Journal Cover
Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.681
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 991  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0961-0006 - ISSN (Online) 1741-6477
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1085 journals]
  • Keeping the doors open in an age of austerity' Qualitative analysis of
           stakeholder views on volunteers in public libraries
    • Authors: Biddy Casselden, Alison Pickard, Geoff Walton, Julie McLeod
      Pages: 869 - 883
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 869-883, December 2019.
      English public libraries are increasingly adopting a hybrid approach to volunteer use, whereby volunteers plug the gaps created by reductions in paid staff, in response to local authority cuts arising from the Conservative Government’s austerity measures. This article builds on an initial phase of research reported in a previous article from 2015, which examined library service managers’ views of volunteering in public libraries using a Delphi study method. The second phase of research uses a case study method to investigate a variety of stakeholder views regarding public library volunteer use, using interviews, focus groups and surveys, thereby providing a complex picture of understandings and meanings. Results indicate that there is a clear mismatch of opinions relating to this phenomenon, in addition to a number of unintended consequences, directly attributable to the challenges identified. Key consequences of volunteer use relate to social exclusion, reductions in service accountability and quality, and a blurring of the boundaries that exist within the library, causing tensions for all stakeholders. Formal and informal strategies for ensuring these consequences are minimized are vital for library professionals who may be managing these volunteers, and a carefully planned volunteer relationship management strategy is suggested, which underpins the volunteer use equation, ensuring a mutually beneficial arrangement for all. A series of key recommendations are discussed that may help to counter some of the challenges identified, and provide a possible way forward for library professionals having to deal with this complex situation.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617743087
       
  • Comparison of Slovenian and Korean library laws
    • Authors: Hyeonsook Ryu, Primož Južnič
      Pages: 884 - 893
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 884-893, December 2019.
      This paper aims to provide a comprehensive report of the results of a comparative study of Slovenian and Korean library law. Although the countries of Slovenia and Korea have entirely different historical backgrounds, the library laws of both countries are of a comprehensive nature. Despite this, there are many differences between them. This study aims to clarify the differences between the library legislation of Slovenia and Korea and indicates the origins of these differences. The library laws of Slovenia and Korea share a common comprehensive nature and in both countries, library policy is administered by the Ministry charged with culture. Nonetheless, significant differences may be observed in their chapter structures, description methods, composition, as well as the characteristics of the shared national bibliographic system, etc. Additional findings indicate that as a small country surrounded by larger states, Slovenia has historically been more prone to accepting different cultures and can interact with them easily. On the other hand, by not embracing multiple cultures within its system of library law, Korea still fails to provide social and cultural security to ethnic minorities and migrants. This paper represents not only a juxtaposed comparison of Slovenian and Korean library laws, but also provides a detailed cross comparison, considering all of the similarities and differences that may be understood through this process. This study clarifies how each country’s social systems and the environment surrounding library affected the enactments of currently applicable library legislation.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617743543
       
  • Analysis of the factors affecting volunteering, satisfaction, continuation
           will, and loyalty for public library volunteers: An integrated structural
           equation model
    • Authors: Dong-Geun Oh
      Pages: 894 - 914
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 894-914, December 2019.
      This study aims to develop an integrated model to analyze the behaviors of public library volunteers in order to help the libraries utilize them as helpful and important human resources. An integrated structural equation model which consists of factors affecting volunteering, volunteer satisfaction, continuation will of volunteering, and loyalty/contributing intention to the library has been developed and tested using survey data from 401 public library volunteers in Daegu Metropolitan City, Korea. Understanding/enhancement and value functions, as well as those significantly directly influencing volunteer satisfaction, are higher motivating factors than other functions of the Voluntary Function Inventory. Direct effects of factors affecting volunteering, and indirect effects mediated by volunteer satisfaction, both on the continuation will of volunteering and loyalty/contributing intention to the library of the volunteers, are investigated: volunteer satisfaction has strong direct positive effects on both factors. Considering the total effects, support and recognition, perceptions of experience, and understanding/enhancement function have positive effects on the continuation will of volunteering, whereas the career function has negative effects; and support and recognition, perceptions of volunteer experience, values function, protective function, understanding/enhancement function, and social function have positive effects on the loyalty/contributing intention to the library, whereas the career function has a negative weak effect on it. Mean differences among groups are also analyzed. Because this study is a kind of extensive exploratory research for library volunteers with some limitations, recommendations for further research are offered, as well as research and managerial implications based on the discussion.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617747338
       
  • Redefining Library and Information Science education and training in
           Zimbabwe to close the workforce skills gaps
    • Authors: Pedzisai Katuli-Munyoro, Stephen M. Mutula
      Pages: 915 - 926
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 915-926, December 2019.
      The purpose of this study is to assess Library and Information Science (LIS) curricula in Zimbabwean universities and polytechnic colleges in the context of perceived skills gaps and from employers’ perspectives on what is required from graduate professionals in entry-level jobs. The study is qualitative in nature and is supported by a post-positivist framework. A case study research design and methods are used. All (three) curricular documents from two universities and polytechnic colleges (use a common curriculum) offering LIS education in Zimbabwe are reviewed using document review methods. Twenty-seven course outlines are analysed. Seventeen LIS employers and five deans/heads of departments have been purposively selected and interviewed using in-depth face-to-face interviews. Data are analysed using NVivo. The study identifies gaps in knowledge as well as in functional and generic employability training in LIS curricula. These are attributed to the transitory environment in which LIS departments operate, dated educational models, shortage of well-developed multi-stakeholder mutual partnerships and alliances, a lack of shared understanding and responsibility, an expanding labour environment and the absence of continuous professional development programmes. The study results suggest that Zimbabwean LIS education programmes are in urgent need of radical transformation and need to adopt innovative education models to meet the dictates of the techno-economic paradigm that serves society today.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617748472
       
  • Applications and applicability of Social Cognitive Theory in information
           science research
    • Authors: Lyndsey Middleton, Hazel Hall, Robert Raeside
      Pages: 927 - 937
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 927-937, December 2019.
      Social Cognitive Theory is a theory that derives from Psychology yet has been adopted in other interdisciplinary subject areas, including information science. The origins and key concepts of Social Cognitive Theory are presented, and the value of its contributions to information science research analysed, with particular reference to research into information-seeking behaviour and use and knowledge sharing. Prior applications of Social Cognitive Theory in information science research are related to a study of employee-led workplace learning and innovative work behaviour that has been designed to create new insight on: (1) workplace information literacy; (2) knowledge management; and (3) the relationship between information behaviours and innovation processes. It is anticipated that this research will also extend understandings of Social Cognitive Theory as a valuable tool for theory development across a range of domains that focus on learning processes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769985
       
  • Can in-house use data of print collections shed new light on library
           practices' Statistical evidence from a five-year longitudinal study in
           China
    • Authors: Xi Han, Min Song, Chunqiu Li, Qinghua Zhu
      Pages: 938 - 949
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 938-949, December 2019.
      Libraries worldwide are encountering limited budgets, rising e-collection prices and declining check-out use of print books. It is necessary for administrators to demonstrate physical library value to stakeholders and make empirically based collection development decisions. This five-year longitudinal study of the Southern Medical University Library in China was conducted based on the in-house use and the check-out use data of the whole collection from 2012 to 2016. We found that the in-house use of print materials was positively correlated with the check-out use. In-house use represented 26.78% of the total circulation, on average. Academic bound periodicals and reference books were rarely used in-house. The in-house use ratio differed greatly among subjects, and subjects with frequent check-out use approximated the average ratio. Collections with high check-out use also had a high in-house use ratio. Of the books, 46.1% of the titles were used only in-house, and titles of in-house use were 1.5 times that of check-out use, although the average frequency of in-house use was lower than check-out use. Check-out use data could not comprehensively represent in-house use. In-house use data provided important information for the physical library’s value estimation and collection weeding. We provide practical suggestions on in-house use data collection, collection development and weeding work.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617752230
       
  • Practices of community representatives in exploiting information channels
           for citizen democratic engagement
    • Authors: Hazel Hall, Peter Cruickshank, Bruce Ryan
      Pages: 950 - 961
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 950-961, December 2019.
      The purpose of the research was to investigate the practices of elected, yet unpaid, community councillors in Scotland as they exploit information channels for democratic engagement with citizens. Its focus is both novel and significant in that it considers the information literacy of a group that has not been studied before: volunteer representatives active in hyperlocal government. The primary means of data collection was semi-structured interviews of one hour in length with 19 community councillors. Research design and data analysis were informed by the SCONUL 7-Pillar Model of Information Literacy, and by Activity Theory. The main finding of the analysis is that community councillors engage with a range of information sources and tools in their work, the most important of which derives from local authorities. Three recommendations emerge from the analysis. These relate to: (1) information literacy training; (2) valuing information skills; and (3) the role of the public library service in supporting community council work.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769966
       
  • Exploring Becoming, Doing, and Relating within the information professions
    • Authors: Jennifer Campbell-Meier, Lisa Hussey
      Pages: 962 - 973
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 962-973, December 2019.
      Professional identity in Library and Information Sciences (LIS) in the United States and Canada is often defined by education, particularly the Masters in Library and Information Science(s) or its equivalent (MLIS). However, education is not the only attribute expected of an information professional. Anteby et al. (2016) developed three lenses for examining professions: Becoming, Doing and Relating. Each of these lenses provides a different view of how professional status is achieved and maintained and reflects the evolution of professional identification over the past century. Given the lack of any recognized definition within LIS, applying the lenses to “information professions” in general provides a framework to discuss professional identity. In order to understand how the LIS community defines information professional an exploratory survey was developed for information professions in the United States and Canada that included an open-ended question about professional identity. The survey was taken by more than 700 information professionals 2014–2015, and includes responses from MLIS students, information professionals with and without an MLIS (or an equivalent degree), LIS educators, retired professionals, and professionals with an MLIS working outside the field, but still active within the community. The responses uncovered a wide range of definitions, which reflected the concepts of lenses of professional status as presented by Anteby et al. However, not all of the definitions were easily assigned to a single lens. The findings do identify other important questions to consider. Why is there such a range of how we define LIS professional' What does this mean about how we interact with society in our professional roles' What impact might this have on how we are viewed by the larger society'
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618757298
       
  • Predictors of burnout in public library employees
    • Authors: Michelle P. Salyers, Melanie A. Watkins, Amber Painter, Eric A. Snajdr, Lauren O. Gilmer, Jennifer M. Garabrant, Nancy H. Henry
      Pages: 974 - 983
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 974-983, December 2019.
      Work stress and professional burnout are recognized as concerns for public library employees, yet little research has been conducted. The purpose of the current study was to better understand burnout and the contributing factors in a state-wide sample of public library employees in Indiana. Using a web-based survey, 171 employees of public libraries reported their level of burnout (emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy; Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey) and potential predictors, including levels of autonomy, co-worker support, work pressure, technology attitudes, and recovery experiences. A subset of 70 completed the burnout measures twice, allowing for predictions of change over time. Most predictors were correlated with burnout cross-sectionally, except for technology attitudes. Emotional exhaustion was positively associated with work pressure, and negatively associated with autonomy, role clarity, coworker support, and recovery experiences of relaxation, mastery, and control. Similar patterns were found for cynicism and reduced efficacy. However, over a period of approximately six months, only role clarity predicted decreased burnout (emotional exhaustion) above prior levels of burnout.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618759415
       
  • Talk to me: Exploring user interactions with the Amazon Alexa
    • Authors: Irene Lopatovska, Katrina Rink, Ian Knight, Kieran Raines, Kevin Cosenza, Harriet Williams, Perachya Sorsche, David Hirsch, Qi Li, Adrianna Martinez
      Pages: 984 - 997
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 984-997, December 2019.
      Amazon Alexa is a voice-controlled application that is rapidly gaining popularity. We examined user interactions with this technology, and focused on the types of tasks requested of Alexa, the variables that affect user behaviors with Alexa, and Alexa’s alternatives. The data about Alexa usage were collected from 19 participants via the online questionnaire and diary methods over the course of several days. The results indicate that across all age groups, Alexa was primarily used for checking weather forecasts, playing music, and controlling other devices. Several participants reported using Apple Siri and Google Now applications in addition to Alexa for similar purposes except for controlling other devices. Alexa uses over the weekends were more frequent than on weekdays, but its overall usage tended to decrease over time. The users reported being satisfied with Alexa even when it did not produce sought information, suggesting that the interaction experience is more important to the users than the interaction output. More work is required to understand whether users treat Alexa and similar voice-controlled applications as primarily a traditional information retrieval system, a casual leisure system, a control interface for smart home devices, or, simply, a new toy.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618759414
       
  • Information creation and models of information behavior: Grounding
           synthesis and further research
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 998 - 1006
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 998-1006, December 2019.
      This paper contributes to the conceptualization of information creation in the field of information behavior. To do so, it synthesizes discussions and conceptual models on information creation and related topics, such as communication, design and documentation, which to date have been disconnected. A number of models are discussed, as well as some of the strengths, weaknesses and unique contributions of each with respect to information creation. This discussion leads to a number of paths for further research, both conceptual and empirical, on information creation. In particular, one fruitful site for further research in information creation is art. Drawing on the ground-breaking work of Tidline, it is clear that art is informative, and that the activities involved in and surrounding the creation of art showcase the aspects of information creation that have been highlighted in theoretical models of information behavior. Further research should consider the information behavior involved in an artistic task from start to finish.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769968
       
  • Mining location information from life- and earth-sciences studies to
           facilitate knowledge discovery
    • Authors: Jason W. Karl
      Pages: 1007 - 1021
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1007-1021, December 2019.
      Location information in published studies represents an untapped resource for literature discovery, applicable to a range of domains. The ability to easily discover scientific articles from specific places, nearby locales, or similar (but geographically separate) areas worldwide is important for advancing science and addressing global sustainability challenges. However, the thematic and not geographic nature of current search tools makes location-based searches challenging and inefficient. Manually geolocating studies is labor intensive, and place-name recognition algorithms have performed poorly due to prevalence of irrelevant place names in scientific articles. These challenges have hindered past efforts to create map-based literature search tools. Thus, automated approaches are needed to sustain article georeferencing efforts. Common pattern-matching algorithms (parsers) can be used to identify and extract geographic coordinates from the text of published articles. Pattern-matching algorithms (geoparsers) were developed using regular expressions and lexical parsing and tested their performance against sets of full-text articles from multiple journals that were manually scanned for coordinates. Both geoparsers performed well at recognizing and extracting coordinates from articles with accuracy ranging from 85.1% to 100%, and the lexical geoparser performing marginally better. Omission errors (i.e. missed coordinates) were 0% to 14.9% for the regular expression geoparser and 0% to 10.3% for the lexical geoparser. Only a single commission error (i.e. erroneous coordinate) was encountered with the lexical geoparser. The ability to automatically identify and extract location information from published studies opens new possibilities for transforming scientific literature discovery and supporting novel research.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618759413
       
  • The Roma and documentary film: Considerations for collection development
    • Authors: Rebecca Adler Schiff
      Pages: 1022 - 1032
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1022-1032, December 2019.
      This paper explores the issues and criteria involved in developing a creditable documentary film collection about the Romani people for an academic library. Throughout their history, the Roma, or Gypsies, have dealt with biased, romanticized versions of their story, perpetuated by stereotypes found in legend, literature, song, and film. The expectation in the present undertaking is that the evidence coming from documentary films provides an effective antidote for misrepresentations. The paper reviews pertinent literature, suggests a selection process, and furnishes commentaries on individual titles as they relate to a framework based on the Romani historical and geographical narrative. A critical lens, namely, an awareness of the misrepresentations that abound in all media, is recommended as the instrument through which the films should be viewed. It is this dual approach – applying a historical framework and a critical lens – that can offer librarians a foundation upon which to build and grow a well-balanced collection.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618759592
       
  • Enacting and capturing embodied knowledge in the practices of enthusiast
           car restorers: Emerging themes
    • Authors: Annemaree Lloyd, Michael Olsson
      Pages: 1033 - 1040
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1033-1040, December 2019.
      This paper reports on emerging themes drawn from a larger ongoing qualitative study of car restorers which explores themes of embodiment, embodied knowledge and ways of knowing. The themes described in this current article indicate that car restoration is bounded within a discourse of loyalty to the particular type of practice and its projects (restoration), its material object (the car) and to narratives of expertise, maintenance and preservation. The study’s findings also demonstrate that enthusiast car restorers, along with other serious leisure communities, have become the unacknowledged custodians of a large body of hands-on knowledge which would otherwise be in danger of being lost in an increasingly post-industrial world.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769979
       
  • Knowledge sharing and organizational change: Practice interactions in
           Australian local government
    • Authors: Dean Leith, Hilary Yerbury
      Pages: 1041 - 1051
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1041-1051, December 2019.
      The sharing of knowledge in organizations is deemed critical to achieving environmental and economic sustainability outcomes. This study applies a practice theoretical approach to investigating knowledge sharing in a team in local government created to break down the boundaries which have led to siloed practices. Findings indicate a range of activities, including influencing and resisting, and these differ from findings in other studies. Analysis of organizational discourses, physical arrangements and social spaces of organizations demonstrated the existence of two distinct practices: knowledge sharing and organizational change. Sharing knowledge of the organization and its ways of working were found to be as important as sharing subject knowledge and expertise.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769969
       
  • Mediation effect of knowledge management on the relationship between
           transformational leadership and job performance of librarians in
           university libraries in Nigeria
    • Authors: Cyprian I. Ugwu
      Pages: 1052 - 1066
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1052-1066, December 2019.
      This paper proposes a mediation model of transformational leadership for improving the job performance of librarians in university libraries in Nigeria. A quantitative approach underpinned by positivist philosophy was considered appropriate for this type of research and adopted to accomplish the main goal of this study. A questionnaire was used to collect data from a total of 215 librarians who participated in the study. Factor analysis and multiple regressions were used to analyse data. The results of the study reveal that knowledge management has full and partial influence on the relationship between transformational leadership and job performance of librarians.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618763715
       
  • Encountering the muse: An exploration of the relationship between
           inspiration and information in the museum context
    • Authors: K.F. Latham, Bhuva Narayan, Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1067 - 1076
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1067-1076, December 2019.
      How are information and inspiration connected' Answering this question can help information professionals facilitate the pathways to inspiration. Inspiration has previously been conceptualized as a goal or mode of information seeking, but this says little about the nature of inspiration or how it is experienced. In this study, we explore the connection between information and inspiration through a qualitative approach, using the museum as our setting; specifically, the researchers’ own visits to three separate museums. We use collaborative auto-hermeneutics, a methodology specifically suited to such a reflexive exploration, to document and analyze three individual museum visits. The following research questions were the main driver for this exploratory study: What is inspiration, and How are inspiration and information related' In answer, we present an inductive definition of inspiration as a kind of information, and we discuss how this definition fits in with the information science literature as well as offer some practical applications.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769976
       
  • Professional networking with Yahoo! Groups: A case of school librarians
           from international schools in Hong Kong
    • Authors: Samson Choi, Zvjezdana Dukic, Agnes Hill
      Pages: 1077 - 1090
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1077-1090, December 2019.
      The study explores how the group of school librarians from international schools in Hong Kong uses the Yahoo! Groups platform for their professional networking. In this case study quantitative and qualitative data were gathered and analyzed. Quantitative data about the groups’ use of Yahoo! Groups were extracted from the platform archive pages. An online questionnaire was sent to all group members to collect quantitative and qualitative data about their experience with social software and their views on Yahoo! Groups suitability for professional networking. The study findings show that the group members regularly use Messages, a web-based mailing list and occasionally use Files and Polls. While nearly half of the group members take part in discussions via Yahoo! Groups, only a small number posted most of the messages. Most popular discussion topics are reading, group’s administrative issues, professional development, and school library collection development. Group members mostly agree that Yahoo! Groups features which they use are user-friendly and that the platform is a convenient tool for the group. Although group members widely use various social software for leisure and for work purposes, most of them do not consider replacing Yahoo! Groups with another social networking tool.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618763488
       
  • When social support by patrons protects against burnout: A study among
           Italian public library workers
    • Authors: Mara Martini, Sara Viotti, Daniela Converso, Jolanda Battaglia, Barbara Loera
      Pages: 1091 - 1102
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1091-1102, December 2019.
      The study aimed to measure burnout among librarians in a city in Northern Italy, and to identify which demands and resources influence emotional exhaustion and cynicism. In particular, it focused on the relationship with patrons, since in the service sector users are mostly studied as a cause of stress and rarely considered as a source of support for service operators. Hierarchical regressions carried out on data (167 self-administered questionnaires) showed that burnout dimensions are influenced by some socio-demographic and job characteristics, and by the positive and negative aspects of relationships with users. We present some practical implications for library managers, in order to reduce the impact of their patrons’ negative behaviour and to improve conditions to facilitate the expression of users’ support for workers.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618763716
       
  • Librarians’ perceptions of educational values of comic books: A
           comparative study between Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Australia and New
           Zealand
    • Authors: Patrick Lo, Bradley Allard, Kevin K.W. Ho, Joyce Chao-chen Chen, Daisuke Okada, Andrew Stark, James Henri, Chung-chin Lai
      Pages: 1103 - 1119
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1103-1119, December 2019.
      Comic books are becoming increasingly popular in the field of education. In the past, comic books were excluded from school libraries and classrooms. However, with the resurgence in the popularity of comic books and students’ increased demands for them, they are now considered as recreational reading with educational value. In response to this, school libraries have begun collecting comic books and including them as part of their regular collections. This research paper reflects on the current situation of comic books in primary and middle school library collections and examines school librarians’ perceptions towards educational values of comics. The investigation was launched in Hong Kong, Taiwan, New Zealand, Australia and Japan – making comparisons amongst different levels (primary school and secondary school), and different types (public school and private school) of schools in five different countries. Questionnaire surveys were sent to selected school librarians and were the main method of data collection. A total number of 683 responses were collected for this study. Research results include librarians’ attitudes towards comic books in school libraries, adolescent readers’ use of school libraries, their reading and borrowing practices, as well as other problems encountered with the on-going maintenance of comic books as part of the school libraries’ regular collections.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618763979
       
  • Public libraries, museums and physical convergence: Context, issues,
           opportunities: A literature review Part 1
    • Authors: Emily Warren, Graham Matthews
      Pages: 1120 - 1133
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1120-1133, December 2019.
      There has recently been a growth in physical convergence in cultural heritage domains. Part 1 examines this ‘trend’, its drivers and related issues, with particular focus on public libraries and museums. It offers an overview of practice, challenges and opportunities. Through thematic analysis of a comprehensive, literature review of both domains that looked at the wider aspects of collaboration, cooperation, partnerships and integration in the sector as well as physical convergence, it provides insight into background, theory and activities worldwide. It presents discussion on the meaning of convergence, the concept of ‘memory institutions’, the relationship between public libraries and museums in the context of convergence, shared mission and values, convergence and re-convergence, and professionalism and divergence. It concludes with consideration of practical aspects such as motivations for convergence, including digital technology, changing user expectations and culture, and economic and political challenges that impact on physical convergence in a dynamic local government environment.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769720
       
  • Tacit knowledge sharing in online environments: Locating ‘Ba’ within a
           platform for public sector professionals
    • Authors: Iris Buunk, Colin F. Smith, Hazel Hall
      Pages: 1134 - 1145
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1134-1145, December 2019.
      This article presents preliminary findings from a larger doctoral study which investigates tacit knowledge sharing and social media use. The results reported here are from a survey completed by members of an online platform that incorporates social media features and enables knowledge sharing amongst public sector professionals in Scotland. There are two main findings from the study explored in this paper. The first relates to the various roles that an online platform may play in the facilitation of tacit knowledge sharing, apparent around learning processes, expertise sharing, problem solving and innovation. The second relates to how social interactions are supported online, allowing discussions among experts to be initiated, fostering collective intelligence and enabling tacit and personal knowledge to become visible, and accessible, while decreasing the time and the effort required. The outcomes of the research additionally suggest that three aspects of the concept of Ba (or space), as proposed by Nonaka and Konno (1998), can be found in online environments. These aspects are Dialoguing/Interacting Ba, Cyber Ba and Exercising Ba.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769982
       
  • Why librarians can’t fight fake news
    • Authors: M. Connor Sullivan
      Pages: 1146 - 1156
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Volume 51, Issue 4, Page 1146-1156, December 2019.
      In the wake of the panic over fake news that followed the 2016 US presidential election, librarians and other information professionals are being urged to “take leadership in the current crisis” (Jacobson, 2017: 24). The response from the profession has been to reaffirm the core values of librarianship and to hold up traditional services as a means for combating misinformation. The problem is that these solutions are offered in the absence of a full understanding of the real danger of misinformation, which is “not just [that] misinformation is ‘out there,’” but “what misinformation does to our mind” (Ecker, 2015: 22). Misinformation research in other fields directly challenges the solutions proposed by library professionals and casts doubts on their underlying assumptions. This article provides an overview of the library and information science approach to misinformation in the United States, discusses the shortcomings of that approach, and points to possible next steps for remedying the problem.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618764258
       
  • Book review: KJ Varnum (ed.), Beyond Reality: Augmented, Virtual, and
           Mixed Reality in the Library
    • Authors: Alan MacLennan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-12-02T03:54:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619890757
       
  • A quantitative investigation of students’ attitudes towards
           electronic book technology
    • Authors: Hatice Gonca Bulur, Mustafa Sinan Gönül
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to analyse the factors that have an impact on technology adoption for e-books utilizing the Analytic Hierarchy Process and Multiple Regression Analysis methods. Findings indicate that perceived usefulness and ease of use are the most significant determinants in using e-books. Of key significance is that Analytic Hierarchy Process results show that consumers make pairwise comparisons, adding environmental concerns to the selection process. Recognizing the importance of all these factors is valuable to e-book developers and marketers in presenting products that meet all consumer choice criteria. The Analytic Hierarchy Process provides researchers with a more thorough decision-making analysis.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-11-08T03:58:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619884114
       
  • Sharing stories: An exploration of genres in storytimes
    • Authors: Jacqueline Kociubuk, Kathleen Campana
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Exposure to a variety of stories can support many early literacy skills for young children. Using video recordings from a previous study that examined early literacy in public library storytimes, this study investigated the use of genre and story variety in storytimes for young children (birth to 60 months). Findings showed that attendees were primarily exposed to stories from the storybook/narrative genre with limited use of both non-narrative and narrative informational genres in number of stories and time spent reading each genre. Story variety and the use of current titles can be improved to better support early literacy development in public library storytimes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T04:03:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619882751
       
  • The use of mobile devices and applications for health information: A
           survey of Croatian students
    • Authors: Sung Un Kim, Ivana Martinović, Snježana Stanarević Katavić
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to understand the information behaviours of youth seeking health information on mobile devices and to explore differences by prior knowledge, gender and grade level. A survey was conducted in two high schools in Osijek, Croatia. Results indicate that among the total 408 participants, 84.3% reported having used mobile devices for health information and 54.7% reported having used applications for health information. Students seek health information about physical activity and eating issues/nutrition mostly on mobile devices. Students with more prior medical knowledge tend to have more information needs, perceive mobile devices as more beneficial, search health information and use health-related applications more frequently, and consider the tracking/recording/monitoring feature of applications more useful. Students with less prior medical knowledge tend to consider the video feature of applications more useful. Students rely heavily on searching health topics in search engines on mobile devices, rather than browsing or using applications. This study provides implications to better assist young people in using mobile devices and applications to manage their health issues.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-23T04:02:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619880937
       
  • Strategies for preserving memes as artefacts of digital culture
    • Authors: Fátima García López, Sara Martínez Cardama
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Internet archives kept by heritage libraries are analysed, focusing specifically on that new type of expression characteristic of web culture and digital folklore, the meme. Five paradigmatic examples of heritage institutions engaging in web archive initiatives are explored: the Library of Congress, British Library, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Biblioteca Nacional de España and National Library of Australia. Specific assessment categories are defined for the study. The findings reveal a lack of collection policies for such representative objects of today’s mass culture and identify the challenges both for the custodial institutions and for research in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T04:06:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619882070
       
  • Transformational and transactional leadership influence on knowledge
           management activities of librarians in university libraries in Nigeria
    • Authors: C.I. Ugwu, A.M. Okore
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to determine the influence of transformational and transactional leadership on knowledge management activities of librarians in university libraries in Nigeria. Quantitative methodology was considered appropriate for this type of research and adopted to accomplish the main goal of this study. A questionnaire was used to collect data from a total of 215 librarians who participated in the study. Factor analysis and multiple regressions were used to analyze data. The results of the study reveal a positive and significant influence of transformational and transactional leadership on knowledge management activities of academic librarians in university libraries in Nigeria. Further, the results show that transformational leadership behaviours impacted knowledge management activities of librarians more than transactional leadership behaviours. The study provides both theoretical and empirical evidence on the impact of transformational and transactional leadership behaviours on knowledge management processes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T04:05:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619880229
       
  • LIS pre-professionals’ perspectives towards library user education: A
           comparative study between three universities in Greater China
    • Authors: Bradley Allard, Patrick Lo, Qianxiu Liu, Kevin K.W. Ho, Dickson K.W. Chiu, Joyce C.C. Chen, Qingshan Zhou, Tianjin Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although the perceptions of library user education of academic libraries has been studied in a general context, specific studies on perspective of library and information science students are relatively few, especially in the context of Asia. Filling this research gap is particularly important because it affects the experiential learning of these pre-professionals, and shapes future library user education directions. As such, this study aims at understanding and comparing the views and perceptions of library user education programs in Greater China from the perspective of library and information science students. A total number 305 questionnaire survey responses were collected from three different universities in Greater China, namely: The University of Hong Kong (HKU), National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU), and Peking University (PKU). Results from this survey study reveal high evaluations of library user education programs and library user education librarians as a whole, as well as possible ways for librarians to better promote such programs. Such ratings are attributed to findings from previous studies on why students choose librarianship as a career, as well as the importance of experiential learning embedded in the Library and Information Science programs at each university. Findings of this study also suggest that as pre-professionals (soon-to-be professional librarians), these student respondents recognize the values behind library user education as an important part of their overall learning practices. Results from this study will be useful in identifying how future library professionals in Greater China perceive library user education programs, and librarians – therefore potentially helping librarians improve the delivery of these services.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-19T09:57:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619874106
       
  • Exploring secondary school students’ self-perception and actual
           understanding of plagiarism
    • Authors: Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Xiao Hu, Jeremy Ng
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Plagiarism has been a growing concern among institutions and academics in recent years. To address the problem, and to alleviate the growing trend of this academic misconduct, students’ perceptions of plagiarism should be considered. This study explores students’ self-perception and actual understanding of plagiarism, and the relations between them. Survey responses were collected from 433 students in a Hong Kong junior secondary school. Results reveal that students show different understanding towards ‘obvious’ and ‘obscure’ plagiarism, with misunderstanding or misconception more likely arising over obscure plagiarism. This study also reports that students’ self-perception on their understanding of plagiarism differed across grade levels, and their academic performance of inquiry-based learning has a relation to their self-perceived and actual understanding of plagiarism. Implications for improving the teaching and learning of plagiarism are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-17T03:52:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619872527
       
  • Managing multilingual collections: Insights from data analytics research
    • Authors: Simon Musgrave, Steve Wright, Tom Denison, Louisa Willoughby
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Libraries, through their catalogues and borrowing records are well-placed to use data analytics to enhance their collection management (and of course do this already, for example by directing orders to genres/areas that are heavily borrowed). In this article, we explore some of the insights for the management of multilingual collections offered by a novel research method that fuses analysis of a large data set of borrowing records with data from interviews with library staff. Such a method, we argue, helps to untangle the Gordian knot around why materials in some languages are widely popular while materials for other equally widely-spoken languages sit unused on the shelves. It also draws our attention to the ways in which different demographics of speakers are engaging with library materials across the various languages, and gives a suite of tools local libraries might use to better assess the likely demand for materials in languages other than English.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T03:56:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619874110
       
  • Standardization and standards in Bulgarian libraries: Current state
    • Authors: Rositsa Dobreva Krasteva
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The article contains the results of an empirical study conducted in the early 2018 through a survey conducted among the libraries in Bulgaria. Data obtained were processed by the software product for mathematical analysis of statistical data SPSS for Windows 19.0. The aim of the study is to create a complete picture of the Bulgarian library system in terms of understanding the benefits of standardization activity and the application of specific standards in the field of library activities. The applied research methods are: research, analysis and synthesis of information received, a comparative analysis between different groups of libraries participated in the survey. In order to specify the psychometric characteristics of the methods and verification of the working hypothesis, the following methods for statistical processing were applied: descriptive statistics; correlation analysis; factorial analysis; one-way ANOVA test. This study is the first large-scale study of its kind on standardization among Bulgarian libraries. Its contributions can be assigned to those that enrich the theory and methodology of sociological studies in the field of library activities. As a result of the survey the current level of application of the specific national, branch and international standards in the Bulgarian libraries was established. Measures have been identified to promote the standardization activity in the field of library activities. Data gathered from the survey contribute to the development of methodology and curricula for online training of the library specialists, according to their specific needs and interest.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T03:55:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871603
       
  • Cultural heritage literacy: A survey of academics from humanities and
           social sciences
    • Authors: Semanur Öztemiz
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the 21st century, some factors, such as the awareness of multiculturalism, the preservation of local culture and the recognition of national cultural heritage, have led to the need for a new literacy skill called cultural heritage literacy. This study aimed to draw attention to the concept of cultural heritage literacy, defining the competencies of this literacy and investigating these competencies among academics from the humanities and social sciences at Hacettepe University Faculty of Letters, Turkey. Cultural heritage information needs and the information behaviours of academics were found to have differences in practices and perceptions across age, gender, status and subject disciplines. Within the scope of the study, a questionnaire with 30 questions was given to 114 academics from the humanities and social sciences at Hacettepe University Faculty of Letters, Turkey. The data were analysed using descriptive statistics and a chi-square test. The findings show that most of the academics reported having strong cultural heritage literacy abilities. There are statistically significant correlations between participants’ demographic features and cultural heritage literacy. It is expected that this study will contribute to the professionals of cultural heritage institutions. By considering cultural heritage literacy skills, professionals of cultural heritage institutions can develop new information services for cultural-heritage literate people.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-11T03:42:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619872529
       
  • Library and information science as a career in Kuwait
    • Authors: Hanadi Buarki, Mashael Al-Omar
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Library and Information Science discipline is in constant flux, facing myriad impediments with the development of technology. Per se, the field introduced information and communications technology into its curriculum which has changed librarians’ roles in information handling. Moreover, the integration of the term ‘information’ changed the nomenclature thereby giving a new name of Information Science/Studies, embracing an enormous range of subjects. The present study investigates the previous and current skills of alumni at the Department of Library and Information Science, College of Basic Education, Kuwait. Descriptive analysis of the distributed survey revealed frequencies and percentages data on participants’ gender, marital status, age, grade point average, certificate obtained, employment sector, years of experience, and salary. Qualitative data revealed comments on employment issues, difficulties faced, and the Department of Library and Information Science curriculum. The findings suggested that the majority of the alumni have benefited from their major as their employment is relevant (84%), it is within their specialisation and most of them (56%) are employed in a library setting. The most frequently learned skill is ethics (54%), and the skills that needed improvement are library skills and English language proficiency. The research data initiated a list of skills required and organisations employing the alumni. It is recommended that LIS alumni should be equippedwith multi-tasking skills to work at the job market institutions, and that LIS schools should start offering a PhD qualification in Kuwait. This research contributes to decisions in curriculum updating from the viewpoint of alumni to meet the requirements of the job market. The research is the first study to collect data from LIS alumni in Kuwait at CBE, PAAET and realises their concerns. Departments sharing a similar curriculum can benefit as the research is an initial step that should be regularly taken to update the curricula.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871992
       
  • Libraries as agents for development: The potential role of Egyptian rural
           public libraries towards the attainment of Sustainable Development Goals
           based on the UN 2030 Agenda
    • Authors: Essam Mansour
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The key purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of Egyptian rural public libraries, being one of the social agents for development, towards the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals according to the United Nations Agenda for 2030. To meet the objectives and questions of the study, a multi-faceted research methodology was adopted and conducted in the period from September to November 2017. The study used a qualitative approach in terms of personal interview, discussion and observations of group meetings, and examination of documents to investigate the implementation of community development programmemes and services in 34 rural public libraries representing the four main administrative divisions comprising Egypt. The 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals have been discussed with ways in which Egyptian rural public libraries can include and meet them. Challenges facing libraries in the provision of information (poor infrastructure, inappropriate collections and related facilities and services, high levels of illiteracy, lack of funding and cooperation between related agencies, inappropriate training of library and information professionals, lack of studies and surveys, as well as analyses of information needs of rural communities) have also been emphasized. This study concluded that Egyptian rural public libraries have struggled to be part of the United Nations Agenda for the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals. They have tried as much as possible to integrate and adapt to the surrounding community in light of the common economic, political and social factors and conditions. Despite these challenges, these libraries showed a good response that is characterized as somewhat positive, though not sufficient, toward the achievement of these goals.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:15:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619872064
       
  • Design thinking and methods in library practice and graduate library
           education
    • Authors: Rachel Ivy Clarke, Satyen Amonkar, Ann Rosenblad
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite interest in the application of design thinking and methods in librarianship, there seems to be a disconnect between application and education to support it. This study used an online questionnaire to elicit feedback from library workers in the United States about interest in and use of design thinking and methods in library practice, and the need for design skills and abilities in library education. We found that practicing librarians perceive design thinking and methods have relevance to library work, but opinions vary based on library type and nature of the work. Design thinking and methods were used mostly for space planning and program development, with applications emphasizing empathy and user/community understanding aspects—despite myriad other possibilities. Most respondents were in favor of including design thinking and methods in MLIS programs, which can support more robust applications through inclusion of the theoretical, philosophical, and epistemological underpinnings from which design thinking and methods emerge.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:15:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871989
       
  • The moderating effects of information overload and academic
           procrastination on the information avoidance behavior among Filipino
           undergraduate thesis writers
    • Authors: Maria Cristina M. Fuertes, Beatriz Marie D. Jose, Mary Angelie A. Nem Singh, Pauline Eirisse P. Rubio, Allan B. de Guzman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information avoidance is a behavior that could either prevent or delay consumption of information. While information avoidance has been documented in various fields of interest, its overall dynamics in the context of library and information science remains a research blankspot. The overall intent of this paper is to develop a model that examines the moderating effect of information overload and academic procrastination on the information avoidance behavior among Filipino undergraduate thesis writers. Capitalizing on Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) design, a total of 215 Filipino undergraduate thesis writers participated in the study. A multi-aspect questionnaire was used to measure the following variables: information overload, academic procrastination and information avoidance. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Results show that when students have a positive attitude towards reading, the more likely they are to employ better reading strategies and the less likely they are to exhibit information avoidance. On the other hand, the more reading strategies are used, the lower is information avoidance. Additionally, the tendency to procrastinate has less effect on the relationship between reading strategies and information avoidance and the tendency to procrastinate and acquire excessive information has less effect on the relationship between reading attitudes and information avoidance. Implications for university settings are also discussed in this paper.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T04:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871608
       
  • What is innovative to public libraries in the United States' A
           perspective of library administrators for classifying innovations
    • Authors: Devendra Dilip Potnis, Joseph Winberry, Bonnie Finn, Courtney Hunt
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Innovations are critical for public libraries but rarely does any primary research study the scope and interpretation of the term “innovation” by public libraries. Also, few of the existing innovation typologies are based on data collected from public libraries. This study fills in the gap by eliciting 80 innovations reported by the administrators of 108 award-winning public libraries in the United States, and proposes the first organic classification of innovations for public libraries, with the following four types of innovations: Program (access-oriented/use-oriented), Process (efficiency-driven/effectiveness-driven), Partnership (internal/external), and Technology (web-based technologies/assistive technologies/artificial intelligence). Findings can advance the state of innovations in libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T03:48:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871991
       
  • A case study investigation of academic library support for open
           educational resources in Scottish universities
    • Authors: Seth D. Thompson, Adrienne Muir
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of the research was to investigate why and how Scottish university libraries support open educational resources and to assess their ability to provide support services for their development and use within higher education institutions. There has been little research on the role of academic libraries in supporting open educational resources in Scotland and previous research found that there is a lack of awareness of them in Scottish higher education institutions and few have open educational resources policies. The case study methodology therefore involved two Scottish academic libraries providing open educational resources services. The libraries’ motivation includes supporting teaching and learning and the development of educator digital skills and copyright knowledge. However, there are a number of barriers limiting the services the libraries are able to provide, particularly lack of human resources. The research confirmed the findings of previous research on the importance of institutional commitment, incentives for educator engagement, and understanding of copyright and licensing issues by educators and library staff.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T03:46:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871604
       
  • The means-end cognitions of perceived information quality in academic
           social networking sites
    • Authors: Ning Zhang, Qinjian Yuan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Academic social networking sites (ASNS) have received substantial attention in recent years. The information quality of academic resources is vital to users. In order to improve the users’ information quality experience, it is necessary to understand how users perceive information quality in ASNS and what factors or relations affect their results of information quality perception. Drawing on the approach of the means-end chain, our study implemented a laddering interviews with ASNS users. We both elucidated various factors influencing information quality perception and constructed a hierarchical value map, all of the complex relationships were quantitatively calculated and represented in a hierarchical structure. The results showed that 13 factors were identified and 18 relations were described. This study contributes by addressing the process of users’ information quality perception in the ASNS and by giving a deep and nuanced understanding of the factors affecting information quality. This is different from prior research that mainly focused on information quality evaluation. The results not only enrich the information quality research but also can be used to guide ASNS’ platform design and management.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-09-04T03:41:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871612
       
  • ‘To be understood as to understand’: A readability analysis of public
           library acceptable use policies
    • Authors: Elaine Robinson, David McMenemy
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) are documents stating the limitations users must agree to when first accessing information and communications technologies (ICTs) in organisations, such as employers, educational institutions and public libraries. AUPs lay out the parameters of acceptable use expected of someone accessing the ICT services provided, and should state in clear and understandable terms what behaviours will attract sanctions, both legal and in terms of restricting future access. Utilising a range of standard readability tests used to measure how understandable documents are, the paper investigates how readable the AUPs presented to public library patrons in the UK are in practice. Of the 206 AUPs in use across the local government departments who manage public library services 200 were obtained and subjected to a range of readability testing procedures. Four readability tests were used for analysis: the Flesch Reading Ease, the Coleman-Liau Index, the Gunning Fog Index and the SMOG Grade. Results for all four readability tests administered on all AUPs raise significant questions. For the Flesch Reading Ease score only 5.5% of AUPs scored at the standard readability level or higher (60+), and 8% scored at a very high level of difficulty akin to a piece of scientific writing. Similarly, for SMOG, only 7.5% of the 200 AUPs scored at the recommended level of 10. Likewise, very few AUPs scored at levels recommended for a general audience with either the Gunning Fog Index (11.5%) or the Coleman-Liau Index (2%). With such variability in readability, the fitness for purpose of the average AUP as a contract patrons must agree to can be called into question. This paper presents the first ever analysis of the readability of library AUPs in the literature. Recommendations are made as to how public library services may improve this aspect of practice.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-08-29T03:51:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871598
       
  • Library services to an aging population: A nation-wide study in the United
           States
    • Authors: Noah Lenstra, Fatih Oguz, Courtnay S. Duvall
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study presents a large-scale study of public library services to older adults in the United States. A random sampling method was used to identify public libraries (n=226) for the study. Results suggest that libraries serve their aging communities in multiple ways. Some libraries provide a plethora of specialized programs focused on the specific needs of older adults. Others extend core library services to ensure they are accessible to older adults. Others invest in infrastructure and staff development to prepare for an aging society. Some do not provide any specialized programs or services for older adults. There is great unevenness in terms of library services for older adults across the nation. The discussion suggests additional work needed to better understand this unevenness, and to address it.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-08-28T03:57:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871596
       
  • Elaborating the sensory and cognitive-affective aspects of information
           experience
    • Authors: Reijo Savolainen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on pragmatist ideas proposed by John Dewey, the study elaborates the picture of information experience by examining how researchers have characterized the ways in which people receive, acquire and interpret sensory and cognitive-affective information. To this end, a conceptual analysis was conducted by concentrating on 43 studies pertinent to the topic. The findings indicate that so far, the construct of information experience has remained quite vague. This is mainly due to that experience - the fundamental constituent of information experience – has not been sufficiently reflected in the context of informational phenomena. Information experience studies have mainly contributed to information behaviour research by describing how people receive and acquire sensory information, while the picture of experiencing cognitive-affective information has remained quite vague. There are also gaps in studies examining how sensory and cognitive-affective information are interpreted as an integral part of information experience. The study also identifies topics of further research dealing with the elaboration of the construct of information experience.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-08-21T11:43:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619871595
       
  • Book review: Mary Grace Flaherty, Promoting Individual and Community
           Health at the Library
    • Authors: Jane Garner
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T03:49:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619866073
       
  • Linkages between information overload and acculturative stress: The case
           of Black diasporic immigrants in the US
    • Authors: Ana Ndumu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the information behavior of Black immigrants in the United States and specifically investigates possible linkages between information overload and acculturative stress. Focus groups were conducted with African, Afro-Caribbean, and Afro-Latinx immigrants in Florida. When analyzed according to Jaeger and Burnett’s theory of information worlds (Burnett and Jaeger, 2011; Jaeger and Burnett, 2010), the data supports that participants experience information overload as a result of the voluminous and dispersed nature of information in the US; perceptions of belonging and transnationality; and undertaking high-stakes tasks such as immigration procedures, finding employment, and understanding cultural norms. Participants felt that the large, stratified, and complex US information landscape can prompt stress. Since information overload poses a barrier to immigrant social inclusion, it can be interpreted as acculturative stress.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T03:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619857115
       
  • From classroom to library: What are the transferable knowledge and skills
           teachers bring to library work
    • Authors: Franklin Gyamfi Agyemang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the transferable knowledge, experience or skills second-career librarians with a teaching background bring to bear or utilize in the discharge of their library work. It also explores how the transferable knowledge helps librarians and teaching librarians to discharge the roles delineated by ACRL’s (2017) document. Snowball sampling method was used to locate 17 participants for this study in Ghana. Mixed methods were used for data collection; questionnaire (open-ended questions) and interview. The data were analyzed using the thematic analysis technique. The study found the following transferable knowledge, skills and experiences to library work: methodology of teaching, questioning and listening skills, knowledge of courses content, presentation, communication and good public speaking skills and human relational skills. The study found that transferable knowledge from the teaching profession help second-career (teaching) librarian to discharge to their library role effectively.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T03:51:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856401
       
  • How to increase the loyalty of public library users' A qualitative
           study
    • Authors: Oranus Tajedini, Ali Akbar Khasseh, Mahin Afzali, Ali Sadatmoosavi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The main objective of this study is to explain how to increase user loyalty behavior to public library services. This study uses a qualitative method based on grounded theory. The research population included users of public libraries in Iran. The data were collected through in-depth interviews, and the theoretical saturation was obtained after interviewing 24 members of public libraries. The collected data through interviews were analyzed using theoretical coding and content analysis. Results indicated that observing moral and humane principles when dealing with library users plays a significant role in both building user loyalty to the library and attracting new users. In addition, it was found that causal conditions in increasing loyalty among public library users are related to four areas including physical space management, information resource management, human resource management, and information technology management. It was also noted that factors such as service quality, proper design of interiors, providing diverse and updated information resources, the use of new communication technologies, and the use of cyberspace and social network applications must be taken into account by public libraries. Building loyalty among users and members of public libraries in today’s technological world is of high importance, as it will guarantee the repeated and more frequent use of public libraries and their services and thus reflect their positive effects. The loyalty of users of libraries and information centers can be based on perceived quality, effective communication between librarians and users, and satisfaction with services offered by libraries and their staffs and can affect the intention for repeated visits, and the use of library service and preferring a library over other libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-04T03:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856081
       
  • How good is our public library service' The evolution of a new quality
           standards framework for Scottish public libraries 2012–2017
    • Authors: Peter H. Reid
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The current challenging environment for public library has resulted in an ever greater need to demonstrate and evidence the quality of library provision as well as the value and impact of these services on society. Research, conducted on behalf of the Scottish Library and Information Council, reviewed the previous quality standards mechanism used in Scotland and resulted in the creation of a new framework. Data were gathered through a systematic review of all published quality audits of Scottish public libraries, focus groups with heads of service, impact workshops with library staff. The findings resulted in the creation of a new approach to assessing and evaluating the quality of provision as well as the value and impact of Scottish public libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-04T03:46:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619855430
       
  • Knowledge management best practices among rice farmers in selected areas
           of Tanzania
    • Authors: Wulystan Pius Mtega, Mpho Ngoepe
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      For improved rice production, farmers need access to timely and relevant knowledge at each stage of the rice-cropping calendar. To understand how farmers involve themselves in acquiring and sharing agricultural knowledge, this study investigates how knowledge management best practices can be enhanced among rice farmers in selected rural areas of Tanzania. Data were collected from 226 rice farmers in three districts (Kilombero, Kilosa and Mvomero) of the Morogoro region in Tanzania. Findings from structured questionnaires and focused group discussion indicate that rice farmers accessed, shared and used agricultural knowledge. It was found that individual, institutional and knowledge factors influence the performance of agricultural knowledge management activities. For enhancing effective agricultural knowledge management, it is important to take into consideration the knowledge management best practices, which include developing effective knowledge infrastructure, involving different stakeholders and using appropriate information and communications technology tools in enhancing access to knowledge. It is concluded that effective knowledge management activities increase the level of adoption of agricultural innovations. It is recommended that the proposed agricultural knowledge management best practices be adapted for improving rice production.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-02T03:49:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856087
       
  • User needs assessment for research data services in a research university
    • Authors: Soohyung Joo, Christie Peters
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study assesses the needs of researchers for data-related assistance and investigates their research data management behavior. A survey was conducted, and 186 valid responses were collected from faculty, researchers, and graduate students across different disciplines at a research university. The services for which researchers perceive the greatest need include assistance with quantitative analysis and data visualization. Overall, the need for data-related assistance is relatively higher among health scientists, while humanities researchers demonstrate the lowest need. This study also investigated the data formats used, data documentation and storage practices, and data-sharing behavior of researchers. We found that researchers rarely use metadata standards, but rely more on a standard file-naming scheme. As to data sharing, respondents are likely to share their data personally upon request or as supplementary materials to journal publications. The findings of this study will be useful for planning user-centered research data services in academic libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-02T03:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619856073
       
  • Book review: Brianna H Marshall (ed.), The Complete Guide to Personal
           Digital Archiving
    • Authors: Simon Burnett
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-07-01T03:49:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619859780
       
  • Book review: Peter Gisolfi (ed.), Collaborative Library Design from
           Planning to Impact
    • Authors: Huan Vo-Tran
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T03:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619853974
       
  • Book Review: Michelle Reale, The Indispensable Academic Librarian:
           Teaching and Collaborating for Change
    • Authors: Wendy Frerichs
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T05:11:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619853975
       
  • Organizational empowerment: A vital step toward intrapreneurship
    • Authors: Seyedeh Zeinab Moghaddas, Masoumeh Tajafari, Mohsen Nowkarizi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-05-06T10:58:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841658
       
  • Information as a construction
    • Authors: Boris Bosancic, Marta Matijevic
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T04:00:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841657
       
  • Higher education student pathways to ebook usage and engagement, and
           understanding: Highways and cul de sacs

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Biddy Casselden, Richard Pears
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T03:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841429
       
  • Designing an information architecture for data management technologies:
           Introducing the DIAMANT model
    • Authors: Katarina Blask, André Förster
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-15T04:20:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841419
       
  • Contextual variables explaining the influence of social networking sites
           for information communication among library users: Cross-cultural study
           between China and Pakistan using Structure Equation Modeling
    • Authors: Misbah Jabeen, Yuan Qinjian, Muhammad Imran, Munazza Jabeen, Muhammad Rafiq
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T04:09:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836721
       
  • User recommendations for intelligent personal assistants
    • Authors: Irene Lopatovska, Alice London Griffin, Kelsey Gallagher, Caitlin Ballingall, Clair Rock, Mildred Velazquez
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-09T03:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841107
       
  • Applying participatory action approach to integrating professional
           librarians into open source software communities
    • Authors: Vandana Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-08T05:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836724
       
  • The Yoga Sutra of librarianship: Towards an understanding of holistic
           advocacy
    • Authors: Courtney M Block, Christopher L Proctor
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-04-04T04:55:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619841120
       
  • National culture and trust in online health information
    • Authors: Mahmood Khosrowjerdi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-27T04:17:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836716
       
  • The impact of Chinese library and information science on outside
           disciplines: A citation analysis
    • Authors: Chuanfu Chen, Qiao Li, Kuei Chiu, Zhiqing Deng
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-13T07:40:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619836706
       
  • Book review: Peggy Johnson, Fundamentals of Collection Development and
           Management
    • Authors: Daniella Hutchings
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T06:45:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619827199
       
  • Japanese public library services for dyslexic children
    • Authors: Hanae Ikeshita
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-02-01T06:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618823871
       
  • Factors influencing knowledge sharing among academics in Bowen University,
           Nigeria
    • Authors: Adedolapo Akosile, Wole Olatokun
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-01-11T03:49:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618820926
       
  • An investigation into cataloguers’ experiences with RDA
    • Authors: Alan MacLennan, Agnieszka Walicka
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2019-01-07T11:15:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618820655
       
  • Linking digital literacy and online information searching strategies of
           Philippine university students: The moderating role of mindfulness
    • Authors: Manny B. Atoy, Francesca Renee O. Garcia, Rayanne R. Cadungog, Julius Dominic O. Cua, Siena C. Mangunay, Allan B. de Guzman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The extent to which students are able to maximize the potential benefits of information from the online world depends, in great measure, on the development of a set of skills that would make them effective users and decision-makers. While previous studies have revealed the role of prior knowledge, availability of ICT resources and infrastructure in the development of information-type skills, the identification of other unexplored variables remains important in information science. This paper seeks to ascertain the moderating role of mindfulness on digital literacy and online information searching strategies on a select group of university students in the Philippines. Structural equation modeling was used to test a hypothesized model and explore the factors affecting the information-seeking behavior of 321 students from the largest comprehensive university in the Philippines. A multi-aspect instrument, consisting of a robotfoto, and three scales such as the Langer Mindfulness Scale (LMS), Internet Skills Scale (ISS), and Online Information Searching Strategies Inventory (OISSI), was used in this study. Results revealed that digital literacy had a direct positive relationship with the online information searching strategies of students. Surprisingly, mindfulness did not moderate the relationship between digital literacy and online information searching strategies. Further, digital literacy was found to be a mediating factor to university students’ information searching strategies. Implications of these for library practice and policy are discussed in this paper.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619898213
       
  • Transformational leadership practice in the world’s leading academic
           libraries
    • Authors: Patrick Lo, Bradley Allard, Hermina G.B. Anghelescu, Yawei Xin, Dickson K.W. Chiu, Andrew J. Stark
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes 12 semi-structured interviews within the framework of transformational leadership, using a set of open-ended questions addressed to 12 directors (six men and six women) of academic libraries in high-ranking universities in four different countries (Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America). It also investigates the interviewees’ approach to managing and leading their library organizations within the context of the opportunities and challenges facing their organizations as well as their parent institutions. The interpretation of the participants’ responses is based on the four ‘I’s, the four dimensions of the concept of transformational leadership: (1) Idealized influence, (2) Inspirational motivation, (3) Intellectual stimulation, and (4) Individualized consideration. The findings indicated that academic library directors who chose to implement transformational leadership noted its significance as a major contributing factor to the enhancement of inner communication and building mutual trust, and respect within the library organization. This, in turn, has fostered a motivated and creative work environment that has ensured personal and collective success and institutional advancement. Transformational leadership contributes to promoting sustained organizational performance based on adaptability to the rapidly changing environment of academic libraries worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619897991
       
  • Not your final destination: A grounded theory study on adjustment among
           Filipino librarians who experienced job rotation
    • Authors: Edward H. Puzon, Allan B. de Guzman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of job rotation in the overall performance of an organization has been well documented in the literature. Despite a considerable number of studies on job rotation, only a handful are carried out in the context of librarianship. Further, the dynamics of job rotation as experienced by librarians in the Philippines remains a research blank spot. Cognizant of the dearth in literature, this grounded theory inquiry purports to shed light on the process of adjustment of a select group of Filipino librarians who experience job rotation within their organization. A total of 15 participants from Luzon were purposively selected and interviewed. Field texts were read, reread and constantly compared via open, axial and selective coding process. Interestingly, a novel and distinct process surfaced how a select group of Filipino librarians experience job rotation. The emerged Puzon and de Guzman BELT Theory of Adjustment process by which Filipino librarians adjust after being transferred to another post is typified by four distinct phases of: bemusing, establishing, leveraging, and transforming. This theory offers a number of implications on personal development, departmental initiatives, and institutional assistance and support relative to the phenomenon under study.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619891764
       
  • Survey of information literacy instructional practices in academic
           libraries
    • Authors: Noa Aharony, Heidi Julien, Noa Nadel-Kritz
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reports a study of information literacy instructional practices in Israeli academic libraries, conducted to understand the methods and approaches used by academic librarians in their instructional work, and to explore whether their practices have been influenced by the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. The study used an online survey to gather data, an instrument based on one used successfully in similar surveys in Canada and the United States. The survey was completed by Israeli academic librarians with instructional responsibilities. Findings show that respondents believe that information literacy instruction is a shared responsibility, and that one-on-one instruction is the most-used approach. Results reveal multiple challenges faced by respondents, as well as opportunities for improvement in their instruction.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619891762
       
  • Classification of humorous interactions with intelligent personal
           assistants
    • Authors: Irene Lopatovska
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study examined humorous interactions with intelligent personal assistants (IPAs, including Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa, Microsoft Cortana, Apple Siri) with the aim of classifying user utterances, IPA responses and user reactions of system responses. Data from online diaries and paper questionnaires were collected and analyzed using content analysis method. The findings suggest that the most frequent types of utterances include questions that test system “personality” and opinions. Joke requests are also frequent and produce pre-programmed humor that users generally find funny. The initial classification of humorous utterances has been validated and expanded using published datasets of humorous utterances for the four investigated IPAs. The findings can be used for immediate improvements to IPA performance as well as long-term development of IPA personas.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000619891771
       
  • Analysis of language use in public library storytimes
    • Authors: Maria Cahill, Soohyung Joo, Kathleen Campana
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Public libraries are well positioned to support young children’s growth and development, yet few studies have examined programming to determine the extent to which they actually do. The current study investigated the nature of language use in public library storytimes as an initial step in determining their potential to contribute to the vocabulary and oral language development of young children. The study employed textual analysis methods with 22 storytime transcripts to identify token and type counts, the most frequent words spoken by participating librarians and children respectively, the major grammar elements present, and the top 20 nouns, verbs, and adjectives. Results suggest that librarians dominate storytime communication with language that is highly repetitive and complex, yet centered on children and cognitively accessible for them. Further, storytimes seem to promote cognitive and behavioral skills necessary for school success such as counting and exposure to foundational concepts like colors, size, and position.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618818886
       
  • Library directors’ concerns and attitudes towards going green and
           sustainability in China: An unexplored area
    • Authors: Qi Kang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Environmental issues are one of today’s growing concerns. Numerous associations, organizations and individuals are waging an active world preservation campaign. The purpose of this pilot study is to examine an important aspect of library directors’ attitudes towards environmental protection and the level of their concerns and green practices regarding sustainable development that has generally been overlooked in the literature. Multiple means of data collection (interviews, observation and document analysis) involving 14 libraries in China were conducted between March and May 2015; seven main thematic areas emerged from the data, such as: levels of awareness and commitment to sustainability issues in Chinese libraries are relatively low, and the current efficiency of facilities and operations have been seriously wasted. These findings indicate that the main priority of the library has been to attain economic and social development rather than environmental sustainability, while ignoring the energy costs and serious waste to some extent in the rapid development process of the Chinese library. The author notes just from observation of daily practices that there is definitely room for improvement to minimize the negative impact of their activities on the environment. This paper discusses for the first time the library directors’ concerns and attitudes towards “going green” and sustainability. The ideas are expected to inform and improve library directors’ environmental consciousness and sustainable practices, as well as open new vistas for research into the economic, social and environmental sustainability of library information services. How to achieve the social, economic and environmental requirements of present and future generations from libraries, especially library environmental sustainability is discussed intensively.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618818874
       
  • How preschool children think about libraries: Evidence from six
           children’s libraries in China
    • Authors: Jianhua Xu, Pianran Wang, Brian W. Sturm, Yingying Wu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Listening to young children’s voices is crucial to improving children’s library services. The first step is unveiling how young children think about the library. Thus, researchers recruited the Mosaic approach including photography, interview, and drawing to explore the features of children’s libraries in children’s perspectives in six libraries in China. The results indicate that first, the children’s library is a “primary third place”. Second, the children’s library is an overlapping of home and society. Third, children can read books in the children’s library, but not just read. Fourth, the children’s library improves children’s awareness as patrons. It is suggested that young patrons already form initial understandings of the library, begin to complain about any problems, and put forward requirements for the library. Additionally, their interpersonal needs should be paid attention to. Therefore, librarians and researchers should respect the rights of children and listen to their voice when designing and providing library services associated with children.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618818887
       
  • Book review: Amy J Alessio, Katie LaMantia and Emily Vinci, Pop
           Culture-Inspired Programs for Tweens, Teens, and Adults
    • Authors: Jane Garner
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618817964
       
  • Relationship between job involvement, leader-member exchange, and
           innovative behavior of public librarians
    • Authors: Yu-Ping Peng
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Public library leaders require librarians to exhibit markedly high job involvement and notably innovative behaviors to maintain pace with rapidly varying environments. The study examined the relationships between the job involvement, leader–member exchange, and innovative behavior of public librarians through structural equation modeling. The finding identified the antecedents (job involvement and leader–member exchange ) of innovation behavior. Leader–member exchange was a significant moderator of the job involvement–innovative behavior relationship. The findings can enhance understanding of these relationships in the public library context. Finally, the study provided suggestions for leaders within the librarianship profession to develop for themselves and their subordinates.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618810378
       
  • Book review: Patrick Lo, Heather Rogers and Dickson Chiu, Effective School
           Librarianship: Successful Professional Practices from Librarians around
           the World
    • Authors: Marianne Bamkin
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618810589
       
  • Leadership and innovation within a complex adaptive system: Public
           libraries
    • Authors: Darin Freeburg
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Viewing public libraries as Complex Adaptive Systems, the current study analyzed leadership within these systems in terms of complexity and innovation. This included a leader’s capacity for ambiguity and emergence, features of leadership in different contexts, and perceptions of success and innovation. From a list of current public library directors and managers, 15 participants completed a 30-minute phone interview that followed a semi-structured guide. By analyzing the intersection of complexity of approach with complexity of context, eight leadership approaches were uncovered through coding. Results suggest that most participants engaged with most of the leadership approaches at some point. In addition, most of these approaches were seen as successful and innovative—though in different ways. Findings suggest that traditional hardline distinctions between leadership and management—or innovative and non-innovative—are no longer useful. This study is an important contribution to the study of public library leadership, as it applies theories of complexity to both approach and context.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618810367
       
  • Eradicating information poverty: An agenda for research
    • Authors: Rita Marcella, Gobinda Chowdhury
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information poverty remains a critical issue for societies today. The literature of information poverty is reviewed tracking its origins in library and information science and the various approaches that have been taken to tackling information poverty, including international development programmes such as the Global Libraries Initiative, working response to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, the importance of access to health information and so on. The paper sets out themes that emerged in a roundtable discussion of library and information science academics in 2017. Discussion centred on: definitions of information poverty which reflect the wide variety of ways in which it is possible to be information poor; literacy and information literacy; the ways in which information can reduce poverty and disadvantage; library and information science initiatives to tackle information poverty; and information poverty in the context of social justice. The group agreed that there was a major piece of work to be done in reframing the library and information science discipline in terms of information poverty. Four key dimensions of information poverty for collaborative future research are: (1) information as an agent to eradicate poverty; (2) the causal factors resulting in information poverty; (3) creation and production activities to combat information poverty; and (4) better understanding of areas of extreme disadvantage and aspects of information need. A list of the key causal factors in creating information poverty which came out of the discussion is presented. Further research initiatives are underway for setting up a partnership/consortium that would lay the foundations for a multidisciplinary network on information poverty, sharing expertise internationally.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618804589
       
  • A data-driven analysis of the knowledge structure of library science with
           full-text journal articles
    • Authors: Tatsawan Timakum, Giyeong Kim, Min Song
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In previous studies, full-text analyses and mining techniques have not been combined to identify and trace changes in the knowledge trends of library science over the past 20 years (1997–2016). Thus, to grasp the knowledge trends of library science at a fine-grained level, this study analyzes full-text journal articles from six top-ranked library science journals by applying text-mining techniques such as co-word analysis, text summarization, and topic modeling. Visualization tools were used to map the knowledge structure of library science. The findings indicate that, during the past 20 years, library science has developed into an interdisciplinary knowledge structure that integrates librarianship topics with a range of other fields, generating major topics that include the academic library, the digital library, research methodology, library marketing, information retrieval, digital information, document citation, and so on. In the past ten years, the library science discipline has focused increasingly on research methodology and evaluation and become more concerned with digital information management.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618793977
       
  • Embedding constructive alignment of reading lists in course design
    • Authors: Dan Croft
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Reading list practices are long-standing but cause confusion and misunderstanding between module leaders and students. Constructive alignment (Biggs and Tang, 2011), although widely applied in course design across the UK Higher Education sector, has not previously been applied to the practice of reading lists but offers a practical and pedagogically sound method for reinventing reading list practice and bridging the gap of understanding between the intentions of module leaders and the interpretation of students. The module leaders of seven modules were offered the support of a project led by Oxford Brookes Library to redesign their modules so that the reading lists were constructively aligned with the learning outcomes of the modules. After an initial run of the redesigned modules the module leaders were asked whether they would embed the practice of constructively aligned reading lists in their modules. Five of the modules were redesigned and continued with the redesign past the initial instance, one of the modules exited the project before it was redesigned, and one of the modules returned to the pre-project module design and reading list practice. The project was successful in embedding constructively aligned reading list practice in Oxford Brookes University modules past the first run of the module, but several barriers to effective learning and teaching were identified with the most significant being a lack of student engagement with the redesigned reading lists. The implication for practice is that constructively aligned reading lists should include an element of summative assessment to increase the chances of student engagement and the successful embedding of constructively aligned reading lists in the design of modules.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618804004
       
  • Visualizations of bibliographic information: A user experience study
    • Authors: Athena Salaba, Tanja Merčun
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Bibliographic information was presented using five different prototype systems, including four different visualizations of FRBR-based bibliographic information and one more traditional bibliographic information system. This study reports user performance and perceptions using the same tasks across the different visualizations. Users include undergraduate students of a large university in the USA. The study’s methodology is based on a continuation of a study testing the same prototype interfaces in Slovenia, with a number of modifications. The findings show visualization displays performing better on a number of measures than the traditional library catalog interface. A comparison of results highlights some of the differences in findings between the two groups of users. The paper concludes with a discussion on the implications for the design of future bibliographic information interfaces.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618804014
       
  • Information professionals meet Arthur Prior
    • Authors: Volkmar Paul Engerer, Fatima Sabir
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The paper investigates the supporting role of information professionals in interdisciplinary digital research projects. It identifies three encounter scenarios in which information professionals meet domain researchers (as research librarian, as information specialist, and as iHumanist) and links them to the domain researchers ‘modes of orientation’. We examine these theoretical distinctions by discussing three cases from our own practical engagement in the Prior project. Our discussion shows that the scenarios help to understand information professionals’ supporting work, explain the conflicts that emerge, and explicate information professionals’ shifting conceptions of what they are doing in terms of the shifting encounter scenarios. In short, the paper presents methodological and theoretical insights that can be useful in understanding encounters between information professionals and domain researchers.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618799527
       
  • Valuing studies in higher education: Symbolic means and strategies of
           students negotiating their position in the library and information science
           field
    • Authors: Valentini Moniarou-Papaconstantinou
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The library and information science field attempts to legitimize its position in higher education, in a ‘culture of uncertainty’, where boundaries are fluid. The position of LIS in the hierarchical classification of academic subjects is influenced by the changes in both the field of higher education and in the information environment, creating expectations for the emergence of new fields of study, research and professional practices. The purpose of this paper is to examine how LIS students position themselves in their field of study and the resources they use in processes of meaning-making. Data were obtained through semi-structured interviews with students from the three LIS departments operating in Greece at the undergraduate level. The results showed that the academic knowledge content of the object, the assignment of scientific characteristics to it, the signifier of the book, the form of professional practice and, above all, technology are the most prominent resources among those that most young people utilized in their effort to negotiate the symbolic class (i.e. the dominant cultural categories which give meaning to the social world).
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618799530
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618804393
       
  • Servant leadership theory in practice: North America’s leading
           public libraries
    • Authors: Patrick Lo, Bradley Allard, Na Wang, Dickson K.W. Chiu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to understand the current North American public library directors’ views and perceptions of successful library leadership in the 21st century. It was carried out based around a series of semi-structured interviews with 10 top-level directors of public libraries in the United States and Canada, which were published in the book World’s Leading National, Public, Monastery and Royal Library Directors: Leadership, Management: Future of Libraries. The data collection method for this study consisted of narrative analysis of the 10 interviews utilizing Robert Greenleaf’s servant leadership theory, which highlights the leader’s desire to serve others first and foremost. With the current trends of increased globalization, digitization, and cultural diversity, among others, public libraries need to have leadership focused on creating shared-power environments encouraging collaboration. Analysis of these interviews showed that many of the directors’ responses were quite similar to the concepts discussed in servant leadership. The library directors, through their leadership philosophies, benefited in boosting team cohesion, fostering collaboration, increasing creativity, and promoting morality-centered self-reflection amongst leaders, thereby helping their libraries gain and maintain competitive advantage, and improving the overall ethical culture of their organizations. The results of this study would be of interest to library professionals interested in management as well as LIS students who want to understand how library directors view successful traits of library leadership.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618792387
       
  • Book review
    • Authors: Paul H Cleverley
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618796027
       
  • The role of space attributes in space-choice behaviour and satisfaction in
           an academic library
    • Authors: Seung Hyun Cha, Tae Wan Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Space attributes concern both users’ space-choice behaviour (i.e. where to sit) and satisfaction (i.e. level of satisfaction in the chosen seat). However, the effects of space attributes in academic libraries have most often been investigated with a separate focus on either space-choice behaviour or user satisfaction. Since library contexts vary greatly, it is unreasonable to compare findings from existing separate-focus studies. The present study thus aims to conjointly investigate the effects of space attributes on space-choice behaviour and user satisfaction from the same context of an academic library. For this purpose, a questionnaire survey was conducted and the data were explored in a series of statistical analyses. As a result, the study demonstrates that the influence of some space attributes differs between space choice and satisfaction. Once generalized in future studies of a wider variety of academic libraries, these findings should help architects to make better-informed decisions in library space-planning and design, leading to more efficient use of space and enhanced user satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618794257
       
  • Developing scales for identifying and classifying library and information
           science skills and competencies: An Israeli perspective
    • Authors: Jenny Bronstein, Ora Nebenzahl
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to present the development of a skills and competencies scale for LIS professionals. Scales for the identification and classification of the skills and competencies needed to work in the library and information science profession can contribute to the development of academic and professional programs. This empirical survey was conducted in Israel among members of two library and information science listservs. The final sample included 183 valid questionnaires. The study tested the viability of a typology comprised of 46 skills and competencies as items in multi-items scales. Factor analysis and Cronbach’s Alpha were utilized in performing the analysis that resulted in four clusters: technology skills, information skills, personal competencies and traditional librarianship skills and show that 25 out of 46 original skills contribute to the explanation of 44% of the total variance. The study contributes to the literature on the subject by proposing updated scales that examine practitioners’ views and opinions of which skills and competencies they needed in information work. The typology that resulted from the study ascertains that, regardless of the rapid changes that the profession has confronted in the last decades, the skills that have been at the core of the profession are still relevant alongside technological skills related to online environments such as website development and management.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618792390
       
  • One hundred tweets from library land: A case study of RMIT University
           Library (academic library) and State Library of Victoria (public state
           library) in Australia
    • Authors: Reham Ali Alsuhaibani
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Twitter is used by different library types to communicate and engage with their community. This case study focuses on content choices in tweets and the level of engagement generated, in the context of two different types of library. The current study attempts to examine the contents of Library Twitter account of two libraries (academic and public) with the aim of evaluating in a comparative mode, their themes and levels of user engagement. This research used a mixed method research approach. For quantitative approach, this study analyzed 100 Tweets from each library, i.e. RMIT University Library and State Library of Victoria. Also, the study analyzed a number of tweets and levels of engagement by recording numbers of likes, replies and retweets. The qualitative aspect analyzed each Tweet to determine engagement level and type of content shared by each library. The results demonstrate that the public and academic libraries publish different types of content. The varied nature, audience and mandate of each library appear to influence the focus of their tweets. Also, the results show that the level of engagement is a factor of the numbers of tweets in any theme. The limitation of this study is the data set contained only 100 tweets for each library. Moreover, the number of users and registered library accounts had probably increased since the study was conducted.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618792367
       
  • The adoption of Web 2.0 technologies in academic libraries: A comparative
           exploration
    • Authors: Marion Lucille Williams
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper addresses the adoption and non-adoption of communication methods such as social media and explores the implementation of Web 2.0 technologies and their use in academic libraries. I interviewed 16 library employees from six academic university libraries in the Flanders region of Belgium and in South Africa. I explored five academic university libraries in the urban regions of Flanders and South Africa and one situated in a rural region of South Africa. This article discusses the benefits of using social media as a communication tool to engage with students. The results demonstrate that ‘ease of use’ was portrayed as a beneficial construct and has a positive influence on behavioural intention and use of Web 2.0 technologies. A comparison on the adoption of social media between the two countries indicate that financial resources, infrastructure and management support are crucial determining factors in service delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618788725
       
  • Students’ information literacy self-efficacy: An exploratory study
    • Authors: Noa Aharony, Tali Gazit
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The current study focuses on students’ information literacy self-efficacy and investigated whether students estimate that they know how to handle and evaluate the vast amount of information they find on the Internet. The objectives of this study are to explore: (1) to what extent does the openness to experience variable explain students’ information literacy self-efficacy'; (2) to what extent do the cognitive appraisals threat and challenge explain students’ information literacy self-efficacy' and (3) to what extent does the variable of motivation explain students’ information literacy self-efficacy' The research was conducted in Israel during the spring semester of the 2017 academic year and involved 136 students. Researchers used five questionnaires to gather data. Findings suggested that the personality characteristics of openness to experience, as well as threat and challenge, and motivation predicted students’ information literacy self-efficacy.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618790312
       
  • Restorative justice as a tool to address the role of policing and
           incarceration in the lives of youth in the United States
    • Authors: Jeanie Austin
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Disciplinary practices utilized in public libraries in the United States carry echoes of the ways in which youth of color and/or LGBTQ and gender non- conforming youth are policed and incarcerated. This research includes interviews with librarians and staff engaging in relational disciplinary practices, namely restorative justice, to gain understanding of how altering approaches to discipline may create cultural shifts that lead to more culturally conscious services to youth made vulnerable by the state. Individual, open-ended interviews with librarians and staff at an urban library system in California addressed the implementation of restorative justice practices, individuals’ approaches and understandings of restorative justice, and the process of institutionalizing restorative justice throughout the library system. This research reveals that restorative justice offers one approach to creating social change through increased access to library services and resources.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618787979
       
  • Attitudes, perceptions and prospectings on mobile information literacy
           training: Design and validation of the MOBILE-APP questionnaire
    • Authors: Maria Pinto, Dora Sales, Rosaura Fernández-Pascual, David Caballero-Mariscal
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The basic aim of this paper is to outline the process of designing and validating an instrument for measuring teachers’ perceptions regarding the importance of using mobile technologies in the teaching-learning of information competencies (MOBILE-APP). Validation was carried out by administering the instrument to a pilot group of teachers, all of whom were experts in new technologies selected from the Information and Communication, Business and Education degrees, together with a rubric to analyse the quality and relevance of the content, as well as the wording of the items. Quantitative and qualitative methodologies were combined (statistical and descriptive analyses). The results from the quantitative-qualitative analysis of the evaluation rubric and the psychometric analysis of the items show the strengths of the questionnaire and the possible improvements that could be made to optimise it, which were focused on small adjustments to some of the categories and the reordering of several items. The quantitative analysis shows a high degree of internal consistency, thus ensuring the usefulness and applicability of the instrument for evaluating teachers’ perceptions regarding the use of mobile technologies in the teaching-learning of information competencies. The validity and reliability of the instrument mean that it can be transferred to other academic settings as a platform for future diagnostic studies that allow advances to be made in teaching innovation using mobile technologies, while at the same time permitting it to be reviewed and updated. The innovative element of the MOBILE-APP questionnaire lies in the interrelation between the mode of learning (mobile learning) and the information literacy competencies.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618788726
       
  • The relationship between emotional intelligence, library anxiety, and
           academic achievement among the university students
    • Authors: Sajjad Ullah Jan, Mumtaz Ali Anwar, Nosheen Fatima Warraich
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Emotional intelligence has a strong link with academic anxieties. It is apparent from the published literature that a student with high emotional intelligence would face low academic anxiety and vice versa. Similarly, library anxiety, which is an academic anxiety, also affects students’ academic performance. Library anxiety of students may increase or decrease along with their ability to understand and manage their own emotions and those of others. However, there is a dearth of literature on the relationship between these two concepts. Data regarding these concepts were collected from university undergraduates. Findings established significant relationships between emotional intelligence, library anxiety and academic performance among the participants. This study has practical implications for academicians and professional librarians to deal with the library anxiety of students and their academic performance.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618790629
       
  • Understanding the information experiences of parents involved in
           negotiating post-separation parenting arrangements
    • Authors: Helen Partridge, Lynn McAllister, Lisa Toohey, Rachael Field, Jonathan Crowe, Annelies Allcock
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The paper presents findings from a study into the information experiences of people needing to make post-separation parenting arrangements. Data was collected from 20 participants, through in-depth, semi-structured, telephone interviews. Thematic analysis identified five major themes: Following, Immersion, Interpersonal, History and Context which depict the information experiences of the participants. The findings can be used as an evidence base to inform the design and delivery of support and services provided by government agencies and other community groups supporting the legal information needs of individuals and families. The work extends current understandings of information experience as an object of study in the information science discipline.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618787604
       
  • Correction and retraction practices in library and information science
           journals
    • Authors: Isola Ajiferuke, Janet O. Adekannbi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Retraction of scholarly publications ensures that unqualified knowledge is purged from the scientific community. However, there appears to be little understanding about how this is practiced among library and information science (LIS) journals. Hence, this study investigated the correction and retraction practices of LIS journals. Journals included in the Web of Science’s information science and library science subject category were selected for the study and the characteristics of the articles corrected or retracted in those journals between 1996 and 2016 were examined. Findings show that there were 517 corrections and five retractions in LIS journals during the period. Most of the corrections made to articles in LIS journals were minor while the reasons for article retraction included plagiarism, duplication, irreproducible results and methodological errors. Our findings also reveal that on average it took about 587 days for an article to be retracted while some of the retracted articles continued to be cited after retraction. The study concluded that the average number of errors per correction was lower than what had been observed in medical journals while some of the retracted articles continued to receive positive post-retraction citations. It also recommended the inclusion of a check on the validity of literature cited by authors at the review stage as part of the quality control mechanism by publishers of LIS journals.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618785408
       
  • Scholarly databases under scrutiny
    • Authors: Selcuk Besir Demir
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study aims to investigate whether indices (e.g. SSCI/ SCI/AHCI/ESCI, SCOPUS, MEDLINE, HW Wilson, ERIC) include potentially fake journals (PFJs) identified earlier in Beall’s list. Fourteen indices were examined to find out if PFJs are indexed by indices. The study also aims to provide detailed data regarding which of these indices include such PFJs along with information about the number of issues and articles published per year and publication fees charged by PFJs indexed by ordinary indices. The universe of the PFJs is composed of those listed in the Beall list (n=2708), and the study aimed to reach all the universe instead of being content with a sample from it. The results of the study indicated that one PFJ was indexed by SCI and two were indexed by ESCI. In addition, it was found that 53 PFJs were indexed by SCOPUS, 12 by ERIC and six by MEDLİNE. It was revealed that PFJs indexed by indices have significantly higher numbers of articles published annually and charge significantly higher fees compared to PFJs that are not indexed in such indices.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618784159
       
  • Book review: David Haynes, Metadata for Information Management and
           Retrieval: Understanding Metadata and Its Use
    • Authors: Diane Rasmussen Pennington
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618783103
       
  • Book review: Information Systems: Process and Practice
    • Authors: Jon Knight
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618780028
       
  • Usability evaluation of a library website with different end user groups
    • Authors: Katja Kous, Maja Pušnik, Marjan Heričko, Gregor Polančič
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      To ensure a certain degree of usability, a library website should be carefully designed, especially since end users constitute a multitude of people with different needs and demands. The focal objective of this research was to investigate how different types of end users (i.e. pupils, students, the working population, seniors and researchers) respond to a library website in terms of its effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction, which together represent its usability. The answers were obtained by performing formal usability testing, including think-aloud protocol, log analysis and questionnaires. The results of the statistical analysis show that different groups of end users achieve different levels of effectiveness and efficiency, while there is no significant difference between groups in satisfaction level. The results also indicate that participants did not achieve the threshold for a usable website. Based on the identified weaknesses, researchers present recommendations for improving a website’s usefulness, especially for non-experienced users. This research has two main contributions: (1) the connection between the theoretical definition and practical use of ISO 9241-11 attributes and (2) a usability testing procedure with a measurement framework applicable for different types of users in a specific domain, which could be applied to other domains.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618773133
       
  • Book Review: Books on Screens: Players in the Swedish E-Book Market
    • Authors: Laura Muir
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618775772
       
  • The hollowing out of children’s public library services in England
           from 2010 to 2016
    • Authors: Catriona Robertson, David McMenemy
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This research develops a normative understanding of Rhodes’ (1994) theory of hollowing out of public services and the extent to which this process has happened to children’s library services between 2010 and 2016 in England. The objectives were to gain knowledge of the phenomenon, seek to assess emerging trends, and create a working definition of hollowing out as it applies in the public library domain. To achieve these objectives, Freedom of Information requests were made to local authorities across England to gather data on library input since 2010. It was found that there has been a significant downward trend in staff, spending and opening hours across children’s public library services in England between 2010 and 2016. The research found that there has indeed been hollowing out of children’s library services. On average, specialist staff have been cut by 40%, children’s book budgets by 23% and opening hours by 11%. The literature suggests that this is coupled with a rise in closures, community run and outsourced libraries, and volunteering. The data produced for this research describes a process which is consistent with the definition of hollowing out proposed by Rhodes (1994). This definition encompasses the economic and political factors that shape the phenomenon of hollowing out. This research is the first in the world to consider the concept of hollowing out in relation to public libraries. The definition and methods used will be beneficial for future research in the domain, and the findings from the study can help to inform debates about the condition of public library services in England in the modern era.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618771139
       
  • Going the full distance: Strategic support for digital libraries in
           distance education at the University of Education, Winneba in Ghana
    • Authors: Christopher M. Owusu-Ansah, Antonio Da Silva Rodrigues, Thomas Van Der Walt
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many African universities have employed distance education to expand access to education and digital libraries can ensure seamless access to information for distance learners. The purpose of this study was to investigate the availability of policies and strategic initiatives for developing digital library services in distance education at the University of Education, Winneba in Ghana. The study relies on the results of semi-structured interviews with selected librarians of the University, and institutional document analysis. The study found that digital library use in distance education at the University is seriously hampered due to the absence of strategic support, consistent policies and dedicated funding for digital library initiatives.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618772871
       
  • Book Review: Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources: A
           How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians
    • Authors: Clare McCluskey Dean
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618775773
       
  • Youth digital participation: Measuring social impact
    • Authors: Alicja Pawluczuk, Hazel Hall, Gemma Webster, Colin Smith
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Current scholarly debate around digital participatory youth projects and approaches to their evaluation are examined in this article. The analysis of the literature presented here reveals (1) an over-reliance on traditional evaluation techniques for such initiatives, and (2) a scarcity of models for the assessment of the social impact of digital participatory youth projects. It is concluded that the challenges and limitations of social impact evaluation practice in digital participatory youth projects should be addressed through the adoption of alternative, participant-centred approaches. These issues are discussed in reference to a current ongoing study that seeks to identify solutions for enhancing social impact evaluations of participatory digital initiatives by young people.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769975
       
  • Blurred reputations: Managing professional and private information online
    • Authors: Frances V.C. Ryan, Peter Cruickshank, Hazel Hall, Alistair Lawson
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Results are reported from a study that investigated patterns of information behaviour and use as related to personal reputation building and management in online environments. An everyday life information seeking (ELIS) perspective was adopted. Data were collected by diary and interview from 45 social media users who hold professional and managerial work roles, and who are users of Twitter, Facebook and/or LinkedIn. These data were first transcribed, then coded with NVivo10 according to themes identified from a preliminary literature review, with further codes added as they emerged from the content of the participant diaries and interviews. The main findings reveal that the portrayal of different personas online contributes to the presentation (but not the creation) of identity, that information-sharing practices for reputation building and management vary according to social media platform, and that the management of online connections and censorship are important to the protection of reputation. The maintenance of professional reputation is more important than private reputation to these users. They are aware of the ‘blur’ between professional and private lives in online contexts, and the influence that it bears on efforts to manage an environment where LinkedIn is most the useful of the three sites considered, and Facebook the most risky. With its novel focus on the ‘whole self’, this work extends understandings of the impact of information on the building and management of reputation from an information science perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769977
       
  • Public libraries, museums and physical convergence: Context, issues,
           opportunities: A literature review Part 2
    • Authors: Emily Warren, Graham Matthews
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      There has recently been a growth in physical convergence in cultural heritage domains. The second of a two-part article that considers this trend with particular regard to public libraries and museums provides an overview of factors to be considered by those planning or developing physically converged services. This has been achieved through thematic analysis of a review of international literature from both domains. It begins with consideration of obstacles to convergence, ethical challenges, organisational and strategic complexity, organisational culture and resistance. It moves on to discuss factors, general and physical, that can lead to success in convergence: vision, strategy and planning, communication and trust, for example, and, how these can be led and managed. It also considers the role of professional education and training, the benefits of convergence, for example improved cultural offer and visibility, financial savings, with viewpoints from around the world. Part 2 ends with a critical note on the ‘convergence narrative’, and a conclusion that focuses on physical convergence which draws on both Parts.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618769721
       
  • Investigating the public response to local government decisions to reduce
           or remove public library services
    • Authors: Daisy McCahill, Briony Birdi, Roger B. Jones
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents new findings regarding the public response to public spending cuts as part of the UK Government fiscal consolidation programme, specifically to the perceived effects of reduced library opening hours on the public library user in a city in the North of England. An inductive approach was taken to the mixed methods study, using a self-completion, cross-sectional survey distributed to adults visiting one of three libraries in the city during a six-day period. Qualitative and quantitative data analyses indicate a shared level of dissatisfaction with the service reductions across the respondents, and a shared perception of having been adversely affected. Statistical analyses revealed a strong level of agreement that the changes had a significantly negative impact on different aspects of respondents’ lives. The research evidences the direct effects of service reductions on library users, as well as the wider social and economic implications.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618768028
       
  • Information literacy of doctoral students in engineering and the
           librarian’s role
    • Authors: Teja Koler-Povh, Žiga Turk
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      After a reform of the doctoral study programme at the authors’ faculty in Slovenia, an introductory course on scientific research methods became mandatory. It includes the topic of information literacy and covers its five main elements according to ALA 2000 standards. A librarian/researcher runs the practical part. As this course has been running for seven years we were interested in its impacts: (1) what are students’ subjective impressions about the course and (2) if and how such a systematic education on information literacy topics objectively impacts their publishing and citations. The paper first presents the results of the questionnaire among 120 PhD students (the response was 67.5%, i.e. 81 of them) conducted immediately after the completion of the information literacy course. Four indicators were measured to address Question 1. Question 2 was approached by examining students’ citation practices in their own PhD theses and their publishing results. The hypothesis was that the information literacy course increased students’ competence. It was tested using quantitative parameters, such as the number of references in PhD theses and the number of scientific publications written during the study and shortly after it, separately for reformed programme students who attended the information literacy course, and for pre-Bologna reform students who did not take this course. We found that although pre-reform students on average cited a few more references than their post-reform colleagues, there were smaller differences among post-reform than among pre-reform students. Also, the median/typical post-reform students cited more references, what can be attributed to the information literacy course.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000618767726
       
  • Book review: Michael F. Bemis, Library and Information Science: A Guide to
           Key Literature and Sources
    • Authors: J.H. Bowman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617729978
       
  • Book review: Bryce Nelson, The Academic Library Administrator’s
           Field Guide
    • Authors: Janet Waters
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617729975
       
  • Book review: Barbara Allan, Emerging Strategies for Supporting Student
           Learning
    • Authors: Tim Leonard
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617729977
       
  • Book review: Paul T. Jaeger, Natalie Greene Taylor and Ursula Gorham,
           Libraries, Human Rights and Social Justice: Enabling Access and Promoting
           Inclusion
    • Authors: Andrew Taylor
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000617730514
       
  • Influence of social networking sites on scholarly communication: A study
           using literature in Artificial Intelligence
    • Authors: Rishabh Shrivastava, Preeti Mahajan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      With the advent of Web 2.0 tools and especially social media, researchers are increasingly active on the Web. This has resulted in a transformation in the scholarly communication process through which researchers share and bookmark research works in online platforms. In the present study, the influence of social networking sites on the field of Artificial Intelligence research was studied. The study analysed the influence of social networking sites on both conference papers and journal articles, as in a field like Artificial Intelligence both channels of research dissemination play important roles. The top 100 cited journal articles and conference papers in Artificial Intelligence published in 2009 and 2013 were analysed for their presence on social networking sites and online reference managers. It was found that amongst social networking sites, Mendeley had the greatest influence on research in Artificial Intelligence. Mendeley played the most remarkable role in transforming scholarly communication with the highest coverage of both journal articles and conference papers for both the years 2009 and 2013. It was found that the influence of social networking sites was greater for journal articles than conference papers, the latter still having a lower average Mendeley readership. The highest correlation between citation counts and Mendeley readership was found for journal articles published in 2009, followed by journal articles published in 2013, conference papers published in 2009 and conference papers published in 2013. The average Mendeley readership was also higher for journal articles than for conference papers. Mendeley readership was also found to be higher for journal articles and conference papers published earlier in time, indicating that research works published earlier in time were more popular in social networking sites and online reference managers.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000616678309
       
 
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