for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 1840  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for December 4, 2018
    • Pages: 2171 - 2173
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12658
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 2175 - 2176
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12659
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • JAMA Network Articles of the Year 2018
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 2188 - 2191
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses the top-viewed articles published in the JAMA family of journals over the past year.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17934
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Airway Cells Make Trade-off When Fighting the Cold Virus
    • Authors: Hampton T.
      Pages: 2192 - 2192
      Abstract: Non–influenza-related respiratory virus infections cause an estimated 500 million colds per year in the United States. However, recent research suggests that disease-causing viruses enter individuals’ nasal passages much more frequently than they cause illness. In many cases, airway antiviral defense responses effectively clear local virus before it causes noticeable symptoms. Now, researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism involving 2 antagonistic host-defense responses that may help explain why some people exposed to rhinovirus become ill while others do not.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12867
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Devices Help Surgeons See Parathyroid Tissue
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 2193 - 2193
      Abstract: Two newly approved devices will make it easier for surgeons to locate parathyroid tissue during procedures such as thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.18768
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • New Flu Drug Approved
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 2193 - 2193
      Abstract: The first new antiviral treatment for acute, uncomplicated influenza in nearly 20 years received FDA approval in late October, just as a small uptick in outpatient visits for flu-like symptoms was reported.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.18772
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Warning on Warfarin Monitoring
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 2193 - 2193
      Abstract: The FDA expected patients and physicians who use at-home or in-the-office medical devices that monitor warfarin levels to have accurate test strips by late November after a Class I recall, the most serious type.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.18789
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Vaccines as an Integral Component of Cancer Immunotherapy
    • Authors: Schlom J; Gulley JL.
      Pages: 2195 - 2196
      Abstract: This Viewpoint reviews recent preclinical developments in the use of therapeutic cancer vaccines to induce immune responses to tumor-associated antigens, alone or in combination with other therapies, such as tumor checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies, to render resistant (cold) tumor cells susceptible to T-cell antitumor activity.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.9511
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • The Role of Managed Care in Redistributing Benefits from Health to Social
           Services
    • Authors: Shrank WH; Keyser DJ, Lovelace JG.
      Pages: 2197 - 2198
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the increasing investments managed care organizations are making in social services to improve members’ health and decrease costs, and argues that the trend could free up resources for investment in the health of groups not covered by managed care plans.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14987
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Clinical Decision Support in the Era of Artificial Intelligence
    • Authors: Shortliffe EH; Sepúlveda MJ.
      Pages: 2199 - 2200
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the potential capabilities and challenges of decision support systems that are designed to be used interactively by clinicians.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17163
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • The Pain of Febromyalgia and Assembling a Tool Kit, Building a Life
    • Authors: Boehnke KF.
      Pages: 2201 - 2202
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, the author shares how he assembled the tools to help him manage his pain from fibromyalgia and argues for reuniting pain medicine with compassion.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17722
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Oncology in Transition
    • Authors: Schrag D; Basch E.
      Pages: 2203 - 2204
      Abstract: Contemporary challenges and changes in the field of oncology reflect and often magnify medicine more broadly. Morbidity and mortality are often substantial, treatment is expensive, and management is complex necessitating interdisciplinary coordination across every field of medicine. The recent emergence of immunotherapy and adoptive cellular therapy has generated tremendous excitement because these approaches can sometimes achieve cure or durable responses, even in the setting of advanced cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17057
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Hypothermia After Traumatic Brain Injury
    • Authors: Docherty A; Emelifeonwu J, Andrews PD.
      Pages: 2204 - 2206
      Abstract: The report of the Prophylactic Hypothermia Trial to Lessen Traumatic Brain Injury—Randomized Clinical Trial (POLAR-RCT) by Cooper and colleagues in this issue of JAMA describes an international, multicenter, randomized clinical trial of early therapeutic hypothermia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to increase favorable functional outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17121
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Medicaid Expansion and Mortality Among Patients Initiating Dialysis for
           Irreversible Kidney Failure
    • Authors: Erickson KF; Ho V, Winkelmayer WC.
      Pages: 2206 - 2208
      Abstract: A key provision in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 provided federal funding for states to expand Medicaid coverage to individuals earning up to 138% of the federal poverty line. Currently, 33 states plus Washington, DC, have elected to expand Medicaid coverage, and others may soon follow suit. Polls suggest that Medicaid expansion is one of the more popular components of the ACA. Among the approximately 20 million individuals in the United States who newly acquired health insurance following the ACA, more than half received coverage through state Medicaid expansions.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14291
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Time for Clinicians to Embrace Their Inner Bayesian'
    • Authors: Lewis RJ; Angus DC.
      Pages: 2208 - 2210
      Abstract: This issue of JAMA includes a Special Communication by Goligher et al reporting a Bayesian reanalysis of the results from the recent Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) to Rescue Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) (EOLIA) trial. This trial, which tested whether routine early ECMO reduced mortality for patients with severe ARDS, was stopped early for futility, and concluded that ECMO was not shown to reduce mortality. In contrast, Goligher et al found it highly probable that ECMO lowers mortality, incorporating various assumptions, although it is unclear whether the benefit is as large as that assumed when the EOLIA trial was designed. How can the conclusions drawn from these 2 analyses of the same trial be so different'
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16916
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Effect of Early Sustained Prophylactic Hypothermia on Neurologic Outcomes
           in Patients With Severe TBI
    • Authors: Cooper D; Nichol AD, Bailey M, et al.
      Pages: 2211 - 2220
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of prophylactic hypothermia targeted to a core temperature of 33°C-35°C vs usual normothermic emergency care on neurologic outcomes or independent living of adult patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17075
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Association Between Oral Anticoagulant PPI Cotherapy and UGl Bleeding
    • Authors: Ray WA; Chung CP, Murray KT, et al.
      Pages: 2221 - 2230
      Abstract: This pharmacoepidemiology study examines the association between oral anticoagulants (warfarin, apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban), cotherapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and upper gastrointestinal (UGI) tract bleeding in Medicare beneficiaries.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17242
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Association Between RAS Inhibitor Treament After TAVR and Mortality
    • Authors: Inohara T; Manandhar P, Kosinski AS, et al.
      Pages: 2231 - 2241
      Abstract: This cohort study uses registry and Medicare claims data to investigate associations between prescription for a renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitor at hospital discharge after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and 1-year all-cause mortality and heart failure readmissions.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.18077
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Association of Medicaid Expansion With 1-Year Mortality Among Patients
           With ESRD
    • Authors: Swaminathan S; Sommers BD, Thorsness R, et al.
      Pages: 2242 - 2250
      Abstract: This before-after study examines changes in 1-year mortality among nonelderly patients initiating dialysis in states that did vs did not participate in Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act in 2014.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16504
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • ECMO for ARDS: Bayesian Analysis and Posterior Probability of Mortality
           Benefit
    • Authors: Goligher EC; Tomlinson G, Hajage D, et al.
      Pages: 2251 - 2259
      Abstract: This Special Communication describes a Bayesian reanalysis of a randomized clinical trial comparing the effects on mortality of venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) vs conventional mechanical ventilation among patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, performed because of divergence between the clinical vs statistical significance of the trial’s findings and continued controversy over the benefit of ECMO.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14276
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Incidental Pulmonary Nodules Detected on CT Images
    • Authors: Anderson IJ; Davis AM.
      Pages: 2260 - 2261
      Abstract: This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the 2017 Fleischner Society guidelines on management of incidental pulmonary nodules detected on computed tomography (CT) imaging.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16336
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Two New Intra-Articular Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis
    • Pages: 2262 - 2263
      Abstract: This Medical Letter review summarizes doses and formulations of 2 recently approved treatments for osteoarthritic knee pain, a single-injection hyaluronic acid gel (Durolane) and an extended-release formulation of triamcinolone acetonide (Zilretta).
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.13134
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Non–US-Born and Noncitizen Health Care Professionals in the United
           States, 2016
    • Authors: Patel YM; Ly DP, Hicks T, et al.
      Pages: 2265 - 2267
      Abstract: This national survey study uses US Census Bureau data to estimate the proportion of non–US-born and noncitizen health care professionals in the United States in 2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.14270
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Association Between LCME Diversity Accreditation Standards and US Medical
           School Diversity
    • Authors: Boatright DH; Samuels EA, Cramer L, et al.
      Pages: 2267 - 2269
      Abstract: This study examines the change in matriculant sex, race, and ethnicity in US medical schools after the 2009 implementation of diversity standards from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) meant to broaden diversity among qualified applicants.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.13705
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Acupuncture for Aromatase Inhibitor–-Related Joint Pain Among Breast
           Cancer Patients
    • Authors: Mao JJ; Farrar JT.
      Pages: 2269 - 2270
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Hershman and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of acupuncture’s efficacy in reducing aromatase inhibitor–related joint pain among breast cancer survivors compared with sham acupuncture and waitlist control. They concluded that “the study results rejected the null hypothesis that true acupuncture generated the same outcomes as sham acupuncture and waitlist control, although the magnitude of the effect did not achieve the prespecified difference of 2 points,” having selected a 2-point difference as clinically important. However, the difference of 2 points or 30% was never meant to be applied to between-group differences, but rather is the change that represents a clinically important difference for an individual patient, creating dichotomous groups of responders and nonresponders to the therapy. The authors did appropriately apply the clinically important criteria to their data in a post hoc analysis showing that the number of patients who achieved a 30% difference was 52.0% in the treatment group compared with 33.3% in the sham acupuncture group and 29.4% in the waitlist control group. This dichotomous outcome was also statistically significant.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16736
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Acupuncture for Aromatase Inhibitor–-Related Joint Pain Among Breast
           Cancer Patients
    • Authors: Liu C; Zhang H, Sun C.
      Pages: 2270 - 2270
      Abstract: To the Editor In an RCT, the authors demonstrated that true acupuncture, compared with sham acupuncture or with waitlist control, resulted in a statistically significant reduction in aromatase inhibitor–related joint pain among women with breast cancer at 6 weeks. There are several issues that require comment.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16740
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Acupuncture for Aromatase Inhibitor–Related Joint Pain Among Breast
           Cancer Patients—Reply
    • Authors: Hershman DL; Unger JM, Crew K.
      Pages: 2270 - 2271
      Abstract: In Reply As Drs Mao and Farrar point out, based on current guidelines, clinical trials reporting pain should report the proportion of patients with a clinical response (either a 2-point change on an 11-point scale or a 30% reduction). Our study was designed to detect a 2-point difference between groups. We based this on the study by Farrar et al, although we recognize now that their study did not actually define what a clinically meaningful difference between groups is. As we stated in the discussion, several recent randomized studies of pain control interventions have reported clinically meaningful between-group mean differences ranging from 0.7 to 1.0 points. Our results fell within this range.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16744
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Sepsis Bundles and Mortality Among Pediatric Patients
    • Authors: Scott HF; Balamuth F, Paul RM.
      Pages: 2271 - 2271
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Evans and colleagues demonstrated that delivery of bundled care within 1 hour was associated with a significant reduction in pediatric sepsis mortality in 59 hospitals in New York State, although individual bundle elements were not. Prior pediatric studies have similarly shown that timely bundled sepsis care was associated with improved outcomes, despite differences in bundle components and population. These studies together suggest that delivery of locally defined best care, including timely fluid and antibiotics, improves outcomes, even when bundle details differ.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16748
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Sepsis Bundles and Mortality Among Pediatric Patients—Reply
    • Authors: Evans IR; Angus DC, Seymour CW.
      Pages: 2271 - 2272
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Scott and colleagues discuss the contribution of the New York pediatric sepsis mandate analysis to prior literature and highlight challenges to the study of time-sensitive sepsis bundles in children. We agree that there is heterogeneity of sepsis cases and criteria for treatment across New York hospitals. We were encouraged that our findings were consistent after extensive adjustment for measured confounders in multiple sensitivity analyses. We also agree that consensus definitions for pediatric sepsis and time to treatment will allow for more efficient study of existing and new quality improvement and policy initiatives in sepsis.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16751
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Protocol Deviations, Reanalyses, and Corrections to PREDIMED Trial
    • Authors: Martínez-González MA.
      Pages: 2272 - 2272
      Abstract: To the Editor As reported elsewhere, my coinvestigators and coauthors of the PREDIMED trial have identified protocol deviations, including enrollment of household members without randomization, assignment to a study group without randomization of some participants at 1 of 11 study sites, and apparent inconsistent use of randomization tables at another site. Briefly, in the overall trial, 425 members of the same household as a previous study participant were directly allocated during the trial to the same group as their previously randomized relative. In addition, 441 individual participants and 26 participant members of the same household who attended small clinics in 1 of the 11 recruiting sites were not individually randomized, but rather were assigned to an intervention group based on clinic (ie, all participants in a particular clinic, the site where the intervention was delivered for small groups of participants, received the same intervention). The original PREDIMED trial compared cardiovascular outcomes from 3 diet groups: (1) a traditional Mediterranean diet plus virgin olive oil, (2) a traditional Mediterranean diet plus nuts, and (3) a low-fat control diet. Derivative studies assessed other outcomes, including peripheral artery disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.16553
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Protocol Deviations and Reanalyses in a Derivative Study of the PREDIMED
           Trial
    • Pages: 2272 - 2272
      Abstract: A derivative study of the PREDIMED trial was published as a Research Letter in JAMA in 2014. After publication of this article, protocol deviations were discovered that were addressed in reanalyses and that require corrections to this Research Letter. A Letter of explanation describes the reanalyses and corrections. This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17893
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Data Errors in Table 3
    • Pages: 2272 - 2273
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Effect of Early Surgery vs Physical Therapy on Knee Function Among Patients With Nonobstructive Meniscal Tears: The ESCAPE Randomized Clinical Trial,” published in the October 2, 2018, issue, the upper limits of 95% CIs were incorrectly reported as positive rather than negative numbers in Table 3. The between-group differences for the arthroscopic partial meniscectomy vs physical therapy groups overall, at 6 months, and at 24 months should have been reported as −5.9 (95% CI, −10.3 to −1.4), −8.2 (95% CI, −14.1 to −2.3), and −7.7 (95% CI, −14.0 to −1.3) points, respectively. Also, the P value for the between-group difference for the delayed arthroscopic partial meniscectomy vs physical therapy group at 6 months should have been .009. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17900
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Clarification for Reported Colposcopy Rates
    • Pages: 2273 - 2273
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Effect of Screening With Primary Cervical HPV Testing vs Cytology Testing on High-grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia at 48 Months: The HPV FOCAL Randomized Clinical Trial,” published in the July 3, 2018, issue, the colposcopy referral rates should have included the term “per 1000” in the Results section. The sentences under Secondary End Points in the Results section should have read as follows: “Colposcopy referral rates (per 1000) in the intervention group were significantly higher in round 1 (intervention: 57.0 [95% CI, 52.5-61.9] vs control: 30.8 [95% CI, 27.5-34.5]; absolute difference between intervention and control: 26.2 [95% CI, 20.4-32.1])” and “Cumulative colposcopy referral rates (per 1000) were similar between both groups (intervention: 106.2 [95% CI, 100.2-112.5]; control: 101.5 [95% CI, 95.6-107.8]; absolute difference between intervention and control: 4.7 [95% CI, −4.0 to 13.4]).” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.17912
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Low-Dose Opioid Hyperalgesia
    • Authors: Skillman J.
      Pages: 2274 - 2274
      Abstract: They gave me pills for painand I took them for my memories,knowing this takingcarried warnings of dependence.I became the drug of sleepslowly, Hypnos a mask to coveramnesia. Afraid to waketoo much I watched birds slipfrom trees, heard wind and waternarrow the spaces. Between proverbsthe sun came and went. At timesthe moon sprouted like an eyein the backyard—sinister,unyielding, veiled by wisps of cloud.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.11161
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • The Future of the Medical Profession
    • Pages: 2275 - 2275
      Abstract: Scarcely have we had time to realize that the great war is over when the numerous after-the-war problems present themselves. Reconstruction seems to be the word on every one’s tongue, and the term is applied to almost every phase of human activity. There is reconstruction of the wounded, not only in a physical sense, but also in the sense of reeducating the partially disabled along lines that will enable them to become self-supporting; reconstruction of the industries to meet the new problems of finance, transportation, labor, foreign markets, etc.; in fact, conditions have changed so that readjustments along many lines have become necessary. Nor is the reconstruction idea limited to certain activities, for in some countries the fundamental principles of social existence are rapidly undergoing reconstruction. There is so much upheaval going on throughout the world that it is not surprising that the medical profession has received some attention.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12688
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
  • Treating Hepatitis C
    • Authors: Grennan D.
      Pages: 2280 - 2280
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes recent advancements in hepatitis C treatment.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Dec 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15997
      Issue No: Vol. 320, No. 21 (2018)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 34.228.41.66
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-