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Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.951
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 413  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1548-0518 - ISSN (Online) 1939-7089
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1086 journals]
  • The Work/Nonwork Spillover: The Enrichment Role of Work Engagement
    • Authors: Liat Eldor, Itzhak Harpaz, Mina Westman
      Pages: 21 - 34
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Volume 27, Issue 1, Page 21-34, February 2020.
      This study examines whether work engagement enriches employees beyond the contribution of the domain of work, focusing on satisfaction with life and community involvement. Moreover, the ambivalence of scholars about the added value of the work engagement concept compared with similar work-related attitudes prompted us to assess the benefits that work engagement offers with regard to improving one’s satisfaction with life and community involvement compared with the benefits of other, similar work-related attitudes such as job involvement and job satisfaction. Furthermore, given the studies indicating the impact of sector of employment (public vs. business) on understanding the work/nonwork nexus, the current study also investigates the effect of the sector of employment on this enrichment process. Utilizing multilevel modeling analysis techniques on data from 554 employees in public and business sector organizations, we obtained results consistent with our hypotheses. Work engagement and employees’ outcomes beyond work had positive and significant relationships. Moreover, the relationship between work engagement and community involvement was stronger in public sector employees than in business sector employees. The implications for organizational theory, research, and practice are discussed as possible leverage points for creating conditions that promote engagement at work and beyond.
      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2020-02-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051816647362
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Testing a Moderated Mediation Model of Transformational Leadership,
           Values, and Organization Change
    • Authors: Kevin S. Groves
      Pages: 35 - 48
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Volume 27, Issue 1, Page 35-48, February 2020.
      A field study of organizational leaders and their immediate followers was conducted to investigate (a) the mediating roles of follower openness to change values and follower self-transcendence values in linking transformational leadership to follower change resistance and follower extra effort, respectively and (b) the moderating role of organization change magnitude in influencing the mediation effects. Transformational leadership theory postulates that a range of follower attitudinal and performance outcomes are at least partially explained by a leader’s ability to influence followers’ values to support organizational change. Using Preacher, Rucker, and Hayes’s moderated mediation framework, this study extends transformational leadership research by testing a model that explicates the roles of leader behavior, follower values, and a key contextual variable in producing effects on follower attitudinal and performance outcomes. Data from 181 organizational leaders and 723 of their respective followers demonstrated strong support for the moderated mediation model. The conditional indirect effects of transformational leadership on follower change resistance and follower extra effort via follower openness to change and self-transcendence values, respectively, were stronger in work contexts characterized by high organization change magnitude. Implications for theory, future research, and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2020-02-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051816662614
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • A Meta-Analysis of Shared Leadership: Antecedents, Consequences, and
           Moderators
    • Authors: Qiong Wu, Kathryn Cormican, Guoquan Chen
      Pages: 49 - 64
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Volume 27, Issue 1, Page 49-64, February 2020.
      Many organizations are encouraging a shared leadership approach that meets the increased complexity of today’s working environment. It is therefore imperative for researchers to clearly comprehend the mechanism of shared leadership in teams. Contributing to the burgeoning research in the field of shared leadership, this study aims to advance our understanding along the many dimensions of the shared leadership phenomenon: its antecedents, moderators, and consequences. In this article, we provide a critical and comprehensive analysis of the extant literature and generate an integrated framework that presents seven hypotheses and five research questions. We then empirically test this framework via a systematic meta-analysis from 40 studies (team n = 3,019). Significantly, our findings reveal that the internal team environment and team heterogeneity are positively related to the emergence of shared leadership in teams. Moreover, we confirm the positive relationship between shared leadership and team outcomes. Our analysis also highlights how intragroup trust and task interdependence significantly moderate the shared leadership–team outcomes relations, with higher correlations observed in greater levels of intragroup trust, as well as larger levels of task interdependence. We also find the moderating effect of shared leadership measurement methods in such relations. Specifically, there is a stronger relationship when shared leadership is measured with social network analysis, rather than aggregating approaches. Overall, our study brings valuable insights into the shared leadership area and provides clear directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2020-02-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051818820862
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • When Do Followers Compensate for Leader Silence' The Motivating Role
           of Leader Injustice
    • Authors: Alexander Zill, Michael Knoll, Alexandra (Sasha) Cook, Bertolt Meyer
      Pages: 65 - 79
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Volume 27, Issue 1, Page 65-79, February 2020.
      Leaders are important for overcoming silence in organizations, because they can serve as role models and facilitate voice, for example, by being just. However, at times, leaders themselves remain silent. In such instances, trickle-down models of leadership and role-modeling theory suggest that leader silence results in follower silence. Drawing on research on laissez-faire leadership and coping, we challenge these approaches proposing that team members can compensate for their leader’s silence. This compensatory effect, in turn, is proposed to be contingent on followers’ justice perceptions, although in a counterintuitive way: Drawing on the fairness heuristic and collective action research, we propose that perceiving the leader as unjust makes it less likely that followers use their leader as a role model and can motivate followers to overcome fear and resignation, eventually resulting in followers’ speaking up in cases when leaders fail to do so. Results from two studies in organizations support our assumption that jointly considering leader and follower silence can reveal surprising effects and thus inspire new research complementing current approaches to overcome silence and its detrimental effects for organizations and their stakeholders. Additionally, we discuss theoretical and practical implications regarding the role of leaders, followers, and context as antecedents of silence.
      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2020-02-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051818820861
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Threatened but Involved: Key Conditions for Stimulating Employee Helping
           Behavior
    • Authors: Dirk De Clercq, Inam Ul Haq, Muhammad Umer Azeem
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the relationship between employees’ job involvement and helping behavior directed toward coworkers, as well as how this relationship might be augmented when employees encounter adversity, whether due to malicious leadership (abusive supervision) or threats to their physical integrity (workplace hazards, fear of terrorism). Drawing on a two-wave survey research design that collected data from employees and their supervisors in Pakistan, the results reveal that job involvement increases the likelihood that employees go out of their way to help their coworkers, and this relationship is strongest when they have to deal with the hardships of malicious leadership or threats to their physical safety. For organizations, these findings indicate that employees perceive their own allocation of positive work energy, derived from their job involvement, to helping behaviors that assist other members as particularly useful when they also experience significant adversity, inside or outside the workplace.
      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-06-18T08:57:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819857741
       
  • Self-Efficacy and Resilience: Mediating Mechanisms in the Relationship
           Between the Transformational Leadership Dimensions and Well-Being
    • Authors: Nia Plamenova Djourova, Isabel Rodríguez Molina, Nuria Tordera Santamatilde, Gebeyehu Abate
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-05-29T09:19:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819849002
       
  • Antecedents of Health-Promoting Leadership and Workload as Moderator
    • Authors: Sarah Turgut, Svenja Schlachter, Alexandra Michel, Karlheinz Sonntag
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T09:10:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819848988
       
  • How Authentic Leadership Promotes Individual Creativity: The Mediating
           Role of Affective Commitment
    • Authors: Neuza Ribeiro, Ana Patrícia Duarte, Rita Filipe, Rui Torres de Oliveira
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-04-24T06:22:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819842796
       
  • The Effects of LMX Differentiation on Team Performance: Investigating the
           Mediating Properties of Cohesion
    • Authors: Brian Manata
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T08:50:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819842792
       
  • Exploring the Embeddedness of an Informal Community of Practice Within a
           Formal Organizational Context: A Case Study in the German Military

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Benjamin Schulte, Florian Andresen, Hans Koller
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-03-11T07:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819833382
       
  • How Do Different Faces of Paternalistic Leaders Facilitate or Impair Task
           and Innovative Performance' Opening the Black Box
    • Authors: Zahide Karakitapoğlu-Aygün, Lale Gumusluoglu, Terri A. Scandura
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T07:01:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819833380
       
  • Defeating the Toxic Boss: The Nature of Toxic Leadership and the Role of
           Followers
    • Authors: Ivana Milosevic, Stefan Maric, Dragan Loncar
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T07:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819833374
       
  • Defining the Socially Responsible Leader: Revisiting Issues in Responsible
           Leadership
    • Authors: David A. Waldman, Donald S. Siegel, Günter K. Stahl
      First page: 5
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.
      We renew an exchange of letters from 2008 regarding the meaning of responsible leadership, which applies to senior executives of firms as they attempt to engage in corporate social responsibility. An interesting aspect to this discussion is that, depending on one’s theoretical perspective, responsible leadership can be defined in multiple, somewhat disparate ways. We use the terms strategist versus integrator to characterize the most common delineation of responsible leader orientations. While the strategist orientation implies the planning and use of corporate social responsibility initiatives for the direct targeting of return on investment, the integrator orientation involves senior leaders’ use of corporate social responsibility to serve the interests of a range of corporate stakeholders. Although a divergence of opinion is expressed in our letters, we concur in our conclusion that more research is necessary to better understand these diverse orientations and their effects on organizations.
      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-08-29T08:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051819872201
       
  • Leadership Variables and Business Performance: Mediating and Interaction
           Effects
    • Authors: Fenwick Feng Jing, Gayle C. Avery, Harald Bergsteiner
      First page: 80
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-01-25T07:27:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051818824532
       
  • The Influence of Transformational Leadership and Leader Attitudes on
           Subordinate Attitudes and Implementation Success
    • Authors: Lauren R. Farahnak, Mark G. Ehrhart, Elisa M. Torres, Gregory A. Aarons
      First page: 98
      Abstract: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies
      PubDate: 2019-01-19T07:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1548051818824529
       
 
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