for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.7
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 222  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0002-9378
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3157 journals]
  • Critical Appraisal of the Proposed Defenses for Planned Home Birth
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Amos Grünebaum, Laurence B. McCullough, Birgit Arabin, Frank A. Chervenak
       
  • Expanding the indications for cell-free DNA in the maternal circulation:
           clinical considerations and implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Gian Carlo di Renzo, Jose’ Luis Bartha, Catia M. Bilardo Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal aneuploidy using cell-free DNA has been widely integrated into routine obstetrical care. The scope of cfDNA testing has expanded from trisomies 21, 18, and 13 to include sex chromosome conditions, panels of specific microdeletions, and more recently genome-wide copy number variants and rare autosomal trisomies. Because the technical ability to test for a condition does not necessarily correspond with a clinical benefit to a population or to individual pregnant women, the benefits and harms of screening programs must be carefully weighed before implementation. Application of the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria to cell-free DNA screening is informative when considering implementation of expanded cfDNA test menus. Most microdeletions and duplications are rare to the point that the prevalence has not even been defined and their natural history cannot be reliably predicted in the prenatal period. At the current time, scientific evidence regarding clinical performance of expanded cfDNA panels is lacking. Expanded cell-free DNA menus therefore create a dilemma for diagnosis, treatment, and counseling of patients. The clinical utility of expanding cell-free DNA testing to include panels of microdeletions and genome-wide assessment of large chromosomal imbalances has yet to be demonstrated; as such, the clinical implementation of this testing is premature.
       
  • Diagnostic Performance of Third Trimester Ultrasound for the Prediction of
           Late-Onset Fetal Growth Restriction: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Javier Caradeux, Raigam J. Martinez-Portilla, Anna Peguero, Alexandros Sotiriadis, Francesc Figueras ObjectiveTo establish the diagnostic performance of ultrasound screening for predicting late smallness for gestational age (SGA) and/or fetal growth restriction (FGR).Data sourcesA systematic search was performed to identify relevant studies published since 2007 in English, Spanish, French, Italian, or German, using the databases PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and SCOPUS.Study eligibility criteriaProspective and retrospective cohort studies in low-risk or non-selected singleton pregnancies with screening ultrasound performed at ≥32 weeks of gestation.Study appraisal and synthesis methodsThe estimated fetal weight (EFW) and fetal abdominal circumference (AC) were assessed as index tests for the prediction of birthweight (BW)
       
  • Resolution of intra-amniotic sludge after antibiotic administration in a
           patient with short cervix and recurrent mid-trimester loss
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Cheryl Dinglas, Martin Chavez, Anthony Vintzileos
       
  • Association between gestational age and severe maternal morbidity and
           mortality of preterm cesarean delivery: a population-based cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Julie Blanc, Noémie Resseguier, François Goffinet, Elsa Lorthe, Gilles Kayem, Pierre Delorme, Christophe Vayssiere, Pascal Auquier, Claude D’ercole BackgroundCesarean delivery rates at extreme prematurity have regularly increased over the last years and few previous studies investigated severe maternal morbidity of extreme preterm cesarean.ObjectiveTo evaluate if gestational age < 26 weeks of gestation (weeks) is associated with severe maternal morbidity and mortality (SMMM) of preterm cesarean in comparison with cesarean between 26 and 34 weeks.Study designThe “Etude Epidémiologique sur les petits âges gestationnels” (EPIPAGE) 2 is a national prospective population-based cohort study of preterm births in 2011. We included mothers with cesareans between 22 and 34 weeks excluding those who had a cesarean for the second twin only and pregnancy terminations. SMMM was analyzed as a composite endpoint defined as the occurrence of at least one of the following complications: severe post-partum hemorrhage defined by the use of a blood transfusion, intensive care unit (ICU) admission or death. To assess the association of gestational age
       
  • Academic Physicians as Factory Workers: Identifying and Preventing
           Alienation of Labor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Frank A. Chervenak, Laurence B. McCullough Recent changes in the culture of academic obstetrics and gynecology have increased the potential for disconnect between physicians and their patients. These changes include increased emphasis on productivity, burgeoning bureaucracies for purposes of compliance, arbitrary clinical goals such as low cesarean delivery rates, the electronic medical record, and lack of respect. These changes are predatory on professionalism when they alienate obstetrician-gynecologists from their patients. The concepts of alienated labor and non-alienated labor in the political philosophy of Karl Marx can be used to explain this alienation. We identify alienated labor by analogy to factory workers who perform routinized, thoughtless tasks for goals they do not set to create profit for others, the factory owners. We identify non-alienated labor by analogy to skilled craftsmen who use their highly advanced skills guided by deep experience to fully own the products of their labor. We then suggest that academic physicians are at increasing risk of becoming factory workers and experiencing decreased professionalism while their colleagues in private practice are better positioned to experience non-alienated labor and sustained professionalism. Based on this analysis, we propose five remedies to prevent alienated labor in academic obstetrics and gynecology: expanding the concept of rewarding productivity to include excellence in clinical care and teaching; critical appraisal of the compliance culture and the large bureaucracy it now seems to require; setting evidence-based and therefore clinically realistic goals such as a lower cesarean delivery rate; reforming the medical record to return to the original purpose of the record of promoting communication among care teams with data extraction for billing a secondary purpose; and creating an organizational culture that respects the contributions of clinical academic obstetricians to the mission of their department and medical school. We close by calling on academic leaders in the specialty to work with their clinical practice and teaching colleagues to identify and prevent alienation of labor in academic obstetrics and gynecology.
       
  • Two Dose versus Single Dose of Methotrexate for Treatment of Ectopic
           Pregnancy: a Meta-Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Snigdha Alur-Gupta, Laura G. Cooney, Suneeta Senapati, Mary D. Sammel, Kurt T. Barnhart ObjectiveTo compare the treatment success and failure rates, as well as side effects and surgery rates between methotrexate protocols.Data SourcesPubMed, Embase and the Cochrane library searched up till July 2018.Study eligibility criteriaRCTs that compared women with ectopic pregnancies receiving the single dose, two dose or multi-dose methotrexate protocols.Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Odds of treatment success, treatment failure, side effects and surgery for tubal rupture as well as length of follow-up until treatment success compared using random and fixed effects meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses compared treatment success in high hCG and large adnexal mass groups, as defined by individual studies. Cochrane’s collaboration tool used to assess risk of bias.ResultsThe two dose protocol was associated with higher treatment success compared to single dose protocol (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.13, 3.00). The two dose protocol was more successful in women with high hCG (OR: 3.23, 95% CI: 1.53, 6.84) and in women with a large adnexal mass (OR: 2.93 95% CI: 1.23, 6.9). The odds of surgery for tubal rupture were lower in the two dose protocol (OR: 0.65, 95%CI: 0.26, 1.63), but not statistically significant. The length of follow up was 7.9 days shorter for the two dose protocol (95% CI: -12.2, -3.5). Odds of side effects were higher in the two dose protocol (OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.30).Compared to the single dose protocol the multi-dose protocol is associated with a non-significant reduction in treatment failure (OR: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.28, 1.13) and a higher chance of side effects (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.24, 3.54). Odds of surgery for tubal rupture (OR: 1.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 6.49) and time to follow-up (-1.3, 95% CI: -5.4, 2.7) were similar.ConclusionThe two dose methotrexate protocol is superior to the single dose protocol for the treatment of ectopic pregnancy in terms of treatment success and time to success. Importantly, these findings hold true in patients thought to be at a lower likelihood of responding to medical management, such as those with higher hCGs and large adnexal mass.
       
  • The American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society - Reinvigorating for
           the 21st Century
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Laurel W. Rice, Charles J. Lockwood, Maureen Phipps, John O.L. Delancey, Ronald D. Alvarez, Marcelle I. Cedars The American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society (AGOS) has the potential to serve as a unifying organization to advocate for women’s reproductive health care, education and research. This report reviews a strategic plan designed to reinvigorate AGOS to address, together with our partner organizations, the ever more pressing issues and challenges in women’s reproductive health.
       
  • Alobar holoprosencephaly detected in a nine-week embryo
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Simon Meagher, Lisa Hui
       
  • Clinical diagnosis of endometriosis: a call to action
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyAuthor(s): Sanjay K. Agarwal, Charles Chapron, Linda C. Giudice, Marc R. Laufer, Nicholas Leyland, Stacey A. Missmer, Sukhbir S. Singh, Hugh S. Taylor Endometriosis can have a profound impact on women’s lives, including associated pain, infertility, decreased quality of life, and interference with daily life, relationships, and livelihood. The first step in alleviating these adverse sequelae is to diagnose the underlying condition. For many women, the journey to endometriosis diagnosis is long and fraught with barriers and misdiagnoses. Inherent challenges include a gold standard based on an invasive surgical procedure (laparoscopy) and diverse symptomatology, contributing to the well-established delay of 4 to 11 years from first symptom onset to surgical diagnosis. We believe remedying the diagnostic delay requires increased patient education and timely referral to a women’s healthcare provider and a shift in physician approach to the disorder. Endometriosis should be approached as a chronic, systemic, inflammatory and heterogeneous disease that presents with symptoms of pelvic pain and/or infertility rather than focusing primarily on surgical findings and pelvic lesions. Using this approach, symptoms, signs, and clinical findings of endometriosis are anticipated to become main drivers of clinical diagnosis and earlier intervention. Combining these factors into a practical algorithm is expected to simplify endometriosis diagnosis and make the process accessible to more clinicians and patients, culminating in earlier effective management. The time has come to bridge disparities and minimize delays in endometriosis diagnosis and treatment for the benefit of women worldwide.
       
  • 1020: Regulatory effect of various perinatal multipotent stromal cells on
           T cells.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ramon Coronado, Shatha Dallo
       
  • Does energy expenditure influence body fat accumulation in pregnancy'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Jasper Most, Leanne M. Redman
       
  • Savings with expanding use of the levonorgestrel intrauterine device and
           fewer benign hysterectomies
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Daniel M. Morgan, Neil S. Kamdar, Vanessa K. Dalton, Carolyn W. Swenson, Michelle H. Moniz, Brahmajee Nallamothu
       
  • Trends in pregnancy-associated mortality involving opioids in the United
           States, 2007–2016
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Alison Gemmill, Mathew V. Kiang, Monica J. Alexander
       
  • A rare case of endometriosis invading external iliac vein causing
           deep vein thrombosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Ma Li, Kailun Chen, Yoke Fai Fong
       
  • June 2018 (vol. 218, no. 6, pages 618.e1-7)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Placental transcriptional and histologic subtypes of normotensive fetal
           growth restriction are comparable to preeclampsia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Isaac Gibbs, Katherine Leavey, Samantha J. Benton, David Grynspan, Shannon A. Bainbridge, Brian J. CoxBackgroundInfants born small for gestational age because of pathologic placenta-mediated fetal growth restriction can be difficult to distinguish from those who are constitutionally small. Additionally, even among fetal growth–restricted pregnancies with evident placental disease, considerable heterogeneity in clinical outcomes and long-term consequences has been observed. Gene expression studies of fetal growth–restricted placentas also have limited consistency in their findings, which is likely due to the presence of different molecular subtypes of disease. In our previous study on preeclampsia, another heterogeneous placenta-centric disorder of pregnancy, we found that, by clustering placentas based only on their gene expression profiles, multiple subtypes of preeclampsia, including several with co-occurring suspected fetal growth restriction, could be identified.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to discover placental subtypes of normotensive small-for-gestational-age pregnancies with suspected fetal growth restriction through the use of unsupervised clustering of placental gene expression data and to investigate their relationships with hypertensive suspected fetal growth–restricted placental subtypes.Study DesignA new dataset of 20 placentas from normotensive small-for-gestational-age pregnancies (birthweight
       
  • The increased activity of a transcription factor inhibits autophagy in
           diabetic embryopathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Cheng Xu, Xi Chen, E. Albert Reece, Wenhui Lu, Peixin YangBackgroundMaternal diabetes induces neural tube defects and stimulates the activity of the forkhead box O3 (Fox)O3a in the embryonic neuroepithelium. We previously demonstrated that deleting the FOXO3a gene ameliorates maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects. Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as “autophagy”) is essential for neurulation. Rescuing autophagy suppressed by maternal diabetes in the developing neuroepithelium inhibits neural tube defect formation in diabetic pregnancy. This evidence suggests a possible link between FoxO3a and impaired autophagy in diabetic embryopathy.ObjectiveWe aimed to determine whether maternal diabetes suppresses autophagy through FoxO3a, and if the transcriptional activity of FoxO3a is required for the induction of diabetic embryopathy.Study DesignWe used a well-established type 1 diabetic embryopathy mouse model, in which diabetes was induced by streptozotocin, for our in vivo studies. To determine if FoxO3a mediates the inhibitory effect of maternal diabetes on autophagy in the developing neuroepithelium, we induced diabetic embryopathy in FOXO3a gene knockout mice and FoxO3a dominant negative transgenic mice. Embryos were harvested at embryonic day 8.5 to determine FoxO3a and autophagy activity and at embryonic day 10.5 for the presence of neural tube defects. We also examined the expression of autophagy-related genes. C17.2 neural stem cells were used for in vitro examination of the potential effects of FoxO3a on autophagy.ResultsDeletion of the FOXO3a gene restored the autophagy markers, lipidation of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3I to light chain 3II, in neurulation stage embryos. Maternal diabetes decreased light chain 3I-positive puncta number in the neuroepithelium, which was restored by deleting FoxO3a. Maternal diabetes also decreased the expression of positive regulators of autophagy (Unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1, Coiled-coil myosin-like BCL2-interacting protein, and autophagy-related gene 5) and the negative regulator of autophagy, p62. FOXO3a gene deletion abrogated the dysregulation of autophagy genes. In vitro data showed that the constitutively active form of FoxO3a mimicked high glucose in repressing autophagy. In cells cultured under high-glucose conditions, overexpression of the dominant negative FoxO3a mutant blocked autophagy impairment. Dominant negative FoxO3a overexpression in the developing neuroepithelium restored autophagy and significantly reduced maternal diabetes-induced apoptosis and neural tube defects.ConclusionOur study revealed that diabetes-induced FoxO3a activation inhibited autophagy in the embryonic neuroepithelium. We also observed that FoxO3a transcriptional activity mediated the teratogenic effect of maternal diabetes because dominant negative FoxO3a prevents maternal diabetes-induced autophagy impairment and neural tube defect formation. Our findings suggest that autophagy activators could be therapeutically effective in treating maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects.
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of opportunistic salpingectomy vs tubal ligation at the
           time of cesarean delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Kartik K. Venkatesh, Leslie H. Clark, David M. StamilioBackgroundRemoval of the fallopian tubes at the time of hysterectomy or interval sterilization has become routine practice to prevent ovarian cancer. While emerging as a strategy, uptake of this procedure at the time of cesarean delivery for pregnant women seeking permanent sterilization has not been widely adopted due to perceptions of increased morbidity and operative difficulty with a lack of available data in this setting.ObjectiveWe sought to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing strategies for long-term sterilization and ovarian cancer risk reduction at the time of cesarean delivery, including bilateral tubal ligation, opportunistic salpingectomy, and long-acting reversible contraception.Study DesignA decision-analytic and cost-effectiveness model was constructed for pregnant women undergoing cesarean delivery who desired permanent sterilization in the US population, comparing 3 strategies: (1) bilateral tubal ligation, (2) bilateral opportunistic salpingectomy, and (3) postpartum long-acting reversible contraception. This theoretic cohort consisted of 110,000 pregnant women desiring permanent sterilization at the time of cesarean delivery and ovarian cancer prevention at an average of 35 years who were monitored for an additional 40 years based on an average US female life expectancy of 75 years. The primary outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. Effectiveness was measured as quality-adjusted life years. Secondary outcomes included: the number of ovarian cancer cases and deaths, procedure-related complications, and unintended and ectopic pregnancies. The 1-, 2-, and 3-way and Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at $100,000.ResultsBoth bilateral tubal ligation and bilateral opportunistic salpingectomy with cesarean delivery have favorable cost-effectiveness ratios. In the base case analysis, salpingectomy was more cost-effective with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $23,189 per quality-adjusted life year compared to tubal ligation. Long-acting reversible contraception after cesarean was not cost-effective (ie, dominated). Although salpingectomy and tubal ligation were both cost-effective over a wide range of cost and risk estimates, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio analysis was highly sensitive to the uncertainty around the estimates of salpingectomy cancer risk reduction, risk of perioperative complications, and cost. Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis estimated that tubal ligation had a 49% chance of being the preferred strategy over salpingectomy. If the true salpingectomy risk of perioperative complications is>2% higher than tubal ligation or if the cancer risk reduction of salpingectomy is
       
  • Early preterm preeclampsia outcomes by intended mode of delivery
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Elizabeth M. Coviello, Sara N. Iqbal, Katherine L. Grantz, Chun-Chih Huang, Helain J. Landy, Uma M. ReddyBackgroundThe optimal route of delivery in early-onset preeclampsia before 34 weeks is debated because many clinicians are reluctant to proceed with induction for perceived high risk of failure.ObjectiveOur objective was to investigate labor induction success rates and compare maternal and neonatal outcomes by intended mode of delivery in women with early preterm preeclampsia.Study DesignWe identified 914 singleton pregnancies with preeclampsia in the Consortium on Safe Labor study for analysis who delivered between 24 0/7 and 33 6/7 weeks. We excluded fetal anomalies, antepartum stillbirth, or spontaneous preterm labor. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared between women undergoing induction of labor (n = 460) and planned cesarean delivery (n = 454) and women with successful induction of labor (n = 214) and unsuccessful induction of labor (n = 246). We calculated relative risks and 95% confidence intervals to determine outcomes by Poisson regression model with propensity score adjustment. The calculation of propensity scores considered covariates such as maternal age, gestational age, parity, body mass index, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, chronic hypertension, hospital type and site, birthweight, history of cesarean delivery, malpresentation/breech, simplified Bishop score, insurance, marital status, and steroid use.ResultsAmong the 460 women with induction (50%), 47% of deliveries were vaginal. By gestational age, 24 to 27 6/7, 28 to 31 6/7, and 32 to 33 6/7, the induction of labor success rates were 38% (12 of 32), 39% (70 of 180), and 54% (132 of 248), respectively. Induction of labor compared with planned cesarean delivery was less likely to be associated with placental abruption (adjusted relative risk, 0.33; 95% confidence interval, 0.16–0.67), wound infection or separation (adjusted relative risk, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.06–0.85), and neonatal asphyxia (0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.02–0.78). Women with vaginal delivery compared with those with failed induction of labor had decreased maternal morbidity (adjusted relative risk, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.09–0.82) and no difference in neonatal outcomes.ConclusionAbout half of women with preterm preeclampsia who attempted an induction had a successful vaginal delivery. The rate of successful vaginal delivery increases with gestational age. Successful induction has the benefit of preventing maternal and fetal comorbidities associated with previous cesarean deliveries in subsequent pregnancies. While overall rates of a composite of serious maternal and neonatal morbidity/mortality did not differ between induction of labor and planned cesarean delivery groups, women with failed induction of labor had increased maternal morbidity highlighting the complex route of delivery counseling required in this high-risk population of women.
       
  • Hospital variation in utilization and success of trial of labor after a
           prior cesarean
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Xiao Xu, Henry C. Lee, Haiqun Lin, Lisbet S. Lundsberg, Katherine H. Campbell, Heather S. Lipkind, Christian M. Pettker, Jessica L. IlluzziBackgroundTrial of labor after cesarean delivery is an effective and safe option for women without contraindications.ObjectivesThe objective of the study was to examine hospital variation in utilization and success of trial of labor after cesarean delivery and identify associated institutional characteristics and patient outcomes.Study DesignUsing linked maternal and newborn hospital discharge records and birth certificate data in 2010–2012 from the state of California, we identified 146,185 term singleton mothers with 1 prior cesarean delivery and no congenital anomalies or clear contraindications for trial of labor at 249 hospitals. Risk-standardized utilization and success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery were estimated for each hospital after accounting for differences in patient case mix. Risk for severe maternal and newborn morbidities, as well as maternal and newborn length of stay, were compared between hospitals with high utilization and high success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery and other hospitals. Bivariate analysis was also conducted to examine the association of various institutional characteristics with hospitals’ utilization and success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery.ResultsIn the overall sample, 12.5% of women delivered vaginally. After adjusting for patient clinical risk factors, utilization and success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery varied considerably across hospitals, with a median of 35.2% (10th to 90th percentile range: 10.2–67.1%) and 40.5% (10th to 90th percentile range: 8.5–81.1%), respectively. Risk-standardized utilization and success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery demonstrated an inverted U-shaped relationship such that low or excessively high use of trial of labor after cesarean delivery was associated with lower success rate. Compared with other births, those delivered at hospitals with above-the-median utilization and success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery had a higher risk for uterine rupture (adjusted risk ratio, 2.74, P < .001), severe newborn respiratory complications (adjusted risk ratio, 1.46, P < .001), and severe newborn neurological complications/trauma (adjusted risk ratio, 2.48, P < .001), but they had a lower risk for severe newborn infection (adjusted risk ratio, 0.80, P = .003) and overall severe unexpected newborn complications (adjusted risk ratio, 0.86, P < .001) as well as shorter length of stays (adjusted mean ratio, 0.948 for mothers and 0.924 for newborns, P < .001 for both). Teaching status, system affiliation, larger volume, higher neonatal care capacity, anesthesia availability, higher proportion of midwife-attended births, and lower proportion of Medicaid or uninsured patients were positively associated with both utilization and success of trial of labor after cesarean delivery. However, rural location and higher local malpractice insurance premium were negatively associated with the utilization of trial of labor after cesarean delivery, whereas for-profit ownership was associated with lower success rate.ConclusionUtilization and success rates of trial of labor after cesarean delivery varied considerably across hospitals. Strategies to promote vaginal birth should be tailored to hospital needs and characteristics (eg, increase availability of trial of labor after cesarean delivery at hospitals with low utilization rates while being more selective at hospitals with high utilization rates, and targeted support for lower capacity hospitals).
       
  • Uterine and fetal placental Doppler indices are associated with maternal
           cardiovascular function
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Jasmine Tay, Giulia Masini, Carmel M. McEniery, Dino A. Giussani, Caroline J. Shaw, Ian B. Wilkinson, Phillip R. Bennett, Christoph C. LeesBackgroundThe mechanism underlying fetal-placental Doppler index changes in preeclampsia and/or fetal growth restriction are unknown, although both are associated with maternal cardiovascular dysfunction.ObjectiveWe sought to investigate whether there was a relationship between maternal cardiac output and vascular resistance and fetoplacental Doppler findings in healthy and complicated pregnancy.Study DesignWomen with healthy pregnancies (n=62), preeclamptic pregnancies (n=13), preeclamptic pregnancies with fetal growth restriction (n=15), or fetal growth restricted pregnancies (n=17) from 24–40 weeks gestation were included. All of them underwent measurement of cardiac output with the use of an inert gas rebreathing technique and derivation of peripheral vascular resistance. Uterine and fetal Doppler indices were recorded; the latter were z scored to account for gestation. Associations were determined by polynomial regression analyses.ResultsMean uterine artery pulsatility index was higher in fetal growth restriction (1.37; P=.026) and preeclampsia+fetal growth restriction (1.63; P=.001) but not preeclampsia (0.92; P=1) compared with control subjects (0.8). There was a negative relationship between uterine pulsatility index and cardiac output (r2=0.101; P=.025) and umbilical pulsatility index z score and cardiac output (r2=0.078; P=.0015), and there were positive associations between uterine pulsatility index and peripheral vascular resistance (r2=0.150; P=.003) and umbilical pulsatility index z score and peripheral vascular resistance (r2= 0.145; P=.001). There was no significant relationship between cardiac output and peripheral vascular resistance with cerebral Doppler indices.ConclusionUterine artery Doppler change is abnormally elevated in fetal growth restriction with and without preeclampsia, but not in preeclampsia, which may explain the limited sensitivity of uterine artery Doppler changes for all these complications when considered in aggregate. Furthermore, impedance within fetoplacental arterial vessels is at least, in part, associated with maternal cardiovascular function. This relationship may have important implications for fetal surveillance and would inform therapeutic options in those pathologic pregnancy conditions currently, and perhaps erroneously, attributed purely to placental maldevelopment. Uterine and fetal placental Doppler indices are associated significantly with maternal cardiovascular function. The classic description of uterine and fetal Doppler changes being initiated by placental maldevelopment is a less plausible explanation for the pathogenesis of the conditions than that relating to maternal cardiovascular changes.
       
  • Interpersonal trauma and aging-related genitourinary dysfunction in a
           national sample of older women
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Carolyn J. Gibson, Nadra E. Lisha, Louise C. Walter, Alison J. HuangBackgroundAmong reproductive-aged women, exposure to interpersonal trauma is associated with genitourinary symptoms. Little is known about the relationship between these exposures and the genitourinary health of older women, who tend to experience different and more prevalent genitourinary symptoms because of menopause and aging.ObjectivesIn this study, we examined relationships between common types of interpersonal trauma and aging-related genitourinary dysfunction among older women.Study DesignWe analyzed data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, a national area probability sample of older community-dwelling adults born between 1920 and 1947. We used cross-sectional data from home-based study visits conducted in 2005–2006 to examine interpersonal violence exposures (any lifetime sexual assault, past-year emotional and physical abuse), and past-year genitourinary symptoms (urinary incontinence, other urinary problems, and vaginal pain/lubrication problems with sexual intercourse) among women participants. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to relate interpersonal violence and genitourinary symptoms, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, education, marital status, parity, hormone therapy, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and self-reported health. In exploratory models, we further adjusted for vaginal maturation, a tissue-specific marker of aging-related urogenital atrophy obtained from vaginal self-swabs.ResultsIn this national sample of 1551 older women (mean age 69 ± 2 years), 9% reported sexual assault, 23% reported emotional abuse, and
       
  • Vulvovaginal candidiasis: histologic lesions are primarily polymicrobial
           and invasive and do not contain biofilms
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Alexander Swidsinski, Alexander Guschin, Qionglan Tang, Yvonne Dörffel, Hans Verstraelen, Alexander Tertychnyy, Guzel Khayrullina, Xin Luo, Jack D. Sobel, Xuefeng JiangBackgroundThe recent demonstration of a vaginal biofilm in bacterial vaginosis and its postulated importance in the pathogenesis of recurrent bacterial vaginosis, including relative resistance to therapy, has led to the hypothesis that biofilms are crucial for the development of vulvovaginal candidiasis. The histopathology and microbial architecture of vulvovaginal candidiasis have not been previously defined; neither has Candida, containing biofilm been reported in situ. The present study aimed at clarifying the histopathology of vulvovaginal candidiasis including the presence or absence of vaginal biofilm.Study DesignIn a cross-sectional study, vaginal tissue biopsies were obtained from 35 women with clinically, microscopically, and culture-proven vulvovaginal candidiasis and compared with specimens obtained from 25 healthy women and 30 women with active bacterial vaginosis. Vaginal Candida infection was visualized using fluorescent in situ hybridization with ribosomal gene–based probes.ResultsCandida microorganisms were confirmed in 26 of 35 biopsies obtained from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis; however, Candida containing biofilm were not detected in any of the cases. Histopathological lesions were exclusively invasive and accompanied by co-invasion with Gardnerella or Lactobacillus species organisms.ConclusionHistopathological lesions of vulvovaginal candidiasis are primarily invasive in nature and polymicrobial and do not resemble biofilms. The clinical significance of Candida tissue invasion is unknown.
       
  • A group-based yoga program for urinary incontinence in ambulatory women:
           feasibility, tolerability, and change in incontinence frequency over 3
           months in a single-center randomized trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Alison J. Huang, Margaret Chesney, Nadra Lisha, Eric Vittinghoff, Michael Schembri, Sarah Pawlowsky, Amy Hsu, Leslee SubakBackgroundBecause of the limitations of existing clinical treatments for urinary incontinence, many women with incontinence are interested in complementary strategies for managing their symptoms. Yoga has been recommended as a behavioral self-management strategy for incontinence, but evidence of its feasibility, tolerability, and efficacy is lacking.ObjectiveTo evaluate the feasibility and tolerability of a group-based therapeutic yoga program for ambulatory middle-aged and older women with incontinence, and to examine preliminary changes in incontinence frequency as the primary efficacy outcome after 3 months.Materials and MethodsAmbulatory women aged 50 years or older who reported at least daily stress-, urgency-, or mixed-type incontinence, were not already engaged in yoga, and were willing to temporarily forgo clinical incontinence treatments were recruited into a randomized trial in the San Francisco Bay area. Women were randomly assigned to take part in a program of twice-weekly group classes and once-weekly home practice focused on Iyengar-based yoga techniques selected by an expert yoga panel (yoga group), or a nonspecific muscle stretching and strengthening program designed to provide a rigorous time-and-attention control (control group) for 3 months. All participants also received written, evidence-based information about behavioral incontinence self-management techniques (pelvic floor exercises, bladder training) consistent with usual first-line care. Incontinence frequency and type were assessed by validated voiding diaries. Analysis of covariance models examined within- and between-group changes in incontinence frequency as the primary efficacy outcome over 3 months.ResultsOf the 56 women randomized (28 to yoga, 28 to control), the mean age was 65.4 (±8.1) years (range, 55−83 years), the mean baseline incontinence frequency was 3.5 (±2.0) episodes/d, and 37 women (66%) had urgency-predominant incontinence. A total of 50 women completed their assigned 3-month intervention program (89%), including 27 in the yoga and 23 in the control group (P = .19). Of those, 24 (89%) in the yoga and 20 (87%) in the control group attended at least 80% of group classes. Over 3 months, total incontinence frequency decreased by an average of 76% from baseline in the yoga and 56% in the control group (P = .07 for between-group difference). Stress incontinence frequency also decreased by an average of 61% in the yoga group and 35% in controls (P = .045 for between-group difference), but changes in urgency incontinence frequency did not differ significantly between groups. A total of 48 nonserious adverse events were reported, including 23 in the yoga and 25 in the control group, but none were directly attributable to yoga or control program practice.ConclusionFindings demonstrate the feasibility of recruiting and retaining incontinent women across the aging spectrum into a therapeutic yoga program, and provide preliminary evidence of reduction in total and stress-type incontinence frequency after 3 months of yoga practice. When taught with attention to women’s clinical needs, yoga may offer a potential community-based behavioral self-management strategy for incontinence to enhance clinical treatment, although future research should assess whether yoga offers unique benefits for incontinence above and beyond other physical activity−based interventions.
       
  • Hysterectomy status and all-cause mortality in a 21-year Australian
           population-based cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Louise F. Wilson, Nirmala Pandeya, Julie Byles, Gita D. MishraBackgroundHysterectomy is a common surgical procedure, predominantly performed when women are between 30 and 50 years old. One in 3 women in Australia has had a hysterectomy by the time they are 60 years old, and 30% have both ovaries removed at the time of surgery. Given this high prevalence, it is important to understand the long-term effects of hysterectomy. In particular, women who have a hysterectomy/oophorectomy at younger ages are likely to be premenopausal or perimenopausal and may experience greater changes in hormone levels and a shortened reproductive lifespan than women who have a hysterectomy when they are older and postmenopausal. Use of menopausal hormone therapy after surgery may compensate for these hormonal changes. To inform clinical decisions about postsurgery management of women who have a hysterectomy prior to menopause (ie, average age at menopause 50 years), it is useful to compare women with a hysterectomy to women with no hysterectomy and to stratify the hysterectomy status by whether or not women have had a bilateral oophorectomy, or used menopausal hormone therapy.ObjectiveWe sought to investigate whether women who had a hysterectomy with ovarian conservation or a hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years were at a higher risk of premature all-cause mortality compared to women who did not have this surgery before the age of 50 years. We also sought to explore whether use of menopausal hormone therapy modified these associations.Study DesignWomen from the midcohort (born 1946 through 1951) of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health were included in our study sample (n = 13,541). Women who reported a hysterectomy (with and without both ovaries removed) before the age of 50 years were considered exposure at risk and compared with women who did not report these surgeries before age 50 years. To explore effect modification by use of menopausal hormone therapy we further stratified hysterectomy status by menopausal hormone therapy use. Risk of all-cause mortality was assessed using inverse-probability weighted Cox regression models.ResultsDuring a median follow-up of 21.5 years, there were 901 (6.7%) deaths in our study sample. Overall, there was no difference in all-cause mortality between women who reported a hysterectomy with ovarian conservation (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.72–1.02) or women who reported a hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy (hazard ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.78–1.34) and women with no hysterectomy. When stratified by menopausal hormone therapy use, women with hysterectomy and ovarian conservation before the age of 50 years were not at higher risk of all-cause mortality compared to no hysterectomy, regardless of menopausal hormone therapy use status. In contrast, among nonusers of menopausal hormone therapy only, women who reported a hysterectomy-bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years were at a higher risk of death compared to women with no hysterectomy (hazard ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–3.25).ConclusionHysterectomy with ovarian conservation before the age of 50 years did not increase risk of all-cause mortality. Among nonmenopausal hormone therapy users only, hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy before the age of 50 years was associated with a higher risk of death.
       
  • Counterpoint
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Jason GardosiThe publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated.The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal.
       
  • Point
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Wessel Ganzevoort, Baskaran Thilaganathan, Ahmet Baschat, Sanne J. GordijnThe publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated.The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal.
       
  • Tackling poorly selected, collected, and reported outcomes in obstetrics
           and gynecology research
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): James M.N. Duffy, Sue Ziebland, Peter von Dadelszen, Richard J. McManusClinical research should ultimately improve patient care. To enable this, randomized controlled trials must select, collect, and report outcomes that are both relevant to clinical practice and genuinely reflect the perspectives of key stakeholders including health care professionals, researchers, and patients. Unfortunately, many randomized controlled trials fall short of this requirement. Complex issues, including a failure to take into account the perspectives of key stakeholders when selecting outcomes, variations in outcome definitions and measurement instruments, and outcome reporting bias make research evidence difficult to interpret, undermining the translation of research into clinical practice. Problems with poor outcome selection, measurement, and reporting can be addressed by developing, disseminating, and implementing core outcome sets. A core outcome set represents a minimum data set of outcomes developed using robust consensus science methods engaging diverse stakeholders including health care professionals, researchers, and patients. Core outcomes should be routinely utilized by researchers, collected in a standardized manner, and reported consistently in the final publication. They are currently being developed across our specialty including infertility, endometriosis, and preeclampsia. Recognizing poorly selected, collected, and reported outcomes as serious hindrances to progress in our specialty, more than 80 journals including the Journal, have come together to support the Core Outcomes in Women’s and Newborn Health (CROWN) initiative. The consortium supports researchers to develop, disseminate, and implement core outcome sets. Implementing core outcome sets could make a profound contribution to addressing poorly selected, collected, and reported outcomes. Implementation should ensure future randomized controlled trials hold the necessary reach and relevance to inform clinical practice, enhance patient care, and improve patient outcomes.
       
  • The importance of access to comprehensive reproductive health care,
           including abortion: a statement from women’s health professional
           organizations
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Eve Espey, Amanda Dennis, Uta LandyBarriers to women’s reproductive health care access, particularly for termination of pregnancy, are increasing at the local, regional, and national levels through numerous institutional, legislative, and regulatory restrictions. Lack of access to reproductive health care has negative consequences for women’s health. Twelve women’s health care organizations affirm their support for access to comprehensive reproductive health care, including abortion.
       
  • Zika virus and the nonmicrocephalic fetus: why we should still
           worry
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Christie L. Walker, Marie-Térèse E. Little, Justin A. Roby, Blair Armistead, Michael Gale, Lakshmi Rajagopal, Branden R. Nelson, Noah Ehinger, Brittney Mason, Unzila Nayeri, Christine L. Curry, Kristina M. Adams WaldorfZika virus is a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus and was first linked to congenital microcephaly caused by a large outbreak in northeastern Brazil. Although the Zika virus epidemic is now in decline, pregnancies in large parts of the Americas remain at risk because of ongoing transmission and the potential for new outbreaks. This review presents why Zika virus is still a complex and worrisome public health problem with an expanding spectrum of birth defects and how Zika virus and related viruses evade the immune response to injure the fetus. Recent reports indicate that the spectrum of fetal brain and other anomalies associated with Zika virus exposure is broader and more complex than microcephaly alone and includes subtle fetal brain and ocular injuries; thus, the ability to prenatally diagnose fetal injury associated with Zika virus infection remains limited. New studies indicate that Zika virus imparts disproportionate effects on fetal growth with an unusual femur-sparing profile, potentially providing a new approach to identify viral injury to the fetus. Studies to determine the limitations of prenatal and postnatal testing for detection of Zika virus–associated birth defects and long-term neurocognitive deficits are needed to better guide women with a possible infectious exposure. It is also imperative that we investigate why the Zika virus is so adept at infecting the placenta and the fetal brain to better predict other viruses with similar capabilities that may give rise to new epidemics. The efficiency with which the Zika virus evades the early immune response to enable infection of the mother, placenta, and fetus is likely critical for understanding why the infection may either be fulminant or limited. Furthermore, studies suggest that several emerging and related viruses may also cause birth defects, including West Nile virus, which is endemic in many parts of the United States. With mosquito-borne diseases increasing worldwide, there remains an urgent need to better understand the pathogenesis of the Zika virus and related viruses to protect pregnancies and child health.
       
  • Giants in Obstetrics and Gynecology Series: a profile of Judith
           Vaitukaitis, MD, who made possible the early detection of pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Roberto Romero
       
  • Rediscovering Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis (1818−1865)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Nicholas KadarIgnaz Philipp Semmelweis was a Hungarian obstetrician who discovered the cause of puerperal or childbed fever (CBF) in 1847 when he was a 29-year-old Chief Resident (“first assistant”) in the first clinic of the lying-in division of the Vienna General Hospital. Childbed fever was then the leading cause of maternal mortality, and so ravaged lying-in hospitals that they often had to be closed. The maternal mortality rate (MMR) from CBF at the first clinic where Semmelweis worked, and where only medical students were taught, was 3 times greater than at the second clinic, where only midwives were taught, and Semmelweis was determined to find out why.Semmelweis concluded that none of the purported causes of CBF could explain the difference in MMR between the 2 clinics, as they all affected both clinics equally. The clue to the real cause came after Semmelweis’ beloved professor, Jacob Kolletschka, died after a student accidentally pricked Kolletscka’s finger during an autopsy. Semmelweis reviewed Kolletschka’s autopsy report, and noted that the findings were identical to those in mothers dying of CBF. He then made 2 groundbreaking inferences: that Kolletschka must have died of the same disease as mothers dying of CBF, and that the cause of CBF must be the same as the cause of Kolletschka’s death, because if the 2 diseases were the same, they must have the same cause.Semmelweis quickly realized why the MMR from CBF was higher on the first clinic: medical students, who assisted at autopsies, were transferring the causative agent from cadavers to the birth canal of mothers in labor with their hands, and he soon discovered that it could also be transferred from living persons with purulent infections. Bacteria had not yet been discovered to cause infections, and Semmelweis called the agent “decaying animal organic matter.” He implemented chlorine hand disinfection to remove this organic matter from the hands of the attendants, as soap and water alone had been ineffective.Hand disinfection reduced the MMR from CBF 3- to 10-fold, yet most leading obstetricians rejected Semmelweis’ doctrine because it conflicted with all extant theories of the cause of CBF. His work was also used in the fight raging over academic freedom in the University of Vienna Medical School, which turned Semmelweis chief against him, and forced Semmelweis to return to Budapest, where he was equally successful in reducing MMR from CBF. But Semmelweis never received the recognition that his groundbreaking work deserved, and died an ignominious death in 1865 at the age of 47 in an asylum, where he was beaten by his attendants and died of his injuries.Fifteen years later, his work was validated by the adoption of the germ theory, and honors were belatedly showered on Semmelweis from all over the world; but over the last 40 years, a myth has been created that has tarnished Semmelweis’ reputation by blaming the rejection of his work on Semmelweis’ character flaws. This myth is shown to be a genre of reality fiction that is inconsistent with historical facts.
       
  • Top-cited articles in the Journal: a bibliometric analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Stacy M. Yadava, Haylea S. Patrick, Cande V. Ananth, Todd Rosen, Justin S. BrandtBackgroundThe Journal has had a profound influence in nearly 150 years of publishing. A bibliometric analysis, which uses citation analyses to evaluate the impact of articles, can be used to identify the most impactful papers in the Journal’s history.ObjectiveThe objective was to identify and characterize the top-cited articles published in the Journal since 1920.Study DesignWe used the Web of Science and Scopus databases to identify the most frequently cited articles of the Journal from 1920 through 2018. The top 100 articles from each database were included in our analysis. Articles were evaluated for several characteristics including year of publication, article type, topic, open access, and country of origin. Using the Scopus data, we performed an unadjusted categorical analysis to characterize the articles and a 2 time point analysis to compare articles before and after 1995, the median year of publication from each database list.ResultsThe top 100 articles from each database were included in the analysis. This included 120 total articles: 80 articles listed in both and 20 unique in each database. More than half (52%) were observational studies, 9% were RCTs, and 75% were from US authors. When the post-1995 studies were compared with the articles published before 1995, articles were more frequently cited (median 27 vs 13 citations per year, P < .001), more likely to be randomized (14.0% vs 4.8%, P = .009), and more likely to originate from international authors (33.3% vs 17.5%, P = .045).ConclusionSlightly more than half of the top-cited papers in the Journal since 1920 were observational studies and three quarters of all papers were from US authors. Compared with top-cited papers before 1995, the Journal's top-cited papers after 1995 were more likely to be randomized and to originate from international authors.
       
  • Opportunistic salpingectomy: an appropriate procedure during all pelvic
           surgeries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Farr R Nezhat, Vanessa T. Martinelli
       
  • Postpartum salpingectomy: a procedure whose time has come
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Abigail S. Zamorano, David G. Mutch
       
  • Catherine S. Bradley, MD, MSCE, AJOG's new Editor-in-Chief for
           Gynecology
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Roberto Romero
       
  • A tribute to Ingrid Nygaard, MD, MS, Editor-in-Chief for Gynecology,
           2014–2018
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Roberto Romero
       
  • 150 Years of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s): Roberto Romero, Catherine S. Bradley
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Institutional Index
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • LB 3: Prophylactic antibiotics for the prevention of infection following
           operative vaginal delivery: the ANODE trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Marian Knight on behalf of the ANODE Collaborator Group
       
  • Late Breaking Divider Page 2
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • LB 2: Maternal sildenafil for severe early-onset fetal growth
           restriction: the Dutch multicentre placebo-controlled double-blind
           STRIDER-trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Anouk Pels, Jan Derks, Ayten Elvan-Taspinar, Joris Van Drongelen, Marjon De Boer, Hans Duvekot, Judith Van Laar, Jim Van Eyck, Salwan Al-Nasiry, Marieke Sueters, Leonard Morssink, Wes Onland, Aleid Van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, Christiana Naaktgeboren, Wessel Ganzevoort
       
  • LB 1: Premature Infants Receiving Cord Milking or Delayed Cord Clamping: A
           Randomized Controlled Non-inferiority Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Anup C. Katheria, Frank Reister, Helmut Hummler, Jochen Essers, Marc Mendler, Giang Truong, Shareece Davis-Nelson, Akila Subramaniam, Wally Carlo, Toby Debra Yankowitz, Hyagriv Simhan, Stacy Beck, Joseph Kaempf, Mark Tomlinson, Georg Schmolzer, Radha Chari, Eugene Dempsey, Keelin O’Donoghue, Shazia Bhat, Matthew Hoffman
       
  • Late Breaking Divider Page 1
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s):
       
  • 1059: Does educational intervention improve sonographer awareness of
           ultrasound safety'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Vanessa T. Martinelli, Agata Kantorowska, Jean Murphy, Martin Chavez, Wendy Kinzler, Anthony Vintzileos
       
  • 1058: Disparities in nuchal translucency uptake in California
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Toki Fillman, Jamie Matteson, Stan Sciortino, Sona Saha
       
  • 1057: Posterior uterocervical angle for predicting spontaneous preterm
           birth
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Tara A. Lynch, Erica Nicasio, Kam Szlachetka, Neil S. Seligman
       
  • 1056: Placental corticotrophin-releasing hormone (pCRH) as a possible
           modulator of human fetal liver blood perfusion
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Satoru Ikenoue, Feizal Waffarn, Masanao Ohashi, Kaeko Sumiyoshi, Chigusa Ikenoue, Claudia Buss, Sonja Entringer, Pathik D. Wadhwa
       
  • 1055: Treatment of amniotic fluid sludge is not associated with decreased
           incidence of preterm birth
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ryan D. Cuff, Elliott Carter, Rosalea Taam, Eugene Y. Chang, Scott A. Sullivan
       
  • 1054: Prenatal diagnosis of congenital face and neck malformations - is
           complementary fetal MRI of value'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Roni Zemet, Inna Amdur-Zilberfarb, Moran Shapira, Tomer Ziv-Baran, Chen Hoffmann, Eran Kassif, Eldad Katorza
       
  • 1053: Accuracy of mid-trimester ultrasound (u/s) in the prediction of
           placental cord insertion
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Riddhi Parikh, William Cusick
       
  • 1052: Brain composition differences in fetuses after laser surgery for
           twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS)
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ramen H. Chmait, Douglas Vanderbilt, Karam Ashouri, Arlyn Llanes, Hollie A. Lai, Vidya Rajagopalan
       
  • 1051: Likelihood of vasa previa resolution across gestation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Nathan S. Fox, Rebecca A. Klahr, Kelly B. Zafman, Melissa B. Hill, Courtney T. Connolly, Andrei Rebarber
       
  • 1050: Cross-modality, in-vivo validation of 4D-Flow MRI evaluation of
           uterine artery blood flow in human pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Nadav Schwartz, Eileen Hwuang, Ana Rodriguez-Soto, Felix Wehrli, Marta Vidorreta, Brianna F. Moon, Kirpal Kochar, Shobhana Parameshwaran, Nathanel C. Koelper, Mary D. Sammel, Matthew D. Tisdall, John Detre, Walter R. Witschey
       
  • 1049: Fully automated placental volume quantification from 3DUS for
           prediction of small-for-gestational age infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Nadav Schwartz, Ipek Oguz, Jiancong Wang, Alison Pouch, Natalie Yushkevich, Shobhana Parameshwaran, James Gee, Paul Yushkevich, Baris U. Oguz
       
  • 1048: Early-onset isolated fetal growth restriction and perinatal outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Moeun Son, Ronald J. Wapner, Robert M. Silver, David M. Haas, Deborah A. Wing, Samuel Parry, Brian M. Mercer, George R. Saade, Uma M. Reddy, William A. Grobman
       
  • 1047: Increased abdominal circumference to head circumference ratio in
           late pregnancy is predictive of shoulder dystocia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Mark P. Hehir, Naomi Burke, Gerard Burke, Fionnuala M. Breathnach, Fionnuala M. McAuliffe, John J. Morrison, Michael Turner, Samina Dornan, John R. Higgins, Amanda Cotter, Peter McParland, Sean Daly, Fiona Cody, Patrick Dicker, Elizabeth Tully, Fergal D. Malone
       
  • 1046: Accuracy of estimated fetal weight assessment in fetuses with
           congenital diaphragmatic hernia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Lisa C. Zuckerwise, Emily W. Taylor, Sarah S. Osmundson
       
  • 1045: Which is better: fetal AC or EFW in predicting SGA infants'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Kathy C. Matthews, Rohini Kopparam, Rana Khan, Evan Sholle, Shari E. Gelber
       
  • 1044: Sonographic Cord Insertion-to-Placental Edge Distance (CPED):
           Perinatal complications and threshold for identifying marginal cord
           insertions.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Joseph R. Wax, Ian R. Wax, Angelina Cartin, Wendy Y. Craig, Michael G. Pinette
       
  • 1043: Comparison of fetal thigh fractional limb volume with neonatal
           ponderal index in fetal growth restriction
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jonathan G. Steller, Diane L. Gumina, Allison Gillan, Shannon Son, Shane Reeves, John C. Hobbins, Henry L. Galan
       
  • 1042: Comparison of 3D fetal thigh fractional limb volume between two
           Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) cohorts
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jonathan G. Steller, Diane L. Gumina, Allison Gillan, Shannon Son, Shane Reeves, John Hobbins, Henry L. Galan
       
  • 1041: Utility of follow-up sonography for fetal anomaly detection
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): John J. Byrne, Jamie L. Morgan, Donald D. McIntire, Diane M. Twickler, Jodi S. Dashe
       
  • 1040: Congenital diaphragmatic hernia-associated neonatal morbidity and
           mortality based on TOTAL trial severity designation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jaye C. Boissiere, Jill N. Anderson, Anna I. Girsen, Susan R. Hintz, Yasser Y. El-Sayed, Krisa P. Van Meurs, Karl G. Sylvester, Yair J. Blumenfeld
       
  • 1039: Machine learning approach to fetal weight estimation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ido Solt, Or Caspi, Ron Beloosesky, Zeev Weiner, Eyal Avdor
       
  • 1038: Fetal Bladder Extrophy: A commonly missed diagnosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Gharid Nourallah, Greg Ryan, Jon Barrett, Darius Bagli
       
  • 1037: Isolated amniotic fluid disorders and the risk for long-term
           endocrine morbidity of the offspring
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Gali Pariente, Asnat Walfisch, Tamar Wainstock, Ruslan Sergienko, Eyal Sheiner
       
  • 1036: Euploid first trimester cystic hygroma - A more benign entity than
           previously thought'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ciara M. Malone, Sieglinde Mullers, Nollaig Kelliher, Jane Dalrymple, Joan O'Beirnes, Karen Flood, Fergal Malone
       
  • 1035: Five years’ experience with universal preterm birth screening
           using transvaginal ultrasound for cervical length measurement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Catherine M. Igel, Jill Berkin, Rachel Meislin, Peer Dar, Peter S. Bernstein, Diana Wolfe
       
  • 1034: Abdominal vs. vaginal approach for the mid-trimester cervical length
           screening
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Yuval Ginsberg, Yaniv Zipori, Nizar Khatib, Alon Shrim, Ghanem Nadir, Dalia Schwake, Zeev Weiner, Ron Beloosesky
       
  • 1033: Pregnancy after bariatric surgery, effect of personalized tailored
           nutrition on dietary intake and pregnancy outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Shir Araki
       
  • 1032: Can we identify risk factors for decreased birth satisfaction among
           women undergoing induction of labor'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rebecca F. Hamm, Sindhu K. Srinivas, Lisa D. Levine
       
  • 1031: There are racial disparities in birth satisfaction for women
           undergoing induction of labor
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rebecca F. Hamm, Sindhu K. Srinivas, Lisa D. Levine
       
  • 1030: Umbilical artery gas studies and the prediction of adverse neonatal
           outcomes in elective cesarean deliveries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Noa Gonen, Ohad Gluck, Jacob Bar, Michal Kovo, Eran Weiner
       
  • 1029: Optimization of labor and delivery procedure flow using six sigma
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Jaimie L. Maines, Cori Shollenberger, Ashley Brinton, James O'Brien, Avi Hameroff, Serdar Ural, Jaimey Pauli
       
  • 1028: Flow velocity profiles in the descending aorta in hypertensive
           disease during pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Yalda Afshar, Allison Woods, Greggory DeVore, Brian Koos
       
  • 1027: Screening for membrane progesterone receptors: labor associated
           functional progesterone withdrawal in fetal membranes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Violetta Lozovyy
       
  • 1026: Effect of lactation on maternal metabolic and inflammatory markers:
           a murine model
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Tania Roman, Talar Kechichian, Phyllis Gamble, Patrick S. Ramsey, George Saade, Egle Bytautiene Prewit
       
  • 1025: Autophagy deficiency leads to intrinsic production of cell-free DNA
           in extravillous human trophoblast
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Sarah M. Davis, Shibin Cheng, Sukanta Jash, Sayani Banerjee, Surendra Sharma
       
  • 1024: Ecology and diversity of the vaginal microbiome in pregnancy and
           postpartum
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ryan M. Pace, Derrick M. Chu, Amanda L. Prince, Kristen M. Meyer, Max Seferovic, Kjersti M. Aagaard
       
  • 1023: Autonomic regulation of maternal heart rate variability in
           preeclampsia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rosa J. Speranza, Monica Rincon, Karen S. Greiner, Kathleen Brookfield, Brandon Togioka, Richard M. Burwick
       
  • 1022: Placental myeloid cell population alterations in parturition
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rivka Frankel, Ola Gutzeit, Shay Hantisteanu, Mordechai Hallak, Yuval Ginsberg, Ron Beloosesky, Zeev Weiner, Ofer Fainaru
       
  • 1021: Alterations of myeloid cell populations in human pregnancies
           complicated by preeclampsia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Rivka Frankel, Ola Gutzeit, Shay Hantisteanu, Mordechai Hallak, Yuval Ginsberg, Ron Beloosesky, Zeev Weiner, Ofer Fainaru
       
  • 1019: Progesterone attenuates brain inflammatory response and protects the
           brain from inflammation-induced immature myeloid cells increase
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ola Gutzeit, Linoy Segal, Yuval Ginsberg, Nizar Khatib, Ofer Fainaru, Michael Ross, Zeev Weiner, Ron Beloosesky
       
  • 1018: Myeloid cells in prgenancy and in inflammatory bowel disease:
           lessons from mouse models
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Ofer Fainaru, Gili Paz, Shay Hantisteanu, Mordechai Hallak, Yuval Ginsberg, Ron Beloosesky, Zeev Weiner
       
  • 1017: Gene expression profiling fetal Hofbauer cells and maternal
           intervillous macrophages
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Volume 220, Issue 1, SupplementAuthor(s): Nida Ozarslan, Joshua F. Robinson, Stephanie L. Gaw
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 52.87.253.202
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-