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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 1754  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for July 17, 2018
    • Pages: 215 - 217
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12460
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 219 - 220
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12461
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • “Is There a Doctor on the Plane'”
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 221 - 223
      Abstract: In this Medical News article, frequent traveler Rachel Zang, MD, talks about her experiences helping ill patients aboard commercial airline flights and discusses what all physicians should know about in-flight medical emergencies.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6654
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • What’s the Best Way to Treat Normal-Weight People With Metabolic
           Abnormalities'
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 223 - 225
      Abstract: This Medical News story discusses different approaches to treating normal-weight individuals who have metabolic abnormalities that are usually associated with overweight and obesity.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8188
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • The Risks and Benefits of Expedited Drug Reviews
    • Authors: Frakt AB.
      Pages: 225 - 226
      Abstract: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees several programs that expedite approval of certain drugs that treat serious conditions and address unmet medical needs. On average, a drug in an expedited program reaches market almost a year sooner than other drugs. However, expediting drug approvals raises concerns that important safety or effectiveness information will be missed, potentially heightening risk of patient harm.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8262
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Efforts to Address Snakebite
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 227 - 227
      Abstract: The World Health Assembly adopted a resolution during its 71st meeting to make snakebite envenoming a high priority. The measure aims to ensure that countries develop a common plan of action to improve access to safe, effective, and affordable treatment for individuals bitten by venomous snakes. Last year, snakebite envenoming was added to the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) list of neglected tropical diseases.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9118
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Global Temperature Affects Dengue
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 227 - 227
      Abstract: Millions of cases of dengue fever could be averted in Latin America and the Caribbean by limiting the increase in global warming by the end of the century, according to a new study by investigators from the United Kingdom and Brazil.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9737
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Older People With Disabilities Overlooked in Humanitarian Response
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 227 - 227
      Abstract: As many as 14 million older people with disabilities around the world are affected by humanitarian disasters, but not all are benefitting from humanitarian relief efforts, according to a report from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and HelpAge International, a nongovernmental organization working for the rights of older people around the world.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9738
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Caffeine Supplement Warning
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 228 - 228
      Abstract: Two manufacturers have received warnings that their highly concentrated caffeine supplements violate the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act because consumers could find it difficult to accurately measure a safe amount of either product. Excessive amounts of caffeine can cause nausea, heart palpitations, arrhythmia, and death.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9508
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • FDA Prods “Clean Meat” Discussion
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 228 - 228
      Abstract: The FDA has launched a public discussion on the safe development of so-called cultured food, specifically meat, poultry, and seafood made from cells collected from animals and grown in a laboratory.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9507
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Generic for Opioid Use Disorder
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 228 - 228
      Abstract: A generic version of buprenorphine and naloxone combined in a sublingual film has received FDA approval to treat opioid use disorder.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9584
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • How HIPAA Harms Care, and How to Stop It
    • Authors: Berwick DM; Gaines ME.
      Pages: 229 - 230
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, Berwick and Gaines review common misconceptions about Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) requirements regarding personal health information and propose steps the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) can take to better balance privacy protections with the need to ensure health information is available for clinical care in reasonable time at reasonable expense.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8829
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • HIPAA and Protecting Health Information in the 21st Century
    • Authors: Cohen I; Mello MM.
      Pages: 231 - 232
      Abstract: This Viewpoint posits that HIPAA no longer fully protects health information in today’s big data era in which health data are collected and exchanged in nonclinical settings, such as social media, apps, and search engines, and proposes principles around which reform of health information privacy protections should be organized.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5630
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Health Data and Privacy in the Era of Social Media
    • Authors: Gostin LO; Halabi SF, Wilson K.
      Pages: 233 - 234
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses personal health information on social media and other sites and ways in which this information can and should be protected.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8374
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Reality vs Hope in the Face of a Dire Prognosis
    • Authors: Mannix R.
      Pages: 235 - 235
      Abstract: This narrative medicine essay explores the difference between understanding a dire prognosis and believing it.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8654
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Bridging the Evidence-to-Practice Gap in Stroke Care
    • Authors: Hill MD; Kamal N, Jeerakathil T.
      Pages: 236 - 237
      Abstract: Stroke is particularly devastating globally. Although much progress on stroke has been made, stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the leading cause of death in China, a country with a population greater than 1.5 billion. Indeed, the burden of stroke is substantial in Asian countries because of a higher stroke incidence and evolving access to modern stroke care. Stroke care may be one area of medicine that has a particularly large evidence-to-practice gap. Modern stroke treatment requires technology including imaging equipment, as well as stroke units and rehabilitation units, all of which can be prohibitively expensive. Stroke care requires organization and team-based delivery, which simply are not in place in much of the world. Worldwide, many patients with stroke do not receive up-to-date care for acute stroke or treatment to prevent stroke. What is known is not applied for multiple reasons.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8803
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Digital Media and ADHD Symptoms in Adolescents
    • Authors: Radesky J.
      Pages: 237 - 239
      Abstract: Over the past 10 years, the introduction of mobile and interactive technologies has occurred at such a rapid pace that researchers have had difficulty publishing evidence within relevant time frames. While software applications such as Angry Birds and Pokémon Go reached adoption by an estimated 50 million global users within 35 and 19 days, respectively, of their release, most research studies encompass years from inception to publication of findings. As a result, crafting evidence-based recommendations that address all of the technologies children and adolescents currently use has been challenging. It is therefore an important contribution when a large, well-designed, longitudinal study accounting for multiple sociodemographic confounders is published.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8932
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • The Status of End-of Life Care in the United States
    • Authors: Emanuel EJ.
      Pages: 239 - 241
      Abstract: Almost everyone has a story about end-of-life care gone bad. The available data reveal many reasons for frustration with how care for dying patients is currently delivered. But rather than see the glass as half empty, the historical perspective offered by Teno and colleagues in this issue of JAMA is a reminder of how far the US health care system has come on end-of-life care. This study suggests 4 important messages about the status of end-of-life care.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.10062
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • USPSTF Recommendations for Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk With
           Nontraditional Risk Factors
    • Authors: Wilkins JT; Lloyd-Jones DM.
      Pages: 242 - 244
      Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in the United States and a major source of morbidity. Individuals in the United States have a 1 in 3 chance of dying from CVD and a 2 in 3 chance of developing CVD before death. However, control of risk factors, such as with cholesterol-lowering statin medications, can substantially reduce the likelihood of mortality and morbidity among at-risk patients. Identifying individuals who will benefit from this highly efficacious class of medications has been a priority of CVD prevention. For the purposes of primary prevention, the estimation of absolute risk of developing a CVD event is used to assist clinicians in determining which patients are likely to benefit from statin therapy, because net benefit (well in excess of any potential harms) is clearly seen in patients with estimated absolute risk of 7.5% or greater over 10 years. Estimation of absolute risk is practical, because it can be performed rapidly in clinical practice with the use of clinical calculators. Furthermore, quantitative risk estimation allows for a direct comparison of the risks and benefits of statin therapy so clinicians and patients can make informed decisions about therapy.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9346
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Effect of a Multifaceted Intervention on Adherence to Performance Measures
           in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients
    • Authors: Wang Y; Li Z, Zhao X, et al.
      Pages: 245 - 254
      Abstract: This cluster randomized clinical trial determines whether a multifaceted quality improvement intervention can improve adherence to evidence-based performance measures in patients with acute ischemic stroke in China.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8802
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Digital Media Use and ADHD in Adolescents
    • Authors: Ra CK; Cho J, Stone MD, et al.
      Pages: 255 - 263
      Abstract: This 24-month cohort study tracks high school students in Los Angeles County, California, who were not initially assessed as having ADHD symptoms to compare frequency of use of digital media platforms with experiencing ADHD symptoms.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8931
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Site of Death, Place of Care, and Health Care Transitions Among US
           Medicare Beneficiaries, 2000-2015
    • Authors: Teno JM; Gozalo P, Trivedi AN, et al.
      Pages: 264 - 271
      Abstract: This population epidemiology study characterizes trends in care in the intensive care unit during the last 30 days of life and in posthospital transitions and site of death among Medicare beneficiaries who died between 2000 and 2015.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8981
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • USPSTF Recommendation: Risk Assessment for CVD With Nontraditional Risk
           Factors
    • Pages: 272 - 280
      Abstract: This 2018 Recommendation Statement from the US Preventive Services Task Force concludes that current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of adding ABI, hsCRP, or CAC score measures to traditional risk assessment for CVD in asymptomatic adults to prevent CVD events (I statement).
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8359
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • USPSTF Report: Nontraditional Risk Factors in CVD Risk Assessment
    • Authors: Lin JS; Evans CV, Johnson E, et al.
      Pages: 281 - 297
      Abstract: This systematic review to support the 2018 US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement on use of nontraditional risk factors in cardiovascular disease risk assessment summarizes published evidence on the benefits and harms of using ABI, hsCRP, and CAC score measures in CVD risk assessment and decisions about initiation of preventive therapy.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4242
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Carcinoembryonic Antigen for Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer Recurrence
    • Authors: Kim SS; Donahue TR, Girgis MD.
      Pages: 298 - 299
      Abstract: A 78-year-old man with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level of 11.0 ng/mL but no evidence of metastasis underwent a right hemicolectomy (surgical pathology showed a 5.5-cm adenocardinoma with 0 of 19 lymph nodes positive for cancer). At 6 months, CEA was 3.0 ng/mL. At 12 months, CEA was 5.1 ng/mL and then 6.1 ng/mL with repeat testing. What would you do next'
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.8424
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Clinical Trial Evidence Supporting FDA Approval of Drugs Granted
           Breakthrough Therapy Designation
    • Authors: Puthumana J; Wallach JD, Ross JS.
      Pages: 301 - 303
      Abstract: This study used the Drugs@FDA database to review FDA-approved “breakthrough” therapies from 2012 to 2017 (characterizing the pivotal clinical trials that serve as the basis of FDA approval), and premarket development and review times to assess the strength of evidence supporting breakthrough approvals.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7619
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Prophylactic Haloperidol for Critically Ill Adults
    • Authors: Strik JH; Schieveld JM.
      Pages: 303 - 303
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr van den Boogaard and colleagues examined the effect of haloperidol on survival among critically ill adults at high risk of delirium. We have a number of concerns.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6041
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Prophylactic Haloperidol for Critically Ill Adults
    • Authors: Torbic H; Duggal A.
      Pages: 303 - 304
      Abstract: To the Editor The Prophylactic Haloperidol Use for Delirium in ICU Patients at High Risk for Delirium (REDUCE) trial found that prophylactic haloperidol did not improve survival at 28 days compared with placebo. Despite the authors’ attempt to capture an at-risk patient population, the enrolled patients did not have many of the risk factors known to be associated with the development of delirium. The mean age of enrolled patients was 67 years, baseline hypertension was not reported, and patients with a history of dementia, alcohol abuse, and psychiatric disorders were excluded. The mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 19. Two-thirds of patients were mechanically ventilated with 41% having acute respiratory failure. One-third of patients had sepsis, and the mean prediction of delirium in ICU patients score was 26. These variables suggest that patients may not have been at high risk of delirium.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6045
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Prophylactic Haloperidol for Critically Ill Adults
    • Authors: van den Boogaard M; Slooter AC, Pickkers P.
      Pages: 304 - 305
      Abstract: In Reply Drs Strik and Schieveld ask why survival was the primary outcome of the REDUCE study. We chose survival based on a previous study and because this is an unequivocal, clinically relevant outcome. We hypothesized that prophylactic haloperidol would improve ICU patients’ 28-day survival compared with placebo by 15%.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6049
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
    • Authors: Tagami T; Sakka SG, Monnet X.
      Pages: 305 - 305
      Abstract: To the Editor In the review article on acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) by Dr Fan and colleagues, the authors mentioned that “more-direct and reproducible methods of measuring pulmonary vascular permeability and extravascular lung water are needed.” Although they implied that these variables are not available yet, 2 hemodynamic monitoring systems that allow bedside estimation of extravascular lung water (EVLW) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI) are currently available worldwide.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5924
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
    • Authors: Fuller BM; Mohr NM, Kollef MH.
      Pages: 305 - 306
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Fan and colleagues reviewed advances in ARDS diagnosis and treatment. We believe the most important comment in the article was: “Strategies that enhance implementation of these clinical recommendations could translate into substantial improvements in patient outcomes.” We agree but are concerned by a paucity of discussion on ARDS prevention and a narrow focus on ARDS in the intensive care unit (ICU).
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5928
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Diagnosis and Treatment of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome—Reply
    • Authors: Fan E; Brodie D, Slutsky AS.
      Pages: 306 - 306
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Tagami and colleagues highlight the potential of EVLW and PVPI in the diagnosis of ARDS. Indeed, the ARDS Definition Task Force considered variables such as EVLW and PVPI for inclusion as diagnostic criteria. At the time, the panel thought that the technology to measure these variables was relatively costly, invasive, and had methodological limitations. However, in patients without an ARDS risk factor, objective measurements such as EVLW or PVPI may help to rule out hydrostatic edema. The requirement for these criteria in the diagnosis of ARDS may further contribute to underrecognition in low- and middle-income countries where the technology may be less prevalent. Future consensus panels should consider the suitability of these variables for inclusion in a revised definition of ARDS.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5932
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Off-label Use of Medications
    • Authors: Maschke K.
      Pages: 306 - 307
      Abstract: To the Editor In their Editorial about off-label use of gabapentin, Drs Wallach and Ross recommended several regulatory and postmarketing surveillance initiatives that could result in better efforts to evaluate the off-label safety and efficacy of medical products. The authors noted that with the exception of 2 indications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and 2 unapproved indications for gabapentin use, approximately 50 Cochrane reviews and updates of off-label use of gabapentin concluded there was “insufficient evidence, no benefit, or benefit based on low-quality evidence” for the off-label indications.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6517
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Off-label Use of Medications—Reply
    • Authors: Wallach JD; Ross JS.
      Pages: 307 - 308
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Maschke that clinicians must play an important role in ensuring safe and appropriate use of prescription drugs, regardless of whether the intended use is for an FDA-approved or off-label indication. Maschke suggests that clinicians should be knowledgeable about the evidence guiding off-label drug use, should prescribe drugs for these uses only when the evidence is sufficient and reliable, should not rely on information from pharmaceutical companies promoting off-label uses, and should inform patients when drugs are not approved by the FDA for the intended use. We agree with these suggestions and hope the final recommendation would be realized through shared decision making between patients and clinicians.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6521
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Data Errors in Figure 3 and Labels Transposed in Figure 4
    • Pages: 308 - 308
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation entitled “Association Between Oxygen Saturation Targeting and Death or Disability in Extremely Preterm Infants in the Neonatal Oxygenation Prospective Meta-analysis Collaboration,” published in the June 5, 2018, issue of JAMA, there were data errors in Figure 3 for the row “z score for infant body weight at postmenstrual age of 36 wk” and male and female were transposed in Figure 4. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9635
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Removal of Drug Name From the Table
    • Pages: 308 - 308
      Abstract: In the Medical Letter entitled “Abuse-Deterrent Opioids” published in the May 15, 2018, issue of JAMA, a drug name is being removed from the Table. In the second to last entry in the Table, “Oxycodone ER/Naltrexone,” the only drug listed should be “Troxyca ER (Pfizer).” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9636
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Shadow Children
    • Authors: Coulehan J.
      Pages: 309 - 309
      Abstract: These are children who don’t have cancer,who bunk overnight with their friendswhile their siblings are getting anotherimmersion in poison, and their mothersare napping next to beds in the hospital,and their fathers have had to travel.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.1460
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Relation of Education to Preventive Medicine
    • Pages: 310 - 310
      Abstract: The triumphs of preventive medicine are a matter of just pride to the medical profession. But while we may congratulate ourselves on what has already been accomplished, we must admit that much remains to be done. Considered in the light of what is possible, that which has been done is so far behind what might have been done as to constitute after all an occasion rather for regret, coupled with a stimulus to renewed and greater effort, than for self-gratulation.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12468
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Risk Assessment for Cardiovascular Disease with Nontraditional Risk
           Factors
    • Authors: Jin J.
      Pages: 316 - 316
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations on assessment for cardiovascular disease using nontraditional risk factors.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9122
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 3 (2018)
       
 
 
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