for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  [SJR: 6.44]   [H-I: 549]   [1201 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
   Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [11 journals]
  • JAMA
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Essential Tremor
    • Authors: Muth CC.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Problems Confronting Medical Investigators
    • Abstract: In a recent address at the fiftieth anniversary celebration of Stanford University, Dr. Walter B. Cannon presented some questions which deserve careful study. The shift in age grouping of the population, with increasing percentages of the elderly and the aged, now widely recognized as a fact, has presented the medical profession with a series of new problems. As one grows older, Cannon points out, the fires of life burn less vigorously and the adjustments of bodily organs to emergencies tend to be impaired—the breath is shorter, the heart beats less effectively, blood pressure gradually rises as the years pass and becomes ill adapted to critical requirements. Are these features essential attributes of the elderly or are they the consequences of comfortable and habitual indolence? In middle age some of these effects may result from inactivity alone and can be reversed by training; is this true in the later decades? If so, should attempts be made to alter them? What, Cannon says, would be the effects if they were altered? These questions offer possibilities for useful research. Almost none of the most prominent disorders of senescence are thoroughly understood. The prevailing ignorance, it may be assumed, is largely due to lack of systematic study. The challenge presented by realization of this fact will doubtless receive many answers. Severe demands on the nervous system, which may have arisen in part from the remarkable shift in the occupation of the citizens, often result in calls for medical attention. A disorder of the brain may fail to be revealed at necropsy or under the microscope. And yet emotional upsets which leave in the nervous pathways no visible trace have concrete and obvious effects and may be the occasion for profound misery and suffering. The gradual onset of disabilities, bodily and mental, in the later years of life demands, Cannon believes, long range studies on the possible influence of inheritance, early injuries, severe infections in childhood and youth, frustrated plans, the demands of labor and probably many other conditioning experiences.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Fewer Opioids, More Exercise for Severe Joint Pain From Arthritis
    • Abstract: Clinicians should look to the 2016 National Pain Strategy instead of their prescription pads to help millions of US adults with arthritis who have debilitating severe joint pain (SJP), according to CDC researchers.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Undervaccinated Kindergarteners
    • Abstract: The vast majority of US kindergarteners received a passing grade for being fully vaccinated on their first day of class last year. Even so, many kindergarteners are undervaccinated because they haven’t completed their immunization doses.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Art of Plastic Surgery
    • Authors: Neal S.
      Abstract: In this Arts and Medicine essay, the author, an artist and facial plastic surgeon, describes the importance of sculpture as an educational tool to enhance surgeons’ aesthetic judgment and procedural technique.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Memories
    • Authors: Halberstadt C.
      Abstract: Where are the memories that live in me from all that I have been—the memories in every leaf and worm and fish and bird I have known—Where do they roam?
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • All Demographic Groups Now Better Insured
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: Writing in JAMA earlier this year, President Barack Obama reported that the US uninsured rate has declined by 43%, from 16% in 2010 to 9.1% in 2015, mainly because of reforms that came out of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) analysis of National Health Interview Survey data now shows that the gains in insurance coverage under the ACA haven’t discriminated.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Low Prostate-Cancer Mortality Regardless of Treatment
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Abstract: Deaths from localized prostate cancer 10 years after detection by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing were about 1% regardless of treatment, according to a trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Youth Suicide Prevention Plan Developed
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: More than 12 000 people aged 10 to 34 years took their own lives in 2014, making suicide the second most common cause of death in these age groups. Now, an independent National Institute of Health panel has proposed a plan to prevent youth suicide over the next decade.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • NIH Launches ECHO Study
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: A 7-year initiative to understand how environmental factors shape children’s health is getting under way with the announcement of $157 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for fiscal year 2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Incentives and Restrictions Lead to Better Food Choices
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Abstract: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) subsidized food purchases for 1 in 7 low-income Americans in 2015. Policy makers have long debated ways to control the types of foods that can be purchased with SNAP benefits to help people eat more nutritious foods. A randomized trial recently published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that financial incentives and certain food restrictions lead people to eat more healthful diets and reduce their calorie intake, which could help prevent obesity and diseases linked to poor nutrition.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Human Milk Protein Prevents Infections in Preterm Infants
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Abstract: Diseases that affect premature infants in neonatal intensive care units are usually caused by hospital-acquired infections. Breast milk protects against infection by modifying the intestinal microbiome and boosting systemic immunity, but maternal colostrum is limited when infants are extremely preterm. According to a recent trial in The Journal of Pediatrics, feeding extremely low-weight preterm infants recombinant human lactoferrin talactoferrin (TLf), a human milk protein, was safe and resulted in fewer infections compared with placebo.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Incorrect Section Headings in Figures
    • Abstract: In the US Preventive Services Task Force Evidence Report entitled “Primary Care Interventions to Support Breastfeeding: Updated Evidence Report and Systematic Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force,” published in the October 25, 2016, issue of JAMA, section headings were incorrect in figures. In Figures 3, 4, and 5, the heading for the top section should have read, “Timing of intervention: combination of prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal,” and the heading for the bottom section should have read, “Timing of intervention: only prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal.” This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A Plan to “Write” the Human Genome
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses the Human Genome Project-write with Harvard geneticist, George Church, PhD.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Revisions to the Nutrition Facts Label—Reply
    • Authors: Malik V; Willett WC, Hu FB.
      Abstract: In Reply Drs Mayne and Balentine disagree with our statement about the inclusion of purified additives such as inulin and cellulosic fibers on the fiber line of the revised Nutrition Facts label. We believe that inclusion of these isolated or synthetic constituents on the label together with naturally occurring fibers from fruits, vegetables, and whole grains can be misleading to consumers and misused by food manufacturers to portray otherwise unhealthy products as healthy.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Euthanasia or Assisted Suicide in Patients With Psychiatric Illness
    • Authors: Hodel MA; Trachsel M.
      Abstract: To the Editor Drs Olié and Courtet commented on the report by Dr Kim and colleagues on euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) of psychiatric patients in the Netherlands, highlighting the challenges surrounding the legalization of EAS in patients with a psychiatric illness.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Euthanasia or Assisted Suicide in Patients With Psychiatric
           Illness—Reply
    • Authors: Olié E; Courtet P.
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Ms Hodel and Dr Trachsel when they conclude, “With improvements in the quality of care, there might be fewer requests for EAS.” According to the article by Dr Kim and colleagues, most patients receiving EAS for psychiatric conditions did not receive accurate treatment for their mental state and level of suffering that could have led to avoiding EAS. Dr Trachsel and colleagues suggested palliative care in psychiatry for severe persistent mental illness, including long-term residential care patients with severe chronic schizophrenia and insufficient quality of life; those with therapy-refractory depression; and persons with severe, long-standing, therapy-refractory anorexia nervosa. Most EAS psychiatric patients in the series by Kim and colleagues did not meet these criteria.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Revisions to the Nutrition Facts Label
    • Authors: Mayne ST; Balentine DA.
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint by Dr Malik and colleagues commented on the revised Nutrition Facts label, describing it as an “important step forward” but with “more room for improvement.” The authors commended the inclusion of added sugars, the greater prominence of calories, and the changes made to show calories per serving and per package, along with other changes.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Infectious Disease Mortality Trends in the United States, 1980-2014
    • Authors: Hansen V; Oren E, Dennis LK, et al.
      Abstract: This study uses data from the US National Office of Vital Statistics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention WONDER database to characterize trends in infectious disease mortality from 1980 through 2014.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 Inhibitor Therapy
    • Authors: Mastey V; Johnstone BM.
      Abstract: To the Editor Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors are an important treatment option for patients at highest risk of CVD who are unable to reach their lipid goals with current treatments. Dr Kazi and colleagues suggested that use of PCSK9 inhibitors for patients with atherosclerotic CVD and heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia is not cost-effective and that these medicines will increase costs to the US health care system. These findings depend on questionable assumptions that overestimate the calculated cost-effectiveness ratio and thus underestimate the value of PCSK9 inhibitors.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of PCSK9 Inhibitor Therapy—Reply
    • Authors: Kazi DS; Moran AE, Bibbins-Domingo K.
      Abstract: In Reply Ms Mastey and Dr Johnstone are incorrect in their assessment of our results and the goals of our analysis. The Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model is calibrated to actual, observed CVD events in the general US population and predicts myocardial infarctions, strokes, and cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality within 1% of estimates from national vital statistics and the US National Hospital Discharge Survey (for the model base year of 2010; eTable 3 in the online supplement to the article). Our reference-case estimates of cardiovascular risk among patients with familial hypercholesterolemia are nearly identical to those observed in a pooled analysis of 6 US epidemiological cohorts. Doubling the predicted risk in sensitivity analyses improved the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, but PCSK9 inhibitor therapy still did not meet conventionally accepted thresholds of cost-effectiveness. Our reference case did incorporate quality-of-life benefits from avoiding CVD events, and when we assumed even more severe disease-related disability in patients with CVD in sensitivity analyses—thus magnifying the potential benefits associated with PCSK9 inhibitor use—the results did not change materially (eTable 14 in the online supplement to the article).
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Utility of Coronary Artery Calcification to Assess CVD in Low-Risk Women
    • Authors: Kavousi M; Desai CS, Ayers C, et al.
      Abstract: This meta-analysis of data from 5 population-based cohort studies assesses the associations between coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) in low-risk women and the changes in risk discrimination when CAC score is added to traditional CVD risk factors.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Screening for Colorectal Cancer and Evolving Issues for Physicians and
           Patients
    • Authors: Lieberman D; Ladabaum U, Cruz-Correa M, et al.
      Abstract: This narrative review summarizes the most commonly used colorectal cancer screening tests in the United States and offers guidance about screening programs for higher-risk patients and management of antithrombotic therapy before colonoscopy.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mixing Study for Evaluation of Abnormal Coagulation Testing
    • Authors: Choi S; Rambally S, Shen Y.
      Abstract: An 84-year-old woman with a history of chronic kidney disease, prior stroke, and hypertension but no personal or family history of bleeding disorders was admitted with a 2-week history of spontaneous subcutaneous ecchymoses and hematomas. She had normal vital signs, laboratory results showing isolated severe anemia but unremarkable for other causes of anemia, and a large soft-tissue hematoma in the left chest wall without evidence of internal hemorrhage. How do you interpret these test results?
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Reducing Adverse Drug Events
    • Authors: Kessler C; Ward MJ, McNaughton CD.
      Abstract: Gains in life expectancy in the United States are being eroded at least in part due to the use and misuse of prescribed medications. Earlier this year, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that life expectancy for some groups in the United States continues to stagnate. Among middle-aged white women, life expectancy decreased, in large part due to medication overdose, opioid use, and liver disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Inpatient Palliative Care and Quality of Life After HCT
    • Authors: El-Jawahri A; LeBlanc T, VanDusen H, et al.
      Abstract: This randomized trial assesses the effect of an inpatient palliative care intervention vs standard transplant care on quality of life during hospitalization for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT).
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Palliative Care and Patient and Caregiver Outcomes
    • Authors: Kavalieratos D; Corbelli J, Zhang D, et al.
      Abstract: This meta-analysis of clinical trials article assesses the effects of palliative care interventions on patient quality of life, symptom burden, and survival and on caregiver burden and satisfaction.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Emergency Department Visits for Outpatient Adverse Drug Events
    • Authors: Shehab N; Lovegrove MC, Geller AI, et al.
      Abstract: This study uses National Electronic Injury Surveillance System–Cooperative Adverse Drug Event Surveillance data to characterize emergency department visits for adverse drug events in the United States in 2013-2014 and to describe changes in emergency department visits for adverse drug events since 2005-2006
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Lowering the Bar on the Low-Fat Diet
    • Authors: Ludwig DS.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint by David Ludwig assesses the lessons learned from US nutrition recommendations to limit fat intake and the continuing increase in obesity and diabetes and discusses the challenges inherent in scientific evidence regarding nutrition.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Good-Enough Parent
    • Authors: Gilsdorf JR.
      Abstract: The venue was a career development session for pediatric infectious diseases physicians, and mine was the voice of experience. Tension sizzled in the conference room air. “How do I do this?” someone asked. “I’m a constant wreck.” The comments continued. “My spouse travels a lot.” “My spouse is also a physician.” “Will it ever get better?” “I don’t see how I can keep this up much longer.” “My kids are so important to me, but so are my patients. And my research.”
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Promise of Palliative Care
    • Authors: Malani PN; Widera E.
      Abstract: In 1998, only 15% of US hospitals with 50 beds or more had a formal palliative care program; by 2013, the proportion had increased to 67%. Among larger hospitals (>300 beds), 90% now have palliative care programs. This expansion coincides with a growing body of high-quality evidence that supports the early involvement of palliative care specialists, even from the time a serious illness is initially diagnosed.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Patient Self-care as a Disruptive Heath Care Delivery Innovation
    • Authors: Bhavan KP; Agrawal D, Cerise F.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses self-administered outpatient intravenous antibiotic treatment as an example of a health care delivery innovation that improves the patient experience of health care, improves outcomes, and reduces costs.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Pharmaceuticals and Public Health
    • Authors: Conti RM; Gee RE, Sharfstein JM.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint argues for a shift in pharmaceutical pricing from an individual- to a population-based perspective and proposes policy options to incentivize pricing that would make treating populations with disease sustainable.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Pharmaceuticals and Public Health
    • Authors: Conti RM; Gee RE, Sharfstein JM.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint argues for a shift in pharmaceutical pricing from an individual- to a population-based perspective and proposes policy options to incentivize pricing that would make treating populations with disease sustainable.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Trade, Investment, and Tobacco
    • Authors: Roache SA; Gostin LO, Bianco Fonsalia E.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint summarizes tobacco industry challenges to public health laws and the risks faced by countries seeking to enact laws targeting smoking and highlights the need for full exclusion of tobacco products from trade agreements.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Highlights for November 22/29, 2016
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Highlights for November 22/29, 2016
    • PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Patient Self-care as a Disruptive Heath Care Delivery Innovation
    • Authors: Bhavan KP; Agrawal D, Cerise F.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses self-administered outpatient intravenous antibiotic treatment as an example of a health care delivery innovation that improves the patient experience of health care, improves outcomes, and reduces costs.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.147.211.117
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016