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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2122  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for November 26, 2019
    • Pages: 1935 - 1937
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15608
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 1939 - 1940
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15609
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • The Search for a Universal Flu Vaccine Heats Up
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 1942 - 1944
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses the urgent need for a more broadly protective, durable influenza vaccine—and advancements toward it.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16816
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Study Identifies Primary Care Knowledge Gaps and Barriers in Type 2
           Diabetes Prevention
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 1945 - 1946
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses knowledge deficiencies and health system barriers that keep some primary care physicians from caring adequately for patients with prediabetes.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18024
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • HHS Guide for Tapering or Stopping Long-term Opioid Use
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1947 - 1947
      Abstract: Physicians should not taper or discontinue patients’ long-term opioid pain medicine use without discussing it with them, emphasizes a new guide from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18979
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • New NIH Strategic Research Plan Focuses on Tickborne Diseases
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1947 - 1947
      Abstract: A recently announced National Institutes of Health (NIH) 5-year strategic plan aims to accelerate research initiatives leading to better prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tick-borne diseases.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18978
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Proposed Rule for Lowering Lead Levels in Drinking Water
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 1947 - 1947
      Abstract: The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently announced a proposed rule designed to reduce lead in drinking water.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18278
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Intense Exercise Improved Motor Function in Parkinson Disease
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1948 - 1948
      Abstract: Patients with mild Parkinson disease who exercised strenuously at home improved their motor scores and showed good adherence to a minimally supervised exercise program, reported a trial in Lancet Neurology.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18983
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Polypill More Effective Than Usual Care for Reducing Cardiovascular Risks
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1948 - 1948
      Abstract: Taking a low-cost polypill to prevent cardiovascular disease significantly reduced systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol among patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), a New England Journal of Medicine trial found.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18982
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Gaming Intervention Increased Physical Activity in Overweight Adults
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1948 - 1948
      Abstract: Of gaming interventions with social incentives, one incorporating competition most effectively increased physical activity among overweight and obese adults, according to a trial in JAMA Internal Medicine.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18981
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Low Back Pain Guideline Didn’t Improve Outcomes
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1948 - 1948
      Abstract: Primary care physicians trained to treat low back pain based on guideline recommendations gained greater confidence and knowledge, but the training didn’t improve patient outcomes, reported a trial in PLOS Medicine.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18980
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • H pylori Treatment May Reduce Gastric Cancer Risk
    • Authors: Slomski A.
      Pages: 1948 - 1948
      Abstract: Short-term treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection and vitamin or garlic supplementation may afford long-term protection against gastric cancer among people at high risk, according to a BMJ follow-up study.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18424
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • US Narrowly Preserves Measles Elimination Status
    • Authors: Kuehn B.
      Pages: 1949 - 1949
      Abstract: The official end of New York State’s measles outbreak allowed the United States to narrowly retain its measles elimination status, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Four other countries have already lost their measles elimination status in the past year, including the United Kingdom and Brazil.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18901
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Recommended Vaccines Underused During Pregnancy
    • Authors: Kuehn B.
      Pages: 1949 - 1949
      Abstract: Most US mothers-to-be (65%) have not been vaccinated for both influenza and pertussis, according to a CDC report.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18105
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Vaping—Seeking Clarity in a Time of Uncertainty
    • Authors: Baldassarri SR; Fiellin DA, Friedman AS.
      Pages: 1951 - 1952
      Abstract: This Viewpoint attempts to provide public health context to the 2019 emergence of e-cigarette, or vaping, product use–associated lung injury (EVALI), emphasizing that EVALI is likely caused by vaping exposure to THC-containing products and is a public health risk far less than that of smoking combustible tobacco, and suggesting ways physicians might use awareness of the phenomenon to counsel patients about the risks of smoking electronic and traditional cigarettes.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16493
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Colorado End-of-Life Options Act—A Clash of Organizational and
           Individual Conscience
    • Authors: Wynia M.
      Pages: 1953 - 1954
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the pending case of Mahoney Morris v Centura Health, in which a physician employed by a Catholic-affiliated health system in Colorado sued to be able to provide medical aid-in-dying (MAID) to a patient with end-stage cancer under the 2016 Colorado End-of-Life Options Act, which permits health care professionals to write and fill life-ending prescriptions without regard to their employer’s position on the law.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16438
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Two Rooms: Reflections on Empathy, Openness, and Parenthood
    • Authors: Waldman E.
      Pages: 1955 - 1956
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay a pediatric palliative care physician reflects on the contrast between his healthy children and the dying patients he cares for and expresses his struggle to bridge the gap between being fully present for his patients’ families through their grieving and the deep gratitude he feels that his family is healthy and not forced to confront the same loss and grief.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17601
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Protecting the Sanctity of the Patient-Physician Relationship
    • Authors: Harman S; Verghese A.
      Pages: 1957 - 1958
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA, Wynia describes a patient in Colorado with terminal cancer for whom a physician agreed to prescribe aid-in-dying medications in accordance with new state legal guidelines. However, the health care organization that employed the physician objected to her actions, even though by doing so it was violating state law. The patient and physician filed suit against her employer. Chillingly, in a move that should alarm physicians long concerned about erosion of their autonomy, the physician’s dismissal letter chided her for violating the ethical directives of Catholic health care services, which view assisted suicide as “intrinsically immoral” and state that “Patients experiencing suffering that cannot be alleviated should be helped to appreciate the Christian understanding of redemptive suffering.”
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17965
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Should Fibrinogen Concentrate Replace Cryoprecipitate in Cardiac
           Surgery'
    • Authors: Hess AS; Hess JR, Coursin DB.
      Pages: 1958 - 1960
      Abstract: Excessive bleeding presents a critical medical challenge. Many of the problems encountered at the bedside, such as inadequate measures of coagulation, challenges in delivering blood components, uncertain role of prothrombotic drugs or antifibrinolytics, dilutional coagulopathy, varied clinical settings, and patient comorbidities, have occupied a great deal of recent research effort and still have only imperfect solutions. Fibrinogen is an essential component of hemostasis: it is cleaved by thrombin into fibrin, which polymerizes into factor XIII–crosslinked fibers that have important functions in adhesion, platelet aggregation, and inflammation. A low fibrinogen level is an ominous finding in patients with bleeding, but it has been difficult to prove the utility of direct fibrinogen replacement. More than 20 small trials have suggested that using fibrinogen concentrate reduces bleeding and transfusions in various clinical situations, but any general conclusions are limited by the study sizes, quality, and heterogeneity in methods.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17313
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • The Thyrotropin Reference Range Should Be Changed in Older Patients
    • Authors: Cappola AR.
      Pages: 1961 - 1962
      Abstract: In endocrinology and many other disciplines, laboratory test results discriminate between patients who require treatment and those who do not. The reference range provided with the laboratory test result should align with the threshold for additional clinical action. When the reference range denoting a normal result is not aligned with the reference range needed for optimal health, confusion arises. Patients interpret the reference range as a normal range and question why abnormal test results are being ignored. Clinicians looking for an explanation for a patient’s symptoms may incorrectly focus on a result outside of the reference range. Accurate laboratory reference ranges are essential for good clinical care.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.14728
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Confronting the Rise and Fall of US Life Expectancy
    • Authors: Koh HK; Parekh AK, Park JJ.
      Pages: 1963 - 1965
      Abstract: For decades US life expectancy at birth increased. Many clinicians and demographers assumed it would always be that way. However, an exhaustive, detailed long-term analysis by Woolf and Schoomaker in this issue of JAMA strengthens reports from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) documenting recent declines in US life expectancy. Combined, the studies confirm that downward trends in life expectancy, which declined after 2014 for 3 successive years, represent a US health disadvantage compared with peer high-income nations, despite the United States having the highest per capita health care spending in the world.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17303
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Effect of Fibrinogen Concentrate vs Cryoprecipitate on Transfusion Volume
           After Cardiac Surgery
    • Authors: Callum J; Farkouh ME, Scales DC, et al.
      Pages: 1966 - 1976
      Abstract: This noninferiority trial compares the effects of fibrinogen concentrate vs cryoprecipitate on the number of red blood cell (RBC), platelet, and plasma units transfused 24 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass in adult patients with clinically significant bleeding and hypofibrinogenemia after cardiac surgery.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17312
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Levothyroxine Treatment and Thyroid-Related Symptoms in Older Adults With
           Subclinical Hypothyroidism
    • Authors: Mooijaart SP; Du Puy RS, Stott DJ, et al.
      Pages: 1977 - 1986
      Abstract: This cohort study combines data from 2 randomized trials to estimate associations between use of levothyroxine to manage subclinical hypothyroidism and hypothyroid symptoms and fatigue at 1 year among community-dwelling adults aged 80 years and older.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17274
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Baclofen Use in CKD and Risk of Encephalopathy
    • Authors: Muanda FT; Weir MA, Bathini L, et al.
      Pages: 1987 - 1995
      Abstract: This pharmacoepidemiology study uses Canadian health care database data to estimate the risk of encephalopathy among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Ontario prescribed higher (≥20 mg) vs lower (<20 mg) doses of baclofen.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17725
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Life Expectancy and Mortality Rates in the United States, 1959-2017
    • Authors: Woolf SH; Schoomaker H.
      Pages: 1996 - 2016
      Abstract: This population epidemiology study uses data from the National Center for Health Statistics and the US Mortality Database to assess changes and state-level trends in US life expectancy and mortality rates from 1959 to 2017, and to identify potential contributing factors.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16932
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Bisphosphonates for Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
    • Authors: Ensrud KE; Crandall CJ.
      Pages: 2017 - 2018
      Abstract: This JAMA Women’s Health summarizes evidence-based use of bisphosphonates for fracture prevention in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, and reviews potential harms of the drugs and alternative agents (denosumab, raloxifene) for patients with contraindications or intolerance to alendronate, risedronate, or zoledronate.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15781
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Object-Related Aspiration Deaths in Children and Adolescents in the United
           States, 1968 to 2017
    • Authors: Cramer JD; Meraj T, Lavin JM, et al.
      Pages: 2020 - 2022
      Abstract: This study uses National Vital Statistics System data to characterize trends in deaths among children and adolescents aged 0 to 17 years caused by object-related aspiration.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15375
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Change in Prevalence of Disabilities and Accommodation Practices Among US
           Medical Schools, 2016 vs 2019
    • Authors: Meeks LM; Case B, Herzer K, et al.
      Pages: 2022 - 2024
      Abstract: This survey study assesses the prevalence of students with disabilities and types of accomodation provided at US allopathic medical schools in 2019, and compares the numbers with those of a 2016 survey to characterize 3-year changes.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15372
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Professionalism and the Review of Systems—Reply
    • Authors: Hendrickson MA; Melton GB, Pitt MB.
      Pages: 2024 - 2025
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Taitsman that precompleted checklist defaults embedded within the EHR can be a setup for unintentional inaccuracy or even fraud. However, we would not want a focus on improving the means of accurately capturing compliance with existing Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) requirements to detract from our central point that current CMS requirements in and of themselves provide conflicting and problematic incentives.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15588
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Professionalism and the Review of Systems
    • Authors: Taitsman JK.
      Pages: 2024 - 2024
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint by Dr Hendrickson and colleagues on review of systems (ROS) and electronic health record (EHR) systems suggested reimbursement incentives might encourage clinicians to complete, or falsely claim to have completed, a full ROS, even when not clinically useful. The authors noted that EHR systems can facilitate false documentation when “a generic phrase asserting that the ROS was conducted is automatically included in physician note templates” or “a single mouse click in a series of required clicks records its completion,” and that “a prepopulated attestation statement endorsing that a 10-point ROS was completed may have the unintended effect of introducing dishonesty….” I share this concern and propose that physicians demand greater control of EHR functionalities and eschew functionalities that set them up to fail.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15581
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Use of an ICU Diary and Patient Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
           Symptoms—Reply
    • Authors: Garrouste-Orgeas M; Bailly S, Timsit J.
      Pages: 2025 - 2026
      Abstract: In Reply The widespread use of ICU diaries has occurred without a high standard of proof. Our study showed that 30% of patients developed PTSD symptoms 3 months after ICU discharge. Given this prevalence, it is important to identify efficient interventions. Our study was the first multicenter and assessor-blinded study in this field, to our knowledge.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16117
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Use of an ICU Diary and Patient Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms
    • Authors: Kredentser M; Olafson K, Sareen J.
      Pages: 2025 - 2025
      Abstract: To the Editor The randomized clinical trial by Dr Garrouste-Orgeas and colleagues examined the effect of intensive care unit (ICU) diaries on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in ICU survivors. This large trial found no significant differences in PTSD symptoms between the ICU diary group and a control group. This finding is surprising, given the promising evidence and widespread use of diaries in reducing PTSD, anxiety, and depression, as well as being acceptable to patients and families.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16114
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • Incorrect Terminology in Table 2
    • Pages: 2026 - 2026
      Abstract: In the Special Communication entitled “Preferred Reporting Items for a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Test Accuracy Studies: The PRISMA-DTA Statement” published in the January 23/30, 2018, issue of JAMA, incorrect terminology appeared in Table 2. In Table 2, in the ninth row up from the bottom of the table, “Results of individual studiesb,” “receiver operating characteristic curve” should have been “receiver operating characteristic plot.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18307
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • It Will Be Good for Us
    • Authors: Okonkwo JT.
      Pages: 2027 - 2027
      Abstract: Would it be wrong for us to take this moment out to dance. For us to let fall the iron that sits on our chins that binds our eyes and our arms in solemn diligence. It would only be a moment. We would unleash the blistering frenzy that pushes us and tap out a medley under the canopy of the weight of the world.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16622
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • An English Experiment in Social Medicine
    • Pages: 2028 - 2028
      Abstract: In England, the medical profession and the public are apparently in a state of readjustment. Social insurance in the four years preceding the war, the needs and emergencies of war times, and the discussion of the last year culminating in the creation of a national health ministry, all have combined to arouse and concentrate interest and discussion on the improvement of medical services. An experiment now being carried on in Glasgow is, therefore, of special interest. Dr. David McKail, lecturer on public health at St. Mungo's College, and Mr. William Jones, clerk and treasurer of the Glasgow Insurance Committee, have worked out a plan for a public medical service as a substitute for the social insurance scheme now in operation. Beginning with a criticism of social insurance, which they condemn for failure to provide any form of institutional treatment and for furnishing medical services to only about one third of the total population, they propose to build up a complete medical service, furnishing unrestricted treatment to every citizen needing it, and involving the enrolment of the medical profession and the public control of all general hospitals and infirmaries.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.15616
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
  • What Is Norovirus'
    • Authors: Desai AN.
      Pages: 2032 - 2032
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of norovirus.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.15921
      Issue No: Vol. 322, No. 20 (2019)
       
 
 
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