Journal Cover
IEEE Spectrum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.159
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 348  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0018-9235
Published by IEEE Homepage  [228 journals]
  • When all reality is virtual - [Back Story]
    • Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: WE'RE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE DEBUT, in this issue, of a new column, Macro & Micro. Perhaps you've heard of its author, Mark Pesce. If not, prepare to be impressed.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • John Deere's quest to solve agricultures deep-learning problems -
           [Spectral Lines]
    • Authors: Tekla S. Perry;
      Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: What's the world's hardest machine-learning challenge' Autonomous vehicles' Robots that can fall over and get back up' Cancer detection' ¶ Julian Sanchez believes it's agriculture. ¶ He may be a little biased. Sanchez is the director of precision agriculture for John Deere, and he's in charge of adding intelligence to traditional farm vehicles. I met with Sanchez and Alexey Rostapshov, head of digital innovation at John Deere Labs, in San Francisco, where John Deere launched the spin-off in 2017 to take advantage of Silicon Valley's tech expertise. ¶ Sanchez believes agriculture is the biggest challenge for artificial intelligence because it's not just about driving tractors around, although autonomous driving is certainly part of the mix. According to Sanchez, the more complex problems revolve around issues such as crop classification. John Deere would like to create an AI system that allows farmers to know, for example, whether a grain being harvested is high quality or low quality. The many differences between grain types, and between grains grown under different conditions, make this a tough task for machine learning. ¶ Sanchez uses corn as an example. To build a deep-learning algorithm to analyze corn kernel quality, you'd feed it millions of pictures of kernels. Kernels harvested in central Illinois might have one color. But kernels of the same hybrid from a different farm 5 miles away might look slightly different. Now imagine solving that challenge for dozens of grain varieties-some of which, like canola, are nearly microscopic.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Bangladesh scrambles to grow power supply - [News]
    • Authors: Peter Fairley;
      Pages: 6 - 7
      Abstract: ELECTRIC THREE-WHEELERS ferry people and goods around Bangladesh but are banned in its capital. Batteries and motors could accelerate the bicycle rickshaws that gum up Dhaka's traffic and eliminate exhaust from tuk tuks, gas-powered three-wheelers. But charging such EVs would further burden already strained power lines.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Smart headphones warn of nearby cars - [Journal Watch]
    • Authors: Jeremy Hsu;
      Pages: 8 - 8
      Abstract: HOW CAN PEDESTRIANS safely tune out the world' Perhaps with a pair of intelligent headphones that alert them to oncoming vehicles.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • India grapples with vast solar park - [News]
    • Authors: Peter Fairley;
      Pages: 8 - 9
      Abstract: IT'S 10 A.M. AND Indian peanut farmer Venkeapream is relaxing at his family compound in Pavagada, an arid area north of Bangalore. The 67-year-old retired three years ago upon leasing his land to the Karnataka state government. That land is now part of a 53-square-kilometer area festooned with millions of solar panels. As his fields yield carbon-free electricity, Venkeapream pursues his passion full time: playing the electric harmonium, a portable reed organ.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • 4 Ways to handle more qubits - [News]
    • Authors: Samuel K. Moore;
      Pages: 9 - 10
      Abstract: AS RESEARCHERS STRIVE TO boost the capacity of quantum computers, they've run into a problem that many people have after a big holiday: There's just not enough room in the fridge.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Quantum-dot tattoos store vaccine history - [News]
    • Authors: Megan Scudellari;
      Pages: 11 - 11
      Abstract: I REMEMBER A FADED yellow booklet about the size of a wallet that my mother used to pull out at the doctor's office to record my vaccines. Today, nurses document my children's vaccinations in electronic health records that will likely follow them to adulthood.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Location, location - [News]
    • Pages: 12 - 13
      Abstract: BITCOIN MINING is energy-intensive work. Pictured is part of the BitRiver facility in Bratsk, Russia-one of the world's largest data centers dedicated to doing the complex calculations that keep the blockchain humming along. There were two solid reasons for BitRiver to open up shop there. Keeping this huge facility running requires nearly 100 megawatts of electric power. But because the site is a stone's throw from the Bratskaya hydropower plant on the Angara River, it takes advantage of some of the cheapest electricity rates in the world. The data center depends on dozens of industrial fans that blow on the racks to keep the 20,000 mining devices cool. But Siberia's bitter cold climate means that BitRiver can get away with just those fans instead of a fancy and expensive cooling system, further slashing its energy budget.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • A diy audio induction loop: Here's a simple way to transmit audio to
           people who wear T-coil-equipped hearing aids - [Hands On]
    • Authors: David Schneider;
      Pages: 14 - 16
      Abstract: I REGULARLY ATTEND AN unprogrammed Quaker meeting, where a lot of the folks are older and have hearing impairments. This style of worship poses a special challenge for these people because, unlike the convention at many other religious gatherings, there is no one person who addresses the congregation. At an unprogrammed Quaker meeting, anyone may speak from anywhere in the room.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Electricity prices: A changing bargain: Crosstalk
    • Pages: 17 - 18
      Abstract: THE GENERATIONS-OLD TREND toward lower electricity prices now appears to have ended. In many affluent countries, prices tilted upward at the turn of the century, and they continue to rise, even after adjusting for inflation.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Wi-Fi's long goodbye: Crosstalk
    • Authors: Stacey Higginbotham;
      Pages: 19 - 19
      Abstract: IN TEN YEARS, we won't need Wi-Fi. At least, that's what Azhar Hussain, the CEO of IoT company Hanhaa, told me on a phone call late last year. He thinks the end of Wi-Fi is nigh because he believes that allocating spectrum in smaller chunks will let municipalities, universities, and companies create private 5G cellular networks. The convenience of those networks will impel companies to choose cellular connections over Wi-Fi for their IoT devices.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Sense and sensoribility - [Crosstalk]
    • Pages: 20 - 20
      Abstract: I'M WRITING A BOOK about augmented reality, which forced me to confront a central question: When will this technology truly arrive' I'm not talking about the smartphone-screen versions offered up by the likes of Pokémon Go and Minecraft Earth, but in that long-promised form that will require nothing more cumbersome than what feels like a pair of sunglasses.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Portrait of a black hole: Here's how the event horizon telescope team
           pieced together a now-famous image
    • Authors: Katherine L. Bouman;
      Pages: 22 - 29
      Abstract: Last April, a Research Team That I'M Part of Unveiled a Picture that most astronomers never dreamed they would see: one of a massive black hole at the center of a distant galaxy. Many were shocked that we had pulled off this feat. To accomplish it, our team had to build a virtual telescope the size of the globe and pioneer new techniques in radio astronomy.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • 5 Big ideas for fusion power: Startups, universities, and major companies
           are vying to commercialize a nuclear fusion reactor
    • Authors: Tom Clynes;
      Pages: 30 - 37
      Abstract: THE JOKE HAS BEEN AROUND almost as long as the dream: Nuclear fusion energy is 30 years away…and always will be. But now, more than 80 years after Australian physicist Mark Oliphant first observed deuterium atoms fusing and releasing dollops of energy, it may finally be time to update the punch line.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Routers in space: Kepler communications' CubeSats will create an
           Internet for other satellites
    • Authors: Mina Mitry;
      Pages: 38 - 43
      Abstract: For decades, the astronomical cost of launching a satellite meant that only government agencies and large corporations ever undertook such a herculean task. But over the last two decades or so, newer, commercial rocket designs that accommodate multiple payloads have reduced launch costs dramatically-from about US $ $ $54,000 per kilogram in 2000 to about $ $ $2,720 in 2018. That trend in turn has fostered a boom in the private satellite industry. Since 2012, the number of small satellites-roughly speaking, those under 50 kilograms-being launched into low Earth orbit (LEO) has increased 30 percent every year.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Atom-thick transistors
    • Authors: Iuliana Radu;
      Pages: 44 - 49
      Abstract: IF THERE'S ONE THING ABOUT Moore's Law that's obvious to anyone, it's that transistors have been made smaller and smaller as the years went on. Scientists and engineers have taken that trend to an almost absurd limit during the past decade, creating devices that are made of one-atom-thick layers of material.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Is it time to drag tech jobs out of Silicon Valley' - [Careers]
    • Authors: Tekla S. Perry;
      Pages: 50 - 50
      Abstract: SILICON VALLEY CONTINUES TO DOMINATE. In every study I've seen, it has the lion's share of tech jobs. Its engineers command the highest salaries. This is despite the fact that over the years, various regions in the United States and worldwide have pitched themselves as the “next Silicon Valley” (or “Silicon Glen” or “Silicon Fen.”) Some have indeed increased their pool of tech jobs. But none have really become a serious technology hub, outside of Boston, Seattle, San Diego, and North Carolina's Research Triangle.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
  • Fun with uranium!
    • Authors: Allison Marsh;
      Pages: 52 - 52
      Abstract: “Users should not take ore samples out of their jars, for they tend to flake and crumble and you would run the risk of having radioactive ore spread out in your laboratory.” Such was the warning that came with the Gilbert U-238 Atomic Energy Lab, a 1950s science kit that included four small jars of actual uranium. Budding young nuclear scientists were encouraged to use the enclosed instruments to measure the samples' radioactivity, observe radioactive decay, and even go prospecting for radioactive ores. Yes, the Gilbert company definitely intended for kids to try this at home. And so the company's warning was couched not in terms of health risk but rather as bad scientific practice: Removing the ore from its jar would raise the background radiation, thereby invalidating your experimental results.
      PubDate: Feb. 2020
      Issue No: Vol. 57, No. 2 (2020)
       
 
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