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Journal Cover JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  [SJR: 6.44]   [H-I: 549]   [1718 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
   Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [13 journals]
  • Highlights for May 15, 2018
    • Pages: 1953 - 1955
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12372
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 1957 - 1958
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12373
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Will Nutritional Information Calories on Menus Lead to Healthier
           Choices'
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1969 - 1971
      Abstract: This Medical News Story discusses the effectiveness of posting calories and other nutrition information on restaurant menus.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3729
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • The Mediterranean Diet’s Fight Against Frailty
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1971 - 1972
      Abstract: This Medical News story describes mounting evidence that shows a Mediterranean diet rich in plant-based foods may reduce older adults’ risk of becoming frail.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3653
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Antibiotic Consumption Increasing Globally
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 1973 - 1973
      Abstract: Antibiotic use has increased globally since 2000, fueled by an increase in antibiotic consumption in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) that have experienced economic growth, report an international group of researchers.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5711
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Hookworm Treatment Improves Physical Stamina of Female Farmers
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 1973 - 1973
      Abstract: One dose of albendazole improved the stamina of rural female farmers of childbearing age with hookworm in the Democratic Republic of Congo, according to a report from an international group of researchers.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5432
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • WHO’s Blueprint List of Priority Diseases
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 1973 - 1973
      Abstract: The World Health Organization (WHO) updated its list of prioritized diseases that have the potential to cause a public health emergency and for which there is a need for accelerated research and development of novel therapeutic, prophylactic, and diagnostic approaches.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5712
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • A Mandate for Opioid Education'
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1974 - 1974
      Abstract: Given the scale of the US opioid epidemic, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, suggested that it may be time to “seriously consider” mandatory opioid prescribing education for physicians.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5565
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Contact Lenses Adjust to Sunlight
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1974 - 1974
      Abstract: The first contact lens that darkens automatically when exposed to bright light has received FDA approval. The lenses have the same technology as eyeglasses that darken in sunlight.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5585
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • New Physician Requirements to Use Permanent Birth Control Device
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1974 - 1974
      Abstract: Less than 2 years after the FDA added a boxed warning to the Essure contraceptive device, the agency has imposed new restrictions on its use.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5587
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Evolution in the Ability of Choosing Wisely Campaigns to Reduce Health
           Care Overuse
    • Authors: Levinson W; Born K, Wolfson D.
      Pages: 1975 - 1976
      Abstract: This Viewpoint reviews the growth of the Choosing Wisely campaign from its inception in 2012 into an international movement and outlines advances in evidence and implementation that will be necessary for the effort to have more widespread, durable effects on the quality, safety, and value of health care.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.2202
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Adding Cost-effectiveness to the Definition of Low-Value Care
    • Authors: Pandya A.
      Pages: 1977 - 1978
      Abstract: This Viewpoint points out that many definitions of low-value health care are based exclusively on efficacy or harm, and argues that inclusion of cost and cost-effectiveness measures is necessary to define health service value.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.2856
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Precision Medicine, Genome Sequencing, and Improved Population Health
    • Authors: Feero W; Wicklund CA, Veenstra D.
      Pages: 1979 - 1980
      Abstract: This Viewpoint summarizes a 2017 NASEM Roundtable on Genomics and Precision Health that shared experiences of US health systems with use of genome sequencing for clinical and research applications and that explored how the sequencing programs might advance models for data sharing and collaborative implementation research; generate evidence regarding the benefits, harms, and value of precision medicine; and reduce disparities through partnerships with diverse populations.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.2925
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • In the Era of Precision Medicine and Big Data, Who Is Normal'
    • Authors: Manrai AK; Patel CJ, Ioannidis JA.
      Pages: 1981 - 1982
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, John Ioannidis and colleagues discuss the challenges and potential benefits of defining what is “healthy” in an era of precision medicine, when defining normal will require that each person be assigned to an increasingly narrow and granular reference population.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.2009
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Beating “Natural” Selection by In Vitro Fertilization
    • Authors: Nagata JM.
      Pages: 1983 - 1984
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, a pediatrician recounts his struggle to work through his family’s beliefs about marriage and children and his own commitments to science exemplified by Darwin’s theory of natural selection as he and his husband began a family using an egg donor and in vitro fertilization.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5078
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Monoclonal Antibodies for Migraine Prevention
    • Authors: Loder EW; Robbins MS.
      Pages: 1985 - 1987
      Abstract: Migraine is a common chronic condition characterized by recurrent attacks of severe headache with associated symptoms such as light and sound sensitivity, nausea, vomiting, and focal neurological disturbances. In 2016, migraine affected an estimated 1.04 billion people worldwide. Migraine prevalence and disease activity are highest among women during their childbearing years. Approximately 14% of people with migraine experience 5 or more attacks per month. For many patients, migraine episodes are debilitating, and overall, 25% of people with migraine report that they have missed a day of work or school because of migraine in the previous 3 months.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4852
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Medication Prescribing for Children
    • Authors: Freed GL.
      Pages: 1988 - 1989
      Abstract: The article by Hales and colleagues in this issue of JAMA highlights trends in the use of prescription medications among children and adolescents. Such an important, comprehensive update has not been performed for nearly a decade but is needed, given changes in child health and treatment recommendations. Using data on 38 277 children and adolescents in the 1999-2014 National Health and Examination Survey (NHANES), the authors reported that use of any prescription medication in the past 30 days decreased from 24.6% to 21.9%. Use of medications for asthma, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and contraception increased, whereas use of antibiotics, antihistamines, and upper respiratory combination medications decreased.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5731
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Effect of Acupuncture vs Sham Acupuncture on Live Births During In Vitro
           Fertilization
    • Authors: Smith CA; de Lacey S, Chapman M, et al.
      Pages: 1990 - 1998
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of true vs sham acupuncture on live births among women undergoing assisted reproduction with in vitro fertilization.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5336
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Effect of Fremanezumab vs Placebo on Prevention of Episodic Migraine
    • Authors: Dodick DW; Silberstein SD, Bigal ME, et al.
      Pages: 1999 - 2008
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effect of a monthly vs a single dose of fremanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting calcitonin gene-related peptide, on monthly migraine days in patients with episodic migraine.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4853
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Trends in Prescription Medication Use Among US Children and Adolescents
    • Authors: Hales CM; Kit BK, Gu Q, et al.
      Pages: 2009 - 2020
      Abstract: This pharmacoepidemiology study uses 1999-2014 NHANES data to characterize trends in use of prescription medications among children and adolescents aged 0 to 19 years in the United States.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5690
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Association of Colonoscopy Adenoma Findings With Long-term Colorectal
           Cancer Incidence
    • Authors: Click B; Pinsky PF, Hickey T, et al.
      Pages: 2021 - 2031
      Abstract: This cohort study of participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer randomized clinical trial compares long-term CRC incidence between individuals with either advanced or nonadvanced adenomas compared with those with no adenomas.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5809
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Management of Bleeding in Patients Taking Oral Anticoagulants
    • Authors: Anderson I; Cifu AS.
      Pages: 2032 - 2033
      Abstract: This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Foundation’s 2017 consensus guideline on management of bleeding in patients taking oral anticoagulants.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3504
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Serum α 1 -Antitrypsin Concentration in the Diagnosis of
           α1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
    • Authors: Hurley K; O’Connor GT.
      Pages: 2034 - 2035
      Abstract: A 64-year-old man with a family history of early-onset lung disease, presented with dyspnea and recurrent pneumonia, emphysema changes on CT, and a serum α1-antitrypsin concentration of 14 mg/dL. How would you interpret the result'
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3888
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Abuse-Deterrent Opioids
    • Pages: 2036 - 2037
      Abstract: This Medical Letter review summarizes labeling requirements, effectiveness, and availability of new abuse-deterrent opioids approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4996
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Trends in e-Cigarette Use Among Adults in the United States, 2014-2016
    • Authors: Bao W; Xu G, Lu J, et al.
      Pages: 2039 - 2041
      Abstract: This study analyzes National Health Interview Survey data to characterize changes in electronic cigarette use among US adults in 2014-2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4658
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements and Fractures in Community-Dwelling
           Adults
    • Authors: Anagnostis P; Paschou SA, Goulis DG.
      Pages: 2041 - 2041
      Abstract: To the Editor In a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs), Dr Zhao and colleagues showed that the use of calcium or vitamin D supplements or both was not associated with a lower risk of fractures in community-dwelling older adults compared with placebo or no treatment. We have a number of concerns.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3935
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements and Fractures in Community-Dwelling
           Adults
    • Authors: Pundole X; Lopez-Olivo MA, Lu H.
      Pages: 2041 - 2042
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Zhao and colleagues concluded that the findings of their review did not support the routine use of calcium or vitamin D supplementation in community-dwelling older adults. This broad conclusion is potentially weakened by several aspects of the study.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3931
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements and Fractures in Community-Dwelling
           Adults
    • Authors: Wang Y; Huang Z, Yi B.
      Pages: 2042 - 2042
      Abstract: To the Editor A recent meta-analysis showed no significant association of calcium or vitamin D with risk of fractures, regardless of calcium dose, dietary calcium intake, or baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration. Vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency develops slowly, and it also takes time to optimize and maintain serum 25(OH)D concentration via supplementation. In the included RCTs, calcium and vitamin D supplementation lasted for 4 months to 7 years. This large variation in the treatment course might affect the results. Therefore, subgroup analyses based on calcium or vitamin D treatment course would be helpful. Other factors that might be investigated in subgroup analyses include baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration (as low as 10.6 ng/mL in the included RCTs), posttreatment serum 25(OH)D concentration, or change in 25(OH)D concentration. Posttreatment vitamin D level is also affected by various other factors, including body mass index, genetic background, or dose, route, and duration of vitamin D supplementation, which could influence the association of calcium or vitamin D with risk of fractures.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3919
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements and Fractures in Community-Dwelling
           Adults
    • Authors: Tu W; Wang H, Liu Q.
      Pages: 2042 - 2043
      Abstract: To the Editor Calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D supplements were associated with a lower fracture incidence in community-dwelling older adults in a systematic review and meta-analysis. The authors suggested that these findings did not support the routine use of these supplements in community-dwelling older people.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3915
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements and Fractures in Community-Dwelling
           Adults
    • Authors: Tian S; Zhao D.
      Pages: 2043 - 2043
      Abstract: To the Editor The systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs by Dr Zhao and colleagues found that treatment with calcium, vitamin D, or both was not associated with reduced risk of fracture incidence compared with placebo or no treatment in community-dwelling elderly individuals. However, there are several important methodological constraints.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3909
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Calcium and Vitamin D Supplements and Fractures in Community-Dwelling
           Adults—Reply
    • Authors: Zhao J; Zeng X, Wang J.
      Pages: 2043 - 2044
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Anagnostis and colleagues propose reasons for the lack of association in our meta-analysis, but they do not mention that older people living in the community (our population) vs institutions are different, with the latter having lower BMD, older age, more vitamin D deficiency, and higher risk of fracture. They suggest that vitamin D doses may have been too low to reach sufficient 25(OH)D concentrations, but almost all RCTs reporting posttreatment concentrations showed levels more than 20 ng/mL. Race and ethnicity are unlikely to have affected our results because randomization should have produced equal distributions in the 2 groups.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.3947
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Research on Underrepresented Populations
    • Authors: Chang EY; Bakinde N, Obih UL.
      Pages: 2044 - 2045
      Abstract: To the Editor Drs Spong and Bianchi noted that despite advances in personalized medicine, limited evidence-based therapies have been developed to address the specific needs of various subpopulations. We acknowledge the importance of addressing health disparities to advance health equity and the need to include underrepresented populations in all forms of research.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4094
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Research on Underrepresented Populations
    • Authors: Spong CY; Bianchi DW.
      Pages: 2045 - 2045
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Chang and colleagues correctly note that inclusion of underrepresented populations in research is key to addressing health disparities and advancing health equity. In addition to the underrepresented populations mentioned in our Viewpoint (children, older adults, pregnant and lactating women, individuals with physical and intellectual disabilities), the writers correctly add LGBT individuals. We agree that more studies are needed on how educational level, family dynamics, and other social and environmental factors affect not only the health of underrepresented populations but also their participation and retention in clinical research. We also concur that enhanced training and mentoring of researchers from underrepresented populations is an important step in making inclusion a routine approach and in helping to eliminate health disparities.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4098
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Quiet Moment on Night Call
    • Authors: DePew R.
      Pages: 2046 - 2046
      Abstract: Learn to sit still. Let this be one of theunremembered moments that definewhat you call your life. There is a timefor breathless and breaths missed, letthis be neither and taken slowly. Letthe atmosphere enter, separated threelayers from your soul, and no more. Thisis your world for now, even if it is finite.You can stop worrying that you are notenough. You never had to be. Someoneshould have told you that. Let the worldshow you what it means when it saysthere are oranges on the table, have one.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.19743
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • The Conscientious Objector
    • Pages: 2047 - 2047
      Abstract: The term conscientious objector came into use in the first world war, although reference to the problem appears in Gibbon’s “Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.” The Mennonites were exempted from military service in the Netherlands in 1575. In the United States, members of some religious denominations were exempted from general military service during the Civil War. At the commencement of the first world war there were in the United States, according to Hoag, about 300,000 males classified as conscientious objectors. About 30 per cent of these were of military age. In June 1918 the Surgeon General’s Office sent out to various camps a special form for examination of conscientious objectors. May, in his report to the Office of the Surgeon General, presented the then available information concerning the intelligence, education, grounds of objection and social and political history of conscientious objectors. The report covered twenty camps and represented about 1,000 objectors.... At least 97 per cent of the men had sufficient intelligence to know what they were doing. About 50 per cent were Mennonites; less than 10 per cent of these went beyond the eighth grade.... The grounds of objection were, in general, three: religious, social and political. The religious objector makes his appeal to the Bible, church creed and to conscience, the social objector to individual freedom; the political objector usually bases his objection on the ground of alien citizenship.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12380
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
  • Angioedema
    • Authors: Tarbox JA; Bansal A, Peiris AN.
      Pages: 2054 - 2054
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the causes and types of angioedema and its symptoms, prevention, and treatment.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4860
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 19 (2018)
       
 
 
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