria, followed by Firmicutes, which were equally abundant in gastrointestinal disease. A significant difference in Shannon (alpha) diversity index (95% CI, 2.6-4.4; P = .008), among the microbiota of the fecal samples categorized by disease conditions, was observed. In beta diversity analysis of fecal microbiota, remarkable variations were found within the groups of deworming therapy (95% CI, 0.40-0.90; P = .033), disease conditions (95% CI, 0.44-0.86; P 
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Exploring+the+relationship+between+growth+hormone+and+thyroid+function&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Exploring the
           relationship between growth hormone and thyroid function
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Rasha Alradadi, John S. Fuqua
       
  • Clinically Asymptomatic Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Infants with
           Single-Ventricle Physiology
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Robyn W. Stamm, Brandon M. Henry, Hemant Sawnani, Narong Simakajornboon, Geoffrey Rulong, Nicholas J. Ollberding, Samuel P. Hanke, Thomas J. Dye, David S. CooperObjectivesTo assess clinically asymptomatic infants with single-ventricle physiology (SVP) for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in the supine and car seat positions using polysomnography. Polysomnography results also were compared with results of a standard Car Seat Challenge to measure the dependability of the standard Car Seat Challenge.Study designThis was an observational study of 15 infants with SVP. Polysomnography data included Obstructive Index, Central Index, Arousal Index, Apnea Hypopnea Index, and sleep efficiency. Polysomnography heart rate and oxygen saturation data were used to compare polysomnography with the standard Car Seat Challenge.ResultsPolysomnography demonstrated that all 15 infants had SDB and 14 had obstructive sleep apnea (Obstructive Index ≥1/hour) in both the supine and car seat positions. Infants with SVP had a statistically significant greater median Obstructive Index in the car seat compared with supine position (6.3 vs 4.2; P = .03), and median spontaneous Arousal Index was greater in the supine position compared with the car seat (20.4 vs 15.2; P = .01). Comparison of polysomnography to standard Car Seat Challenge results demonstrated 5 of 15 (33%) of infants with SVP with abnormal Obstructive Index by polysomnography would have passed a standard Car Seat Challenge.ConclusionsInfants with SVP without clinical symptoms of SDB may be at high risk for SDB that appears worse in the car seat position. The standard Car Seat Challenge is not dependable in the identification of infants with SVP and SDB. Further studies are warranted to further delineate its potential impact of SDB on the clinical outcomes of infants with SVP.
       
  • he +J ournal + of +P ediatrics :+The+Micro-Erythrocyte+Sedimentation+Rate+in+Newborn+Infants&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : The Micro-Erythrocyte
           Sedimentation Rate in Newborn Infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Aleyda Monreal-Malacara, Angela Liliana Ruiz Barreto
       
  • he +J ournal + of +P ediatrics :+Sodium+Concentration+in+Unstimulated+Parotid+Saliva+and+on+Oral+Mucosa+in+Normal+Subjects+and+Patients+with+Cystic+Fibrosis&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Sodium Concentration in
           Unstimulated Parotid Saliva and on Oral Mucosa in Normal Subjects and
           Patients with Cystic Fibrosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Thomas F. Boat
       
  • The Importance of Echocardiogram during the Second Week of Illness in
           Children with Kawasaki Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Shani Ma, So Yung Choi, Hyeong Jun Ahn, Andrea M. Siu, Marian E. Melish, Andras BratincsakObjectiveTo determine the timing of peak coronary artery dilation and the characteristics of patients who present with new-onset coronary artery dilation during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease with an initial normal echocardiogram.Study designThis retrospective study analyzed 231 children hospitalized for Kawasaki disease in Hawai'i over a period of 7 years. Clinical and echocardiographic data were collected to calculate the timing of peak z score, and study subjects were compared based on the timing of coronary dilation.ResultsPeak coronary artery dilation was observed on average at 11.5 days from the onset of fever (median 8, IQR 7-13 days). Among study subjects with normal z scores in both coronary arteries during the initial encounter and echocardiogram (n = 164), 16 (10%) developed coronary artery dilation or aneurysm at the second echocardiogram, and 5 (3%) continued to have coronary artery dilation or aneurysm at the convalescent phase.ConclusionsA repeat echocardiogram during the second week of illness (day 7-14 from fever onset) in patients with normal initial echocardiogram could identify new-onset coronary artery dilation or aneurysm and could be useful in the timely adjustment of antithrombotic or anti-inflammatory therapies.
       
  • Three-Variate Longitudinal Patterns of Metabolic Control, Body Mass Index,
           and Insulin Dose during Puberty in a Type 1 Diabetes Cohort: A Group-Based
           Multitrajectory Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Anke Schwandt, Oliver Kuss, Desiree Dunstheimer, Beate Karges, Thomas Kapellen, Thomas Meissner, Michael Witsch, Monika Flury, Stefanie Straubinger, Reinhard W. Holl, Diabetes-Patienten-Verlaufsdokumentation (DPV) InitiativeObjectiveTo analyze the interrelationship of metabolic control, age- and sex-adjusted body mass index, and daily insulin dose and to identify heterogeneous multivariate developmental curves from childhood to young adulthood in a large cohort of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D)Study designData were extracted from the diabetes follow-up registry DPV. Longitudinal data from 9239 participants with T1D age 8-18 years with diabetes duration ≥2 years and ≥5 years of follow-up were analyzed. We applied group-based multitrajectory modeling to identify latent groups of subjects following similar developmental curves across outcomes (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], age/sex-standardized body mass index [BMI-SDS], daily insulin dose per kg). Group number was based on Bayes information criterion and group size (≥5%).ResultsThe group-based multitrajectory approach revealed 5 heterogeneous 3-variate trajectories during puberty. Individuals with stable good metabolic control, high-normal increasing BMI-SDS, and rising insulin dose patterns were classified as group 1 (33%). Group 2 (20%) comprised youths with intermediate-increasing HbA1c, low BMI-SDS, and steeply increasing insulin dose trajectories. Group 3 (11%) followed intermediate-rising HbA1c and high-normal increasing BMI-SDS developmental curves, while insulin dose increased steeply. In group 4 (14%), both high-increasing HbA1c and insulin dose trajectories were observed, while BMI-SDS was stable-normal. Group 5 (22%) included subjects with intermediate-rising HbA1c patterns, high-increasing BMI-SDS, and increasing insulin dose patterns.ConclusionsThis study identified 5 distinct 3-variate curves of HbA1c, BMI-SDS, and insulin dose during puberty among youths with T1D. This approach demonstrates a considerable heterogeneity highlighting the importance of personalized medical care.
       
  • he +J ournal + of +P ediatrics :+Chromosome+Studies+in+Full+Term,+Low+Birth+Weight,+Mentally+Retarded+Patients&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Chromosome Studies in
           Full Term, Low Birth Weight, Mentally Retarded Patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Jannicke H. Andresen, Ola Didrik Saugstad
       
  • Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Human Milk Intake at Neonatal Intensive
           Care Unit Discharge among Very Low Birth Weight Infants in California
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Jessica Liu, Margaret G. Parker, Tianyao Lu, Shannon M. Conroy, John Oehlert, Henry C. Lee, Scarlett Lin Gomez, Salma Shariff-Marco, Jochen ProfitObjectivesTo examine how infant and maternal factors, hospital factors, and neighborhood-level factors impact or modify racial/ethnic disparities in human milk intake at hospital discharge among very low birth weight infants.Study designWe studied 14 422 infants from 119 California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative neonatal intensive care units born from 2008 to 2011. Maternal addresses were linked to 2010 census tract data, representing neighborhoods. We tested for associations with receiving no human milk at discharge, using multilevel cross-classified models.ResultsCompared with non-Hispanic whites, the adjusted odds of no human milk at discharge was higher among non-Hispanic blacks (aOR 1.33 [1.16-1.53]) and lower among Hispanics (aOR 0.83 [0.74-0.93]). Compared with infants of more educated white mothers, infants of less educated white, black, and Asian mothers had higher odds of no human milk at discharge, and infants of Hispanic mothers of all educational levels had similar odds as infants of more educated white mothers. Country of birth and neighborhood socioeconomic was also associated with disparities in human milk intake at discharge.ConclusionsNon-Hispanic blacks had the highest and Hispanic infants the lowest odds of no human milk at discharge. Maternal education and country of birth were the biggest drivers of disparities in human milk intake, suggesting the need for targeted approaches of breastfeeding support.
       
  • Latent Class Analysis of Low Birth Weight and Preterm Delivery among
           Australian Women
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Michael Hendryx, Catherine Chojenta, Julie E. BylesObjectivesTo identify patterns of health, socioeconomic, behavioral, and psychosocial indicators that may be associated with low birth weight delivery or preterm birth.Study designData were analyzed from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. A total of 9075 live singleton births among 3801 women were linked to state perinatal records with birth outcome data. Survey data were used to identify 11 indicators for latent class analysis. Latent classes were tested for association to birth outcomes. These indicators also were used along with covariates in main effect multiple logistic regression analyses of birth outcomes.ResultsLatent class analysis revealed 5 classes, including those characterized by low education, recent drug use, stress/anxiety/depression, smoking/drinking/low education/multi-risk, and a low risk referent group. The stress/anxiety/depression class was associated with preterm delivery (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.20-2.92), and the smoking/drinking/low education/multirisk class was associated with low birth weight (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.02-2.30). Traditional logistic regression analyses for main effects identified some measures not captured by the latent classes, and the latent classes identified variable combinations not captured by the main effect analysis.ConclusionsUnique latent classes were associated with preterm delivery vs low birth weight. Both latent class analysis and main effects analyses may be combined to improve understanding of birth outcome risks. Clinical and programmatic interventions to reduce risks of low birth weight and preterm delivery may benefit from risk profiles that women experience.
       
  • Reducing Tobacco Smoke Exposure in High-Risk Infants: A Randomized,
           Controlled Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Angela L. Stotts, Thomas F. Northrup, Charles Green, Robert Suchting, Melbourne F. Hovell, Amir Khan, Yolanda R. Villarreal, Joy M. Schmitz, Mary M. Velasquez, S. Katharine Hammond, Eunha Hoh, Jon TysonObjectiveTo evaluate a hospital-initiated intervention to reduce tobacco smoke exposure in infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.Study designA randomized, controlled trial compared motivational interviewing plus financial incentives with conventional care on infant urine cotinine at 1 and 4 months' follow-up. Mothers of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (N = 360) who reported a smoker living in the home were enrolled. Motivational interviewing sessions were delivered in both the hospital and the home. Financial incentives followed session attendance and negative infant cotinine tests postdischarge.ResultsThe intervention effect on infant cotinine was not significant, except among mothers who reported high baseline readiness/ability to protect their infant (P ≤ .01) and mothers who completed the study within 6 months postdischarge (per protocol; P ≤ .05). Fewer mothers in the motivational interviewing plus financial incentives condition were smoking postdischarge (P ≤ .01). More mothers in the motivational interviewing plus financial incentives group reported a total home and car smoking ban at follow-up (P ≤ .05).ConclusionsMotivational interviewing combined with financial incentives reduced infant tobacco smoke exposure in a subset of women who were ready/able to protect their infant. The intervention also resulted in less maternal smoking postpartum. More robust interventions that include maternal and partner/household smoking cessation are likely needed to reduce the costly effects of tobacco smoke exposure on children and their families.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01726062.
       
  • Prenatal Exposure to Tobacco and Offspring Neurocognitive Development in
           the Healthy Start Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Brianna F. Moore, Allison L. Shapiro, Greta Wilkening, Sheryl Magzamen, Anne P. Starling, William B. Allshouse, John L. Adgate, Dana DabeleaObjectiveTo explore the associations between prenatal exposure to tobacco and neurocognitive development, in the absence of prematurity or low birth weight.Study designWe followed mother-child pairs within Healthy Start through 6 years of age. Children were born at ≥37 weeks of gestation with a birth weight of ≥2500 g. Parents completed the Third Edition Ages and Stages Questionnaire (n = 246) and children completed a subset of the National Institutes of Health Toolbox Cognition Battery (n = 200). The Ages and Stages Questionnaire domains were dichotomized as fail/monitor and pass. Maternal urinary cotinine was measured at approximately 27 weeks of gestation. Separate logistic regression models estimated associations between prenatal exposure to tobacco (cotinine below vs above the limit of detection) and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire domains. Separate linear regression models estimated associations between prenatal exposure to tobacco and fully corrected T-scores for inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, and receptive language, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Toolbox. A priori covariates included sex, maternal age, maternal education, daily caloric intake during pregnancy, race/ethnicity, household income, maternal psychiatric disorders, and, in secondary models, postnatal exposure to tobacco.ResultsCompared with unexposed offspring, exposed offspring were more likely to receive a fail/monitor score for fine motor skills (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.5-10.3) and decreased inhibitory control (B: −3.0; 95% CI, −6.1 to −0.7). After adjusting for postnatal exposure, only the association with fine motor skills persisted.ConclusionsPrenatal and postnatal exposures to tobacco may influence neurocognitive development, in the absence of preterm delivery or low birth weight. Increased developmental screening may be warranted for exposed children.
       
  • he +J ournal+of +P ediatrics :+Neurofibromatosis+in+Childhood&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Neurofibromatosis in
           Childhood
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Philip F. Giampietro
       
  • Factors Associated with Neurodevelopmental Impairment in Bronchopulmonary
           Dysplasia
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Sarah E. Bauer, Lydia Schneider, Susan K. Lynch, Daniel T. Malleske, Edward G. Shepherd, Leif D. NelinObjectiveTo identify factors associated with neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI) in patients with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).Study designWe identified 151 patients with moderate to severe BPD from 2010 to 2014 with complete Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID) scores at 24 months corrected age. We defined NDI as any diagnosis of cerebral palsy or ≥1 BSID composite scores of
       
  • he +J ournal + of +P ediatrics :+Renal+Homotransplantations+in+Children&rft.title=Journal+of+Pediatrics&rft.issn=0022-3476&rft.date=&rft.volume=">50 Years Ago in T he J ournal of P ediatrics : Renal
           Homotransplantations in Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Lainie Friedman Ross
       
  • It's Time to Get Serious about Pediatric Readiness
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Kenneth A. Michelson
       
  • Breastfeeding, Baby-Friendly, and Safety: Getting the Balance Right
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Robin H. Steinhorn
       
  • Scurvy: Remember to obtain a dietary history in inflammatory
           “rheumatic” conditions
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Philip Hashkes
       
  • Mothers' knowledge about congenital cytomegalovirus infection is
           associated with desire for infants' screening
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Sarah S. Long
       
  • Get the most out of your data
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): James F. Padbury
       
  • Tight glycemic control in critically ill children
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Philip Toltzis
       
  • Improving our understanding of rare neonatal diseases: Neonatal
           arteriovenous brain malformations with cardiac failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Raye-Ann deRegnier
       
  • Who should care for children with Down syndrome'
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s): Paul G. Fisher
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 218Author(s):
       
  • An In┬áVivo Assessment of Regional Brain Temperature during Whole-Body
           Cooling for Neonatal Encephalopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Tai-Wei Wu, Jessica L. Wisnowski, Robert F. Geisler, Aaron Reitman, Eugenia Ho, Benita Tamrazi, Rachel Chapman, Stefan BlümlObjectiveTo assess differences in regional brain temperatures during whole-body hypothermia and test the hypothesis that brain temperature profile is nonhomogenous in infants with hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy.Study designInfants with hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy were enrolled prospectively in this observational study. Magnetic resonance (MR) spectra of basal ganglia, thalamus, cortical gray matter, and white matter (WM) were acquired during therapeutic hypothermia. Regional brain tissue temperatures were calculated from the chemical shift difference between water signal and metabolites in the MR spectra after performing calibration measurements. Overall difference in regional temperature was analyzed by mixed-effects model; temperature among different patterns and severity of injury on MR imaging also was analyzed. Correlation between temperature and depth of brain structure was analyzed using repeated-measures correlation.ResultsIn total, 53 infants were enrolled (31 girls, mean gestational age: 38.6 ± 2 weeks; mean birth weight: 3243 ± 613 g). MR spectroscopy was acquired at mean age of 2.2 ± 0.6 days. A total of 201 MR spectra were included in the analysis. The thalamus, the deepest structure (36.4 ± 2.3 mm from skull surface), was lowest in temperature (33.2 ± 0.8°C, compared with basal ganglia: 33.5 ± 0.9°C; gray matter: 33.6 ± 0.7°C; WM: 33.8 ± 0.9°C, all P < .001). Temperatures in more superficial gray matter and WM regions (depth: 21.9 ± 2.4 and 21.5 ± 2.2 mm) were greater than the rectal temperatures (33.4 ± 0.4°C, P < .03). There was a negative correlation between temperature and depth of brain structure (rrm = −0.36, P < .001).ConclusionsWhole-body hypothermia was effective in cooling deep brain structures, whereas superficial structures were warmer, with temperatures significantly greater than rectal temperatures.
       
  • Parental Weight Status and Offspring Behavioral Problems and Psychiatric
           Symptoms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Sonia L. Robinson, Akhgar Ghassabian, Rajeshwari Sundaram, Mai-Han Trinh, Tzu-Chun Lin, Erin M. Bell, Edwina YeungObjectivesTo assess relations of prepregnancy maternal and paternal obesity with offspring behavioral problems and psychiatric symptoms at 7-8 years in the Upstate KIDS study, a prospective cohort study.Study designMaternal body mass index (BMI) was calculated from prepregnancy height and weight provided in vital records or self-report at 4 months postpartum. Mothers reported paternal height and weight. At 7-8 years, mothers indicated if their children had been diagnosed with ADHD or anxiety (n = 1915). Additionally, children's behavior was measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire at 7 years of age (n = 1386) and the Vanderbilt ADHD Diagnostic Parent Rating Scale at 8 years of age (n = 1484). Based on Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores, we identified children with borderline behavioral problems. Adjusted risk ratios (aRR) and 95% CIs were estimated with robust multivariable Poisson regression.ResultsCompared with children of mothers with a BMI of
       
  • Identifying Patients at Lowest Risk for Streptococcal Pharyngitis: A
           National Validation Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Daniel J. Shapiro, Yuval Barak-Corren, Mark I. Neuman, Kenneth D. Mandl, Marvin B. Harper, Andrew M. FineObjectivesTo determine the prevalence of features of viral illness in a national sample of visits involving children tested for group A Streptococcus pharyngitis. Additionally, we sought to derive a decision rule to identify patients with features of viral illness who were at low risk of having group A Streptococcus and for whom laboratory testing might be avoided.Study designRetrospective validation study using data from electronic health records of patients 3−21 years old evaluated for sore throat in a national network of retail health clinics (n = 67 127). We determined the prevalence of features of viral illness in patients tested for group A Streptococcus and developed a decision tree algorithm to identify patients with features of viral illness at low risk (
       
  • Evaluation of Home Phototherapy for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Pearl W. Chang, Whitney M. WaiteObjectiveTo characterize home phototherapy treatment for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and assess the risk factors associated with the need for hospital admission during or after home phototherapy.Study designThis was a retrospective study of newborn infants born at ≥35 weeks of gestation who underwent comprehensive home phototherapy (that included daily in-home lactation support and blood draws) over an 18-month period. We excluded infants who lacked a recorded birth date or time, started treatment at age>14 days, or had a conjugated serum bilirubin level of ≥2 mg/dL (≥34.2 μmol/L). The primary study outcome was any hospital admission during or within 24 hours after completion of home phototherapy. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for hospitalization.ResultsOf the cohort of 1385 infants, 1324 met the inclusion criteria. At the time home phototherapy was initiated, 376 infants (28%) were at or above the American Academy of Pediatrics phototherapy threshold. Twenty-five infants required hospitalization (1.9%; 95% CI, 1.3%-2.8%). Hospital admission was associated with a younger age at phototherapy initiation (OR, 0.63 for each day older in age; 95% CI, 0.44-0.91) and a higher total serum bilirubin level relative to the treatment threshold at phototherapy initiation (OR, 1.71 for each 1 mg/dL above the treatment threshold; 95% CI, 1.40-2.08).ConclusionsComprehensive home phototherapy successfully treated hyperbilirubinemia in the vast majority of the infants in this cohort.
       
  • Reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Melissa Bartick, Barbara L. Philipp, Lori Feldman-Winter
       
  • Intravenous Fish Oil Monotherapy as a Source of Calories and Fatty Acids
           Promotes Age-Appropriate Growth in Pediatric Patients with Intestinal
           Failure-Associated Liver Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Kathleen Gura, Muralidhar H. Premkumar, Kara L. Calkins, Mark PuderObjectiveTo compare growth in children with intestinal failure-associated liver disease (IFALD) who received a fish oil intravenous lipid emulsion (FOLE) to those who received a soybean oil intravenous lipid emulsion (SOLE).Study designThis multisite, retrospective study pair-matched FOLE (n = 82) to SOLE recipients (n = 41) using baseline serum direct bilirubin levels and postmenstrual age. Study subjects received open-label FOLE (1 g/kg/day) until IFALD resolved or parenteral nutrition was stopped. Historical control subjects received SOLE (up to 3 g/kg/day). Growth measures (changes in body weight, height/length, and head circumference), prealbumin, triglycerides, and glucose were compared between groups over time using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test.ResultsAlthough changes in all of the growth measures were similar for both groups (P > .05), FOLE recipients demonstrated an overall improved growth trajectory. After 28 weeks, FOLE recipients had a mean body weight within a z score range of −1 to 1 indicating age-appropriate growth. FOLE recipients consistently had higher prealbumin, lower triglyceride, and more normal glucose concentrations over time compared with SOLE recipients.ConclusionsChildren with IFALD who received FOLE had similar growth and fewer metabolic abnormalities compared with those who received SOLE.Trial registrationClinicaltrials.gov: NCT00910104 and NCT00738101.
       
  • Body Mass Index Trajectories in Early Life Is Predictive of
           Cardiometabolic Risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Yue Yuan, Chao Chu, Wen-Ling Zheng, Qiong Ma, Jia-Wen Hu, Yang Wang, Yu Yan, Yue-Yuan Liao, Jian-Jun MuObjectiveTo identify distinct body mass index (BMI) trajectories across the life-course and explore the effects of BMI trajectories on the adult cardiovascular disease outcomes using a dataset with 30 years of follow-up in northern China.Study designA total of 2839 participants aged 6-18 years whose BMIs were measured 3-6 times during the Hanzhong Adolescent Hypertension Study were included in our analysis. Latent mixture modeling was used to clarify distinct BMI trajectories in longitudinal analyses.ResultsThree groups with distinct trajectories in BMI were identified by the latent mixed models: a low-increasing group (n = 1324 [36.64%]), a moderate-increasing group (n = 1178 [16.89%]), and a high-increasing group (n = 337 [39.46%]). Compared with the participants in the low-increasing group, the risk ratios of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, high-risk triglycerides, and high-risk high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were more than 3.0 in the high-increasing group (all P 
       
  • Heterogeneous Liver on Research Ultrasound Identifies Children with Cystic
           Fibrosis at High Risk of Advanced Liver Disease: Interim Results of a
           Prospective Observational Case-Controlled Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Marilyn J. Siegel, A. Jay Freeman, Wen Ye, Joseph J. Palermo, Jean P. Molleston, Shruti M. Paranjape, Janis Stoll, Daniel Leung, Prakash Masand, Boaz Karmazyn, Roger Harned, Simon C. Ling, Oscar M. Navarro, Wikrom Karnsakul, Adina Alazraki, Sarah Jane Schwarzenberg, Frank Glen Seidel, Alex Towbin, Estella M. Alonso, Jennifer L. NicholasObjectiveTo assess if a heterogeneous pattern on research liver ultrasound examination can identify children at risk for advanced cystic fibrosis (CF) liver disease.Study designPlanned 4-year interim analysis of a 9-year multicenter, case-controlled cohort study (Prospective Study of Ultrasound to Predict Hepatic Cirrhosis in CF). Children with pancreatic insufficient CF aged 3-12 years without known cirrhosis, Burkholderia species infection, or short bowel syndrome underwent a screening research ultrasound examination. Participants with a heterogeneous liver ultrasound pattern were matched (by age, Pseudomonas infection status, and center) 1:2 with participants with a normal pattern. Clinical status and laboratory data were obtained annually and research ultrasound examinations biannually. The primary end point was the development of a nodular research ultrasound pattern, a surrogate for advanced CF liver disease.ResultsThere were 722 participants who underwent screening research ultrasound examination, of which 65 were heterogeneous liver ultrasound pattern and 592 normal liver ultrasound pattern. The final cohort included 55 participants with a heterogeneous liver ultrasound pattern and 116 participants with a normal liver ultrasound pattern. All participants with at least 1 follow-up research ultrasound were included. There were no differences in age or sex between groups at entry. Alanine aminotransferase (42 ± 22 U/L vs 32 ± 19 U/L; P = .0033), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (36 ± 34 U/L vs 15 ± 8 U/L; P 
       
  • Geographic Variation in Sudden Unexpected Infant Death in the United
           States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Edwin A. Mitchell, Xiaohan Yan, Shirley You Ren, Tatiana M. Anderson, Jan-Marino Ramirez, Juan M. Lavista Ferres, Richard JohnstonObjectivesTo assess the geographic variation of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) and test if variation in geographic factors, such as state, latitude, and longitude, play a role in SUID risk across the US.Study designWe analyzed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Cohort Linked Birth/Infant Death dataset (2005-2010; 22 882 SUID cases, 25 305 837 live births, rate 0.90/1000). SUID was defined as infant deaths (ages 7-364 days) that included sudden infant death syndrome, ill-defined and unknown cause of mortality, and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. SUID geographic variation was analyzed using 2 statistical models, logistic regression and generalized additive model (GAM).ResultsBoth models produced similar results. Without adjustment, there was marked geographic variation in SUID rates, but the variation decreased after adjusting for covariates including known risk factors for SUID. After adjustment, nine states demonstrated significantly higher or lower SUID mortality than the national average. Geographic contribution to SUID risk in terms of latitude and longitude were also attenuated after adjustment for covariates.ConclusionUnderstanding why some states have lower SUID rates may enhance SUID prevention strategies.
       
  • Differences in Reporting Child Health Needs and Status and Developmental
           Concerns between Mothers and Fathers: Findings from the National Survey of
           Children's Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s): Thomas K. Hagerman, Adam C. Carle, Amy J. HoutrowNationally representative data of 140 000 children in 2-parent households showed that fathers were more likely than mothers to report that a child was in good health and less likely to report the presence of a specific health condition, special health care needs, or unmet health service needs.
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s):
       
  • Correction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s):
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: The Journal of PediatricsAuthor(s):
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.233.221.149
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-