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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2088  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for October 8, 2019
    • Pages: 1329 - 1331
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15542
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 1333 - 1334
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15543
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Uncomplicated Arthroplasty—an Artist’s Perspective
    • Authors: McGuire F.
      Pages: 1336 - 1338
      Abstract: In this Arts and Medicine feature, a visual artist uses a graphic drawing “comics” format to tell the story of her knee replacement in a New York hospital.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14611
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Finding the Right Words to Stop Cancer Screening in Older Adults
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1339 - 1340
      Abstract: In this Medical News article, experts discuss sensitive ways to tell older adults that they no longer need cancer screening when their life expectancy is less than 10 years.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14732
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • In Hot, Humid Weather, Benefit Health and Environment
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1340 - 1341
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses a recent study about the effect of fans on relieving the physiological stress of high temperatures.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14684
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Changing Minds in Health Policy
    • Authors: Chokshi DA.
      Pages: 1341 - 1342
      Abstract: Health policy has not been spared in our current climate of political polarization. In a recent poll, 48% of Americans had a favorable view of the Affordable Care Act (ACA)—the most significant health policy reform in a generation—while 41% had an unfavorable view. What does it take to change minds about health policy'
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15311
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Gold Nanoshells Ablate Prostate Tumors
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 1343 - 1343
      Abstract: Laser-excited gold nanoparticles safely destroyed prostate tumors in a recent pilot study involving 16 patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The highly targeted approach is being developed as an alternative to prostatectomy and radiation therapy, treatments associated with adverse urinary and sexual effects.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15868
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Intubation Guidance Tool Earns Top Prize
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 1343 - 1343
      Abstract: A new intubation assist device received the top prize in the Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) challenge, a contest supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and the nonprofit VentureWell. Five biomedical engineering students from Columbia University in New York City won the $20 000 award for their senior-year capstone project, the InTouch intubation guidance system.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15867
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Cuffless Blood Pressure Monitoring
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 1343 - 1343
      Abstract: A smartphone video-based measurement tool accurately predicted blood pressure (BP) readings in a proof-of-concept study recently published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging. The technology, dubbed transdermal optical imaging, records facial blood flow using a standard smartphone video camera.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15537
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Mumps in Migrant Detention Centers
    • Authors: Kuehn B.
      Pages: 1344 - 1344
      Abstract: Nearly 900 confirmed and probable cases of mumps have been identified in US migrant detention centers in the past year, according to a recent CDC investigation.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15663
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella
    • Authors: Kuehn B.
      Pages: 1344 - 1344
      Abstract: Researchers have identified a new strain of foodborne multidrug-resistant Salmonella with resistance to ciprofloxacin and reduced susceptibility to azithromycin, warned a recent CDC report.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15309
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Communication Strategies for Sharing Prognostic Information With
           Patients—Beyond Survival Statistics
    • Authors: Paladino J; Lakin JR, Sanders JJ.
      Pages: 1345 - 1346
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the challenges of communicating uncertain prognosis to patients and offers a framework and language that go past mortality statistics—addressing range of time left, loss of independence, and the unpredictability of outcomes—that embraces uncertainty and might help empower patients to plan for their quality-of-life goals.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.11533
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • The Law and Ethics of Fetal Burial Requirements for Reproductive Health
           Care
    • Authors: Fox D; Cohen I, Adashi EY.
      Pages: 1347 - 1348
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the 2019 Box v Planned Parenthood US Supreme Court ruling that upheld an Indiana provision mandating that abortion facilities bury or cremate fetal remains, characterizing the law as a “targeted restriction” law intended to place undue burden on abortion providers and patients and incrementally reduce access to abortion and related reproductive health services.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12713
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Will Increasing Primary Care Spending Alone Save Money'
    • Authors: Song Z; Gondi S.
      Pages: 1349 - 1350
      Abstract: This Viewpoint uses recent US state legislation mandating investments in primary care to discuss the lack of evidence supporting assumptions that primary care spending will save downstream health care costs, the reasons why that might be, and implications for policy, payment, and practice reforms.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12016
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Making Machine Learning Models Clinically Useful
    • Authors: Shah NH; Milstein A, Bagley, PhD SC.
      Pages: 1351 - 1352
      Abstract: This Viewpoint reviews conventional ways of assessing performance of machine learning models to diagnose or predict outcomes, but emphasizes that if machine learning is to improve patient care the models must be evaluated for their utility in improving clinical decisions taking into account the range of decisions clinicians can take, the cost and efficacy of those options, and the likelihood that patients will follow the recommended decisions.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.10306
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Into the Well
    • Authors: Wendt C.
      Pages: 1353 - 1354
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, a psychiatrist describes the defenses he uses against the emotional toll of long days of patient care and recalls a traumatic childhood memory that helps him understand his patients’ fears and anxieties and those of their families.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15350
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Cerebellar Intracerebral Hemorrhage
    • Authors: Hemphill J; III, Amin-Hanjani S.
      Pages: 1355 - 1356
      Abstract: Spontaneous bleeding into the brain remains a frustrating and challenging disease. Surgical hematoma evacuation seems intuitive, but clinical trials of evacuation of supratentorial hemorrhages, to date, have been unable to identify a procedure or a specific subset of patients for whom surgery is clearly indicated. However, hemorrhage into the cerebellum has long been viewed as distinctively responsive to intervention, considered by many as a surgical lesion, based on small case series and broad anecdotal experience. However, this perspective has never been assessed in a randomized study as large surgical trials have not included patients with cerebellar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Nontraumatic cerebellar hemorrhage affects approximately 10 000 patients in the United states each year and accounts for approximately 10% of all ICHs and 1.5% of all strokes. Guidelines for management of cerebellar ICH vary from recommending hematoma evacuation for patients with deteriorating conditions, while acknowledging this is based on expert consensus, to avoiding making recommendations due to insufficient evidence.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14673
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Unexpected Harm From an Intensive COPD Intervention
    • Authors: Rinne ST; Lindenauer PK, Au DH.
      Pages: 1357 - 1359
      Abstract: Science and sound clinical care both rely on honest reporting and, when necessary, self-correction. In this issue of JAMA, the Notice of Retraction and republication of the article by Aboumatar et al titled, “Effect of a Hospital-Initiated Program Combining Transitional Care and Long-term Self-management Support on Outcomes of Patients Hospitalized With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease,” represent a commitment by the authors to ensure an accurate scientific record. Following discovery of an error in the analysis of data from the initial report, the reanalysis by the authors now shows that the study’s original conclusion changed remarkably from showing a strong benefit of the intervention to showing harm. The results of this study, as in all high-quality research, are important regardless of outcome. The authors have acknowledged and addressed the error in an open and transparent way. The integrity of science is built on the principle that scientists are forthright in their research, and these authors adopted an earnest approach to amend their error.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12976
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Intra-Articular Sprifermin vs Placebo for Femorotibial Joint Cartilage
           Thickness in Osteoarthritis
    • Authors: Hochberg MC; Guermazi A, Guehring H, et al.
      Pages: 1360 - 1370
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of 2 doses of sprifermin, a recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18, vs placebo on changes in total femorotibial joint cartilage thickness in the knees of patients with osteoarthritis.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14735
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Effect of Transitional Care and Long-term Self-management Support on
           Outcomes After Hospitalization
    • Authors: Aboumatar H; Naqibuddin M, Chung S, et al.
      Pages: 1371 - 1380
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of a hospital-initiated, nurse-delivered program combining transition of care and long-term self-management support vs transition support alone on 6-month hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits among patients hospitalized with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.11982
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Ensuring An Accurate Scientific Record—Retraction and Republication
    • Authors: Bauchner H; Golub RM.
      Pages: 1380 - 1380
      Abstract: The accuracy of the scientific record is one of the most important priorities for authors and editors. To reflect this priority, JAMA issues corrections, retractions, retractions with replacement, and, in this issue, a retraction with republication of an article. On November 12, 2018, JAMA published the article titled “Effect of a Program Combining Transitional Care and Long-term Self-management Support on Outcomes of Hospitalized Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” with an accompanying Editorial.JAMA was notified by the authors of a major coding error that reversed the results, finding that the intervention was associated with harm rather than benefit. The authors have provided a detailed explanation of the error.JAMA consulted peer reviewers who agreed that the corrected findings were important and, after additional internal review to assess validity, warranted publication in JAMA.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14503
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Lifetime Exposure to Lower LDL-C and Lower Systolic Blood Pressure and
           Cardiovascular Disease
    • Authors: Ference BA; Bhatt DL, Catapano AL, et al.
      Pages: 1381 - 1391
      Abstract: This genetic epidemiology study uses UK Biobank database data to estimate the association between genetic variants associated with lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), lower systolic blood pressure (SBP), or both and cardiovascular disease (CVD), defined as coronary death, nonfatal, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14120
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Surgical Hematoma Evacuation vs Conservative Treatment and Functional
           Outcome in Cerebellar Intracerebral Hemorrhage
    • Authors: Kuramatsu JB; Biffi A, Gerner ST, et al.
      Pages: 1392 - 1403
      Abstract: This meta-analysis uses individual participant data from observational studies to compare functional disability among patients with cerebellar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) managed with surgical hematoma evacuation vs conservative treatment.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13014
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Diabetes Screening: Laboratory vs Point-of-Care Glucose and Hemoglobin A1C
           Testing
    • Authors: O’Brien MJ; Sacks DB.
      Pages: 1404 - 1405
      Abstract: An asymptomatic 57-year-old man with obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia requests screening for diabetes. Would you offer laboratory-based or point-of-care glucose or HbA1c testing'
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14063
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Insect Repellents
    • Pages: 1406 - 1407
      Abstract: This Medical Letter review summarizes published evidence on the safety and efficacy of commercially available insect repellents, including DEET, picaridin, and oil of lemon eucalyptus, for repelling mosquitoes, ticks, and other insects, and preventing the infections they transmit.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14373
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Exercise Heat Stress in Patients With vs Without Type 2 Diabetes
    • Authors: Notley SR; Poirier MP, Sigal RJ, et al.
      Pages: 1409 - 1411
      Abstract: This physiology study assesses whole-body heat loss in physically active middle-aged and older men with vs without type 2 diabetes after aerobic cycling to evaluate whether type 2 diabetes impairs heat loss and by what mechanism.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.10943
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Effect of Dousing and Foot Immersion on Cardiovascular and Thermal
           Responses to Extreme Heat
    • Authors: Morris NB; Gruss F, Lempert S, et al.
      Pages: 1411 - 1413
      Abstract: This study assesses the effects of self-dousing and foot immersion on heart rate, core temperature, and thermal discomfort of healthy volunteers randomized to simulated hot and humid vs nonhumid conditions.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13051
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Issues in the Adoption of Robotic Surgery
    • Authors: Curet MJ.
      Pages: 1413 - 1414
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint discussing whether it is time for safeguards in the adoption of robotic-assisted surgery contains a number of problematic statements. For example, the authors did not mention safeguards already in place, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which has reviewed and cleared robotic-assisted surgery as a tool for numerous surgical procedures, including radical and partial nephrectomy, cystectomy, radical prostatectomy, radical hysterectomy, and lobectomy. The FDA has been clear that its recent safety communication regarding breast cancer and other cancers, discussed by the authors, does not change existing clearances for robotic-assisted surgery.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12180
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Issues in the Adoption of Robotic Surgery—Reply
    • Authors: Sheetz KH; Dimick JB.
      Pages: 1414 - 1415
      Abstract: In Reply Our Viewpoint discussing the adoption of robotic surgery in the United States was intended to facilitate important conversations. We agree with Dr Curet that a combination of regulators (FDA), innovators (Intuitive), and clinical leaders are all necessary to ensure that existing safeguards are effective. The FDA’s medical device approval process will rely on the early experience of Intuitive as new companies enter the robotic surgical market in years to come.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12188
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Exercise to Prevent Falls in Older Adults—Reply
    • Authors: Liu-Ambrose T; Davis JC, Khan KM.
      Pages: 1415 - 1416
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Cummings suggests that exercise has little benefit in preventing falls because “the risk ratio for any fall in the current study was 1.01”. However, the primary objective of our trial was to examine whether exercise reduced the rate of falls, not the number of people who experienced a fall. All participants had experienced at least 1 fall during the year prior to study entry, and 70% were recurrent fallers. Reducing fall rate in recurrent fallers is important.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12192
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Exercise to Prevent Falls in Older Adults
    • Authors: Cummings P.
      Pages: 1415 - 1415
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Liu-Ambrose and colleagues described a randomized trial of an exercise program to prevent falls in elderly persons in British Columbia. Some results were similar to those of a trial in Washington State in 2007. In both studies, exercise had little influence on tests of physical performance. Comparing the exercise group with controls, the risk ratio for any fall in the Canadian study was 1.01 (105 adults in the exercise group with a fall divided by 104 adults in the usual care group with a fall). The risk ratio for any fall was 0.96 in the Washington study. These results suggest little benefit from exercise.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12184
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Identifying Sepsis Phenotypes
    • Authors: Moseley PL; Brunak S.
      Pages: 1416 - 1417
      Abstract: To the Editor Although the analysis of novel clinical phenotypes for sepsis provided a thorough and effective examination of measures in a number of clinical domains, we believe that it did not sufficiently explore the data domain of disease comorbidities. A key component of phenotype, and the physician’s evaluation, involves medical history, and this information, including the interrelationships between comorbidities, must be considered in the development of phenotypes. Newer computational methods offer the opportunity to see the patterns of relationships of disease comorbidities in a more complete and lifelong way than prior comorbidity stratification schema such as the Elixhauser comorbidity index.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12591
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Identifying Sepsis Phenotypes
    • Authors: Moser J; van Meurs M, Zijlstra JG.
      Pages: 1416 - 1416
      Abstract: To the Editor A retrospective analysis of data sets from 3 cohorts by Dr Seymour and colleagues reported the identification of 4 novel sepsis patient subtypes and was performed to address the problem of sepsis heterogeneity. However, we believe that the study was limited with regard to advancing individualized or subtype-directed therapy.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12587
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Notice of Retraction
    • Authors: Aboumatar H; Wise RA.
      Pages: 1417 - 1418
      Abstract: To the Editor On behalf of our coauthors, we write to report a programming error and other errors that affected the results in our article, “Effect of a Program Combining Transitional Care and Long-term Self-management Support on Outcomes of Hospitalized Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial” published in the December 11, 2018, issue of JAMA. We write to explain what happened and to request retraction of this article.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.11954
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Identifying Sepsis Phenotypes—Reply
    • Authors: Seymour CW; Angus DC.
      Pages: 1417 - 1417
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Moser and colleagues that heterogeneity in sepsis is an important area of study. Many of the differences in patients with sepsis are clinically apparent, and yet unsupervised methods may identify emerging patterns or phenotypes not otherwise discernible at the bedside.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12595
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Updated Reference
    • Pages: 1419 - 1419
      Abstract: In the Reply Letter entitled “Self-medication as Part of Self-management Plans for Patients With COPD—Reply,” published in the May 21, 2019, issue of JAMA, the original reference 3 was for a study by Aboumatar et al that has since been retracted and republished. The corrected reference is as follows: Aboumatar H, Naqibuddin M, Chung S, et al. Effect of a Hospital-Initiated Program Combining Transitional Care and Long-term Self-management Support on Outcomes of Patients Hospitalized With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial [published October 8, 2019]. JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2019.11982. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16019
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Change to Reflect Corrected Study Findings
    • Pages: 1419 - 1419
      Abstract: In the Letter to the Editor entitled “Self-medication as Part of Self-management Plans for Patients With COPD,” published in the May 21, 2019, issue of JAMA, a word needed to be changed to reflect the corrected findings in the study by Aboumatar et al that the intervention led to more, not fewer, hospitalizations and emergency department visits. The first sentence of the letter now reads as follows: “The randomized clinical trial by Dr Aboumatar and colleagues demonstrated that the combination of transitional care support and long-term self-management resulted in more hospitalizations and emergency department visits for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).” The first reference was also updated to reflect the republished article. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15816
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Incorrect Drug Class in Text
    • Pages: 1419 - 1419
      Abstract: In the Clinical Challenge entitled “A Woman With Dyspnea and Bronchiectasis,” published in the August 13, 2019, issue of JAMA, a drug class was incorrect in the text. In the first sentence of the paragraph just before the “Patient Outcome” heading, “muscarinic agonists” should have read “muscarinic antagonists.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14956
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Cerulean
    • Authors: Pretti S.
      Pages: 1421 - 1421
      Abstract: The world on its axis, handheld and spinning— yours, after illness.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.12256
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Peter Mark Roget (1779-1869)
    • Pages: 1422 - 1422
      Abstract: Peter M. Roget, physician, educator, and scholar, was born in London, son of John Roget, native of Geneva and at the time pastor of the French Protestant Church, a Swiss parish. Peter received his early education in Kensington where he was partial to mathematical studies. He completed his higher education at Edinburgh, obtaining the degree of doctor of medicine before his 20th year. He returned to London to study under Baillie, Cruikshank, Willan, Heberden, Abernethy, and others. After a series of varied professional activities on the Continent and in England, in his 26th year he was appointed physician to the infirmary at Manchester, successor to Thomas Percival. He gave a course of lectures and demonstrations on anatomy and physiology and became one of the founders of the Manchester Medical School, a successful venture.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15550
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
  • Pancreatic Cancer
    • Authors: Moore A; Donahue T.
      Pages: 1426 - 1426
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes risks, diagnosis, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14699
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 14 (2019)
       
 
 
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