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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2015  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for June 18, 2019
    • Pages: 2255 - 2257
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15377
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 2259 - 2260
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15378
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Despite Policies to Improve Faculty Diversity, Disparities Persist at
           Public Health Schools
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 2268 - 2270
      Abstract: This Medical News story discusses a recent study that found a lack of gender and ethnic diversity in leading public health schools.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.3891
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • For “Broken Heart” Syndrome, Brain May Hold the Key
    • Authors: Sancar F.
      Pages: 2270 - 2271
      Abstract: This Medical News feature discusses recent findings suggesting altered functional connectivity in brain regions involved in emotional and autonomic regulation may play a role in the pathophysiology of “broken heart” syndrome.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.5198
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • The Rural Hospital Problem
    • Authors: Frakt AB.
      Pages: 2271 - 2272
      Abstract: Although health is priceless, health care costs money. As such, the institutions that deliver care are subject to economic forces. Financial considerations dictate whether they succeed or fail, with consequences, both good and bad, for costs, quality, and access.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7377
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Vaccine Reduces Pneumonia in Kenya
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 2273 - 2273
      Abstract: Introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) resulted in sharply reduced pneumonia cases in Kenya, according to a report from an international team of researchers.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7978
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • UN: All-out Effort Needed to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 2273 - 2273
      Abstract: In a new report, the United Nations Interagency Coordination Group urges action against mounting resistance to antimicrobial agents that could lead to as many as 10 million deaths annually by 2050.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7977
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Subpopulations Are Vulnerable to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 2273 - 2273
      Abstract: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) disproportionately affects certain vulnerable groups worldwide, according to a meta-analysis by an international group of researchers.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7101
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Safety Alert for Certain Pacemakers
    • Authors: Sancar F.
      Pages: 2274 - 2274
      Abstract: An FDA safety communication has warned clinicians and patients that batteries may suddenly drain in some Medtronic implantable pacemakers and cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemakers (CRT-P). Affected devices include select Azure, Astra, Percepta, Serena, and Solara models.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7980
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • First Treatment for Children With Rare Myasthenic Syndrome
    • Authors: Sancar F.
      Pages: 2274 - 2274
      Abstract: Amifampridine tablets have received approval for treating children aged 6 to 17 years who have Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), a rare autoimmune disease that causes debilitating muscle weakness.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7979
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Drugs for Heart Disease With Rare Cause
    • Authors: Sancar F.
      Pages: 2274 - 2274
      Abstract: The FDA recently approved 2 drugs for adults with cardiomyopathy caused by transthyretin-mediated amyloidosis (ATTR), a rare and life-threatening disease. The oral medications, tafamidis meglumine and tafamidis, are the first to receive agency approval for this indication.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7668
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Federal Requirements to Inform Patients About Breast Density
    • Authors: Keating NL; Pace LE.
      Pages: 2275 - 2276
      Abstract: This Viewpoint explains the challenges of effectively communicating information about breast density under the mandates of the Mammography Quality Standards Act.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.5919
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • The Challenges of Defining and Studying “Digital Addiction” in
           Children
    • Authors: Christakis DA.
      Pages: 2277 - 2278
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, JAMA Pediatrics Editor Dimitri Christakis discusses the conceptual and methodological challenges of studying digital media use by children and adolescents, and calls on the leadership of device and social media companies to collaborate with child health researchers, sharing data as the companies already do with advertisers, to help mediate digital media use in the best interest of children.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4690
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Vision for the Future of Continuing Board Certification
    • Authors: Colenda CC; Scanlon WJ, Hawkins RE.
      Pages: 2279 - 2280
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the recommendations of the Vision Initiative Commission to improve the structure of continuing certification, including setting standards that integrate life-long learning with formative and timely assessments of knowledge and skills and learning activities that advance practice and improve care.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4815
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Artificial Intelligence in Health Care—Will the Value Match the
           Hype'
    • Authors: Emanuel EJ; Wachter RM.
      Pages: 2281 - 2282
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, Ezekiel Emanuel and Robert Wachter discuss reasons for the hype surrounding the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in health care and emphasize the need for changes in structures and culture that can change behaviors of clinicians if AI-derived evidence is to be effectively translated into practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4914
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Finding the Words: Love and Speech Therapy Find a Way
    • Authors: Pandit JA.
      Pages: 2283 - 2284
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, a young cardiologist recounts his experience with an unexpected seizure leading to a diagnosis of astrocytoma and neurosurgery and his journey from postoperative word loss to finding the words once again to tell his family he loves them.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7297
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Setting Positive End-Expiratory Pressure in Mechanically Ventilated
           Patients Undergoing Surgery
    • Authors: Godet T; Futier E.
      Pages: 2285 - 2287
      Abstract: What is the optimal level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) for patients receiving mechanical ventilation' Despite decades of investigations, this question continues to be discussed among researchers and clinicians with no clear answer, leaving bedside management uncertain. The concept of protecting the lung during mechanical ventilation is considered a fundamental approach for patients in the intensive care unit with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and is now attracting increasing interest for patients without injured lungs both in the intensive care unit and in the operating room.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7540
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Stroke After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Authors: Messé SR; Ailawadi G.
      Pages: 2287 - 2289
      Abstract: Stroke after cardiovascular procedures has been associated with substantially increased morbidity, mortality, and cost. Aortic valve replacement is the most common intracardiac procedure performed in the United States and its use has been increasing over the past decade due to the aging of the population, improved survival from other conditions, and new technologies that allow for less invasive procedures. In 2010, the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) 1B randomized study involving patients at inoperable surgical risk reported that transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) improved survival compared with the best medical care. This study reported about a 7% risk of stroke, which was not surprising given the patient population and the likelihood of particulate embolization when expanding a new valve within the annulus of the stenosed and calcified native valve. Nevertheless, even with this stroke risk, there was a clear mortality benefit and quality of life was improved as well. After the PARTNER 1A high-risk cohort demonstrated similar or improved outcomes relative to open surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients at high (but not inoperable) surgical risk, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved TAVR in 2011 and the procedure was rapidly adopted into clinical practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.8613
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Putting the New Alzheimer Disease Amyloid, Tau, Neurodegeneration
           Diagnostic System to the Test
    • Authors: Wolk D; Salloway S, Dickerson B.
      Pages: 2289 - 2291
      Abstract: The field of neurodegenerative dementias, particularly Alzheimer disease (AD), has been limited by challenges in accurate diagnosis, but has recently been potentially revolutionized by the development of imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. These biomarkers have influenced the diagnostic evaluation of symptomatic patients with cognitive impairment or dementia, particularly in dementia subspecialty practice. The primary biomarker modalities include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and CSF.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7534
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Effect of High PEEP vs Low PEEP on Postoperative Pulmonary Complications
           in Obese Patients
    • Pages: 2292 - 2305
      Abstract: This randomized trial compares the effects of higher levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) with alveolar recruitment maneuvers vs a lower level of PEEP on postoperative respiratory failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary infection, pleural effusion, atelectasis, pneumothorax, and other pulmonary complications in obese patients undergoing noncardiac, nonneurological surgery under general anesthesia.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7505
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Early Stroke After TAVR in US Practice
    • Authors: Huded CP; Tuzcu E, Krishnaswamy A, et al.
      Pages: 2306 - 2315
      Abstract: This cohort study uses registry data to describe trends and incidence of 30-day stroke among patients who had undergone transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in the first 5 years the procedure’s use in US clinical practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7525
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Amyloid, Tau, and Neurodegeneration Biomarker Profiles and Memory Decline
           In Individuals Without Dementia
    • Authors: Jack CR; Jr, Wiste HJ, Therneau TM, et al.
      Pages: 2316 - 2325
      Abstract: This cohort study compares memory changes in patients without dementia with vs without positive amyloid or tau positron emission tomography scans or reduced cortical thickness on magnetic resonance imaging, and investigates whether adding information about those imaging variables to a risk prediction model improves predictions of memory decline based on demographic and clinical information and APOE genotype alone.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7437
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • USPSTF Guideline: Screening for HIV Infection
    • Pages: 2326 - 2336
      Abstract: This 2019 Recommendation Statement from the US Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years and in younger adolescents and older adults at increased risk of infection (A recommendation) and in all pregnant persons, including those with unknown HIV status at labor or delivery (A recommendation).
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.6587
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • USPSTF Review: Screening for HIV Infection in Asymptomatic, Nonpregnant
           Individuals
    • Authors: Chou R; Dana T, Grusing S, et al.
      Pages: 2337 - 2348
      Abstract: This systematic review to support the 2019 updated US Preventive Services Task Force guideline on screening for HIV infection in adolescents and adults summarizes published evidence on the clinical benefits and harms of screening and intervention for HIV infection in asymptomatic, nonpregnant adolescents and adults.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.2592
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • USPSTF Report: Screening for HIV Infection in Pregnant Women
    • Authors: Selph SS; Bougatsos C, Dana T, et al.
      Pages: 2349 - 2360
      Abstract: This systematic review to support the 2019 updated US Preventive Services Task Force guideline on screening for HIV infection in pregnant women summarizes published evidence on the clinical benefits and harms of screening and intervention for HIV infection in pregnant women.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.2593
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Suicide Rates in Adolescents and Young Adults, 2000 to 2017
    • Authors: Miron O; Yu K, Wilf-Miron R, et al.
      Pages: 2362 - 2364
      Abstract: This study uses Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data to characterize trends in suicide rates among adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 24 years in the United States and to determine if the increase in suicide rates observed in years 2000-2016 is continuing.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.5054
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Obesity Among US Children Enrolled in WIC, 2010-2016
    • Authors: Pan L; Freedman DS, Park S, et al.
      Pages: 2364 - 2366
      Abstract: This study examines trends in overweight and obesity in low-income children enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) between 2010 and 2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.5051
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Evaluations of Patients With a History of Penicillin Allergy
    • Authors: Faitelson Y; Beigelman A.
      Pages: 2366 - 2367
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Shenoy and colleagues encouraged physicians, not only allergists, to evaluate patients with penicillin allergy before deciding not to use penicillin or other β-lactam antibiotics. Their approach is supported by evidence that shows that true penicillin allergy is rare and that penicillin oral challenge is a safe and effective method to rule out penicillin allergy. Ruling out penicillin allergy serves as an important tool for antimicrobial stewardship.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4534
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Evaluation of Patients With a History of Penicillin Allergy—Reply
    • Authors: Shenoy ES; Blumenthal KG.
      Pages: 2367 - 2367
      Abstract: In Reply Drs Faitelson and Beigelman raise 2 important issues regarding our review related to the use of extended penicillin challenges and the role of penicillin skin testing for patients with low-risk or moderate-risk allergy histories in the context of disseminating these evaluations beyond the realm of allergy specialists.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4542
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Atrial Fibrillation Detection With Wearable Devices
    • Authors: Lambert CT; Bumgarner JM, Tarakji KG.
      Pages: 2367 - 2368
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint by Dr Ip discussed wearable devices in the management of patients with heart rhythm disorders, including atrial fibrillation. Even though we agree with the author’s cautionary message about the consequences of false-positive results, we respectfully disagree with him regarding the interpretation of our study that assessed the performance of the KardiaBand in detecting atrial fibrillation.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4538
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Atrial Fibrillation Detection With Wearable Devices—Reply
    • Authors: Ip JE.
      Pages: 2368 - 2369
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Lambert and colleagues concur with my Viewpoint that data generated from wearable devices need to be further interpreted by experienced clinicians to adjudicate accurate results and avoid inappropriate diagnoses. With continually improving technology and design, these devices are capable of providing patients and clinicians with important information regarding arrhythmias. However, understanding the limitations of these devices is essential to avoid overreliance and to judiciously incorporate them into clinical practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4546
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Challenges of Personal Health Records—Reply
    • Authors: Dameff C; Clay B, Longhurst CA.
      Pages: 2369 - 2369
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Freeman and Ms Karney outline 3 possible pitfalls of personal health records deserving of additional consideration.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4808
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Challenges of Personal Health Records
    • Authors: Freeman WD; Karney M.
      Pages: 2369 - 2369
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Dameff and colleagues discussed the promise of personal health records during the smartphone era. However, one challenge is the increasing amount of data per human and the data storage required globally because it is estimated that each of the big 4 data companies (ie, Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft) use an estimated 1200 petabytes, or 1.2 million terabytes, among them.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.4804
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Error in the Results
    • Pages: 2370 - 2370
      Abstract: The Original Investigation entitled “Effect of Catheter Ablation vs Medical Therapy on Quality of Life Among Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: The CABANA Randomized Clinical Trial,” published in the April 2, 2019, issue of JAMA, had an error in the Results section, which incorrectly stated that a higher Atrial Fibrillation Effect on Quality of Life score indicates a higher level of atrial fibrillation–related disability. The Results have been corrected and now state that a higher Atrial Fibrillation Effect on Quality of Life score indicates a lower level of atrial fibrillation–related disability. (All other information in the Results was correct and is unchanged.) This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.7682
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Missing Information on Sample Size
    • Pages: 2370 - 2370
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation entitled “Effect of Piperacillin-Tazobactam vs Meropenem on 30-Day Mortality for Patients With E coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection and Ceftriaxone Resistance: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” published in the September 11, 2018, issue of JAMA, information was missing from the Sample Size Calculation subsection under Methods. The third sentence of this section should have read as follows: “Based on a mortality rate of 14% in the control group and 10% in the experimental group (assuming mortality in observational cohorts may be greater than in trials with exclusion criteria) and a noninferiority margin of 5%, 454 patients were needed in total to achieve 80% power with a 1-sided α level of .025, allowing for 10% dropout.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.6706
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Incorrect Information
    • Pages: 2370 - 2370
      Abstract: In the News and Analysis article entitled “A Day in the Life: Adventures of a Wilderness Medicine Physician,” published in the May 21, 2019, issue of JAMA, the name of the Wilderness Medical Society was incorrect and wilderness medicine was incorrectly identified as a subspecialty of emergency medicine. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.8299
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • On a Surgeon Poet
    • Authors: Forsbergh E.
      Pages: 2371 - 2371
      Abstract: A wound on paper isn’t quite a wound.It’s a distant diagnosis, lying on clean sheets,no seeps or stains, untreatable, a page unanswered
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.2527
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • THE VICTORY MEETING
    • Pages: 2372 - 2372
      Abstract: From every point of view the annual session of the Association held at Atlantic City last week must be considered a success. The attendance far exceeded the expectations of the most optimistic; the registration was 4,929, exceeding by nearly 1,000 the registration of the largest previous Atlantic City session, held in 1914; in fact, the registration this year has been exceeded only by that of the Chicago and New York sessions.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15385
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
  • Who Should Be Screened for HIV Infection'
    • Authors: Jin J.
      Pages: 2376 - 2376
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the US Preventive Services Task Force’s recent recommendations on screening for HIV infection in adults and adolescents.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jun 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.6919
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 23 (2019)
       
 
 
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