Journal Cover
JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2155  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Audio Highlights
    • Abstract: Listen to the JAMA Editor’s Audio Summary for an overview and discussion of the important articles appearing in this week’s issue of JAMA.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20741
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 203 - 204
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13261
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Vapes Hidden in Hoodies—the Youth e-Cigarette Epidemic
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 205 - 206
      Abstract: This Medical News article is an interview with the American Heart Association’s Rose Marie Robertson, MD, about the explosion of electronic cigarette use among young people.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20781
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • New Budgeting Tools Will Help Foster Social Determinants of Health
    • Authors: Butler SM.
      Pages: 207 - 208
      Abstract: The growing interest in addressing social determinants of health—nonclinical factors influencing health—raises practical issues about the way we budget for collaborative efforts across governmental departments. In particular, the expanding research on the relationship between such factors as housing, transportation, and community services and the health condition of many households indicates the importance of giving program leaders the flexibility and incentive to coordinate resources from multiple sources.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21007
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Cesarean Deliveries Not Linked to Obesity in Latest Study
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 209 - 209
      Abstract: A large Swedish study published in PLOS Medicine appears to debunk the idea that either elective or nonelective cesarean delivery increases the risk that a child will develop obesity.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21721
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Climate Change Puts Children at Risk
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 209 - 209
      Abstract: Urgent action is needed to meet the Paris Agreement climate goals to limit the potential health impacts on children worldwide, according to a statement from 120 international climate experts.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21719
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Dengue Vaccine Protects Youth
    • Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 209 - 209
      Abstract: Researchers have reported that a new vaccine against the dengue virus protected children and adolescents in a phase 3 trial conducted in Asia and Latin America.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21234
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Duchenne Screening Test Is OK’d
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 210 - 210
      Abstract: The first test to aid in screening newborns for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) has received FDA authorization for marketing.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21737
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • App Enables Sharing Off-label Treatments for Infectious Diseases
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 210 - 210
      Abstract: A new app will allow health professionals to share how they’ve used FDA-approved drugs for off-label indications with patients who have difficult-to-treat infectious diseases. The internet-based repository, called CURE ID, is a collaboration between the FDA and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, which is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21735
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • New Test Detects MRSA in Hours Rather Than Days
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 210 - 210
      Abstract: The FDA has authorized a new diagnostic test based on bacteriophage technology to detect methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization more quickly than traditional culture-based techniques allow.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21597
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Disparities Research, Disparities Researchers, and Health Equity
    • Authors: Carnethon MR; Kershaw KN, Kandula NR.
      Pages: 211 - 212
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the position of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) regarding disparities in health and research and offers recommendations that could hasten progress in eliminating disparities on the basis of race/ethnicity, sex, and socioeconomic status.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.19329
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Adding Patient-Reported Outcomes to Medicare’s Oncology Value-Based
           Payment Model
    • Authors: Basch E; Wilfong L, Schrag D.
      Pages: 213 - 214
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses barriers to collecting patient-reported outcome measures for symptom monitoring as a component of the Oncology Care First payment model, a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services program that provides bundled population payments to cover physician services and enhancements intended to improve care quality for patients receiving systemic cancer treatment, and proposes ways to implement and facilitate the requirement given its importance to patient well-being.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.19970
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • This Quiet Lady: Learning to Be With Patients After a Parent’s Death
    • Authors: Snyder RA.
      Pages: 215 - 216
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, a surgical oncologist recalls helping her mother through her treatment and death from lung cancer and tells of the lesson she brought back to her own practice from the experience that the essence of clinical care is human connection: the ability to listen to others, witness their suffering, hear their joy, and be present in their company.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21664
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Hydroxyethyl Starch for Fluid Replacement Therapy in High-Risk Surgical
           Patients
    • Authors: Zampieri FG; Cavalcanti AB.
      Pages: 217 - 218
      Abstract: Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions have had a turbulent history as resuscitation fluids. There was initial optimism that these products would efficiently expand the intravascular space with a prolonged intravascular half-life and therefore would be “volume sparing,” with less edema. However, enthusiasm was tempered when HES solutions were reported to be harmful when administered to critically ill patients, including those with sepsis. Despite these concerns, HES is still used in surgery under the premise that lower doses infused under strict protocols would be safe. In this issue of JAMA, Futier and colleagues report the results of the FLASH multicenter randomized clinical trial, which assessed the effects of HES vs saline for fluid resuscitation in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. The primary end point was a composite of death and occurrence of renal, respiratory, cardiovascular, infectious, or surgical complications. Several secondary and exploratory end points were also reported.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20141
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Tracing the Evidence to Address Painful Chronic Pancreatitis With Surgery
    • Authors: Hines O.
      Pages: 219 - 220
      Abstract: Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, along with persistent, and in some cases, unrelenting pain. While pancreatic insufficiency is effectively managed with pharmacologic intervention, the pain associated with this condition is difficult to control and commonly leads to severe consequences for the patient. A search of ClinicalTrials.gov for chronic pancreatitis revealed 152 studies, nearly all of which consist of interventions for pain. The current modalities, including pain medication, pancreatic enzyme replacement, behavioral therapy, endoscopic treatment, and surgery, all have varying degrees of efficacy. Less-invasive modalities include endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) with stone extraction, ERP with endoscopic lithotripsy and stent placement, and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Surgical interventions include drainage procedures with attachment of the main pancreatic duct to the intestine or resection of the involved pancreas.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.19988
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Improving Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension
    • Authors: Estes N; III.
      Pages: 221 - 222
      Abstract: Atrial fibrillation and hypertension represent 2 of the most important national public health priorities. Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia among adults, affecting up to 2% of the US population. The prevalence of atrial fibrillation is expected to increase 3-fold in the next 3 decades. Robust data have identified hypertension as an independent modifiable risk factor for atrial fibrillation and as the most common cardiovascular condition associated with it. Hypertension is present in up to 80% of individuals with atrial fibrillation. Fulfilling a fundamental principle of evidence-based medicine, current therapeutic strategies to maintain sinus rhythm have a firm foundation in appropriately designed clinical trials. Lifestyle modification, treatment with antiarrhythmic and antihypertensive drugs, and pulmonary vein isolation have been established as approaches to relieve the burden of atrial fibrillation and improve outcomes. Despite considerable progress in prevention and treatment, atrial fibrillation continues to impose a significant economic and disability burden in the United States and worldwide. Robust data from clinical trials for the treatment of atrial fibrillation clarifying the risks and benefits of pulmonary vein isolation have resulted in recent expansion of catheter ablation as a guideline-directed approach for select patient populations.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20144
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Systemic Absorption of Sunscreen
    • Authors: Adamson AS; Shinkai K.
      Pages: 223 - 224
      Abstract: UV radiation is the most important known modifiable risk factor for the development of skin cancer including melanoma. Behavioral measures to reduce this risk factor include seeking shade, wearing hats and protective clothing, avoiding outdoor activities during peak sunlight hours, and regularly using sunscreen. Sunscreen ingredients fall into 2 distinct categories: mineral or chemical. Mineral sunscreens contain physical UV filters, such as zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, that offer broad-spectrum UV coverage by reflecting or refracting UV radiation from skin. Chemical sunscreens contain UV filters that absorb UV radiation and, when used in combination, can provide equal if not superior broad-spectrum UV filtration compared with mineral sunscreens. Chemical sunscreens are less likely to leave chalky or tinted white residue on the skin, which is more cosmetically acceptable especially on darker skin types. Given these relative advantages, chemical sunscreens are found in the majority of commonly available sunscreen formulations within the $1.95 billion sun care industry in the United States.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20143
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Hydroxyethyl Starch vs Saline Volume Replacement on
           Complications After Major Abdominal Surgery
    • Authors: Futier E; Garot M, Godet T, et al.
      Pages: 225 - 236
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial assesses the effect of hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) vs normal saline for intravascular volume expansion in patients at risk of postoperative kidney injury on mortality and postoperative complications up to 14 days after major abdominal surgery.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20833
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Early Surgery vs Stepped Medical-Endoscopic-Surgical Management
           on Pain in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis
    • Authors: Issa Y; Kempeneers MA, Bruno MJ, et al.
      Pages: 237 - 247
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of pancreatic drainage surgery within 6 weeks vs a stepped medical-endoscopy-surgical approach on pain score and relief over 18 months among patients with chronic pancreatitis.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20967
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Catheter Ablation With vs Without Renal Denervation on Atrial
           Fibrillation Recurrence
    • Authors: Steinberg JS; Shabanov V, Ponomarev D, et al.
      Pages: 248 - 255
      Abstract: This randomized trial compares the effects of pulmonary vein isolation with vs without renal denervation on freedom from atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, or atrial tachycardia at 1 year among patients with atrial fibrillation and hypertension.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21187
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Sunscreen Application on Plasma Concentration of Sunscreen
           Active Ingredients
    • Authors: Matta MK; Florian J, Zusterzeel R, et al.
      Pages: 256 - 267
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial assesses the systemic absorption and pharmacokinetics of the 6 active ingredients (avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene, homosalate, octisalate, and octinoxate) in lotion, aerosol spray, nonaerosol spray, and pump spray sunscreen products under single- and maximal-use conditions.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20747
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Diagnosis and Management of Primary Dysmenorrhea
    • Authors: Kho KA; Shields JK.
      Pages: 268 - 269
      Abstract: This JAMA Insights Women’s Health reviews the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of primary dysmenorrhea, with a focus on use of combined hormonal oral contraceptive pills for symptom management.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.16921
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Assessment and Management of Heavy Menstrual Bleeding
    • Authors: Douglass LA; Davis AM.
      Pages: 270 - 271
      Abstract: This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the United Kingdom 2018 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline on the assessment and management of heavy menstrual bleeding.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.17383
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Fever, Abdominal Pain and Jaundice in a Pacific Islander Woman
    • Authors: Zhang Z; Chung H, Gong T.
      Pages: 272 - 273
      Abstract: A 61-year-old woman who had immigrated from Micronesia 10 years ago had 1 month of sharp, progressive, intermittent, nonradiating right upper quadrant abdominal pain; she was febrile, had leukocytosis and elevated levels of liver panel analytes, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed numerous worms in the biliary trees. What is the diagnosis and what would you do next'
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20118
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Medical Assessment of Head Collision Events in Elite Women’s and
           Men’s Soccer
    • Authors: Tarzi C; Tarzi G, Walker M, et al.
      Pages: 275 - 276
      Abstract: This study uses data from the 2019 Fédération Internationale de Football Association Women’s World Cup to determine the incidence rate and subsequent medical assessment of head collision events.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.19919
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Trends in Buprenorphine Treatment in the United States, 2009-2018
    • Authors: Olfson M; Zhang V, Schoenbaum M, et al.
      Pages: 276 - 277
      Abstract: This study assessed the number of individuals receiving treatment for opioid use disorder in the United States by age group and sex using a national prescription database to compare between the number of buprenorphine prescriptions filled and the number of US opioid-related overdose deaths.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18913
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • US Organ Donation Policy
    • Authors: Wall SP; Parent B, Caplan A.
      Pages: 278 - 278
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint on organ donation policy maintained that the US opt-in organ donation system performs among the best in the world. Donors per potential eligible donor were used as evidence despite this metric being criticized for potentially overestimating organ procurement organization (OPO) performance. Organ procurement organizations self-regulate and may be incentivized to modify eligibility of missed cases to meet performance requirements. Also, countries with opt-out programs consider cases when death occurs unexpectedly, often termed uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death. Implementing uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death increases organ supply but with more attrition. Countries that consider higher-risk candidates have fewer donors per potential eligible donor compared with the United States, which has stricter criteria.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18643
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • US Organ Donation Policy
    • Authors: Chan A.
      Pages: 278 - 279
      Abstract: To the Editor Ms Glazier and Mr Mone touted the success of the current opt-in organ donation system and argued for focusing on increasing registered donors to 75% of the adult population. A challenge is the intrinsic difficulty of such a task: more coordinated promotional efforts and new incentives like giving registered donors priority on organ waiting lists would likely be required.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18637
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • US Organ Donation Policy
    • Authors: Glazier A; Mone T.
      Pages: 279 - 280
      Abstract: In Reply In our Viewpoint on the success of opt-in organ donation policy in the United States, we reviewed organ donation rates from opt-in and opt-out legal jurisdictions to provide a high-level comparison between these 2 authorization strategies. The rate was calculated as donors per 10 000 deaths, not donors per potential eligible donor as incorrectly stated by Dr Wall and colleagues. Donors per deaths is the best available data for an international comparison.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18649
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • US Organ Donation Policy
    • Authors: Lynch RJ; Goldberg DS.
      Pages: 279 - 279
      Abstract: To the Editor The article on organ donation by Ms Glazier and Mr Mone comparing deceased organ donation in the United States with countries using an opt-out system minimized the continued shortfall in transplants in the United States. The central reason for this deficit is that the OPOs managing donation in the United States operate without objective metrics by which to standardize and compare performance. As a result, many OPOs have claimed improvement when the gains are merely the product of circumstance.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18646
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Price Transparency in the Electronic Health Record
    • Authors: Cho HJ; Wei EK, Krouss M.
      Pages: 280 - 281
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Miller and colleagues discussed implementing price transparency for health care products and services in electronic health record (EHRs). Price display interventions on paper, before EHRs, were associated with reduced costs. However, a recent analysis reviewing only EHR-based interventions concluded that they were not beneficial. The explanation why remains unclear, and it may include information overload or the price display lacking notable visibility. Additionally, as Mummadi and Mishra pointed out, it may be attributable to the phenomenon of screen inferiority—learning from an electronic screen is more challenging compared with paper.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18573
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Price Transparency in the Electronic Health Record—Reply
    • Authors: Miller BJ; Slota JM, Ehrenfeld JM.
      Pages: 281 - 282
      Abstract: In Reply Regarding our Viewpoint on price transparency in EHRs, Dr Cho and colleagues suggest that clinicians are not adequately trained to discuss costs with patients. While we agree that clinicians are not traditionally trained to discuss costs with patients, these discussions are already occurring. Many patients face significant financial burdens affecting access; transparency merely provides information to help make decisions currently made in a vacuum.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18579
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Price Transparency in the Electronic Health Record
    • Authors: Mummadi SR; Mishra R, Mummadi RR.
      Pages: 281 - 281
      Abstract: To the Editor A Viewpoint proposed implementing price transparency for physicians in EHRs as a means of achieving cost-conscious care.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18576
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Incorrect Data in Table and Discussion Section
    • Pages: 282 - 282
      Abstract: In the Research Letter entitled “Prevalence of Oral HPV Infection in Unvaccinated Men and Women in the United States, 2009-2016” published in the September 10, 2019, issue of JAMA, data were incorrect in the Table and the Discussion section of the text. In the Table, in the “2015-2016” column of the “Women, %” section, the values reported for black, non-Hispanic women and Hispanic women were transposed; the value for black, non-Hispanic women should have been reported as 13.4 and the value for Hispanic women as 17.8. In the first sentence of the Discussion section, the value reported as 37% should have been 38%. This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20662
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Incorrect Value in Results
    • Pages: 282 - 282
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation entitled “Effect of Bempedoic Acid vs Placebo Added to Maximally Tolerated Statins on Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Patients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Disease: The CLEAR Wisdom Randomized Clinical Trial” published in the November 12, 2019, issue of JAMA, a value was incorrect in the text. In the last sentence of the Results section, the value reported as 0.5 for mean creatinine concentration should have been reported as 0.05. This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.20661
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Silence
    • Authors: Cleary E.
      Pages: 284 - 284
      Abstract: Cherry blossoms line the Saturday Market near Burnside. Back home, winter
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.21417
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Asclepius—Man or Myth
    • Pages: 285 - 285
      Abstract: Asclepius, Asclepios, Asklepios, Aesculapius (Latin), or Ασκληπιος (Greek), if one has a yearning for the good old days of resinated wine and chariot races, is probably the most venerated physician of all times. Scholia in Homer’s Iliad suggests that the name Asklepios was derived from words meaning applying (askein) and making the limbs gentle (epia). Another interpretation ascribes his name to “healing soothingly and for deferring the withering that comes with death.” Yet a third writer affirms that Asklepios was originally known as Epios because of his gentleness and calmness. After he had cured Askles, the tyrant of Epidaurus who suffered from ophthalmia, he was called Asklepios, with the accent on the penult. Demosthenes changed the pronunciation by accenting the antepenult. Asclepius is to be distinguished from Asclepiad, a generic appellation for a priest of the temple of Asclepius, from Asclepias, a genus of Asclepiadaceous plants, and from Asclepiades, a Bithynian physician of the second century, B. C., who practiced in Rome and openly admitted opposition to the teachings of Hippocrates.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13268
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Cryptosporidiosis
    • Authors: Desai AN.
      Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes cryptosporidiosis, its symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention methods.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.18691
      Issue No: Vol. 323, No. 3 (2020)
       
 
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