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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2247  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Audio Highlights
    • Abstract: Listen to the JAMA Editor’s Audio Summary for an overview and discussion of the important articles appearing in this week’s issue of JAMA.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0021
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 1873 - 1874
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13437
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Infectious Disease Outbreaks, Pandemics, and Hollywood—Hope and Fear
           Across a Century of Cinema
    • Authors: Dehority W.
      Pages: 1878 - 1880
      Abstract: This Arts and Medicine feature tallies the appearance of infectious disease outbreaks in cinema since 1914, and identifies common themes, such as stigmatization and physician heroism, that characterize the films.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7187
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • The Promise and Peril of Antibody Testing for COVID-19
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 1881 - 1883
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses how antibody tests should—and should not—be used during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6170
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Time to Consider a New Look at Physician-Owned Hospitals to Increase
           Competition in Health Care'
    • Authors: Wilensky G; Miller B.
      Pages: 1884 - 1885
      Abstract: In most sectors of the economy, competition is regarded as the way to improve quality and efficiency, lower costs, and increase innovations. Whether competition effectively achieves these improvements in health care, particularly with respect to hospital services, which remains the largest sector of spending for health care, is open to debate. Also debated, at least among some physicians, is whether functionally banning new physician-owned hospitals by prohibiting their participation in Medicare under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was too blunt an instrument to correct a problem that could have been fixed with a more nuanced regulatory solution, needlessly limiting a potential source of competition for hospital services.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6106
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Studies Explore HIV Treatment and Prevention in Pregnant Women
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 1886 - 1886
      Abstract: Taking dolutegravir along with a single pill containing emtricitabine (FTC) and tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF) is the safest, most effective option for pregnant women with HIV and their infants, according to a large international study presented recently at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI).
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7627
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Study Suggests a Second Patient Has Been Cured of HIV
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 1886 - 1886
      Abstract: For only the second time, a patient with HIV who received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant from a donor with an HIV resistance gene appears to have been cured of the disease, according to a recent study.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7626
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • WHO: Strengthen Nurse Workforce
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 1886 - 1886
      Abstract: An urgent global effort is needed to bolster the nurse workforce, according to a report from the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Council of Nurses, and Nursing Now, an international campaign to raise nurses’ status.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6430
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Generic Albuterol Inhaler Approved
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1887 - 1887
      Abstract: The FDA has approved the first generic version of Proventil HFA Metered Dose Inhaler, 90 μg per inhalation, to treat or prevent bronchospasm in patients aged 4 years or older who have reversible obstructive airway disease. The generic albuterol sulfate inhaler also is indicated for exercise-induced bronchospasm prevention in the same age group.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7282
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • A New Treatment for Children With Neurofibromatosis Type 1
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1887 - 1887
      Abstract: Selumetinib is the first drug approved for pediatric patients aged 2 years or older with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a rare disfiguring disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7157
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Therapy Approved for Hard-to-Treat Upper Tract Urothelial Cancer
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1887 - 1887
      Abstract: The first treatment for low-grade upper tract urothelial cancer (UTUC) has received FDA approval.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7153
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • From Mitigation to Containment of the COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Walensky RP; del Rio C.
      Pages: 1889 - 1890
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses public health strategies necessary for the US to relax its mitigation strategies—most notably expanded testing, isolation, and contact-tracing in ways that avoid stigmatization of vulnerable populations—and proposes investing returns from a reopened economy to finance testing and public health infrastructure.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6572
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19, African Americans, and Health Disparities
    • Authors: Yancy CW.
      Pages: 1891 - 1892
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the long history of racial inequities that cause black populations in US cities to bear a disproportionate burden of COVID-19 illness and mortality and calls for a renewed commitment to eliminating disparities that have been made so starkly visible by the pandemic.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6548
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Mathematical Models Predicting the COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Jewell NP; Lewnard JA, Jewell BL.
      Pages: 1893 - 1894
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the challenges of accurately modeling the COVID-19 pandemic and reviews principles that will make some models more useful than others, such as use of granular local data when available, regular updating and revision, and specification of uncertainty around estimates.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6585
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Optimizing the Trade-off Between Learning and Doing in the COVID-19
           Pandemic
    • Authors: Angus DC.
      Pages: 1895 - 1896
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the tensions between evaluating treatments (learning) and just treating patients (doing) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and proposes actions the clinical research and practice communities can take to support each other’s imperatives so that both can “learn from doing” in a more integrated patient care approach.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4984
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Treating COVID-19—Off-Label and Compassionate Use and Clinical
           Trials During Pandemics
    • Authors: Kalil AC.
      Pages: 1897 - 1898
      Abstract: This Viewpoint uses the absence of known effective treatment for Ebola virus disease to emphasize the costs of off-label and compassionate drug use during an infectious disease outbreak and the importance of establishing the efficacy and safety of promising drug leads in randomized trials to inform their clinical use.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4742
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Ensuring Scientific Integrity and Public Confidence in the Search for
           Effective COVID-19 Treatment
    • Authors: Goodman JL; Borio L.
      Pages: 1899 - 1900
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the risks to patients and public health posed by the FDA’s politically pressured Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 treatment, and proposes principles to follow to ensure new therapies are studied properly and quickly to maximize benefits and minimize risks to patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6434
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Risk of Legal Liability for Withdrawing or Withholding Ventilators From
           COVID-19 Patients
    • Authors: Cohen I; Crespo AM, White DB.
      Pages: 1901 - 1902
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the legal risks to health care workers and hospital systems from withdrawing or withholding ventilation from COVID-19 patients and cites a Maryland statute that offers legal immunity to clinicians making good faith decisions under emergency conditions as an example for other states to follow.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5442
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • FDA Site Inspection Reports on RCT Irregularities and Misconduct—The
           Case For Transparency
    • Authors: Dal-Ré R; Kesselheim AS, Bourgeois FT.
      Pages: 1903 - 1904
      Abstract: This Viewpoint reviews notable examples of clinical trial misconduct identified by routine US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clinical trial site inspections and argues that making inspection reports publicly available on the agency’s and trial registry websites is important to maintaining the integrity of clinical research.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1631
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Failing Another National Stress Test on Health Disparities
    • Authors: Owen WF; Jr, Carmona R, Pomeroy C.
      Pages: 1905 - 1906
      Abstract: This narrative medicine essay emphasizes the undue disease burden carried by minority populations in the COVID-19 pandemic and proposes collection and reporting of data by race/ethnicity and multilingual targeted educational efforts delivered by celebrities or faith leaders as first steps to reduce the imbalance.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6547
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19—Looking Beyond Tomorrow for Health Care and Society
    • Authors: Fontanarosa PB; Bauchner H.
      Pages: 1907 - 1908
      Abstract: Just 6 months ago, the novel coronavirus now known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and COVID-19, the severe disease it causes, were unheard of. Today, this highly contagious and dangerous virus and the widespread virulent disease it causes have resulted in major disruptions of business, education, and transportation, and have permeated and interrupted virtually every aspect of daily life. Millions of people have been affected by COVID-19, hundreds of thousands have experienced critical illness, and tens of thousands have died. Physicians, other health care professionals, and health care systems around the world have been challenged like never before in recent history.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6582
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Public Health Interventions for COVID-19
    • Authors: Hartley DM; Perencevich EN.
      Pages: 1908 - 1909
      Abstract: For decades, leading scientists and influential professional societies have warned of the dangers of emerging infections and the specter of a global pandemic. The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its subsequent spread has lived up to and surpassed many of the warnings and has caused an evolving global public health and economic crisis. Significantly, no pharmaceutical agents are known to be safe and effective at preventing or treating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the resulting illness. This leaves the medical and public health community with only nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs) to rely on for reducing the burden of COVID-19. These measures aim to reduce disease transmission both locally and globally and include bans on public gatherings, compulsory stay-at-home policies, mandating closures of schools and nonessential businesses, face mask ordinances, quarantine and cordon sanitaire (ie, a defined quarantine area from which those inside are not allowed to leave), among others. The effectiveness of NPIs has been studied theoretically, especially within the context of pandemic influenza, and also through analysis of historical observational data. A common finding of these studies is that implementing NPIs, especially when done rapidly after initial detection of a new contagious pathogen, can reduce transmission.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5910
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Antenatal Corticosteroids
    • Authors: DeMauro SB.
      Pages: 1910 - 1912
      Abstract: Antenatal corticosteroids, when administered to a pregnant woman before delivery of a very premature infant, accelerate fetal lung maturation and prevent neonatal mortality, respiratory distress syndrome, and brain injury. Even though the first trial to demonstrate benefits of antenatal corticosteroid exposure was published in 1972, widespread use of this therapy did not occur until 20 years later. The first systematic review of antenatal corticosteroid therapy was so influential in the obstetric and neonatal care communities that a forest plot from this study is depicted in the logo for the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Antenatal corticosteroid therapy has been one of the most important advances in perinatal care.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3935
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Conserving Supply of Personal Protective Equipment—A Call for Ideas
    • Authors: Bauchner H; Fontanarosa PB, Livingston EH.
      Pages: 1911 - 1911
      Abstract: The editors of JAMA recognize the challenges, concerns, and frustration about the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) that is affecting the care of patients and safety of health care workers in the US and around the world. We seek creative immediate solutions for how to maximize the use of PPE, to conserve the supply of PPE, and to identify new sources of PPE. We are interested in suggestions, recommendations, and potential actions from individuals who have relevant experience, especially from physicians, other health care professionals, and administrators in hospitals and other clinical settings. JAMA is inviting immediate suggestions, which can be added as online comments to this article.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4770
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Sourcing Personal Protective Equipment During the COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Livingston E; Desai A, Berkwits M.
      Pages: 1912 - 1914
      Abstract: As the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerates, global health care systems have become overwhelmed with potentially infectious patients seeking testing and care. Preventing spread of infection to and from health care workers (HCWs) and patients relies on effective use of personal protective equipment (PPE)—gloves, face masks, air-purifying respirators, goggles, face shields, respirators, and gowns. A critical shortage of all of these is projected to develop or has already developed in areas of high demand. PPE, formerly ubiquitous and disposable in the hospital environment, is now a scarce and precious commodity in many locations when it is needed most to care for highly infectious patients. An increase in PPE supply in response to this new demand will require a large increase in PPE manufacturing, a process that will take time many health care systems do not have, given the rapid increase in ill COVID-19 patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5317
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Public Health Interventions and Epidemiology of the COVID-19 Outbreak in
           Wuhan, China
    • Authors: Pan A; Liu L, Wang C, et al.
      Pages: 1915 - 1923
      Abstract: This population epidemiology study examines associations between phases of nonpharmaceutical public health interventions (social distancing, centralized quarantine, home confinement, and others) and rates of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection in Wuhan, China, between December 2019 and early March 2020.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6130
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Association Between Antenatal Maternal Corticosteroid Treatment and
           Mental/Behavioral Disorders in Children
    • Authors: Räikkönen K; Gissler M, Kajantie E.
      Pages: 1924 - 1933
      Abstract: This population cohort study uses national Finnish birth registry data to assess associations between antenatal corticosteroid treatment to accelerate fetal maturation and mental and behavioral disorders in term and preterm children.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3937
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Association of Blood Pressure Lowering With Incident Dementia or Cognitive
           Impairment
    • Authors: Hughes D; Judge C, Murphy R, et al.
      Pages: 1934 - 1944
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis examines whether blood pressure lowering is associated with a reduced risk of dementia or cognitive impairment.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4249
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Psoriasis: A Review
    • Authors: Armstrong AW; Read C.
      Pages: 1945 - 1960
      Abstract: This narrative review summarizes current evidence regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatments of plaque psoriasis.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4006
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Management of Kidney Stones in 2020
    • Authors: Rule AD; Lieske JC, Pais VM, Jr.
      Pages: 1961 - 1962
      Abstract: This JAMA Insights Clinical Update reviews the diagnosis and management of kidney stones and proposes a treatment algorithm based on imaging findings, symptom control, and risk of recurrence.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0662
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Drospirenone (Slynd) — A New Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptive
    • Pages: 1963 - 1964
      Abstract: This Medical Letter review summarizes the mechanism of action and drug interactions of drospirenone, a new progestin-only oral contraceptive, and compares it with norethindrone, its competitor.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1603
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • SARS-CoV-2 Among Patients Presenting With Influenzalike Illnesses to a Los
           Angeles Medical Center
    • Authors: Spellberg B; Haddix M, Lee R, et al.
      Pages: 1966 - 1967
      Abstract: This study characterizes the prevalence of reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among patients presenting with influenzalike illness who underwent nasopharyngeal swab testing for influenza and respiratory syncytial virus over 4 days in March 2020.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4958
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Sample Pooling as a Strategy to Detect Community Transmission of
           SARS-CoV-2
    • Authors: Hogan CA; Sahoo MK, Pinsky BA.
      Pages: 1967 - 1969
      Abstract: This study describes findings of novel coronavirus testing on pooled nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage samples taken from patients who had negative results by routine respiratory virus testing to see if pooling samples could increase testing throughput and efficiency and facilitate early detection of community COVID-19 transmission.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5445
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Seasonal Influenza Activity During the SARS-CoV-2 Outbreak in Japan
    • Authors: Sakamoto H; Ishikane M, Ueda P.
      Pages: 1969 - 1971
      Abstract: This study uses data from the National Institutes of Infectious Diseases Japan to compare weekly influenza activity in the 2019/2020 vs the 2014-2019 seasons given mitigation strategies taken in 2020 to limit the spread of COVID-19.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.6173
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Coverage for Biosimilars vs Reference Products Among US Commercial Health
           Plans
    • Authors: Chambers JD; Lai RC, Margaretos NM, et al.
      Pages: 1972 - 1973
      Abstract: This study uses US commercial health plan insurance data to characterize coverage for biosimilar drugs compared with reference products.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.2229
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Cognitive Screening of Older Practitioners
    • Authors: Wijeratne C.
      Pages: 1973 - 1974
      Abstract: To the Editor A JAMA Performance Improvement article reported the use of a cognitive screening battery as the primary basis of recredentialing older practitioners by Yale New Haven Hospital. Some modifications and caveats would enhance this program and those at other centers for testing the cognition of physicians.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4257
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Cognitive Screening of Older Practitioners
    • Authors: Kels CG.
      Pages: 1974 - 1975
      Abstract: To the Editor Drs Cooney and Balcezak described an innovative and well-intentioned effort at Yale New Haven Hospital to assess the cognitive ability and professional competency of aging clinicians. However, the understandably benevolent procedure of allowing older physicians whose safety to treat patients has been called into question to subsequently retire or limit their practice voluntarily raises real questions of compliance with federal law. It is important that physicians who sit on hospital peer review committees be apprised of this issue because failure on the part of the hospital to make mandatory reports may compromise the liability protections afforded to participants in the professional review process.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4260
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Cognitive Screening of Older Practitioners—Reply
    • Authors: Cooney LM; Jr, Balcezak T.
      Pages: 1975 - 1975
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Wijeratne that more information on the results of cognitive testing of older physicians would be helpful, including the optimal age at which to start testing. The screening test created domain-specific results for executive function and other domains, and we did evaluate individuals who were impaired in 1 or more specific domains despite an overall passing score. We extended our screening process in these domains for these clinicians. We proceeded with full neuropsychological testing for individuals with worrisome results in specific domains.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.4266
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Balancing Past vs Future Values in Decision-making
    • Authors: Shapiro SP.
      Pages: 1975 - 1976
      Abstract: To the Editor For 30 years, philosophers and legal scholars have pondered the possible disconnect when a person dictates treatment preferences in advance directives for their future self. Psychologists and disability scholars followed, demonstrating that individuals are poor predictors of how they will feel in the future, potentially locking themselves into unwelcome commitments.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3830
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Balancing Past vs Future Values in Decision-Making—Reply
    • Authors: Creutzfeldt CJ; Holloway RG.
      Pages: 1976 - 1976
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Shapiro comments on our Viewpoint on improving conversations regarding treatment decisions in the intensive care unit. To accomplish truly informed, patient-centered treatment decisions, be it with would-be patients in advance of a crisis (advance care planning) or with the family members of incapacitated patients in the intensive care unit, sensitive, skillful, and honest communication is key.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3837
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • The Sound of Grief
    • Authors: Mitchell EL.
      Pages: 1977 - 1977
      Abstract: I watch in silence as another boy lies still upon this shrouded cot. Garnet jelly pools beside his chest and bubbles seep from holes torn in the pale soft skin. A sigh escapes the room as if the air has been released and all the noise replaced by softer sounds, the closing up of drawers the final keyboard clicks the wide broom brushes on the trash strewn floor the contents to be bagged and tied for homicide or simply thrown away.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.1307
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • The Bubonic Plague in San Francisco
    • Pages: 1978 - 1978
      Abstract: We have always regarded the plague as something very distant and impossible, and have read of its ravages in India and China with much the same feeling of composure and security that we read about an uprising of the natives in Madagascar. Or perhaps we have considered it as a matter of historic interest on account of the fearful epidemics which in pre-sanitary days used to sweep over Europe, devastating countries and hardly leaving enough people behind to keep up the archives and records of the state. Even now that it is among us, and in America for the first time, there seems to be a tendency to underrate its importance and dismiss it without a thought, as a scare designed for base political motives.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13444
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Testing Individuals for COVID-19
    • Authors: Hadaya J; Schumm M, Livingston EH.
      Pages: 1981 - 1981
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the test for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), current guidelines for determining who should be tested, reasons for slow adoption of testing in the US, and potential drawbacks of alternate tests.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5388
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
  • Food Safety and COVID-19
    • Authors: Desai AN; Aronoff DM.
      Pages: 1982 - 1982
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes how the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is transmitted and provides measures people can take while grocery shopping, unpacking groceries, and preparing food to minimize the risk of being infected.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 May 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5877
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 19 (2020)
       
 
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