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Journal Cover JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  [SJR: 6.278]   [H-I: 491]   [1075 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
   Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [11 journals]
  • JAMA
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Plant-Based Therapies and Menopausal Symptoms
    • Authors: Franco OH; Chowdhury R, Troup J, et al.
      Abstract: This meta-analysis of randomized trials examines the effects of plant-based therapies, including phytoestrogens and medicinal herbs, on symptoms of menopause.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • USPSTF Recommendation Statement: Screening for Colorectal Cancer
    • Authors: ; Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, et al.
      Abstract: This Recommendation Statement from the US Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for colorectal cancer starting at age 50 years and continuing until age 75 years (A recommendation) and recommends that for adults aged 76 to 85 years the decision to screen for colorectal cancer should be an individual one that takes into account the patient’s overall health and prior screening history (C recommendation).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Evidence Report: Screening for Colorectal Cancer
    • Authors: Lin JS; Piper MA, Perdue LA, et al.
      Abstract: This systematic review to support the 2016 update of the US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on screening for colorectal cancer summarizes published evidence about the effectiveness of routine screening, accuracy of screening tests and strategies, and potential screening harms.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Diet Trends Among US Adults, 1999-2012
    • Abstract: This nutritional epidemiology study uses National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data to assess trends in overall diet quality and in dietary components in US adults aged 20 years or older between 1999-2000 and 2011-2012.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Protein-Based Risk Score for Cardiovascular Outcomes in Stable Coronary
           Heart Disease
    • Authors: Ganz P; Heidecker B, Hveem K, et al.
      Abstract: This study uses risk scores from 2 studies to assess their accuracy in predicting cardiovascular events among patients with stable coronary heart disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Clinical Practice Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening
    • Authors: Ransohoff DF; Sox HC.
      Abstract: For 32 years, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has served the nation with analyses that are scientific, transparent, and untainted by conflict of interest and political influence. While the task force has been the acknowledged leader in developing preventive services guidelines, its work environment is evolving under intense scrutiny from many powerful interests, including patients, clinicians, insurers, and politicians. The Affordable Care Act of 2010 added to the challenges by mandating private insurance coverage for preventive services that the USPSTF strongly recommends (that is, preventive services that receive a grade of A or B).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Changing Dietary Habits and Improving the Healthiness of US Diets
    • Authors: Denke MA.
      Abstract: Physicians like challenges, and it is time to embrace a difficult one. Lifestyle choices of poor diet, physical inactivity, sleep deprivation, and medication nonadherence have adverse health consequences; however, clinical trials have demonstrated that when improved choices are introduced, patients have an opportunity to experience reversal of adverse consequences. Although this knowledge has advanced clinical care, merely educating patients about the proven effectiveness of lifestyle changes is not enough to help patients change their behaviors. Physicians and other health care professionals must find the best way to translate research findings into actionable messages, help patients set achievable goals, monitor progress, and manage relapses. These are significant, challenging tasks to accomplish in an office visit, particularly for the fundamental lifestyle factor of diet.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A Protein-Based Risk Score for Cardiovascular Disease Prediction
    • Authors: Sabatine MS.
      Abstract: Circulating biomarkers play a major role in risk stratification of patients with cardiovascular disease. The 3 most widely used cardiovascular biomarkers—troponin, C-reactive protein, and B-type natriuretic peptide—have each been shown to predict risk of major adverse cardiovascular outcomes beyond traditional clinical factors, and for that reason, use of these biomarkers is recommended in various practice guidelines.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Osler in Jail
    • Authors: Bell JS.
      Abstract: The front door to the Nashua Street Jail is a two-inch–thick wall of steel and bulletproof glass. I show my identification to a correctional officer behind the security window, and enormous unseen motors spin to life and slowly slide the panel closed to trap me in the anteroom that provides access. A buzzer sounds, and the identical back door begins to rumble open. The buttons in the elevator don’t work; the officer watching me over video surveillance directs it to the appropriate floor.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Toward an Integrated Federal Health System
    • Authors: Khullar D; Chokshi DA.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the fragmented nature of the current US federal health system and proposes approaches for achieving a more integrated and efficient system.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Blood-Based Screening for Colon Cancer
    • Authors: Parikh RB; Prasad V.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the basis for the FDA’s 2016 approval of the blood-based septin 9 gene (SEPT9) assay as a screening test for colon cancer and concerns about its accuracy and use in clinical practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Highlights for June 21, 2016
    • PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Health Care Response to Intimate Partner Violence
    • Authors: Young-Wolff KC; Kotz K, McCaw B.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses Kaiser Permanente’s systems model approach to addressing intimate partner violence using patient messaging, electronic health records, quality improvement, and implementation science.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Modeling Study: Colorectal Cancer Screening Strategies
    • Authors: Knudsen AB; Zauber AG, Rutter CM, et al.
      Abstract: This modeling study uses 3 microsimulation models of a hypothetical cohort to model the benefits, burden, and harms of colorectal cancer screening strategies to inform the 2016 update of US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Reducing Childhood Tobacco Smoke Exposure
    • Authors: Ebbert JO; Jacobson RM.
      Abstract: This commentary discusses a meta-analysis published in JAMA Pediatrics that examined the effectiveness of interventions delivered by professionals who provide routine child health care in reducing children’s exposure to tobacco smoke.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Types of Administration of Parenteral Nutrition in Neonates
    • Authors: Ainsworth SB; McGuire W.
      Abstract: This Clinical Evidence Synopsis summarizes a Cochrane review of clinical trials comparing the efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central catheters vs peripheral cannulas for delivering parenteral nutrition in neonates.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Insurance Changes for Nonelderly Adults After Medicaid Expansion
    • Authors: Davis MM; Gebremariam A, Ayanian JZ.
      Abstract: This study uses Michigan Inpatient Database data to describe proportions of insured and uninsured, nonelderly patients hospitalized in Michigan before and after Medicaid expansion in 2014.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Diet and Exercise for Obese Patients With Heart Failure
    • Authors: Farmakis D; Parissis J, Filippatos G.
      Abstract: To the Editor The study by Dr Kitzman and colleagues documented a beneficial effect of diet and physical training on exercise capacity in obese older patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). The study is among the few reporting encouraging results in this population. We have also observed an improvement in exercise capacity and quality of life by applying functional electrical stimulation of peripheral muscles as an alternative form of exercise in patients with HFPEF.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Diet and Exercise for Obese Patients With Heart Failure
    • Authors: Kitzman DW; Haykowsky MJ, Kraus W.
      Abstract: In Reply The elegant study by Dr Farmakis and colleagues of electrical stimulation provided the most definitive evidence that skeletal muscle abnormalities are important contributors to severe exercise intolerance, which is the primary manifestation of chronic HFPEF, and suggested that skeletal muscle abnormalities are promising therapeutic targets. This was a key premise of our trial.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Stem Cell Transplantation for Refractory Crohn Disease
    • Authors: Burt RK; Ruiz MA, Kaiser RL, Jr.
      Abstract: To the Editor The Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Crohn Disease (ASTIC) trial by Dr Hawkey and colleagues was interpreted as a failure of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) compared with standard care. However, the ASTIC trial used a complex multifaceted primary end point that included all of the following: Crohn disease activity index less than 150; no active treatment; and endoscopic and radiologic remission. This end point has not been used in any prior study. The data from such a small cohort of patients would have been interpreted as encouraging if the authors had used some of their secondary outcomes as the primary end point, for example, Crohn disease activity index change from baseline (P = .04) or simple endoscopic score of Crohn disease change from baseline (P = .03).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Stem Cell Transplantation for Refractory Crohn Disease—Reply
    • Authors: Hawkey CJ; Lindsay J, Gribben J.
      Abstract: In Reply The ASTIC trial was designed to investigate the possibility, suggested by a number of case reports, that long-term, drug-free cure of Crohn disease could be achieved through autologous HSCT. The lack of statistical significance of the primary end point showed that this experience is rare. However, we agree with Dr Burt and colleagues that the extent of improvement in secondary end points suggests possible therapeutic efficacy, albeit falling short of cure.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Lung Volume Reduction Coils for Severe Emphysema
    • Authors: Jabuonski TA; Lazarus DR.
      Abstract: To the Editor The REVOLENS trial found that bronchoscopic treatment with nitinol coils vs usual care improved exercise capacity in patients with severe emphysema and adds to the growing literature on endobronchial treatment of emphysema.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Lung Volume Reduction Coils for Severe Emphysema
    • Abstract: In Reply We agree with Drs Jabuonski and Lazarus that both operator expertise and a multidisciplinary approach are important for emphysema treatment.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Drug-Drug Interactions in Treatment Using Azole Antifungal Agents
    • Abstract: To the Editor Drs. Hotta and Ota reported the case of a boy with nephrotic syndrome who presented with alopecia attributable to tinea capitis, for which he was treated with oral itraconazole during 8 weeks. However, the patient also received cyclosporine for his nephrotic syndrome. The article did not comment on an important drug interaction.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Drug-Drug Interactions in Treatment Using Azole Antifungal
           Agents—Reply
    • Authors: Hotta M; Ota M.
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Schreuder and colleagues about the importance of the drug interaction between cyclosporine and itraconazole and the necessity of strict therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Roles of Academic and Public Health Systems in Population Health
    • Authors: Goodman A; Karpati A.
      Abstract: To the Editor In a recent Viewpoint, Dr Washington and colleagues proposed a convening and leadership role for academic health systems in community efforts to improve population health. Although well intentioned, we believe this vision is misguided.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Roles of Academic and Public Health Systems in Population Health
    • Authors: Boulware L; Coye MJ, Washington A.
      Abstract: In Reply We fully acknowledge the critically important role of government-led public health systems as vital to ensuring and advancing population health, as described by Drs Goodman and Karpati. At the same time, we believe academic health systems can meaningfully augment (not replace) the effectiveness of government-led public health systems to improve population health. Academic health systems are institutions with substantial expertise and resources, and they are influential agents in commerce, employment, and health care delivery. During this time of transition, academic health systems are well positioned to contribute more significantly than they have in the past to population-wide health improvement efforts. Our Viewpoint was intended to encourage academic health systems to collaborate with other sectors and stakeholders to achieve just this aim—improve overall health and well-being in the communities they serve.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Error in Reported Data for Dense Breast Notifications
    • Abstract: In the Research Letter entitled “Content, Readability, and Understandability of Dense Breast Notifications by State” published in the April 26, 2016, issue of JAMA, there was an error in the reported data in the Table, which also affected the Figure and the text. In the Table, under the Mandate Language column, check marks needed to be added for Nevada and Oregon (Oregon only mandates language for women with extremely dense breasts); under the Increased Risk of Cancer column, check marks were added for New Jersey and Louisiana; under Supplemental Screening column, footnote “m” was removed from Oregon, the check mark and footnote “k” was removed from New Jersey, and check marks were added for California, Tennessee, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Minnesota. In the Results section of the text, second sentence, first paragraph, "19, 83%" was changed to "21, 91%"; in the fourth sentence, "15 (65%)" was changed to "20 (87%)"; and in the fifth sentence, "15" was changed to "20." This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Incorrect Wording in Results Section and Data in Tables 3 and 4
    • Abstract: In the Original Investigation entitled “Clinical Risk Score for Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms Among Children With Acute Concussion in the ED” published in the March 8, 2016, issue of JAMA, there was incorrect wording in the Results section of the text and data transcription errors in Tables 3 and 4 that occurred when these Tables were split. In the Results section of the text, “Validation Cohort” subsection, the second sentence should be “For patients not at low risk (≤3 points), the sensitivity was 93.5% (95% CI, 90.0%-95.8%), specificity was 18.1% (95% CI, 15.2%-21.4%), and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.36 (95% CI, 0.23-0.58); the negative predictive value was 84.9% (95% CI, 77.6%-90.1%) and the positive predictive value was 35.9% (95% CI, 32.6%-39.5%).” In Table 3, in the third to last row entitled “Appears dazed and confused, Yes,” the data in column 4 should be “1.4 (1.1-1.7)”; in the next row entitled “Appears confused about events, Yes,” the data in column 4 should be “1.3 (1.0-1.6)”; and in the last row entitled “Answering questions slowly, Yes,” the data in column 4 should be “1.7 (1.4-2.1).” In Table 4, in the first row entitled “Repeats questions, Yes,” the data in column 4 should be “1.4 (1.1-1.9).” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Patient Access to Physician Notes
    • Authors: Jacob JA.
      Abstract: This Medical News feature explores the trend of physicians sharing their medical notes with patients via online portals.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Female Genital Mutilation Continues in Guinea
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Abstract: Although national and international law prohibits the practice, female genital mutilation and excision (FGM/E) continues to be carried out in every region of Guinea. With the second highest prevalence of FGM/E worldwide after Somalia, 97% of women and girls aged 15 to 49 years in Guinea have undergone excision, according to a new report from the United Nations (http://bit.ly/1pCCTfk).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Focus on HIV in West and Central Africa
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Abstract: More than a quarter of all global deaths attributable to HIV occur in the 25 countries within West and Central Africa (WCA), an area in which antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage rates lag behind those of high-burden countries. A new report from Médecins Sans Frontières highlights the treatment gaps in the WCA countries and describes pilot projects aimed at overcoming some of the obstacles to ART access (http://bit.ly/1qQFYcS).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Reducing Malaria Parasite Load in Donated Blood
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Abstract: In areas where the Plasmodium parasite is endemic, it can be transmitted through blood donated from asymptomatic people. Treating donated whole blood with a pathogen reduction technology that uses a combination of UV radiation and riboflavin (vitamin B2) to inactivate malaria parasites in blood reduces the incidence of transfusion-transmitted malaria, according to a report from investigators from the United Kingdom and Ghana (Allain J-P et al. Lancet. 2016;387:1753-1761).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Switch to Bivalent Oral Polio Vaccine
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Abstract: While 3 wild poliovirus strains—types 1, 2, and 3—have caused worldwide disease, type 2 has not been detected since 1999, and with its elimination confirmed in September 2015, the need to vaccinate against it has abated. In April more than 150 countries and territories switched from using the trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), which protects against the 3 strains of wild poliovirus, to the bivalent OPV, which lacks the type 2 strain (http://bit.ly/1SIFoua). These oral vaccines are made with live attenuated polioviruses.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Aripiprazole and Impulse-Control Problems
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Abstract: An FDA safety announcement has warned that the antipsychotic drug aripiprazole has been linked with compulsive or uncontrollable urges to gamble, binge eat, shop, or have sex (http://1.usa.gov/1ru0vEL).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • New Fluoroquinolone Warning
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Abstract: Patients with sinusitis, bronchitis, and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) should receive fluoroquinolone antibacterial drugs only if other treatment options aren’t available, the FDA has advised.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Olanzapine May Cause Serious Skin Reaction
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Abstract: Nearly 2 dozen cases of a rare but serious skin reaction linked over the past 20 years with the antipsychotic medication olanzapine have prompted a warning from the FDA.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A Snapshot of Cancer Spending and Outcomes
    • Authors: Gonzalez S; Cox C, Jankiewicz A, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Taïmyr
    • Authors: Butt CA.
      Abstract: Upon approaching a work of art, there is an expectation that an experience will be had. Most likely, we anticipate an emotion: sadness, awe, delight, comedy, repulsion, even disappointment if our expectation is not met. Less expected is an uncontrolled physiologic response, an effect that makes the viewer disoriented. This was a key feature of artists working under the Op-Art moniker in the 1960s. They used a simple vocabulary of basic forms and colors, but created visually complicated works that engendered a novel and involuntary frequency between art and viewer. Consequently, their works defined the experience of art as something more empirical than emotional.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Neighborhood Playground
    • Authors: Morrison W.
      Abstract: There are no clusters of vans from news stations. No helicopters hovering overhead.This neighborhood isn’t the sort of placewhere these things are noticed.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Strenuous Life and Its Effects in Disease
    • Abstract: At the outset I desire to state that I am not opposed to the strenuous life when it is safeguarded by proper diversion and sufficient rest; but there is a wrong way to live the strenuous life, and it is of this I desire to speak. Work, per se, never kills, but it is the way one works.… Mental and physical exercise in legitimate channels is good. It promotes health, happiness and a long life, but when by prolonged endeavor under high pressure an individual overdraws his supply of energy he must replenish it or suffer the consequence. The temperate life, the systematic methods of diversion and relaxation as practiced by Mr. Gladstone, the great English statesman, and Grover Cleveland, twice president of the United States, is well known and will serve to illustrate the proper way to live the strenuous life and to succeed without sacrificing health and strength. Mr. Gladstone not only had regular times for diversion and recreation, but when the affairs of state became too onerous and tiresome he would turn loose all duties and go to his country home to rest. There he would walk, run, chop wood and do other exercises to divert the mind and to invigorate the body.… We are all familiar with Mr. Cleveland’s fondness for fishing and hunting, and remember while he was president how often he would lay aside official duties and go to the bays of Virginia or North Carolina to indulge in his favorite sport.… The quality of a man’s thought, energy and ideals depends largely on the condition of his health. The now famous saying credited to Dr. Osler that a man is practically useless after 60 years of age is true of most men, but it should not be, and would not be, if we would remember that “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” Every busy man should have a hobby to which he can devote his leisure; he should also have seasons for sport in the country, like hunting and fishing. A married man should spend more time with his family and in reading wholesome literature. Sunday, the best day of all for rest and recreation, is perhaps the most neglected.…
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Screening for Colorectal Cancer
    • Authors: Jin J.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Screening Tests for Colorectal Cancer
    • Authors: Jin J.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
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