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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2210  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Audio Highlights
    • Abstract: Listen to the JAMA Editor’s Audio Summary for an overview and discussion of the important articles appearing in this week’s issue of JAMA.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0014
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 1111 - 1112
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13360
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Fixing the Parent Trap for Resident Physicians
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 1119 - 1121
      Abstract: This Medical News article describes efforts to help residents balance the challenges of becoming a new parent during medical training.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1084
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Influenza 2019-2020
    • Authors: Livingston E; Bucher K, Rekito A.
      Pages: 1122 - 1122
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2633
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • New Resource for Managing Patients Receiving Long-term Opioid Therapy
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1123 - 1123
      Abstract: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recently updated a toolkit for primary care practices who treat patients with chronic pain who take opioids. As AHRQ noted, most patients taking opioids for chronic pain are managed by primary care practitioners and their staffs.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3017
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Government Cites California for Violating Federal Conscience Laws
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1123 - 1123
      Abstract: The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently issued a Notice of Violation of federal conscience laws to the state of California because it mandated that all health insurance plans provide coverage for abortions.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3016
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • White Blood Cells Might Provide Clues to Breast Cancer Risk
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1123 - 1123
      Abstract: The proportions of certain white blood cell types in a woman’s blood might predict her risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer in the short-term and in the long-term, according to a recent study in JAMA Network Open by researchers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2457
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Despite Law, Most Clinical Trial Results Still Not Posted
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1124 - 1124
      Abstract: Less than half of US clinical trial results are reported on ClinicalTrials.gov in accordance with US law, according to a recent study in The Lancet.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2814
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Leading HIV Vaccine Trial Stopped for Ineffectiveness
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1124 - 1124
      Abstract: The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases last month halted a highly anticipated clinical trial testing an investigational HIV vaccine regimen. After an interim review, a data and safety monitoring board found that the 2 experimental vaccines in the regimen were ineffective against HIV, although there were no safety concerns.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2813
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • “Superdonor” Fecal Microbiota Transplant Effective for IBS
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1124 - 1124
      Abstract: Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) using a single “superdonor” produced high rates of clinical response in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in a trial published in Gut. Two previous randomized clinical trials of FMT for IBS had conflicting results.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2812
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Hotspotting Doesn’t Prevent Hospital Readmissions in Study
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1124 - 1124
      Abstract: An intensive “hotspotting” program designed to reduce unnecessary medical care by so-called superutilizer patients while improving their health failed to prevent hospital readmissions, a trial in the New England Journal of Medicine reported.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2811
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Online Mindfulness Therapy Improves Residual Depression
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1124 - 1124
      Abstract: Patients whose depression lingered after treatment had less severe residual symptoms, higher rates of remission, and lower rates of relapse following online mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, a trial in JAMA Psychiatry reported.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2446
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Hundreds of Health Care Workers Exposed to Rabies
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 1125 - 1125
      Abstract: A Utah man who became infected with rabies after handling several bats potentially exposed 279 other people, most of them health workers.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2851
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Adults Are Making It Easier for Children to Ingest Dangerous Drugs
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 1125 - 1125
      Abstract: When children accidentally swallow prescription drugs, more than half the time it’s because an adult has removed the medication from child-safe packaging, according to a CDC study in the Journal of Pediatrics.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2406
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • The Inevitable Reimagining of Medical Education
    • Authors: Emanuel EJ.
      Pages: 1127 - 1128
      Abstract: This Viewpoint summarizes trends in preclinical medical education away from in-person classroom experiences toward online learning, and imagines the transformation of medical schools into programs that provide clinical rotations and residency training only.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1227
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Preparation for Possible Sustained Transmission of 2019 Novel Coronavirus
    • Authors: Swerdlow DL; Finelli L.
      Pages: 1129 - 1130
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the concepts of transmissibility and severity as the critical factors that determine the extent of an epidemic, drawing on the previous pandemic of influenza A(H1N1) and epidemics of SARS and MERS to consider what the scope, morbidity, and mortality of the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) epidemic might be.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1960
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • US Emergency Legal Responses to Novel Coronavirus—Balancing Public
           Health and Civil Liberties
    • Authors: Gostin LO; Hodge JG, Jr.
      Pages: 1131 - 1132
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the policy and legal ramifications of the national public health emergency declared by the US government in response the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, and examines the lawfulness of quarantine and other compulsory measures.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2025
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Enhancing Private Sector Health System Preparedness for 21st-Century
           Health Threats
    • Authors: Berwick DM; Shine K.
      Pages: 1133 - 1134
      Abstract: This Viewpoint summarizes recommendations made by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) experts to address the US health system’s preparedness for major threats, highlighting 5 principles to help regions prepare for specific threats as a prelude to partnerships that would facilitate more comprehensive national preparedness.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1310
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • The Other Side
    • Authors: Song A.
      Pages: 1135 - 1136
      Abstract: In this narrative medical essay, a medicine resident describes her father’s vegetative state following a cardiac arrest and finds herself identifying with families who don’t want limitations on medical care for their loved ones in conflict with her identity as an internist.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2054
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia
    • Authors: Schreiber RA.
      Pages: 1137 - 1138
      Abstract: Biliary atresia is a serious pediatric liver disease. It is among the leading causes of newborn cholestasis, the foremost reason for cirrhosis and liver-related death in children, and the most frequent indication for liver transplant in the pediatric population. The condition results from an idiopathic, rapidly progressive, fibrosclerosing obliterative injury to large bile ducts during the first months of life. Although not an inherited disease, biliary atresia is a rare orphan liver disease that occurs in 1:15 000 to 1:20 000 live births in North America and Western Europe, with the highest incidence rates in Asia (1:6000 to 1:9000) and French Polynesia (1:3000).
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2727
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Thank You to JAMA Peer Reviewers, Authors, and Readers
    • Authors: Golub RM; Bauchner H, Fontanarosa PB.
      Pages: 1139 - 1140
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA, we are pleased to publish the names of the 2816 reviewers who completed reviews of manuscripts for JAMA in 2019. The thoughtful comments and recommendations of each reviewer for each manuscript are carefully considered in the editorial evaluation and are exceedingly helpful in assessing the novelty and importance of submitted manuscripts and in improving the presentation and quality of published articles. JAMA could not be successful without the efforts of the reviewers. We extend our appreciation to all reviewers for their service to the journal and hope that publishing your names in this issue provides recognition of the critical importance of the often underrecognized and underappreciated academic activity of scholarly peer review.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2769
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Accuracy of Newborn Screening for Biliary Atresia Using Direct or
           Conjugated Bilirubin Measurements
    • Authors: Harpavat S; Garcia-Prats JA, Anaya C, et al.
      Pages: 1141 - 1150
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study characterizes the diagnostic accuracy of direct or conjugated bilirubin measurements for identifying newborns with biliary atresia and the associations between screening and age of therapeutic surgery.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0837
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Association of Daily Step Count and Step Intensity With Mortality Among US
           Adults
    • Authors: Saint-Maurice PF; Troiano RP, Bassett DR, Jr, et al.
      Pages: 1151 - 1160
      Abstract: This study uses National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data to examine the dose-response relationships between step count (steps/d) and step intensity (steps/min) and mortality in a representative sample of US adults aged 40 years or older.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1382
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Trends in Diet Quality Among Youth in the United States, 1999-2016
    • Authors: Liu J; Rehm CD, Onopa J, et al.
      Pages: 1161 - 1174
      Abstract: This national survey study uses NHANES data to characterize trends in diet quality among US youth aged 2 to 19 years between 1999 and 2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0878
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis—A Review
    • Authors: Sheka AC; Adeyi O, Thompson J, et al.
      Pages: 1175 - 1183
      Abstract: This narrative review summarizes the epidemiology of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), proposes a diagnostic algorithm for distinguishing the 2, and reviews management options.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2298
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • When Can Intermediate Outcomes Be Used in Clinical Trials'
    • Authors: DeMets DL; Psaty BM, Fleming TR.
      Pages: 1184 - 1185
      Abstract: This JAMA Guide to Statistics and Methods reviews how and under what conditions surrogate outcomes can replace patient-centered outcomes in randomized trials and stresses the importance of properly validating outcomes as surrogates for direct measures of patient experiences.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1176
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism
    • Authors: Zhu CY; Sturgeon C, Yeh MW.
      Pages: 1186 - 1187
      Abstract: This JAMA Insights article reviews the presentation and diagnostic workup of primary hyperparathyroidism, and indications for surgical vs surveillance management.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0538
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Medical Exemption From Disconnection of Utilities in Connecticut
    • Authors: Kahn PA; Daggula KR, Teng W, et al.
      Pages: 1189 - 1190
      Abstract: This study uses data from the Connecticut Public Utilities Regulatory Authority to describe trends in medical exemptions from utility disconnection and characteristics and health care use of adults applying for such exemptions at a Yale New Haven Hospital care practice between 2011 and 2017.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0542
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Confirming Point-of-Care INR Test Results
    • Authors: Fantz CR.
      Pages: 1190 - 1191
      Abstract: To the Editor The authors of the JAMA Diagnostic Test Interpretation article on point-of-care (POC) testing for vitamin K antagonist monitoring suggested confirming POC international normalized ratio (INR) test results greater than 3.5. There are numerous INR tests cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the FDA recommends confirming all POC test results with an INR value greater than 4.5. Variation between whole blood POC and citrated plasma-based laboratory methods can be expected. One significant source of variation between INR testing methods is the animal source of thromboplastin. The authors did not mention which specific POC and laboratory assays were used, and therefore it is difficult to know whether the difference observed between the POC and laboratory tests was expected based on differences in thromboplastin.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0945
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Confirming Point-of-Care INR Test Results—Reply
    • Authors: Anderson I; Wool GD, Madden W.
      Pages: 1191 - 1192
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Fantz and the FDA guidance that confirmation venipuncture INR testing should be performed, at minimum, for all patients with POC INR testing results of 4.5 or greater. However, we recommend that each institution examine whether a lower threshold for performing POC INR testing (such as >3.5) would better meet patient safety goals. Donaldson et al conducted a single-institution study comparing POC INR values using 2 different POC devices (CoaguChek XS Plus and i-STAT) vs venipuncture INR (Stago). Based on prior studies, the authors defined a clinically significant INR difference (one that would result in differing dosing plans) as when the INR measurement was within therapeutic range on one device and out of therapeutic range on the other device or when both device INR measurements were out of range with an INR difference of 0.5 or greater. They also assessed the percentage of times that the device INR values differed by 0.4 INR units or more. The CoaguChek POC INR values were significantly different, with at least a 0.4-unit difference, from the venipuncture INR values in 33% of cases and the i-STAT POC INR values were significantly different, with at least a 0.4-unit difference, than the venipuncture INR values in 54% of cases.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0951
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Cultural Influences in Psychiatry
    • Authors: Deshmukh A; Sarmukaddam SB, Paralikar VP.
      Pages: 1192 - 1193
      Abstract: To the Editor In a Viewpoint, Dr Guinart et al highlighted the need for fuller consideration of transcultural psychiatry to better explain cultural variation in clinical trials of psychotropic medicines. As the article suggested, such research is bedeviled by questions of interrater reliability, variations in the expression of stigmatizing emotional experience, and capacity for measuring treatment response. Neglecting cultural contexts distorts the results of clinical trials. Such concerns about cultural validity for effective clinical practice, in fact, motivated formulation of the “new cross-cultural psychiatry” as an upgrade for transcultural psychiatry more than 4 decades ago.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1091
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Cultural Influences in Psychiatry
    • Authors: Aggarwal N.
      Pages: 1192 - 1192
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Guinart and colleagues asked if transcultural psychiatry is possible. The answer for clinicians in cultural psychiatry is “yes.” However, I have some comments about the article.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1086
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Cultural Influences in Psychiatry—Reply
    • Authors: Guinart D; Kane JM, Correll CU.
      Pages: 1193 - 1194
      Abstract: In Reply Both Dr Aggarwal and Ms Deshmukh and colleagues answer our question of whether transcultural psychiatry is possible with a resounding “yes.”
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1094
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Errors in Author Affiliations
    • Pages: 1194 - 1194
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation entitled “Comparison of Abbreviated Breast MRI vs Digital Breast Tomosynthesis for Breast Cancer Detection Among Women With Dense Breasts Undergoing Screening” published in the February 25, 2020, issue of JAMA, the Department of Radiology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, affiliation that was given for Gillian M. Newstead, MD, should have instead been given for Jennifer A. Harvey, MD. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2991
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Incorrect Percentage
    • Pages: 1194 - 1194
      Abstract: In the Rational Clinical Examination entitled “Will This Patient Be Difficult to Intubate' The Rational Clinical Examination Systematic Review” published in the February 5, 2019, issue of JAMA, an incorrect percentage was reported. In the “Scenario Resolution, Case 2” section, second sentence, the first percentage should have been 20% so that the sentence reads “Based on the cursory physical examination (obese; positive LR, 2.2) and retrognathia (positive LR, 6.0), it was estimated that her posttest probability of a difficult intubation was between 20% and 40%.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2069
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Two Rows Transposed in Table 1
    • Pages: 1194 - 1194
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation entitled “Effect of Folic Acid and Zinc Supplementation in Men on Semen Quality and Live Birth Among Couples Undergoing Infertility Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial” published in the January 7, 2020, issue of JAMA, the data for 2 rows were transposed in Table 1. Under the row labeled “Taking multivitamin within past 3 mo,” the data for “Yes” are 298/751 (40) for the folic acid and zinc group and 284/752 (38) for the placebo group. In the next row, the data for “No” are 453/751 (60) for the folic acid and zinc group and 468/752 (62) for the placebo group. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2066
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Delirium
    • Authors: McAbee D.
      Pages: 1195 - 1195
      Abstract: For days, the silver sprinkler high on the wall is a mouse poking its head out. The tangle of tubing draped over the circulation-boot pump is a Medusa-woman’s hair. You watch a battle rage on the blank TV screen; outside the hospital room window, the white-washed high-rise makes you think you’re in Miami, though you’ve never been. Then again, you’ve never died before either, never come back like Lazarus to this same old unfamiliar world.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0078
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Spirits and the Medical Mind
    • Pages: 1196 - 1196
      Abstract: The linguistic devices by which we distinguish between a specialist in the laws of the behavior of matter, one who deals with the functions of the body, and still another who ministers to the body diseased, indicate that for human ends we must divide what in nature is joined. We call the one man a physicist, the second a physiologist, the third a physician. The names, like the pursuits, all begin alike, for they are but phases of a common nature. So when any doctrines come forward that threaten to overturn the common foundation of science, physicist, physiologist and physician are equally concerned, and with them in these days the psychologist, who shares somewhat of the habit of mind of all three. But so far as the psychologist has a special warrant to consider belief in spirit-agency or in telepathic or other unrecognized forces, he approaches the matter with the clinical sense congenial to the medical mind.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13367
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • JAMA Peer Reviewers in 2019
    • Pages: 1197 - 1209
      Abstract: We sincerely thank the 2816 peer reviewers who completed manuscript reviews for JAMA in 2019.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0556
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
  • Penicillin Allergy in Pregnancy
    • Authors: Blumenthal KG; Shenoy ES.
      Pages: 1216 - 1216
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes testing for penicillin allergy among pregnant women.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Mar 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.19809
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 12 (2020)
       
 
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