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Journal Cover JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  [SJR: 6.44]   [H-I: 549]   [1526 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
   Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [13 journals]
  • Highlights for September 12, 2017
    • Pages: 883 - 885
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.13300
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 887 - 888
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2016.13301
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • New Hope for a Gonorrhea Vaccine
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 894 - 895
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses findings that a meningococcal vaccine might also protect against gonorrhea.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11037
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • “America’s Health First”: A Misnomer
    • Authors: Gostin LO.
      Pages: 896 - 897
      Abstract: On July 7, Tom Price, MD, secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), announced the appointment of Brenda Fitzgerald, MD, as the 17th director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). To this position, Dr Fitzgerald brings her experience as Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Public Health, a role in which she championed infant health and survival, tobacco control, and obesity prevention. Other significant choices of individuals to head agencies that affect the public’s health include the recent nomination of Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, as surgeon general, and reappointment of Francis Collins, MD, PhD, as National Institutes of Health director.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11239
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Expanding Tissue Samples for Pathology
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 898 - 898
      Abstract: A novel method to physically expand small biopsy tissue samples could help pathologists predict and diagnose disease more accurately using light microscopy. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard Medical School, and the Broad Institute developed the method, called expansion pathology (ExPath).
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.13167
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Exosuit for Stroke Rehabilitation
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 898 - 898
      Abstract: Researchers at Harvard University and Boston University have developed a lightweight, soft robotic exosuit that improves gait in patients who have experienced a stroke.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.13165
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Nanochip Turns Skin Into a Bioreactor
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 898 - 898
      Abstract: A nanochip that delivers genetic “cargo” to reprogram skin cells into different types of cells in vivo could one day be used to repair injured tissue or restore tissue function at the bedside, according to researchers at Ohio State University (OSU). The researchers dubbed the technology tissue nanotransfection (TNT) in a recent article in Nature Nanotechnology. Unlike other in vivo cell reprogramming technologies being researched, TNT does not employ viral vectors, which can cause inflammatory responses leading to cell death.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12097
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Challenges in HCV Elimination
    • Pages: 899 - 899
      Abstract: Early progress in a hepatitis C virus (HCV) elimination program launched 2 years ago in the Eurasian country of Georgia apparently has slowed, leading health officials to focus on improvements in screening and linkage to care.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11457
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Lax Infection Control Consequences
    • Pages: 899 - 899
      Abstract: Serious disregard for infection control practices at a New Jersey outpatient clinic left dozens of patients with septic arthritis, many who required surgery to drain infected joints. Two staff physicians and 2 medical assistants had treated the patients for osteoarthritic knee pain with intra-articular injections of a glucocorticoid or a hyaluronic acid-based product.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11455
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Award: Preventing Cancer Caused by HPV Infection
    • Authors: Lowy DR; Schiller JT.
      Pages: 901 - 902
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, 2017 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award winners Douglas Lowy and John Schiller discuss the development of the virus-like particle technology that was used to create the human papillomavirus vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and other diseases.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11706
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • A Century of Progressing and Protecting Reproductive Health Care
    • Authors: Richards C.
      Pages: 903 - 904
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, Cecile Richards on behalf of Planned Parenthood—the 2017 Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award winner—traces the 100-year history of the organization’s provision of medical and reproductive health services to US women and the effect of those services on women’s health, well-being, and career trajectories.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11957
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Diagnostic Errors and Diagnostic Calibration
    • Authors: Cifu AS.
      Pages: 905 - 906
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses physician and patient factors that affect clinical decision making and may lead to diagnostic errors during the treatment of patients.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11030
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • What Should I Do When I Hear the Call for Medical Assistance in a
           Plane'
    • Authors: Eastwood GL.
      Pages: 907 - 908
      Abstract: “If there is a doctor on board, would you please make yourself known to a member of the cabin crew'” Reflexively, my hand shoots up to press the button. Seven times I have responded to such requests. Mostly it has worked out well. Twice I thought the passenger had had too much alcohol. Once I comforted an anxious woman. Another time a young army recruit heading for basic training had unexplained arm pain. Sometimes it was more serious. A man with abdominal pain told me he had cancer and he needed my attention and reassurances. A woman had a cardiac emergency, and I had to request an unscheduled landing. Another emergency on a trans-Pacific flight required the extended care of several physicians.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.7187
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Breast Cancer Surgery
    • Authors: Livingston EH; Li H.
      Pages: 909 - 911
      Abstract: Not until the very end of the 19th century did physicians or patients think that breast cancer was curable. Women only presented when the tumors were large and had spread to the axilla and beyond. Attempts to remove these lesions failed and resected cancers recurred so fast it seemed that the surgery fueled their growth. Halstead, operating just before the turn of the 20th century (at Johns Hopkins Hospital) believed that cancer cells were like seeds and that they migrated from the original tumor through the lymphatic system to the axilla. He believed that cutting through any tissue in the lymphatic system risked contaminating the operative field with cancer cells, any one of which could develop into a new tumor. If true, the best way to control these cancers was to remove the breast in 1 large block of tissue along with everything around it, all the way down to the bone of the chest wall.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12890
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Menopausal Hormone Therapy
    • Authors: McNeil M.
      Pages: 911 - 913
      Abstract: The influence of hormone therapy on the health of women has been a subject of controversy for decades. In the 1960s, when estrogen therapy was first introduced for the treatment of menopausal symptoms, hormones were viewed as a fountain of youth. One of the early hormone advocates, Robert Wilson in his 1966 book about menopause and hormones, stated that “Instead of being condemned to witness the death of their own womanhood, [women] will remain fully feminine—physically and emotionally—for as long as they live…Menopause is curable.” What followed was a decade of unmitigated prescribing of unopposed estrogen (ie, without progesterone) for menopausal women both with and without a uterus. It then became clear that unopposed estrogen given to a woman with an intact uterus increased the risk of endometrial cancer, and hormone therapy fell from favor in the 1970s. This was followed by a resurgence of interest in hormone therapy when it became apparent that the administration of progesterone with estrogen could mitigate the increased risk of endometrial cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11462
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • The Durability of Antireflux Surgery
    • Authors: Spechler SJ.
      Pages: 913 - 915
      Abstract: Patients who have mild, nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have many valid treatment options, but patients with severe erosive GERD (those with endoscopy showing large esophageal mucosal breaks extending between mucosal folds) have only 2: take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) indefinitely or have antireflux surgery with fundoplication. No medication other than PPIs (and potassium-competitive acid blockers, which are not available in the United States) reliably heals reflux esophagitis; once healed, that esophagitis will return quickly and severely in most cases if PPIs are stopped. Endoscopic antireflux treatments and other antireflux devices generally have been used to treat only milder forms of GERD, and their efficacy for healing severe erosive esophagitis has not been established. Increasing awareness that patients taking PPIs often have persistent GERD symptoms even though their esophagitis has healed and recent concerns regarding serious potential consequences of long-term PPI therapy have stimulated renewed interest in antireflux surgery. One key and contentious issue is the durability of fundoplication.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11461
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Genetic Studies Help Clarify the Complexities of Lipid Biology and
           Treatment
    • Authors: Sniderman AD; Peterson ED.
      Pages: 915 - 917
      Abstract: Nearly 50 years ago, investigators from the Framingham Heart Study first associated elevated blood cholesterol levels with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Over the ensuing decades, epidemiologic studies deepened the understanding of the disease process. Higher levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) were associated with increased CVD risk, whereas higher levels of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) were associated with decreased CVD risk. Moving from association to causality required interventional clinical trials. Could drugs that reduce LDL-C levels or raise HDL-C levels decrease the risk for CVD'
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11750
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Effect of Sentinel Lymph Node vs Full Axillary Dissection on Overall
           Breast Cancer Survival
    • Authors: Giuliano AE; Ballman KV, McCall L, et al.
      Pages: 918 - 926
      Abstract: This noninferiority trial compares 10-year overall survival of women with invasive breast cancer and sentinel lymph node metastases treated with breast-conserving therapy and sentinel lymph node dissection alone vs axillary dissection.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11470
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Long-term All-Cause and Cause-Specific
           Mortality
    • Authors: Manson JE; Aragaki AK, Rossouw JE, et al.
      Pages: 927 - 938
      Abstract: This observational follow-up (cumulative 18 years) of postmenopausal women enrolled in 2 RCTs compared rates of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality between groups receiving hormone therapy (conjugated equine estrogens [CEE] plus medroxyprogesterone acetate) or CEE alone vs placebo.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11217
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Recurrence of Gastroesophageal Reflux After Laparoscopic Antireflux
           Surgery
    • Authors: Maret-Ouda J; Wahlin K, El-Serag HB, et al.
      Pages: 939 - 946
      Abstract: This cohort study assesses the risk of recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux after laparoscopic antireflux surgery and risk factors for reflux recurrence.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10981
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Association of CETP Variants With Lipoprotein Levels and Cardiovascular
           Risk
    • Authors: Ference BA; Kastelein JP, Ginsberg HN, et al.
      Pages: 947 - 956
      Abstract: This mendelian randomization analysis of individual-participant data estimated the association between changes in levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (and other lipoproteins) and risk of cardiovascular events due to CETP variants, alone and in combination with HMGCR variants.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11467
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Acute Diarrheal Infections in Adults
    • Authors: Acree M; Davis AM.
      Pages: 957 - 958
      Abstract: This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the 2016 American College of Gastroenterology’s guideline on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of acute diarrheal infections in adults.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.8485
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Antiphospholipid Antibodies
    • Authors: Gupta A; Johnson DH, Nagalla S.
      Pages: 959 - 960
      Abstract: A 39-year-old man with a history of ischemic stroke presented with right calf swelling and shortness of breath and was diagnosed with pulmonary embolism by CTPA. Testing 2 days later showed elevated titers of anticardiolipin and anti–β2 glycoprotein I antibodies and negative lupus anticoagulant screening assays. How would you interpret these results'
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.4854
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Association of RBT With Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis
    • Authors: Geller HI; Singh A, Alexander KM, et al.
      Pages: 962 - 963
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study compares the frequency of rupture of the distal biceps tendon in patients with wild-type transthyretin amyloidosis cardiomyopathy vs those with other causes of heart failure.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.9236
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Guideline Recommendations for Statin Therapy
    • Authors: Grossman DC; Curry SJ, Owens DK.
      Pages: 963 - 964
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Pagidipati and colleagues compared the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations and American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) with statins. We agree that understanding the population effect of these guidelines is important. We wish to emphasize that the USPSTF issued 2 recommendations. The B recommendation applies to persons with a calculated 10-year CVD event risk of 10% or greater; the C recommendation applies to individuals with a calculated 10-year CVD event risk of 7.5% to 10%. The task force recommended low-dose to moderate-dose statins when patients meet all of the following criteria: (1) aged 40 to 75 years; (2) 1 or more CVD risk factors (ie, dyslipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, or smoking); and (3) a calculated 10-year CVD event risk of 10% or greater. Clinicians may choose to offer low- to moderate-dose statins to certain adults without a history of CVD when they meet all of the following criteria: (1) aged 40 to 75 years; (2) 1 or more CVD risk factors; and (3) a calculated 10-year CVD event risk of 7.5% to 10%. The differences between the USPSTF recommendations and the ACC/AHA guidelines are outlined in the recommendation statement.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11375
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Guideline Recommendations for Statin Therapy—Reply
    • Authors: Pagidipati NJ; Navar A, Pencina MJ.
      Pages: 964 - 964
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Grossman and colleagues that the size of the discordant population between the USPSTF B recommendation and ACC/AHA class I guideline recommendation will depend on overall guideline adherence and how many lower-risk individuals have an informed conversation with their clinician and decide to initiate statin therapy. We also agree that informed patient-physician discussions are of paramount importance and that a set of clinical guidelines cannot and should not replace individual patient preferences and professional judgment.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.11379
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Behavioral Economics and Health Insurance Reform
    • Authors: Colloff E.
      Pages: 964 - 965
      Abstract: To the Editor In a Viewpoint, Drs Skinner and Volpp discussed principles for health insurance reform drawing on behavioral economics. One principle was to shift high-cost enrollees into Medicare rather than creating new taxes to pay for subsidies. However, there is an unspoken consequence of this recommendation.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10548
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Behavioral Economics and Health Insurance Reform—Reply
    • Authors: Skinner J; Volpp KG.
      Pages: 965 - 965
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Colloff correctly points out that moving high-cost patients from private exchanges to Medicare would save money immediately for the federal government, but potentially at the expense of hospitals and physicians. The alternatives currently being debated in Congress to replace the Affordable Care Act, however, would be far worse.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10556
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Medication Reconciliation vs Medication Review
    • Authors: Zimmerman KM; Salgado TM, Dixon DL.
      Pages: 965 - 966
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Rose and colleagues proposed that medication reconciliation goes beyond comparing medication lists at admission or discharge and instead comprises the establishment of a correct medication list by completion of 6 levels of reconciliation: clinician agreement, patient agreement, deprescribe, decrease patient burden, minimize out-of-pocket expenses, and inform outside entities.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10552
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Medication Reconciliation vs Medication Review
    • Authors: Rose AJ; Fischer SH, Paasche-Orlow MK.
      Pages: 966 - 966
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Zimmerman and colleagues about the need for a more comprehensive process of medication reconciliation, and there is substantial overlap between the approach we presented in our Viewpoint and the vision they describe. They also emphasize the importance of standardized nomenclature to refer to medication reconciliation, lest a variety of terms for the same concept impede the ability to study and improve it. It is certainly possible that variable terminology may cause confusion, although we think it would be better for an authoritative guideline or policy paper (such as by a government agency) to suggest a unifying terminology.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10560
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Michael Jackson’s Procedures
    • Authors: Collins M.
      Pages: 967 - 967
      Abstract: The history of stardomis written on his bodyin a language of scalpelsand creams, of bleachesblended with vitiligowrapped in money rolling in since Thriller rosethrough almost every languagelike a ubiquitous sonicBabel: chin of Kirk Douglas,nose of a comic bookelf, cheekbones of Audrey Hepburn, wigsof Bombay women’s hair,hairline of black ink,voice of a child no onecould fail to smile at—yes, the color line cagedin one procedure afteranother, but somehowgetting out each time,and the self, with its famousbusiness sense, strugglingto slip out of the gene pooland make a new bodyout of tongue clicks and stop time spins, out of vaultsonto car roofs, legatoruns into octave leaps,the seed of Elvis, and fatherhood and the rights of fame.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.4280
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Progress in Teaching Psychiatry
    • Pages: 968 - 968
      Abstract: The request of our secretary for a contribution to this meeting suggested to me an extension of my discussion on the psychobiologic level of medical facts (presented two years ago in San Francisco and published in The Journal of the American Medical Association, 1915), a consideration of my present plan of teaching psychopathology and psychiatry and of some principles characteristic of the plan. No real physician is altogether specialist and no real specialist fails to define his share as part of the great problem of helping the sick and troubled patient. The psychiatrist may at last say that he has found himself. Instead of being singled out from the rest of physicians as what used to be called an asylum man, pure and simple, he has found his sphere in the special study of the patient as a person, the special study of the total activities and total behavior, the kind of thing which cannot be singled out as merely the function of any one detachable organ, not even of the brain by itself.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10486
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Pneumothorax
    • Authors: Imran JB; Eastman AL.
      Pages: 974 - 974
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Sep 2017 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.10476
      Issue No: Vol. 318, No. 10 (2017)
       
 
 
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