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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 1898  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for February 12, 2019
    • Pages: 523 - 525
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15190
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 527 - 528
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15191
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • The Waverly Gallery —Dementia on Broadway
    • Authors: Berkwits M.
      Pages: 530 - 531
      Abstract: This Arts & Medicine essay reviews the 2018-2019 Broadway revival of The Waverly Gallery, a Kenneth Lonergan play that tells the story of the effects within a well-to-do Manhattan family of the decline of a family member from progressive dementia.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.22035
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • New Planned Parenthood President: No Politics in the Exam Room
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 533 - 535
      Abstract: This Medical News article is an interview with Leana Wen, MD, the new president of Planned Parenthood.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15674
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • The 2018 Midterm Election Results and Health Care
    • Authors: Wilensky G.
      Pages: 535 - 536
      Abstract: With the midterm elections receding, the country’s attention is already focused on 2020 and the most likely candidate to secure the Democratic presidential nomination. No matter which candidate it is, health care and the future direction of health care in the United States is likely to have a major role in the election—just as it did in 2018.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0116
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • New Deep Brain Stimulation Target for Mood Disorders
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 537 - 537
      Abstract: Deep brain stimulation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) improved depression symptoms in a study involving 25 patients with epilepsy at the University of California, San Francisco. The discovery adds a new electrical stimulation target to the handful of brain regions currently under investigation for treatment-resistant depression.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0295
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Advanced Brain-Computer Interface for People With Paralysis
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 537 - 537
      Abstract: In a recent study in PLOS One, a 63-year-old man with tetraplegia caused by a spinal cord injury sent his first text messages with an off-the-shelf consumer tablet paired to an intracortical brain-computer interface (iBCI). He and 2 other participants with limited arm and hand mobility due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also used the iBCI to browse the internet, send emails, chat with researchers, stream music, watch videos, check the weather, and read the news—all by simply thinking about the tasks.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0294
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Imaging Needle to Detect Blood Vessels During Brain Tumor Biopsy
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 537 - 537
      Abstract: Before a patient with a brain tumor undergoes a needle biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to locate the mass and major blood vessels. During the biopsy, the position of the needle is tracked with sensors and superimposed onto the scan, allowing the surgeon to sample the tumor while avoiding blood vessels. But there are 2 problems: the MRI doesn’t detect blood vessels smaller than about 3 mm in diameter and the needle tracking can be off by a few millimeters. If the needle damages a blood vessel, a brain bleed can occur.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0138
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Contaminated Bypass Equipment
    • Authors: Kuehn B.
      Pages: 538 - 538
      Abstract: Blood heating and cooling machines used during heart bypass were linked to 20 cases of Mycobacterium chimaera in California patients in 2016, according to a CDC report.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0190
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Wound Botulism Outbreak
    • Authors: Kuehn B.
      Pages: 538 - 538
      Abstract: A rare 9-person outbreak of wound botulism in California was traced to use of black tar heroin, according to a CDC report.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0050
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • A Framework for Increasing Trust Between Patients and the Organizations
           That Care for Them
    • Authors: Lee TH; McGlynn EA, Safran D.
      Pages: 539 - 540
      Abstract: This Viewpoint summarizes key findings and conclusions of a working group of health care leaders and patient advocates who participated in a 2018 American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation Forum on [Re]Building Trust, convened to identify and prioritize interventions to restore trust in health care teams, standards, measures, and systems.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.19186
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Increasing the Rate of Smoking Cessation in the United States
    • Authors: Leischow SJ.
      Pages: 541 - 542
      Abstract: This Viewpoint argues that adoption of a combination of varenicline, nicotine replacement therapy, and behavioral support as first-line treatment for tobacco addiction could increase smoking cessation rates in the United States and proposes that varenicline be made an over-the-counter medication to help more smokers quit cigarettes and improve population health.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.21557
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • The Rise of Pseudomedicine for Dementia and Brain Health
    • Authors: Hellmuth J; Rabinovici GD, Miller BL.
      Pages: 543 - 544
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the growing market for complementary interventions to prevent cognitive impairment and promote brain health, and urges health care professionals to partner with patients to address their health concerns and help them understand the market forces behind unproven treatments.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.21560
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Permanent Ink: The Stories of Patients’ Tattoos
    • Authors: Luneburg P.
      Pages: 545 - 546
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay a physician recalls the connections she has forged with patients through conversations about their tattoos and reveals how she considers herself tattooed with the narratives and experiences they’ve shared.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0242
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Trust in Health Care
    • Authors: Bauchner H.
      Pages: 547 - 547
      Abstract: Trust is defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary as “assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something.” The Oxford dictionary has a similar definition: “firm belief in the reliability, truth, or ability of someone or something.”
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.20795
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Prevention of Cognitive Impairment With Intensive Systolic Blood Pressure
           Control
    • Authors: Yaffe K.
      Pages: 548 - 549
      Abstract: The prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD) and related dementia is expected to triple over the next 30 years in the United States and worldwide. Alzheimer disease drug development during the past 2 decades has met with disappointment. The last drug approved for this disease by the US Food and Drug Administration was in 2003 and was a drug with symptomatic, not disease-modifying, benefit. The challenges of drug development have been somewhat mitigated by advances in the determination of disease mechanisms, the identification of biomarkers and of genetic and nongenetic risk factors, and an updated conceptual framework for clinical development. In particular, an understanding that most neurodegenerative diseases take many years, if not decades, to develop and thus have a long preclinical phase has spurred interest in prevention. The identification of preclinical or early clinical phases, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), is critical for these primary and secondary prevention approaches.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0008
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Prevention of Perinatal Depression
    • Authors: Freeman MP.
      Pages: 550 - 552
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends “that clinicians provide or refer pregnant and postpartum persons who are at increased risk of perinatal depression to counseling interventions” (B recommendation; net benefit is moderate). This recommendation is supported by the accompanying evidence review that evaluated the benefits and harms of primary care–relevant interventions to prevent perinatal depression.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.21247
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Effect of Intensive vs Standard Blood Pressure Control on Probable
           Dementia
    • Pages: 553 - 561
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effect of treating adults with hypertension to a systolic blood pressure (SBP) goal of less than 120 mm Hg vs treating to a goal of less than 140 mm Hg on risk of probable dementia and mild cognitive impairment.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.21442
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Paracetamol and Ibuprofen and Morphine Consumption After Total Hip
           Arthroplasty
    • Authors: Thybo K; Hägi-Pedersen D, Dahl J, et al.
      Pages: 562 - 571
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of combination paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen at full vs half strength vs either drug alone on 24-hour patient-controlled morphine consumption and 90-day serious adverse events after total hip arthroplasty (THA).
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.22039
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Association of LVEF and Heart Failure Symptoms With Mortality After
           Elective Noncardiac Surgery
    • Authors: Lerman BJ; Popat RA, Assimes TL, et al.
      Pages: 572 - 579
      Abstract: This cohort study found that 90-day mortality following elective noncardiac surgery was higher among Veterans Affairs patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) compared with patients without heart failure.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0156
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • USPSTF Recommendation: Interventions to Prevent Perinatal Depression
    • Pages: 580 - 587
      Abstract: This 2019 Recommendation Statement from the US Preventive Services Task Force recommends that clinicians provide or refer pregnant and postpartum persons at increased risk of perinatal depression to counseling interventions, such as cognitive behavioral or interpersonal therapy (B recommendation).
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0007
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • USPSTF Evidence Report: Interventions to Prevent Perinatal Depression
    • Authors: O’Connor E; Senger CA, Henninger ML, et al.
      Pages: 588 - 601
      Abstract: This systematic review to support the 2019 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on interventions to prevent perinatal depression summarizes published evidence on the benefits and harms of primary care–relevant interventions to prevent depression during pregnancy or up to 1 year after childbirth.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.20865
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Using the E-Value to Assess the Potential Effect of Unmeasured Confounding
           in Observational Studies
    • Authors: Haneuse S; VanderWeele TJ, Arterburn D.
      Pages: 602 - 603
      Abstract: This Guide to Statistics and Methods discusses E-value analysis, an alternative approach to sensitivity analyses for unmeasured confounding in observational studies that specifies the degree of unmeasured confounding that would need to be operative to negate observed results in a study.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.21554
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • A Fussy Infant With a Generalized Papulovesicular Rash
    • Authors: Qian G; Hou L, Guo W.
      Pages: 604 - 605
      Abstract: A previously healthy 7-week-old infant had a 4-week history of a worsening, widespread, papulovesicular rash with nighttime irritability and restlessness; burrows were present, and Gram stain, potassium hydroxide preparation, and Tzanck smear were negative. A babysitter reported having nighttime pruritus. What would you do next'
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.20666
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Buprenorphine Coverage in the Medicare Part D Program for 2007 to 2018
    • Authors: Hartung DM; Johnston K, Geddes J, et al.
      Pages: 607 - 609
      Abstract: This study uses Medicare Part D prescription drug plan formulary files to characterize changes in coverage of buprenorphine and buprenorphine-naloxone for opioid use disorder in 2007, 2012, and 2018.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.20391
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Accuracy of CMS’ Opioid Overutilization Criteria for Classifying Opioid
           Use Disorder or Overdose
    • Authors: Wei Y; Chen C, Sarayani A, et al.
      Pages: 609 - 611
      Abstract: This study characterizes the accuracy of CMS’ Overutilization Monitoring System for correctly identifying prescription opioid users at risk of opioid use disorder (OUD) or overdose between 2011 and 2014.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.20404
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Age of Initiation of Cervical Cancer Screening
    • Authors: Dickinson JA.
      Pages: 611 - 612
      Abstract: To the Editor The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently recommended screening for cervical cancer every 3 years with cervical cytology in women aged 21 to 29 years (A recommendation). I question why cervical screening is recommended starting at age 21 years rather than 25 years. For unscreened women younger than 25 years, the incidence of invasive cervical cancer is extremely low. Many other countries with evidence-based national policies start screening at age 25 years or even 30 years. The task force did not appear to consider the question of starting age.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.19085
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Age of Initiation of Cervical Cancer Screening—Reply
    • Authors: Curry SJ; Krist AH, Owens DK.
      Pages: 612 - 612
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Dickinson raises the question as to why the USPSTF recommended screening for cervical cancer with cervical cytology every 3 years in women aged 21 to 29 years (A recommendation) rather than starting at age 25 years. In support of starting screening at a later age, he cites the low incidence of cervical cancer in younger women, a case-control study showing no benefit in screening women aged 22 to 24 years vs 25 to 29 years, and clinical data from Wales reporting follow-up testing rates after screening in younger women.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.19089
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Antibiotics for Ceftriaxone-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Bloodstream
           Infections
    • Authors: Rodríguez-Baño J; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez B, Kahlmeter G.
      Pages: 612 - 613
      Abstract: To the Editor The MERINO trial found that piperacillin-tazobactam did not result in noninferior 30-day mortality in patients with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections and ceftriaxone resistance, compared with meropenem. We think there might be reasons to explain the results other than differences in effectiveness of the antibiotic regimens.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.19345
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Antibiotics for Ceftriaxone Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Bloodstream
           Infections—Reply
    • Authors: Harris PA; Tambyah P, Paterson DL.
      Pages: 613 - 613
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Rodríguez-Baño and colleagues comment that our findings, in which 30-day all-cause mortality was 12.3% (23/187) of patients randomized to piperacillin-tazobactam compared with 3.7% (7/191) randomized to meropenem, stand in contrast to retrospective observational studies in which outcomes were similar between the 2 groups. In any observational study, the choice of antimicrobial is made by the clinician and is affected by clinical impression of how sick the patient is. Not surprisingly, patients at greater risk of dying may receive an antibiotic that is perceived as more potent, therefore biasing results even if adjustments have been made using severity of illness scores. This bias may explain the observation of Dr Prevel and colleagues that patients in our trial given appropriate initial empirical therapy had a higher risk of dying. We randomized only definitive therapy, not empirical therapy. Some AmpC-producing bacteria are susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, which is why patients with these infections were included in the study.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.19353
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Antibiotics for Ceftriaxone-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Bloodstream
           Infections
    • Authors: Prevel R; Berdaï D, Boyer A.
      Pages: 613 - 613
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Harris and colleagues conducted a well-designed study investigating whether carbapenems for extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing enterobacteria could be spared. The results should be interpreted with caution.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.19349
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Verdict: Stage Four
    • Authors: Ross A.
      Pages: 615 - 615
      Abstract: So blank, so lulled,I lived the seasons like a forest;so lank, so mild,the days disguised a warfare harvest.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14670
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Literature as an Aid to Restoration
    • Pages: 616 - 616
      Abstract: The war, which has in greater or lesser degree affected all the civilized nations of the earth, has given rise to novelties of performance and innovations of thought entirely unanticipated. Aside from the institution of new devices and operations that have demanded unusual ingenuity on the part of both the offensive and the defensive elements concerned, the very magnitude of many of the projects has tended to make ancient provisions in relation to them inadequate if not actually useless. The proportions of the war have been so vast, the numbers involved so huge, that new types of ability have been called for to manage the enormous machinery and its indescribable complexity. Tremendous efforts have become necessary to alter the inertia of traditional procedures.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15198
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Counseling Interventions to Prevent Perinatal Depression
    • Authors: Jin J.
      Pages: 620 - 620
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page explains the US Preventive Services Task Force’s 2019 recommendations to provide or refer pregnant and postpartum women at risk of perinatal depression to counseling interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal therapy.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.0253
      Issue No: Vol. 321, No. 6 (2019)
       
 
 
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