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Journal Cover JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  [SJR: 6.44]   [H-I: 549]   [1416 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
   Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [13 journals]
  • Highlights for June 13, 2017
    • PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Building a Broader Consensus for Health Reform
    • Authors: Capretta JC.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint urges law makers build toward a bipartisan consensus for health care legislation.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Value-Based Payment Models for Community Health Centers
    • Authors: Bhatia J; Tobey R, Hochman M.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the drawbacks of the current reimbursement system for community health centers and highlights the benefits of new payment models if thoughtfully implemented.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Permanent GME Funding for Teaching Health Centers
    • Authors: Durfey SM; George P, Adashi EY.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint argues for the importance and continued funding of the US teaching health center graduate medical education (GME) program, which funds community-based ambulatory primary care residency programs to address the shortage of primary care clinicians and improve primary care residency experiences.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Alternative Pathways to Board Recertification
    • Authors: Welcher CM; Kirk LM, Hawkins RE.
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses origins of physician dissatisfaction with the maintenance of certification programs and how physicians, specialty boards, and others are working to evolve the programs toward processes of certification more relevant to contemporary practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Gray Areas
    • Authors: Moore A.
      Abstract: When I was young, I had a painfully simple philosophy that could be summarized like this: there are good guys and there are bad guys. Bad guys get locked up and good guys roam free.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Abdominal Ultrasound for Pediatric Blunt Trauma
    • Authors: Kessler DO.
      Abstract: The focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination is conducted to rapidly identify bleeding within the abdominal, pericardial, or intrathoracic spaces. The use of the FAST examination is not limited to trauma but is best described in studies involving adults who sustained blunt or penetrating abdominal trauma. Although no clear reduction in mortality has been reported by incorporating the FAST examination into trauma protocols, the use of this bedside imaging modality has been associated with other improvements in outcomes among adult patients including reductions in abdominal computed tomographic (CT) rates, decreased time to the operating room, and decreased hospital length of stay.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Brain Amyloid Pathology and Cognitive Function
    • Authors: Visser P; Tijms B.
      Abstract: If there ever was an exciting time for Alzheimer disease (AD) research, it is now. The discovery of biomarkers beginning 20 years ago, for example, positron emission tomography (PET) tracers that bind to plaques, the core pathological hallmark of the disease, unlocked new research fields. Together with increasing amounts of longitudinal data, it now is possible to study how the disease unfolds. This will transform the way AD is conceptualized, diagnosed, and treated.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Physician Certification and Recertification The Role of Empirical Evidence
    • Authors: Schwartz AB; Schwartz J.
      Abstract: Physicians are faced with the challenge of lifelong learning in a field so vast and complex that no physician can ever hope to master all medical knowledge. Nonetheless, physicians have a duty and responsibility to patients to continuously hone their knowledge, skills, and judgment while appreciating their limits. Striking this balance requires that physicians remain current with the literature, engage with colleagues, identify and address gaps in knowledge, and maintain relevant professional certifications.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Effect of Abdominal Ultrasound on Children With Blunt Torso Trauma
    • Authors: Holmes JF; Kelley KM, Wootton-Gorges SL, et al.
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of adding focused assessment sonography for trauma (FAST) examination to a standard trauma evaluation on missed diagnoses and health services outcomes for pediatric patients with blunt torso trauma.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Ferrous Sulfate vs Iron Polysaccharide Complex for Children With Anemia
    • Authors: Powers JM; Buchanan GR, Adix L, et al.
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of ferrous sulfate vs iron polysaccharide complex on nutritional iron-deficiency anemia among infants and children aged 9 to 48 months receiving care at an outpatient hematology clinic at a US tertiary care hospital.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Elevated Brain Amyloid and Cognitive Decline in Cognitively Normal Persons
    • Authors: Donohue MC; Sperling RA, Petersen R, et al.
      Abstract: This exploratory analysis compares rate of cognitive decline over 4 years between participants with normal vs elevated amyloid levels who are cognitively normal.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Comparison of Conditions Tested by the ABIM MOC Examination vs Those Seen
           in Practice
    • Authors: Gray B; Vandergrift J, Lipner RS, et al.
      Abstract: This study compares the frequency of of medical conditions covered by questions on the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM’s) Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification (MOC) examination with the frequency of conditions seen in general internal medicine practice.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Online Measures of Physician Performance
    • Authors: Davis MM; Hanauer DA.
      Abstract: This commentary discusses a study published in JAMA Dermatology that identified the type of information included on websites providing consumer reviews of physicians and aspects of their practice settings.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Chronic Low Back Pain
    • Authors: Enthoven WM; Roelofs PD, Koes BW.
      Abstract: This Clinical Evidence Synopsis summarizes a Cochrane review of clinical trials comparing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with other drug treatments, nondrug treatments, or placebo in patients with chronic low back pain.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A Man With a Nonblanchable Purpuric Rash
    • Authors: Chalhoub NE; Kaw D, Nagaraja V.
      Abstract: An older man presented with 4 weeks of diffuse rash and elbow and knee pain. The rash improved initially with prednisone but recurred at tapered dosing. Laboratory tests revealed normal blood cell counts, normal values for renal and hepatic panels, microscopic hematuria, and 1+ proteinuria. What would you do next'
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Time to Delivery of Drone-Delivered Automated Defibrillators vs Emergency
           Medical Services
    • Authors: Claesson A; Bäckman A, Ringh M, et al.
      Abstract: This study compares the time to delivery of an automated external defibrillator using fully autonomous drones for simulated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests vs emergency medical services real-time responses.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Abdominal Adiposity and Cardiometabolic Risk
    • Authors: Schulze MB; Stefan N.
      Abstract: To the Editor Using mendelian randomization, Dr Emdin and colleagues found that a genetic predisposition to higher waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) adjusted for body mass index (BMI) was related to higher cardiometabolic risk. Consequently, they concluded that there is a causal relationship between abdominal adiposity and cardiometabolic risk. Although waist circumference is a measure of abdominal fat, hip circumference may reflect larger gluteofemoral subcutaneous fat, greater gluteal muscle mass, or large bone structure. Greater hip circumference is related to lower cardiometabolic risk factors and events, independent of waist circumference. Thus, WHR is the ratio of 2 complex variables, making its interpretation complicated. Given that the polygenic risk score for WHR adjusted for BMI was strongly related to both smaller hip circumference and larger waist circumference, it may be premature to conclude that abdominal fat plays a causative role. Mendelian randomization analyses targeting the independent effects of waist vs hip circumference could disentangle the causal nature of these different aspects of body composition.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Abdominal Obesity and Cardiometabolic Risk—Reply
    • Authors: Emdin CA; Khera AV, Kathiresan S.
      Abstract: In Reply Drs Schulze and Stefan note that WHR may be influenced by traits independent of abdominal fat mass, including bone structure and gluteal muscle mass. However, previous studies have suggested a strong correlation between WHR and direct imaging measurements of the proportion of fat stored in the abdominal region. Consequently, we view the common use of WHR as an indicator of the proportion of fat stored in the abdominal region as reasonable. We agree that future research should explore the independent effects of waist circumference (as a measurement of abdominal fat) and hip circumference (as a measurement of gynoid fat) on coronary heart disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cognitive Function After Testosterone Treatment
    • Authors: Martins RN; Carruthers M, Sohrabi HR.
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Resnick and colleagues reported that 12 months of testosterone treatment in elderly men with age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) was not associated with any of the primary (memory) or secondary (visual memory, executive function, spatial ability) cognitive function outcome measures. We believe this report has several problems.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cognitive Function After Testosterone Treatment
    • Authors: Resnick SM; Matsumoto AM, Stephens-Shields AJ.
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Martins and colleagues note that our definition of AAMI was broad with respect to the definition of subjective memory complaints and in the cutoffs used to exclude objective impairment in memory, the latter potentially resulting in inclusion of some men with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Although our criteria may have resulted in inclusion of some men with mild cognitive impairment or early dementia and adjudicated diagnoses of cognitive status were not available, we found no evidence of associations between testosterone treatment and cognitive function in subgroups of men defined as AAMI. As we reported, there were no significant effects of baseline global cognitive function, measured by the Modified Mini-Mental State Exam (scores
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Childhood and Adolescent Obesity as a Winnable Battle
    • Authors: Dietz WH.
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Frieden and colleagues asserted in their Viewpoint on the Winnable Battles initiative that “there has been no progress reducing childhood obesity.” This assertion was based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey that indicate increases in the prevalence of obesity among 2- to 19-year-old children and adolescents. However, that same publication reported decreases in the prevalence of obesity among 2- to 5-year-old children and a plateau in the prevalence of obesity among 6- to 11-year-old children. The increases in the prevalence of obesity among 2- to 19-year-old children and adolescents appear attributable to increases among 12- to 19-year-old adolescents.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Childhood and Adolescent Obesity as a Winnable Battle—Reply
    • Authors: Frieden TR; Ethier K.
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Dietz that there has been a reduction in childhood obesity among 2- to 5-year-old children. At the launch of the Winnable Battles initiative, the target selected for childhood obesity was a decrease in obesity among 2- to 19-year-old children and adolescents. Obesity among 2- to 19-year-old children and adolescents increased from 16.8% in 2007-2008 to 17.2% in 2014 compared with the target of reducing the prevalence to 15.4%.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Expanding Treatments for Alcoholism
    • Authors: Lyon J.
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses potential new treatment options for patients with alcohol use disorder.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Where Does the Health Insurance Premium Dollar Go'
    • Authors: Reinhardt U.
      Abstract: In early March, America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), the national association of private US health insurers, released an interesting report that presents, for insured patients younger than 65 years, financial statistics for 2014 of commercial and nonprofit health insurance companies.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • CAR-T Therapy Patient Dies in Trial
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: A patient died from cerebral edema—brain swelling—during a trial for the investigational cancer treatment axicabtagene ciloleucel, drug-maker Kite Pharma announced on an investor call in May. Axicabtagene ciloleucel, previously known as KTE-C19, is one of the leading chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T cell) candidate therapies in the US drug development pipeline.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Facebook Plans Brain-Typing Project
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: Facebook’s research and development division, Building 8, recently unveiled a project to help people type with their thoughts rather than their hands. The technology could help people with motor disabilities such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis communicate more easily in the future.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In-home Sleep Apnea Sensor
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Abstract: Personal health analytics company Zansors, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School, could bring to market the first ever affordable, US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved over-the-counter sleep apnea sensor for in-home use next year. Obstructive sleep apnea increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes, among other conditions, but up to 80% of cases are undiagnosed in the United States.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Decline in Death Rates Among Blacks
    • Abstract: Greater use of both universal and targeted interventions is needed to continue the recent trend of declining death rates among black people in the United States.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mercury Risk at Day Care Center
    • Abstract: A Florida day care provider’s well-intentioned purchase of an antique sphygmomanometer landed a 3-year-old boy in the hospital and triggered mercury poisoning in a dozen others who were involved with the center. The cases prompted state health officials to develop educational materials for day care centers about the dangers of mercury exposure.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Song for Pollock
    • Authors: Nash W.
      Abstract: When Pollock spoke of energy made visible, did he mean the fiery banners of his canvases—those vagrant drizzles, vibrant splashes he left just so, circular dynamics five centuries old' The visual vortex they present won’t soon unclench its grip. He made that kind of current, like a live wire traveling back and back to Renaissance battles of horse-borne chaos, but also forward, futureward, to you, my fellow museumgoer, standing alone this crisp November morning in Houston, perfectly still in your autumn cardigan, a single wrist enclosed in a gentle bracelet of fingers, an air of composed self-containment.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Minor Comments
    • PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cardiac Catheterization
    • Authors: Kosova E; Ricciardi M.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • JAMA
    • PubDate: Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
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