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Journal Cover   JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
  [SJR: 6.278]   [H-I: 491]   [974 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
   Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [11 journals]
  • Highlights for September 1, 2015
    • Pages: 853 - 855
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.11949
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 857 - 858
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.11950
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Gasometers
    • Authors: Cole TB.
      Pages: 860 - 861
      Abstract: Gasometers, also called gas holders, were large tanks for storing coal gas and maintaining pressure in distribution lines. In Great Britain, gas holders were common features of the industrial landscape before natural gas became the primary source of fuel for powering streetlights and heating homes. They were often constructed at the sites of gasworks, which manufactured coal gas by carbonizing coal. Although many gas holders are still standing, most are no longer in use.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.11951
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Long-term Mental Health Effects of Hurricane Katrina
    • Authors: Jacob JA.
      Pages: 863 - 865
      Abstract: This Medical News & Perspectives article looks at the long-term mental health effects of Hurricane Katrina 10 years after the disaster.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.9797
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Organoids Help Uncover Mechanisms of Autism
    • Authors: Hampton T.
      Pages: 866 - 866
      Abstract: Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and unaffected family members to grow 3-dimensional neural cultures (organoids) that recapitulate first trimester brain development, investigators at Yale University in New Haven have gained insights into early development of the autistic brain (Mariani J et al. Cell. 2015;162[2]:375-390).
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10607
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Novel Drug May Prevent and Treat Malaria
    • Authors: Hampton T.
      Pages: 866 - 866
      Abstract: An international team of scientists has developed a compound that looks promising as a novel antimalarial agent. The compound targets dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), an enzyme involved in the Plasmodium parasite’s de novo production of pyrimidines required for nucleic acid synthesis (Phillips MA et al. Sci Transl Med. 2015;7[296]:296ra111).
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.9802
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Lipid Molecules Help Bone Marrow Engraftment
    • Authors: Hampton T.
      Pages: 866 - 866
      Abstract: Using a unique approach to screen hundreds of compounds, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital and their colleagues have identified epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) as a family of lipids that can enhance stem cell engraftment in both zebrafish and mice (Li P et al. Nature. doi:10.1038/nature14569 [published online July 22, 2015]).
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10608
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Antibody Therapy Blocks Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury
    • Authors: Hampton T.
      Pages: 866 - 866
      Abstract: Treating mice with an antibody against the cis form of phosphorylated tau protein (cis P-tau) can prevent some of the pathological changes that occur after traumatic brain injury (TBI), researchers report (Kondo A et al. Nature. doi:10.1038/nature14658 [published online July 15, 2015]).
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10605
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Treatment for HCV Genotypes 3 and 4
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 867 - 867
      Abstract: The FDA has approved 2 new medications to treat 2 different hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes without coadministered interferon.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10492
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • New Drug to Lower LDL Cholesterol
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 867 - 867
      Abstract: The first cholesterol-lowering medication in a new class of drugs—proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors—has received FDA approval.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10491
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Nonsurgical Weight Loss Device
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 867 - 867
      Abstract: A newly approved balloon device is intended to aid weight loss in obese adults without the need for invasive surgery.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10199
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Evaluation of Flibanserin
    • Authors: Gellad WF; Flynn KE, Alexander G.
      Pages: 869 - 870
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the history of flibanserin and provides insight about the regulatory process.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8405
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Specialty Society Clinical Practice Guidelines
    • Authors: Classen DC; Mermel LA.
      Pages: 871 - 872
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses challenges of developing and implementing clinical practice guidelines.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.7462
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Body-Fixed Sensors for Parkinson Disease
    • Authors: Mirelman A; Giladi N, Hausdorff JM.
      Pages: 873 - 874
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the use of body-fixed sensors to accurately track disease status and the effect of treatment in patients with Parkinson disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8530
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Learning From the Past to Measure the Future
    • Authors: Cassel CK; Kronick R.
      Pages: 875 - 876
      Abstract: This Viewpoint, from the current CEO of the National Quality Forum and the director of AHRQ, discusses the changes in health care quality measurement over the past 15 years and opportunities for future progress.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.9186
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Beliefs
    • Authors: Rowe M; III.
      Pages: 877 - 878
      Abstract: Somehow, as a kid growing up in a nonreligious family, I developed a very strong sense of right and wrong, of what ethical and moral behavior should be. I have tried to follow this tenet throughout my life. When I became involved with medicine, I took to heart all the maxims we were taught, particularly “First, do no harm.” But for many years now I have realized that this concept is wrong, dead wrong.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.2146
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Autism Spectrum Disorders and Molecular Diagnostic Tests
    • Authors: Miles JH.
      Pages: 879 - 880
      Abstract: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are incompletely understood neurodevelopmental disorders diagnosed solely on the basis of behavioral assessments of social, communicative, and repetitive symptoms. Although ASD is behaviorally distinctive and reliably identified by experienced clinicians, the disorder is clinically and genetically extremely heterogeneous. Psychologists, who began to define autism subgroups in the 1990s, found neither behavioral measures of core ASD symptoms nor cognitive measures reliably identified subgroups with similar outcomes or risk of recurrence in siblings. At the same time, geneticists were attempting with negligible success to find “autism genes” using molecular linkage and association analysis that had successfully identified the genes for cystic fibrosis and Huntington disease. Above all, their failures were attributed to an inability to assemble homogeneous ASD cohorts for analysis. This spurred the search for biomarkers, sometimes called endophenotypes, that might sort out the etiologic heterogeneity associated with ASD. The goal was to identify features that occur consistently in a portion of patients with ASD and are relatively discrete, quantifiable, and most importantly etiologically relevant. Physical dysmorphology appeared to fit the criteria.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.9577
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Genomics and Outcomes in Pediatric Oncology
    • Authors: Schnepp RW; Bosse KR, Maris JM.
      Pages: 881 - 883
      Abstract: Precision medicine, the individualization of health care based on unique patient-specific variables, is not new, especially within oncology. Historically, there has been a “depersonalization” of cancer care by defining histotype-specific standard-of-care treatments for the majority of malignancies, although in contrast oncologists have been adept at individualizing therapy, especially when confronted with disease relapse. Practicing oncologists seek evidence-based approaches to improve patient outcomes, but much of the current personalization of care remains largely empirical. Nevertheless, over the past decade there has been increasing enthusiasm for using genomic data to more precisely diagnose cancer, predict outcomes, and prescribe “targeted” therapies. Although substantial progress has been made, both anticipated and unanticipated barriers exist in integrating sequencing technologies into the care of patients with cancer. Clearly, for multiple reasons, many challenges remain to prove that personalized genomic medicine can substantively improve outcomes for patients with cancer. These challenges are further accentuated with childhood cancers.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.9794
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Effect of Finerenone on Albuminuria in Patients With Diabetic Nephropathy
    • Authors: Bakris GL; Agarwal R, Chan JC, et al.
      Pages: 884 - 894
      Abstract: This randomized trial compares the safety and effects of finerenone, a nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, on albuminuria in patients with diabetic nephropathy already taking renin-angiotensin blockers.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10081
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Molecular Diagnostic Yield of Genetic Tests in Children With Autism
    • Authors: Tammimies K; Marshall CR, Walker S, et al.
      Pages: 895 - 903
      Abstract: This case series of children with autism spectrum disorder compares the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis vs whole-exome sequencing.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10078
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Blood Pressure Control and Recurrent Intracerebral Hemorrhage
    • Authors: Biffi A; Anderson CD, Battey TK, et al.
      Pages: 904 - 912
      Abstract: This cohort study reports that among patients with a first episode of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), inadequate blood pressure control was associated with higher risk of recurrence of ICH.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10082
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Integrative Clinical Sequencing of Young Patients With Cancer
    • Authors: Mody RJ; Wu Y, Lonigro RJ, et al.
      Pages: 913 - 925
      Abstract: This case series involving children and young adults with cancer whose genomic sequencing results were the basis for clinical case recommendations charaterizes the number of clinically actionable findings and resulting patient outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10080
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Medical Therapies for Adult Chronic Sinusitis
    • Authors: Rudmik L; Soler ZM.
      Pages: 926 - 939
      Abstract: This systematic review summarizes the evidence-based medical treatment of adult chronic sinusitis and propses a treatment algorithm.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.7544
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Accounting for Missing Data in Clinical Research
    • Authors: Newgard CD; Lewis RJ.
      Pages: 940 - 941
      Abstract: This Guide to Statistics and Methods characterizes the strengths and limitations of different approaches for modeling missing data in clinical research using the example of a trial that applied several of these techniques.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.10516
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Diplopia and Ataxia in a Heavy Smoker
    • Authors: Yang Y; Haigentz M, Jr, Welch M.
      Pages: 942 - 943
      Abstract: A 64-year-old man with coronary artery disease and an 80 pack-year smoking habit presented with vertigo, diplopia, ataxia, cranial nerve palsy findings, and pulmonary nodules with mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT. What would you do next'
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8617
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • US Bicycle Injuries and Hospital Admissions, 1998-2013
    • Authors: Sanford T; McCulloch CE, Callcut RA, et al.
      Pages: 947 - 949
      Abstract: This study uses National Electronic Injury Surveillance System data to describe trends in adult cycling injuries and related hospital admissions in the United States.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8295
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Assessing Eligibility for Anticoagulation After Atrial Fibrillation
    • Authors: Lip GH; Lane DA.
      Pages: 949 - 950
      Abstract: In Reply Many of the clinical risk scores currently used in everyday practice have not been formally tested in prospective randomized clinical trials. Variability in INRs and TTR is dependent on many clinical risk factors, and the SAMe-TT2R2 score simply puts the more common clinical factors into a simple acronym for easy use in everyday clinical practice rather than relying on guesswork.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8995
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Assessing Eligibility for Anticoagulation After Atrial Fibrillation
    • Authors: Marietta M; Formoso G, Marata A.
      Pages: 949 - 949
      Abstract: To the Editor Some points in the review by Drs Lip and Lane about stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation deserve further discussion.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8992
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Trends in Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome
    • Authors: Wong RJ.
      Pages: 950 - 951
      Abstract: In Reply The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among adults in the United States was 34.7% in 2011-2012; however, sex-specific differences were observed, with a significantly higher prevalence in women (36.6%; 95% CI, 34.9%-38.4%) compared with men (32.8%; 95% CI, 31.0%-34.6%) (P 
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8628
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Trends in Prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome
    • Authors: Lovre D; Mauvais-Jarvis F.
      Pages: 950 - 950
      Abstract: To the Editor Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Dr Aguilar and colleagues reported updated trends in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the adult US population from 2003 through 2012. Although the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome decreased in women between 2007-2008 and 2011-2012, the prevalence in 2011-2012 was still significantly higher in women than men (36.6% vs 32.8%).
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8625
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Maintenance of Certification and the Interstate Licensure Compact
    • Authors: Smith GC; Sr.
      Pages: 951 - 952
      Abstract: To the Editor Drs Teirstein and Topol suggested that the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact being enacted by states requires physician participation in maintenance of certification (MOC). This is not the case.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8906
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Maintenance of Certification and the Interstate Licensure Compact
    • Authors: Teirstein P; Topol EJ.
      Pages: 952 - 952
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Smith questions our assertion that the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact being enacted by states requires physician participation in the highly controversial MOC programs. We find this issue to be a point of frequent confusion and we appreciate the attempt to clarify the requirements. Smith accurately states that the Federation of State Medical Boards Interstate License Compact does not require MOC, but does require specialty certification.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.8912
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Clarification About Lower-Cost Drug
    • Pages: 952 - 952
      Abstract: In the Capitol Health Call article entitled “Senator Urges VA to Nullify Patents for High-Cost Hepatitis C Drugs,” published in the July 14, 2015, issue of JAMA, the proposal for providing patented hepatitis C medication at a lower cost was unclear. In his letter, Sen Bernie Sanders (I, Vt) mentioned a legal statute that, rather than invalidate or nullify the patent, would allow Gilead to seek reimbursement from the Department of Veterans Affairs should they enlist third parties to manufacture the drug Solvadi (sofusbuvir) to make the drug less expensive for veterans infected with hepatitis C. This article and its title were corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.9906
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • In the Meantime, Life
    • Authors: Halberstadt C.
      Pages: 953 - 953
      Abstract: Closer as it comes, the endwith all its rituals and ways of goingseems to matter more and matter less.I have my way.I will be washed and wrappedand put into the earthto share my body with the groundand when all is gone some part of memay return through rivers to the seawhere all once had begun.I will not be burnt or laid out bareupon a mountaintop to feed the birdswho take us in their bodies to the skynor will I lie upon a drying frame of woodor be nibbled by the ocean’s rocking tides.It matters not. The change will happen and the end will comeand only how I’ve lived will matteras I pass someday forgotten into time.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.5885
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • What’s in a Name'
    • Pages: 954 - 954
      Abstract: When Socrates went around questioning his fellow Athenians, seeking definitions for various abstract terms like virtue, justice, and love, he had great difficulty in finding clear meanings. But he had much better success with simpler and more concrete words. In his day there seemed little difficulty in defining a shoemaker, a physician, a sailmaker, or a musician.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.11958
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
  • Adult Chronic Sinusitis
    • Authors: Rudmik L; Soler ZM.
      Pages: 964 - 964
      Abstract:
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Sep 2015 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2015.7892
      Issue No: Vol. 314, No. 9 (2015)
       
 
 
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