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Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.681
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1002  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0961-0006 - ISSN (Online) 1741-6477
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1086 journals]
  • Moving with the media: An exploration of how migrant communities in New
           Zealand use social media
    • Authors: Kingsley T. Ihejirika, Maja Krtalic
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores why and how migrants use social media in different phases of the migration process, how they manage personal information on social media during migration, and whether they use libraries’ social media in any of the migration phases. An anonymous questionnaire was used to collect opinions and investigate the activities of migrant communities in New Zealand in the three above mentioned areas. The paper presents the results of a descriptive statistical analysis performed on the data. These results were categorized and presented under the following themes: demographic data, use of social media during migration, personal information management practices on social media, use of library social media during migration, issues arising from the use of social media during migration and positive impact of social media during migration.The main findings of our research showed that in the transitioning phase migrants use social media mostly for making the decision to move. In the settling phase, social media help them to cushion the anxieties associated with a move and also help them to make an informed decision in the new country. In the settled phase, participants used social media to stay connected with family and friends in the home country. Language barriers can restrict the use of social media during the moving process. Personal information on social media is not recognized as important and is not managed in any particular way. Libraries are present in the life of migrants but more as physical spaces and services than through their social media presence. Findings from this study can be of interest to libraries and other information providers developing services for migrants in physical and digital environments.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-23T07:25:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620911694
       
  • A study on the evaluation analysis of the library’s social values
    • Authors: Younghee Noh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this research is to develop evaluation indicators for assessing the social value of libraries. To this end, preliminary evaluation indicators were derived from a comprehensive analysis of approximately 60 domestic and overseas papers which focus on the value of libraries. On the basis of the derived preliminary evaluation indicators, 11 experts were selected and the final evaluation indicators were developed by conducting a Delphi survey three times. The final evaluation indicators are composed of five main issues, which are divided into areas around the social value of libraries. Included in this process are: the development of local communities, the network of local communities, the improvement of local residents’ quality of life, the levels of equal opportunities for local residents, and the information services necessary for local communities, along with 12 evaluation items, and 64 evaluation indicators. Based on this, public librarians and users were surveyed to obtain a measurement of the social value of libraries. Results showed that in general, there are negligible differences between genders and varying age groups. There are, however, significant differences in perception between people who visit the library with different frequencies; those who visit more often tended to have higher opinions on the library’s availability of resources and positive role in communities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-16T03:45:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620911695
       
  • Understanding adaptive information seeking in the context of microblogging
           from the cognitive switching perspective
    • Authors: Xianjin Zha, Kunfeng Liu, Yalan Yan, Chengsong Huang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on adaptive structuration theory and cognitive switching theory, this study develops a research model exploring the effects of cognitive switching stimuli on adaptive information seeking and the moderating effects of information need and personal innovativeness in information technologies. Data collected from microblogging users were used to test the model. The findings suggest that other people’s use, discrepancies, and deliberate initiatives each have significant positive effects on trying new features to seek information. Other people’s use which essentially reflects the nature of learning from observing other people is the most important determinant. Meanwhile, information need and personal innovativeness in IT each positively moderate the effect of other people’s use on trying new features to seek information. This study contributes to theory by examining adaptive information seeking in the context of microblogging which has been largely overlooked by prior literature. The findings and more implications for theory and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-13T03:46:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620909153
       
  • Library makerspaces in China: A comparison of public, academic, and school
           libraries
    • Authors: Fenfang Cao, Shuheng Wu, Besiki Stvilia
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This exploratory study identified and compared the organization, services, challenges of and motivations for makerspaces in public, academic, and school libraries in China. Although there is a significant body of literature on makerspaces in libraries, this study is one of the first ones that provides a comparison of library makerspace organization and operation by library type. Data was collected using paper and online surveys from 158 librarians. Supporting learning was the most frequently identified motivation for establishing a makerspace by all three categories of librarians. While makerspaces in academic libraries were mostly operated by library staff, school libraries more evenly relied on teaching staff, volunteers, library staff members, and paid instructors to operate their makerspaces. Makerspaces in public and academic libraries were funded mostly from the libraries’ budget, while school libraries were funded more by other units on the campus and institutional or individual investments. The most frequently selected technologies were 3D printing and modeling technologies, and makerspaces in academic libraries were better equipped than makerspaces in the other two types of libraries. Group study rooms and learning commons centers were the most frequently occurring physical spaces in academic and public library makerspaces. School library makerspaces differentiated themselves by offering wooden crafts centers more often than other library makerspaces. While participants selecting budget limitation and inadequate equipment as barriers to implementing makerspaces was not surprising, public and academic librarians also often cited the lack of professional instructors. Based on the findings, several suggestions were offered to the practice of planning and operating a makerspace in libraries such as bringing together internal and external funding to support makerspaces, consolidating the required physical space of makerspaces and the existing space arrangement of libraries, and developing additional training programs to address the problem of a lack of professional instructors.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-11T03:48:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620908657
       
  • Information behaviour of prison inmates in Malawi
    • Authors: Limbani Chrispin Gama, George T. Chipeta, Austine Phiri, Winner D. Chawinga
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study examined the information behaviour of Mzimba prison inmates focusing on the research themes which are information needs, sources of information, and the barriers to seeking and using information of Mzimba prison inmates. A qualitative approach was used coupled with a case study design. Data were collected through focus group discussions and interviews from 12 inmates and two prison teaching staff respectively. The study found that health information, education information and spiritual information are the major information needs of Mzimba prison inmates. The study also found that the majority of respondents agreed that the six popular sources of information are their friends, teachers, radio, television, books and newspapers. However, the study concludes that Mzimba prison (library) fails to fulfil its role as a source of information and in meeting the information needs of inmates due to challenges of lack of information resources, limited time available for inmates to search for information, poor services and lack of funding for the school and library. The study recommends that the Malawi Prison Service should engage some stakeholders such as the Malawi National Library Services, National Initiative for Civic Education and Mzuzu University Library and Learning Resources Centre to support prison libraries with the provision of information resources to meet the information needs of inmates. The study further recommends that the Malawi Prison Service Command should lobby for financial support in order to hire qualified and capable librarians and teachers to manage prison libraries and schools.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-11T03:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620908655
       
  • A voice for the voiceless: Improving provenance practice for working-class
           books
    • Authors: Lauren Alex O’Hagan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, libraries have become increasingly aware of the need to present a more diverse representation of society in their collections. While some efforts have been made to improve gender, race and sexuality representation, little attention has been paid to the working classes. The purpose of this research is to encourage a debate about the social class make-up of institutional collections and how fair representation and lack of diversity can be addressed. The research entails three stages: (1) Interviews with the 36 members of Research Libraries UK to investigate current challenges that prevent them from recording provenance information for working-class books; (2) The inclusive and fair cataloguing of the Janet Powney Collection – a working-class prize book collection in Cardiff University’s Special Collections and Archives; and (3) The organisation of impact and engagement events to promote the Janet Powney Collection. The study highlights that, while librarians face many challenges in terms of time, money and resources, as well as differences in guidelines and practices, the correct recording of provenance is essential in recovering the voices of working-class individuals, giving them agency as autonomous writers, and developing new narratives of working-class life and culture that challenge myths perpetuated by those in higher positions of power.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-05T03:51:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620909160
       
  • Collaboration clusters, interdisciplinarity, scope and subject
           classification of library and information science research from Africa: An
           analysis of Web of Science publications from 1996 to 2015
    • Authors: Toluwase Victor Asubiaro, Oluwole Martins Badmus
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the trends in the scope and subject classifications of library and information science research from authors that are affiliated with institutions in Africa. Library and information science journal articles and conference proceedings from the 54 African countries that were published between 2006 and 2015 and indexed in the Web of Science were retrieved for the study. After the removal of non-relevant articles and articles that were not available online, the library and information science publications were classified based on subject and scope. Results from the analysis of author keywords, country of affiliation, subject and scope classification were also visualized in network maps and bar charts. Frequency analysis shows that though computer science had the most profound influence on Africa’s library and information science research, its influence came to prominence in 2004. Furthermore, North African countries exhibited features that are different from the rest of Africa; they contributed most on core computer classifications while other African countries focused more on the social science-related aspects of library and information science. Unlike other regions in Africa, the North African countries also formed a dense collaboration cluster with strong interests in subjects that are conceptual and global in scope. The collaboration clustering analysis revealed an influence of some colonial languages of as a basis for forging strong collaboration between African and non-African countries. On the other hand, African countries tend to collaborate more with countries in their regions. Lastly, human computer interaction and library and information science history subject classifications were almost nonexistent. It is recommended that further studies should investigate why certain subject classifications are not well represented.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-03-02T04:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620907958
       
  • Digital local information services in developing countries: Evidence from
           Colombia
    • Authors: Aaron van Klyton, Juan Fernando Tavera-Mesías, Wilson Castaño-Muñoz
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This exploratory research identifies and investigates factors that affect the delivery of local information in a developing country. The service provider and 195 local institutions based in Medellin, Colombia collaborate through an online portal, Infolocal, constituting a local information landscape (LIL). The study implements a conceptual framework for the LIL and highlights deficiencies in traditional local information service models. A Delphi study was conducted with global experts of local information services (LIS) in order to refine the traditional Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology model constructs for the Infolocal information service. Second, a survey was developed based on the revised categories (effort expectancy, performance expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, organisational support, and affective commitment) and disseminated to the local institutions to assess their perceptions of the service. This data was then evaluated using exploratory factor analysis. The study found that theories of technology acceptance were insufficient in explaining the disjunctions in the information landscape of this service. This study contributes to closing a gap in understanding the perceptions of LIS practice from the perspective of institutions that engage directly with citizens’ technology acceptance and use behaviour in a multilevel relationship. This article captures, compares, and analyses the disjunctions between the theoretical frameworks as espoused by experts and the practices of LIS.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-26T11:55:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620907970
       
  • Conceptual framework for scholarly communication guidance by the academic
           library: The case of Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
    • Authors: Esther White, Lizette King
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to give academic librarians insight and guidelines into the provision of an effective scholarly communication guidance to doctoral students. The findings of the study showed that doctoral students had not received much training and guidance on research and scholarly communication practices from their supervisors and academic librarians. The study adopted a case study research design with Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) as the research site and sequential explanatory mixed method approach. A proposed scholarly communication guidance model to be used by the academic library is presented. The model proposes that scholarly communication guidance should be offered to doctoral students immediately they enrol for their programmes, throughout their research process, and finally when the research is completed since they are expected to conduct original research. The model will guide the drafting of policies and the academic library in developing tailor-made channels and contents for scholarly communication guidance to doctoral students. The study has contributed to the body of knowledge on scholarly communication guidance by the academic library to doctoral students as previous studies recorded in the literature pertains mostly to faculty and not to students – particularly doctoral students.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-26T11:46:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620907966
       
  • Who is who in library and information science research' The
           integrative application of scholarly influence indicators
    • Authors: Reza Mokhtarpour, Ali Akbar Khasseh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This research concerns determining authors’ scientific influence in library and information science research and their impact on the intellectual structure of the discipline by means of integrative indicators of the Scholarly Capital Model and co-authorship patterns. Research records comprised articles published from 1945 to 2016 in library and information science core journals and indexed in Web of Science. CiteSpace (software for visualization of scientific patterns and trends) was employed to map the intellectual structure of library and information science research based on co-authorship patterns. The results showed that the top 10 authors of library and information science research with the highest scores in terms of influence indicators (except for one person) were mostly concerned with the field of scientometrics which can be considered as the special impact of scientometric authors on the intellectual structure of library and information science research especially in recent years. Based on the results of the research, integrative use of scientometric indicators for measuring authors’ level of scholarly influence may grant a more precise perspective for decision makers in the field of library and information science.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-26T06:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620907956
       
  • Collection development practices in academic libraries in Tanzania
    • Authors: Kardo Joseph Mwilongo, Ireneus Luambano, Mugyabuso J.F. Lwehabura
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to assess the collection development practices in academic libraries in Tanzania. Specifically, the study examined the collection development practices and factors that influence these practices. The study involved four academic libraries and employed both qualitative and quantitative methods for data collection and analysis. Primary data were collected through informant interviews, observations and questionnaires methods. The study involved 44 library staff who filled in self-administered questionnaires. The study discloses that collection development practices and particularly evaluation and weeding or deselection are rarely conducted at these academic libraries. The findings further reveal that collection development practices in academic libraries in Tanzania are constrained by inadequate funding, lack of skills for hybrid collection management and lack of collection development policy catering for both print- and electronic-based information resources. On the basis of the findings, the study recommends that academic libraries should establish a comprehensive collection development policy and introduce professional development programmes to library staff for efficient management of hybrid collections.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-20T03:47:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620907961
       
  • Hidden gems' The cultural contribution of independent libraries in the
           United Kingdom and the United States
    • Authors: Kirsten Loach, Jennifer Rowley, Jillian Griffiths
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Independent libraries are important cultural assets for their communities yet have largely been overlooked in mainstream library research. This research seeks to bring these libraries into the limelight by building a profile of their cultural contributions. Through a content analysis of the websites of the libraries of the Independent Libraries Association (UK) and Membership Libraries Group (US), it demonstrates that independent libraries preserve and facilitate access to a variety of important cultural assets and, while often characterised as ‘hidden gems’, are proactively working to increase engagement beyond traditional audiences, whilst also making significant contributions to the cultural sustainability agenda.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-18T09:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620902252
       
  • A study on the factors of public library use by residents
    • Authors: Younghee Noh, Rosa Chang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study selected various factors that may influence the satisfaction and use of public libraries through reflecting social changes led by the fourth industrial revolution, in an effort to differentiate the study from related studies conducted previously. In addition, this study examined the specific factors of material, facility, location and place, staff, programs and services that affect the satisfaction and use of public libraries by residents. Results show that accessibility and possession factors of material and interior design factor of facility, space for reading and user convenience factors of location and space, reliability and active attitude factors of staff and diversity, operation hours and promotion factors of programs and services have significant influence over the satisfaction and use of public libraries by residents. The results of this study are useful in providing fundamental data for attracting residents to libraries and improving the rate of utilization by providing library services based on the rapidly changing social environments and users’ demands for the practical operation of libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-18T09:18:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620903772
       
  • Reading work as a diversity practice: A differentiated approach to reading
           promotion in academic libraries in North America
    • Authors: Keren Dali, Lindsay McNiff
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article positions the practice of working with readers in academic libraries as a diversity practice and examines this practice through the lens of the Diversity by Design concept. We use Diversity by Design to propose and explicate a differentiated approach to reading promotion on campus, drawing attention to the broader and multiple meanings of diversity in the context of reading engagements. We look at the differentiated nature of readerships on campuses as an expression of inherent diversity in North American institutions of higher education and, by extension, academic libraries. We also make specific recommendations on how to give reading practices in academic libraries a boost and a new direction, befitting the diverse and eclectic nature of contemporary North American universities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T04:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620902247
       
  • Social justice in library science programs: A content analysis approach
    • Authors: Rhiannon Jones
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In an increasingly globalized world, social justice issues dominate the news. Libraries are often viewed as places where social justice ideals are upheld and promoted. This paper uses a content analysis methodology of 10 North American library and information science program websites to discover how social justice education is marketed to potential students through an examination of open access course descriptions, mission statements, and core learning objectives where available. Findings indicate that social justice is embedded in library and information science programs, but there are limited opportunities for prospective students to seek out these courses due to a lack of open access course descriptions and mission statements and shortage of integration in required courses. If library and information science educators want to attract future librarians with strong social justice agendas, then the promotional materials will need to be more explicit in regards to how these programs can aid students in building a social justice mindset.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:10:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620904432
       
  • Library as a consortium perspective: A systematic literature review
    • Authors: Rosivalda Pereira, Mário Franco
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Consortia are a form of association between organizations seeking to reach a common objective. This study aims to systematize discussion in the area of library consortia and relate it to aspects of information management. To this end, the Web of Science databases was used to identify the literature to be analysed, resorting to Bibliometrix software. The results show a tendency in the literature to discuss themes such as open access contract management. The study concludes on an evolution of themes setting out from shared resources and directs future research towards identifying questions of access to and ownership of information resources.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:09:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620904754
       
  • Credibility evaluation of scientific information on websites: Designing
           and evaluating an exploratory model
    • Authors: Hamid Keshavarz, Mohammadreza Esmaeili Givi, Yaghoub Norouzi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aimed to develop a literature-based and expert-modified model for credibility evaluation of scientific web information in order to be used for academic purposes by utilizing a mixed heuristic method. First, meta-synthesis was applied to design a conceptual model. In terms of its usability, the model was evaluated by a sample of student users in five top universities of Iran. The data were analyzed by SPSS 20.0 and LISREL 8.7 for Structural Equation Modelling. Based on the seven-stage meta-synthesis, a conceptual model, including 68 indicators, 14 components, and two main dimensions was identified. The model was confirmed by the sample experts by considering the high degree of Kendall’s coefficient of concordance and the agreement percentage of most dimensions of the model which were 0.67 and higher than 90%, respectively. Next, the results of confirmatory factor analysis were analyzed according to the structural model and indices related to the goodness of fit in order to ensure a high quality respecting measuring the identified variables. Based on data analysis, the variables were of high quality in the studied context although there were some differences among the dimensions. The results further revealed that credibility evaluation is a concept with different and multiple dimensions and components suitable for users, designers, and policymakers which should be considered in designing and evaluating web resources.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T05:09:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620903103
       
  • Health information behavior of speakers of endangered languages
    • Authors: Mary Burke
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      With the advent of increased attention towards language endangerment comes the need for a better understanding of how speakers of endangered languages interact with information, specifically health information resources. This paper builds on health information behavior literature and participatory research models with indigenous communities to develop strategies for future work with indigenous communities of speakers of endangered languages, proposing a participatory methodology for future work with these communities related to health, using ethnographic interviews and focus groups. Lack of infrastructure, multilingualism, and distrust of outsiders are found to be major barriers between this population and health information resources. Approaching health information behavior research with an interdisciplinary and participatory model incorporating ethnographic and linguistic field methods into traditional information behavior methodologies can mitigate the challenges these barriers present. Understanding the health information behavior of speakers of endangered languages will aid in future efforts to make health information resources accessible to wider audiences and to document indigenous knowledge. Currently, fieldwork with speakers of endangered languages is confined to linguistic and anthropological investigation. Through the proposed methodology, community members can work alongside linguists and information professionals to create culturally appropriate health information resources in their native language.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-02-03T06:47:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619899453
       
  • MOBILE-APPS questionnaire: Developing and validating a scale to measure
           the attitudes and perceptions of undergraduate students on mobile
           information literacy
    • Authors: Maria Pinto, David Caballero, Dora Sales, Rosaura Fernández-Pascual
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims at reflecting on the process of developing and validating a scale for measuring the students’ attitudes and perceptions regarding the use of mobile technologies in the teaching-learning of information competencies (MOBILE-APPS). Validation was carried out by administering the questionnaire to a pilot group of students, selected from Education degree, with a rubric to analyse the quality/coherence, clarity and usefulness of the content. The questionnaire was then piloted with a larger sample of students. To analyse the tool’s reliability and internal validity, scale validation techniques and exploratory factorial analysis were used. The resulting questionnaire, MOBILE-APPS, is a simple yet effective scale for collecting information. It can be applied in a number of university settings and degrees to ascertain student attitudes and perceptions of mobile information literacy.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-01-30T04:17:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620902260
       
  • An intersectional quantitative content analysis of the LGBTQ+ catalogue in
           Irish public libraries
    • Authors: Pete Hicks, Páraic Kerrigan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      LGBTQ+ youths in the Republic of Ireland report statistically higher levels of depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts than their heteronormative peers, which can be attributed to bullying and homophobic rhetoric. Research indicates that community services, such as public libraries, can play a role in mitigating the mental health risks of this group. However, there is no formal policy within the Irish public library system directing the collection and provision of LGBTQ+ materials and services to anyone, let alone youths. Previous international studies have shown that, in the absence of a guiding intersectional collection development policy, LGBTQ+ library materials are overwhelmingly representative of the gay, white, adult male experience, to the detriment of other groups within the LGBTQ+ community. Conducting a quantitative content analysis of the Dublin City Council Public Library catalogue through the lens of intersectionality theory confirms that the Irish public library system is not an exception to this trend. Results indicate that catalogue materials containing LGBTQ+ metadata favor the adult, gay, male experience – as well as the youth, gay, male experience – over adult and young women. This trend is particularly noticeable among the eBook catalogue, an area that the Irish public library system has directly identified as a strategic target for collection development. Conclusions align with previous qualitative studies on LGBTQ+ provision in Irish libraries in that a comprehensive organizational policy document is needed to provide direction and enable funding for the development of the LGBTQ+ section of the library system’s catalogue.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-01-27T03:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619898212
       
  • Linking digital literacy and online information searching strategies of
           Philippine university students: The moderating role of mindfulness
    • Authors: Manny B. Atoy, Francesca Renee O. Garcia, Rayanne R. Cadungog, Julius Dominic O. Cua, Siena C. Mangunay, Allan B. de Guzman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The extent to which students are able to maximize the potential benefits of information from the online world depends, in great measure, on the development of a set of skills that would make them effective users and decision-makers. While previous studies have revealed the role of prior knowledge, availability of ICT resources and infrastructure in the development of information-type skills, the identification of other unexplored variables remains important in information science. This paper seeks to ascertain the moderating role of mindfulness on digital literacy and online information searching strategies on a select group of university students in the Philippines. Structural equation modeling was used to test a hypothesized model and explore the factors affecting the information-seeking behavior of 321 students from the largest comprehensive university in the Philippines. A multi-aspect instrument, consisting of a robotfoto, and three scales such as the Langer Mindfulness Scale (LMS), Internet Skills Scale (ISS), and Online Information Searching Strategies Inventory (OISSI), was used in this study. Results revealed that digital literacy had a direct positive relationship with the online information searching strategies of students. Surprisingly, mindfulness did not moderate the relationship between digital literacy and online information searching strategies. Further, digital literacy was found to be a mediating factor to university students’ information searching strategies. Implications of these for library practice and policy are discussed in this paper.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-01-24T04:02:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619898213
       
  • Transformational leadership practice in the world’s leading academic
           libraries
    • Authors: Patrick Lo, Bradley Allard, Hermina G.B. Anghelescu, Yawei Xin, Dickson K.W. Chiu, Andrew J. Stark
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes 12 semi-structured interviews within the framework of transformational leadership, using a set of open-ended questions addressed to 12 directors (six men and six women) of academic libraries in high-ranking universities in four different countries (Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America). It also investigates the interviewees’ approach to managing and leading their library organizations within the context of the opportunities and challenges facing their organizations as well as their parent institutions. The interpretation of the participants’ responses is based on the four ‘I’s, the four dimensions of the concept of transformational leadership: (1) Idealized influence, (2) Inspirational motivation, (3) Intellectual stimulation, and (4) Individualized consideration. The findings indicated that academic library directors who chose to implement transformational leadership noted its significance as a major contributing factor to the enhancement of inner communication and building mutual trust, and respect within the library organization. This, in turn, has fostered a motivated and creative work environment that has ensured personal and collective success and institutional advancement. Transformational leadership contributes to promoting sustained organizational performance based on adaptability to the rapidly changing environment of academic libraries worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-01-13T03:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619897991
       
  • Not your final destination: A grounded theory study on adjustment among
           Filipino librarians who experienced job rotation
    • Authors: Edward H. Puzon, Allan B. de Guzman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of job rotation in the overall performance of an organization has been well documented in the literature. Despite a considerable number of studies on job rotation, only a handful are carried out in the context of librarianship. Further, the dynamics of job rotation as experienced by librarians in the Philippines remains a research blank spot. Cognizant of the dearth in literature, this grounded theory inquiry purports to shed light on the process of adjustment of a select group of Filipino librarians who experience job rotation within their organization. A total of 15 participants from Luzon were purposively selected and interviewed. Field texts were read, reread and constantly compared via open, axial and selective coding process. Interestingly, a novel and distinct process surfaced how a select group of Filipino librarians experience job rotation. The emerged Puzon and de Guzman BELT Theory of Adjustment process by which Filipino librarians adjust after being transferred to another post is typified by four distinct phases of: bemusing, establishing, leveraging, and transforming. This theory offers a number of implications on personal development, departmental initiatives, and institutional assistance and support relative to the phenomenon under study.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2020-01-03T03:49:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619891764
       
  • Survey of information literacy instructional practices in academic
           libraries
    • Authors: Noa Aharony, Heidi Julien, Noa Nadel-Kritz
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reports a study of information literacy instructional practices in Israeli academic libraries, conducted to understand the methods and approaches used by academic librarians in their instructional work, and to explore whether their practices have been influenced by the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The study used an online survey to gather data, an instrument based on one used successfully in similar surveys in Canada and the United States. The survey was completed by Israeli academic librarians with instructional responsibilities. Findings show that respondents believe that information literacy instruction is a shared responsibility, and that one-on-one instruction is the most-used approach. Results reveal multiple challenges faced by respondents, as well as opportunities for improvement in their instruction.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-19T04:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619891762
       
  • Classification of humorous interactions with intelligent personal
           assistants
    • Authors: Irene Lopatovska
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study examined humorous interactions with intelligent personal assistants (IPAs, including Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa, Microsoft Cortana, Apple Siri) with the aim of classifying user utterances, IPA responses and user reactions of system responses. Data from online diaries and paper questionnaires were collected and analyzed using content analysis method. The findings suggest that the most frequent types of utterances include questions that test system “personality” and opinions. Joke requests are also frequent and produce pre-programmed humor that users generally find funny. The initial classification of humorous utterances has been validated and expanded using published datasets of humorous utterances for the four investigated IPAs. The findings can be used for immediate improvements to IPA performance as well as long-term development of IPA personas.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-18T10:00:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619891771
       
  • Book review: KJ Varnum (ed.), Beyond Reality: Augmented, Virtual, and
           Mixed Reality in the Library
    • Authors: Alan MacLennan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T03:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619890757
       
  • A quantitative investigation of students’ attitudes towards
           electronic book technology
    • Authors: Hatice Gonca Bulur, Mustafa Sinan Gönül
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to analyse the factors that have an impact on technology adoption for e-books utilizing the Analytic Hierarchy Process and Multiple Regression Analysis methods. Findings indicate that perceived usefulness and ease of use are the most significant determinants in using e-books. Of key significance is that Analytic Hierarchy Process results show that consumers make pairwise comparisons, adding environmental concerns to the selection process. Recognizing the importance of all these factors is valuable to e-book developers and marketers in presenting products that meet all consumer choice criteria. The Analytic Hierarchy Process provides researchers with a more thorough decision-making analysis.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T03:58:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619884114
       
  • Sharing stories: An exploration of genres in storytimes
    • Authors: Jacqueline Kociubuk, Kathleen Campana
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Exposure to a variety of stories can support many early literacy skills for young children. Using video recordings from a previous study that examined early literacy in public library storytimes, this study investigated the use of genre and story variety in storytimes for young children (birth to 60 months). Findings showed that attendees were primarily exposed to stories from the storybook/narrative genre with limited use of both non-narrative and narrative informational genres in number of stories and time spent reading each genre. Story variety and the use of current titles can be improved to better support early literacy development in public library storytimes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T04:03:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619882751
       
  • The use of mobile devices and applications for health information: A
           survey of Croatian students
    • Authors: Sung Un Kim, Ivana Martinović, Snježana Stanarević Katavić
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to understand the information behaviours of youth seeking health information on mobile devices and to explore differences by prior knowledge, gender and grade level. A survey was conducted in two high schools in Osijek, Croatia. Results indicate that among the total 408 participants, 84.3% reported having used mobile devices for health information and 54.7% reported having used applications for health information. Students seek health information about physical activity and eating issues/nutrition mostly on mobile devices. Students with more prior medical knowledge tend to have more information needs, perceive mobile devices as more beneficial, search health information and use health-related applications more frequently, and consider the tracking/recording/monitoring feature of applications more useful. Students with less prior medical knowledge tend to consider the video feature of applications more useful. Students rely heavily on searching health topics in search engines on mobile devices, rather than browsing or using applications. This study provides implications to better assist young people in using mobile devices and applications to manage their health issues.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T04:02:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619880937
       
  • Strategies for preserving memes as artefacts of digital culture
    • Authors: Fátima García López, Sara Martínez Cardama
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Internet archives kept by heritage libraries are analysed, focusing specifically on that new type of expression characteristic of web culture and digital folklore, the meme. Five paradigmatic examples of heritage institutions engaging in web archive initiatives are explored: the Library of Congress, British Library, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Biblioteca Nacional de España and National Library of Australia. Specific assessment categories are defined for the study. The findings reveal a lack of collection policies for such representative objects of today’s mass culture and identify the challenges both for the custodial institutions and for research in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T04:06:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619882070
       
  • Transformational and transactional leadership influence on knowledge
           management activities of librarians in university libraries in Nigeria
    • Authors: C.I. Ugwu, A.M. Okore
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to determine the influence of transformational and transactional leadership on knowledge management activities of librarians in university libraries in Nigeria. Quantitative methodology was considered appropriate for this type of research and adopted to accomplish the main goal of this study. A questionnaire was used to collect data from a total of 215 librarians who participated in the study. Factor analysis and multiple regressions were used to analyze data. The results of the study reveal a positive and significant influence of transformational and transactional leadership on knowledge management activities of academic librarians in university libraries in Nigeria. Further, the results show that transformational leadership behaviours impacted knowledge management activities of librarians more than transactional leadership behaviours. The study provides both theoretical and empirical evidence on the impact of transformational and transactional leadership behaviours on knowledge management processes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T04:05:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619880229
       
  • LIS pre-professionals’ perspectives towards library user education: A
           comparative study between three universities in Greater China
    • Authors: Bradley Allard, Patrick Lo, Qianxiu Liu, Kevin K.W. Ho, Dickson K.W. Chiu, Joyce C.C. Chen, Qingshan Zhou, Tianjin Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although the perceptions of library user education of academic libraries has been studied in a general context, specific studies on perspective of library and information science students are relatively few, especially in the context of Asia. Filling this research gap is particularly important because it affects the experiential learning of these pre-professionals, and shapes future library user education directions. As such, this study aims at understanding and comparing the views and perceptions of library user education programs in Greater China from the perspective of library and information science students. A total number 305 questionnaire survey responses were collected from three different universities in Greater China, namely: The University of Hong Kong (HKU), National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU), and Peking University (PKU). Results from this survey study reveal high evaluations of library user education programs and library user education librarians as a whole, as well as possible ways for librarians to better promote such programs. Such ratings are attributed to findings from previous studies on why students choose librarianship as a career, as well as the importance of experiential learning embedded in the Library and Information Science programs at each university. Findings of this study also suggest that as pre-professionals (soon-to-be professional librarians), these student respondents recognize the values behind library user education as an important part of their overall learning practices. Results from this study will be useful in identifying how future library professionals in Greater China perceive library user education programs, and librarians – therefore potentially helping librarians improve the delivery of these services.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-19T09:57:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619874106
       
  • Exploring secondary school students’ self-perception and actual
           understanding of plagiarism
    • Authors: Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Xiao Hu, Jeremy Ng
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Plagiarism has been a growing concern among institutions and academics in recent years. To address the problem, and to alleviate the growing trend of this academic misconduct, students’ perceptions of plagiarism should be considered. This study explores students’ self-perception and actual understanding of plagiarism, and the relations between them. Survey responses were collected from 433 students in a Hong Kong junior secondary school. Results reveal that students show different understanding towards ‘obvious’ and ‘obscure’ plagiarism, with misunderstanding or misconception more likely arising over obscure plagiarism. This study also reports that students’ self-perception on their understanding of plagiarism differed across grade levels, and their academic performance of inquiry-based learning has a relation to their self-perceived and actual understanding of plagiarism. Implications for improving the teaching and learning of plagiarism are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-17T03:52:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619872527
       
  • Managing multilingual collections: Insights from data analytics research
    • Authors: Simon Musgrave, Steve Wright, Tom Denison, Louisa Willoughby
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Libraries, through their catalogues and borrowing records are well-placed to use data analytics to enhance their collection management (and of course do this already, for example by directing orders to genres/areas that are heavily borrowed). In this article, we explore some of the insights for the management of multilingual collections offered by a novel research method that fuses analysis of a large data set of borrowing records with data from interviews with library staff. Such a method, we argue, helps to untangle the Gordian knot around why materials in some languages are widely popular while materials for other equally widely-spoken languages sit unused on the shelves. It also draws our attention to the ways in which different demographics of speakers are engaging with library materials across the various languages, and gives a suite of tools local libraries might use to better assess the likely demand for materials in languages other than English.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T03:56:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619874110
       
  • Standardization and standards in Bulgarian libraries: Current state
    • Authors: Rositsa Dobreva Krasteva
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The article contains the results of an empirical study conducted in the early 2018 through a survey conducted among the libraries in Bulgaria. Data obtained were processed by the software product for mathematical analysis of statistical data SPSS for Windows 19.0. The aim of the study is to create a complete picture of the Bulgarian library system in terms of understanding the benefits of standardization activity and the application of specific standards in the field of library activities. The applied research methods are: research, analysis and synthesis of information received, a comparative analysis between different groups of libraries participated in the survey. In order to specify the psychometric characteristics of the methods and verification of the working hypothesis, the following methods for statistical processing were applied: descriptive statistics; correlation analysis; factorial analysis; one-way ANOVA test. This study is the first large-scale study of its kind on standardization among Bulgarian libraries. Its contributions can be assigned to those that enrich the theory and methodology of sociological studies in the field of library activities. As a result of the survey the current level of application of the specific national, branch and international standards in the Bulgarian libraries was established. Measures have been identified to promote the standardization activity in the field of library activities. Data gathered from the survey contribute to the development of methodology and curricula for online training of the library specialists, according to their specific needs and interest.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T03:55:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871603
       
  • Cultural heritage literacy: A survey of academics from humanities and
           social sciences
    • Authors: Semanur Öztemiz
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the 21st century, some factors, such as the awareness of multiculturalism, the preservation of local culture and the recognition of national cultural heritage, have led to the need for a new literacy skill called cultural heritage literacy. This study aimed to draw attention to the concept of cultural heritage literacy, defining the competencies of this literacy and investigating these competencies among academics from the humanities and social sciences at Hacettepe University Faculty of Letters, Turkey. Cultural heritage information needs and the information behaviours of academics were found to have differences in practices and perceptions across age, gender, status and subject disciplines. Within the scope of the study, a questionnaire with 30 questions was given to 114 academics from the humanities and social sciences at Hacettepe University Faculty of Letters, Turkey. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and a chi-square test. The findings show that most of the academics reported having strong cultural heritage literacy abilities. There are statistically significant correlations between participants’ demographic features and cultural heritage literacy. It is expected that this study will contribute to the professionals of cultural heritage institutions. By considering cultural heritage literacy skills, professionals of cultural heritage institutions can develop new information services for cultural-heritage literate people.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-11T03:42:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619872529
       
  • Library and information science as a career in Kuwait
    • Authors: Hanadi Buarki, Mashael Al-Omar
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Library and Information Science discipline is in constant flux, facing myriad impediments with the development of technology. Per se, the field introduced information and communications technology into its curriculum which has changed librarians’ roles in information handling. Moreover, the integration of the term ‘information’ changed the nomenclature thereby giving a new name of Information Science/Studies, embracing an enormous range of subjects. The present study investigates the previous and current skills of alumni at the Department of Library and Information Science, College of Basic Education, Kuwait. Descriptive analysis of the distributed survey revealed frequencies and percentages data on participants’ gender, marital status, age, grade point average, certificate obtained, employment sector, years of experience, and salary. Qualitative data revealed comments on employment issues, difficulties faced, and the Department of Library and Information Science curriculum. The findings suggested that the majority of the alumni have benefited from their major as their employment is relevant (84%), it is within their specialisation and most of them (56%) are employed in a library setting. The most frequently learned skill is ethics (54%), and the skills that needed improvement are library skills and English language proficiency. The research data initiated a list of skills required and organisations employing the alumni. It is recommended that LIS alumni should be equippedwith multi-tasking skills to work at the job market institutions, and that LIS schools should start offering a PhD qualification in Kuwait. This research contributes to decisions in curriculum updating from the viewpoint of alumni to meet the requirements of the job market. The research is the first study to collect data from LIS alumni in Kuwait at CBE, PAAET and realises their concerns. Departments sharing a similar curriculum can benefit as the research is an initial step that should be regularly taken to update the curricula.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871992
       
  • Design thinking and methods in library practice and graduate library
           education
    • Authors: Rachel Ivy Clarke, Satyen Amonkar, Ann Rosenblad
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite interest in the application of design thinking and methods in librarianship, there seems to be a disconnect between application and education to support it. This study used an online questionnaire to elicit feedback from library workers in the United States about interest in and use of design thinking and methods in library practice, and the need for design skills and abilities in library education. We found that practicing librarians perceive design thinking and methods have relevance to library work, but opinions vary based on library type and nature of the work. Design thinking and methods were used mostly for space planning and program development, with applications emphasizing empathy and user/community understanding aspects—despite myriad other possibilities. Most respondents were in favor of including design thinking and methods in MLIS programs, which can support more robust applications through inclusion of the theoretical, philosophical, and epistemological underpinnings from which design thinking and methods emerge.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:15:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871989
       
  • The moderating effects of information overload and academic
           procrastination on the information avoidance behavior among Filipino
           undergraduate thesis writers
    • Authors: Maria Cristina M. Fuertes, Beatriz Marie D. Jose, Mary Angelie A. Nem Singh, Pauline Eirisse P. Rubio, Allan B. de Guzman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information avoidance is a behavior that could either prevent or delay consumption of information. While information avoidance has been documented in various fields of interest, its overall dynamics in the context of library and information science remains a research blankspot. The overall intent of this paper is to develop a model that examines the moderating effect of information overload and academic procrastination on the information avoidance behavior among Filipino undergraduate thesis writers. Capitalizing on Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) design, a total of 215 Filipino undergraduate thesis writers participated in the study. A multi-aspect questionnaire was used to measure the following variables: information overload, academic procrastination and information avoidance. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Results show that when students have a positive attitude towards reading, the more likely they are to employ better reading strategies and the less likely they are to exhibit information avoidance. On the other hand, the more reading strategies are used, the lower is information avoidance. Additionally, the tendency to procrastinate has less effect on the relationship between reading strategies and information avoidance and the tendency to procrastinate and acquire excessive information has less effect on the relationship between reading attitudes and information avoidance. Implications for university settings are also discussed in this paper.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871608
       
  • What is innovative to public libraries in the United States' A
           perspective of library administrators for classifying innovations
    • Authors: Devendra Dilip Potnis, Joseph Winberry, Bonnie Finn, Courtney Hunt
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Innovations are critical for public libraries but rarely does any primary research study the scope and interpretation of the term “innovation” by public libraries. Also, few of the existing innovation typologies are based on data collected from public libraries. This study fills in the gap by eliciting 80 innovations reported by the administrators of 108 award-winning public libraries in the United States, and proposes the first organic classification of innovations for public libraries, with the following four types of innovations: Program (access-oriented/use-oriented), Process (efficiency-driven/effectiveness-driven), Partnership (internal/external), and Technology (web-based technologies/assistive technologies/artificial intelligence). Findings can advance the state of innovations in libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T03:48:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871991
       
  • A case study investigation of academic library support for open
           educational resources in Scottish universities
    • Authors: Seth D. Thompson, Adrienne Muir
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of the research was to investigate why and how Scottish university libraries support open educational resources and to assess their ability to provide support services for their development and use within higher education institutions. There has been little research on the role of academic libraries in supporting open educational resources in Scotland and previous research found that there is a lack of awareness of them in Scottish higher education institutions and few have open educational resources policies. The case study methodology therefore involved two Scottish academic libraries providing open educational resources services. The libraries’ motivation includes supporting teaching and learning and the development of educator digital skills and copyright knowledge. However, there are a number of barriers limiting the services the libraries are able to provide, particularly lack of human resources. The research confirmed the findings of previous research on the importance of institutional commitment, incentives for educator engagement, and understanding of copyright and licensing issues by educators and library staff.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T03:46:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871604
       
  • The means-end cognitions of perceived information quality in academic
           social networking sites
    • Authors: Ning Zhang, Qinjian Yuan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Academic social networking sites (ASNS) have received substantial attention in recent years. The information quality of academic resources is vital to users. In order to improve the users’ information quality experience, it is necessary to understand how users perceive information quality in ASNS and what factors or relations affect their results of information quality perception. Drawing on the approach of the means-end chain, our study implemented a laddering interviews with ASNS users. We both elucidated various factors influencing information quality perception and constructed a hierarchical value map, all of the complex relationships were quantitatively calculated and represented in a hierarchical structure. The results showed that 13 factors were identified and 18 relations were described. This study contributes by addressing the process of users’ information quality perception in the ASNS and by giving a deep and nuanced understanding of the factors affecting information quality. This is different from prior research that mainly focused on information quality evaluation. The results not only enrich the information quality research but also can be used to guide ASNS’ platform design and management.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T03:41:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871612
       
  • ‘To be understood as to understand’: A readability analysis of public
           library acceptable use policies
    • Authors: Elaine Robinson, David McMenemy
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) are documents stating the limitations users must agree to when first accessing information and communications technologies (ICTs) in organisations, such as employers, educational institutions and public libraries. AUPs lay out the parameters of acceptable use expected of someone accessing the ICT services provided, and should state in clear and understandable terms what behaviours will attract sanctions, both legal and in terms of restricting future access. Utilising a range of standard readability tests used to measure how understandable documents are, the paper investigates how readable the AUPs presented to public library patrons in the UK are in practice. Of the 206 AUPs in use across the local government departments who manage public library services 200 were obtained and subjected to a range of readability testing procedures. Four readability tests were used for analysis: the Flesch Reading Ease, the Coleman-Liau Index, the Gunning Fog Index and the SMOG Grade. Results for all four readability tests administered on all AUPs raise significant questions. For the Flesch Reading Ease score only 5.5% of AUPs scored at the standard readability level or higher (60+), and 8% scored at a very high level of difficulty akin to a piece of scientific writing. Similarly, for SMOG, only 7.5% of the 200 AUPs scored at the recommended level of 10. Likewise, very few AUPs scored at levels recommended for a general audience with either the Gunning Fog Index (11.5%) or the Coleman-Liau Index (2%). With such variability in readability, the fitness for purpose of the average AUP as a contract patrons must agree to can be called into question. This paper presents the first ever analysis of the readability of library AUPs in the literature. Recommendations are made as to how public library services may improve this aspect of practice.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-08-29T03:51:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871598
       
  • Library services to an aging population: A nation-wide study in the United
           States
    • Authors: Noah Lenstra, Fatih Oguz, Courtnay S. Duvall
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study presents a large-scale study of public library services to older adults in the United States. A random sampling method was used to identify public libraries (n=226) for the study. Results suggest that libraries serve their aging communities in multiple ways. Some libraries provide a plethora of specialized programs focused on the specific needs of older adults. Others extend core library services to ensure they are accessible to older adults. Others invest in infrastructure and staff development to prepare for an aging society. Some do not provide any specialized programs or services for older adults. There is great unevenness in terms of library services for older adults across the nation. The discussion suggests additional work needed to better understand this unevenness, and to address it.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-08-28T03:57:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871596
       
  • Elaborating the sensory and cognitive-affective aspects of information
           experience
    • Authors: Reijo Savolainen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on pragmatist ideas proposed by John Dewey, the study elaborates the picture of information experience by examining how researchers have characterized the ways in which people receive, acquire and interpret sensory and cognitive-affective information. To this end, a conceptual analysis was conducted by concentrating on 43 studies pertinent to the topic. The findings indicate that so far, the construct of information experience has remained quite vague. This is mainly due to that experience - the fundamental constituent of information experience – has not been sufficiently reflected in the context of informational phenomena. Information experience studies have mainly contributed to information behaviour research by describing how people receive and acquire sensory information, while the picture of experiencing cognitive-affective information has remained quite vague. There are also gaps in studies examining how sensory and cognitive-affective information are interpreted as an integral part of information experience. The study also identifies topics of further research dealing with the elaboration of the construct of information experience.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-08-21T11:43:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871595
       
  • Book review: Mary Grace Flaherty, Promoting Individual and Community
           Health at the Library
    • Authors: Jane Garner
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T03:49:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619866073
       
  • Linkages between information overload and acculturative stress: The case
           of Black diasporic immigrants in the US
    • Authors: Ana Ndumu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the information behavior of Black immigrants in the United States and specifically investigates possible linkages between information overload and acculturative stress. Focus groups were conducted with African, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latinx immigrants in Florida. When analyzed according to Jaeger and Burnett’s theory of information worlds (Burnett and Jaeger, 2011; Jaeger and Burnett, 2010), the data supports that participants experience information overload as a result of the voluminous and dispersed nature of information in the US; perceptions of belonging and transnationality; and undertaking high-stakes tasks such as immigration procedures, finding employment, and understanding cultural norms. Participants felt that the large, stratified, and complex US information landscape can prompt stress. Since information overload poses a barrier to immigrant social inclusion, it can be interpreted as acculturative stress.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T03:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619857115
       
  • From classroom to library: What are the transferable knowledge and skills
           teachers bring to library work
    • Authors: Franklin Gyamfi Agyemang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the transferable knowledge, experience or skills second-career librarians with a teaching background bring to bear or utilize in the discharge of their library work. It also explores how the transferable knowledge helps librarians and teaching librarians to discharge the roles delineated by ACRL’s (2017) document. Snowball sampling method was used to locate 17 participants for this study in Ghana. Mixed methods were used for data collection; questionnaire (open-ended questions) and interview. The data were analyzed using the thematic analysis technique. The study found the following transferable knowledge, skills and experiences to library work: methodology of teaching, questioning and listening skills, knowledge of courses content, presentation, communication and good public speaking skills and human relational skills. The study found that transferable knowledge from the teaching profession help second-career (teaching) librarian to discharge to their library role effectively.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T03:51:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856401
       
  • How to increase the loyalty of public library users' A qualitative
           study
    • Authors: Oranus Tajedini, Ali Akbar Khasseh, Mahin Afzali, Ali Sadatmoosavi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The main objective of this study is to explain how to increase user loyalty behavior to public library services. This study uses a qualitative method based on grounded theory. The research population included users of public libraries in Iran. The data were collected through in-depth interviews, and the theoretical saturation was obtained after interviewing 24 members of public libraries. The collected data through interviews were analyzed using theoretical coding and content analysis. Results indicated that observing moral and humane principles when dealing with library users plays a significant role in both building user loyalty to the library and attracting new users. In addition, it was found that causal conditions in increasing loyalty among public library users are related to four areas including physical space management, information resource management, human resource management, and information technology management. It was also noted that factors such as service quality, proper design of interiors, providing diverse and updated information resources, the use of new communication technologies, and the use of cyberspace and social network applications must be taken into account by public libraries. Building loyalty among users and members of public libraries in today’s technological world is of high importance, as it will guarantee the repeated and more frequent use of public libraries and their services and thus reflect their positive effects. The loyalty of users of libraries and information centers can be based on perceived quality, effective communication between librarians and users, and satisfaction with services offered by libraries and their staffs and can affect the intention for repeated visits, and the use of library service and preferring a library over other libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-04T03:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856081
       
  • How good is our public library service' The evolution of a new quality
           standards framework for Scottish public libraries 2012–2017
    • Authors: Peter H. Reid
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The current challenging environment for public library has resulted in an ever greater need to demonstrate and evidence the quality of library provision as well as the value and impact of these services on society. Research, conducted on behalf of the Scottish Library and Information Council, reviewed the previous quality standards mechanism used in Scotland and resulted in the creation of a new framework. Data were gathered through a systematic review of all published quality audits of Scottish public libraries, focus groups with heads of service, impact workshops with library staff. The findings resulted in the creation of a new approach to assessing and evaluating the quality of provision as well as the value and impact of Scottish public libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-04T03:46:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619855430
       
  • Knowledge management best practices among rice farmers in selected areas
           of Tanzania
    • Authors: Wulystan Pius Mtega, Mpho Ngoepe
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      For improved rice production, farmers need access to timely and relevant knowledge at each stage of the rice-cropping calendar. To understand how farmers involve themselves in acquiring and sharing agricultural knowledge, this study investigates how knowledge management best practices can be enhanced among rice farmers in selected rural areas of Tanzania. Data were collected from 226 rice farmers in three districts (Kilombero, Kilosa and Mvomero) of the Morogoro region in Tanzania. Findings from structured questionnaires and focused group discussion indicate that rice farmers accessed, shared and used agricultural knowledge. It was found that individual, institutional and knowledge factors influence the performance of agricultural knowledge management activities. For enhancing effective agricultural knowledge management, it is important to take into consideration the knowledge management best practices, which include developing effective knowledge infrastructure, involving different stakeholders and using appropriate information and communications technology tools in enhancing access to knowledge. It is concluded that effective knowledge management activities increase the level of adoption of agricultural innovations. It is recommended that the proposed agricultural knowledge management best practices be adapted for improving rice production.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-02T03:49:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856087
       
  • User needs assessment for research data services in a research university
    • Authors: Soohyung Joo, Christie Peters
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study assesses the needs of researchers for data-related assistance and investigates their research data management behavior. A survey was conducted, and 186 valid responses were collected from faculty, researchers, and graduate students across different disciplines at a research university. The services for which researchers perceive the greatest need include assistance with quantitative analysis and data visualization. Overall, the need for data-related assistance is relatively higher among health scientists, while humanities researchers demonstrate the lowest need. This study also investigated the data formats used, data documentation and storage practices, and data-sharing behavior of researchers. We found that researchers rarely use metadata standards, but rely more on a standard file-naming scheme. As to data sharing, respondents are likely to share their data personally upon request or as supplementary materials to journal publications. The findings of this study will be useful for planning user-centered research data services in academic libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-02T03:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856073
       
  • Book review: Brianna H Marshall (ed.), The Complete Guide to Personal
           Digital Archiving
    • Authors: Simon Burnett
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-01T03:49:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619859780
       
  • Book review: Peter Gisolfi (ed.), Collaborative Library Design from
           Planning to Impact
    • Authors: Huan Vo-Tran
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T03:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619853974
       
  • Book Review: Michelle Reale, The Indispensable Academic Librarian:
           Teaching and Collaborating for Change
    • Authors: Wendy Frerichs
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T05:11:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619853975
       
  • Organizational empowerment: A vital step toward intrapreneurship
    • Authors: Seyedeh Zeinab Moghaddas, Masoumeh Tajafari, Mohsen Nowkarizi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-05-06T10:58:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841658
       
  • Information as a construction
    • Authors: Boris Bosancic, Marta Matijevic
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T04:00:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841657
       
  • Higher education student pathways to ebook usage and engagement, and
           understanding: Highways and cul de sacs

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Biddy Casselden, Richard Pears
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T03:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841429
       
  • Designing an information architecture for data management technologies:
           Introducing the DIAMANT model
    • Authors: Katarina Blask, André Förster
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-15T04:20:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841419
       
  • Contextual variables explaining the influence of social networking sites
           for information communication among library users: Cross-cultural study
           between China and Pakistan using Structure Equation Modeling
    • Authors: Misbah Jabeen, Yuan Qinjian, Muhammad Imran, Munazza Jabeen, Muhammad Rafiq
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T04:09:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836721
       
  • User recommendations for intelligent personal assistants
    • Authors: Irene Lopatovska, Alice London Griffin, Kelsey Gallagher, Caitlin Ballingall, Clair Rock, Mildred Velazquez
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T03:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841107
       
  • Applying participatory action approach to integrating professional
           librarians into open source software communities
    • Authors: Vandana Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-08T05:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836724
       
  • The Yoga Sutra of librarianship: Towards an understanding of holistic
           advocacy
    • Authors: Courtney M Block, Christopher L Proctor
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-04T04:55:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841120
       
  • National culture and trust in online health information
    • Authors: Mahmood Khosrowjerdi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-27T04:17:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836716
       
  • The impact of Chinese library and information science on outside
           disciplines: A citation analysis
    • Authors: Chuanfu Chen, Qiao Li, Kuei Chiu, Zhiqing Deng
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-13T07:40:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836706
       
  • Book review: Peggy Johnson, Fundamentals of Collection Development and
           Management
    • Authors: Daniella Hutchings
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T06:45:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619827199
       
  • Japanese public library services for dyslexic children
    • Authors: Hanae Ikeshita
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T06:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618823871
       
  • Factors influencing knowledge sharing among academics in Bowen University,
           Nigeria
    • Authors: Adedolapo Akosile, Wole Olatokun
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-01-11T03:49:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618820926
       
  • An investigation into cataloguers’ experiences with RDA
    • Authors: Alan MacLennan, Agnieszka Walicka
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-01-07T11:15:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618820655
       
  • Libraries as agents for development: The potential role of Egyptian rural
           public libraries towards the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals
           based on the UN 2030 Agenda
    • Authors: Essam Mansour
      First page: 121
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The key purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of Egyptian rural public libraries, being one of the social agents for development, towards the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals according to the United Nations Agenda for 2030. To meet the objectives and questions of the study, a multi-faceted research methodology was adopted and conducted in the period from September to November 2017. The study used a qualitative approach in terms of personal interview, discussion and observations of group meetings, and examination of documents to investigate the implementation of community development programmemes and services in 34 rural public libraries representing the four main administrative divisions comprising Egypt. The 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals have been discussed with ways in which Egyptian rural public libraries can include and meet them. Challenges facing libraries in the provision of information (poor infrastructure, inappropriate collections and related facilities and services, high levels of illiteracy, lack of funding and cooperation between related agencies, inappropriate training of library and information professionals, lack of studies and surveys, as well as analyses of information needs of rural communities) have also been emphasized. This study concluded that Egyptian rural public libraries have struggled to be part of the United Nations Agenda for the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals. They have tried as much as possible to integrate and adapt to the surrounding community in light of the common economic, political and social factors and conditions. Despite these challenges, these libraries showed a good response that is characterized as somewhat positive, though not sufficient, toward the achievement of these goals.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:15:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619872064
       
 
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