Journal Cover
IEEE Software
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.449
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 213  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0740-7459
Published by IEEE Homepage  [191 journals]
  • IEEE Computer Society Information
    • Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Jobs Board
    • Abstract: Advertisement, IEEE.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • The Voice of the Developer
    • Authors: Ipek Ozkaya;
      Pages: 3 - 5
      Abstract: Developers are seldom shy about expressing how they feel about the current task at hand, especially when the task triggers stress and impacts productivity negatively:
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Staff Listing
    • Pages: 4 - 5
      Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Sentiment and Emotion in Software Engineering
    • Authors: Nicole Novielli;Alexander Serebrenik;
      Pages: 6 - 23
      Abstract: We are glad to present the "Sentiment and Emotion in Software Engineering" special issue of IEEE Software. In recent years, this topic has gained attention from both the research community and industry. Indeed, academic researchers have organized a number of highly successful workshops, such as the International Workshop on Emotional Awareness in Software Engineering (SEmotion) in 2016-2019. The topic was also explored in a special issue of The Journal of Systems and Software.1 Both small and large companies have considered emotions in some aspects of their work. For example, Microsoft considers emotions in the context of inclusive hiring and support of neurodiverse developers.2 Meanwhile, SkyTV aims at enhancing productivity of teams3 by increasing their emotional awareness. Yet another company, source{d}, designs techniques for detection of sentiment in source-code repositories.4
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Ten Years of EARS
    • Authors: Alistair Mavin Mav;Philip Wilkinson;
      Pages: 10 - 14
      Abstract: The first easy Approach to Requirements Syntax (EARS) paper was published 10 years ago.1 (For more information, see "Introduction to the Easy Approach to Requirements Syntax.") As the original authors, we were initially unsure about publishing because we thought that EARS was too simple: almost too obvious to be of value. It turns out that it is this simplicity that is perhaps the greatest strength of EARS. Here we reflect on 10 years of EARS and share some lessons learned. Experienced EARS practitioners provide case studies to illustrate some applications of the approach. (For more information, see "The Easy Approach to Requirements Syntax for Agile Cyberphysical System Development," "Applying the Easy Approach to Requirements Syntax to Regulatory Requirements in the Nuclear Energy Domain," and "Intel Corporation.")
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Validation of Autonomous Systems
    • Authors: Christof Ebert;Michael Weyrich;
      Pages: 15 - 23
      Abstract: Society today depends on autonomous systems, such as intelligent service systems, self-driving trains, and remote surgeries.1 The ultimate validation of the Turing test is that we often do not recognize autonomous systems. This growing usage poses many challenges, such as how to provide transparency, which rules or learning patterns are applied in a complex situation, and if these rules are the right ones. Validation is the key challenge, of which we will provide an overview in this article.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Dealing With C's Original Sin
    • Authors: Chris Hathhorn;Grigore Rosu;
      Pages: 24 - 28
      Abstract: In the very early days of C, the compiler written by Dennis Ritchie and supplied with the UNIX operating system entirely defined the language. As the number of users and C implementations grew, however, so too did the need for a language standard-a contract between users and implementers about what should and should not count as C. This effort began in 1983 with the formation of a committee tasked with producing "an unambiguous and machine-independent definition of the language C" and led to the ANSI C Standard in 1989.1 In retrospect, it was not until this date, 17 years after the first compiler, when C's most notorious language feature slithered into the world: undefined behavior.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • 2019 IEEE Computer Society Election
    • Pages: 28 - 28
      Abstract: Presents an advertisement to vote in upcoming CS society elections.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Highlights from ICSE 2019: Software Security and Mobile App Energy
           Consumption
    • Authors: Jeffrey C. Carver;Leandro L. Minku;
      Pages: 29 - 31
      Abstract: This issue's "Practitioners' Digest" department reports on the 2019 International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). We focus on two emerging themes: security and energy issues for mobile apps. Feedback or suggestions are welcome. In addition, if you try or adopt any of the practices included in this article, please send me and the author(s) of the article a note about your experiences.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Release Early, Release Often, and Watch Your Users' Emotions: Lessons From
           Emotional Patterns
    • Authors: Daniel Martens;Walid Maalej;
      Pages: 32 - 37
      Abstract: App stores are highly competitive markets, and unexpected app changes might incite even loyal users to explore alternative apps. In this article, we present five release lessons, from emotional patterns identified using sentiment analysis tools, to assist app vendors maintain positive emotions and gain competitive advantages.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Can a Machine Learn Through Customer Sentiment': A Cost-Aware Approach
           to Predict Support Ticket Escalations
    • Authors: Colin Werner;Ze Shi Li;Daniela Damian;
      Pages: 38 - 45
      Abstract: Given the connection between customer happiness and support ticket escalation, we describe an approach that 1) analyzes the emotions in conversations between a customer and a support analyst and 2) provides organizations with a cost-based mechanism to evaluate machine-learning algorithms trained on emotion-related features to predict support ticket escalations.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Transactions on Big Data
    • Pages: 45 - 45
      Abstract: Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Comparing the Communication Tone and Responses of Users and Developers in
           Two R Mailing Lists: Measuring Positive and Negative Emails
    • Authors: Marc J. Lanovaz;Bram Adams;
      Pages: 46 - 50
      Abstract: The R programming language user and developer communities use email lists to communicate. We compared the characteristics of different communication tones and their relation to email replies for a 10-year period. Our results suggest that different tones may produce small differences in responses across users and developers.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Perceptions of Gender Diversity's Impact on Mood in Software Development
           Teams
    • Authors: Kelly Blincoe;Olga Springer;Michal R. Wrobel;
      Pages: 51 - 56
      Abstract: Gender inequality persists in IT teams. We examine how gender differentiation affects the workplace atmosphere and analyze the results of our study of the issue. We discuss the problem of gender discrimination and consider methods to reduce inequality.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • The Connection Between Burnout and Personality Types in Software
           Developers
    • Authors: Emanuel Mellblom;Isar Arason;Lucas Gren;Richard Torkar;
      Pages: 57 - 64
      Abstract: This article examines the connection between the five-factor model personality traits and burnout in software developers and aims to validate generalizations of findings in other fields.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Sentiment Classification Using N-Gram Inverse Document Frequency and
           Automated Machine Learning
    • Authors: Rungroj Maipradit;Hideaki Hata;Kenichi Matsumoto;
      Pages: 65 - 70
      Abstract: We propose a sentiment classification method with a general machine-learning framework. In comparison to publicly available data sets, our method achieved the highest F1 values in positive and negative sentences on all data sets.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • The End to the Myth of Individual Programmer Productivity
    • Authors: William R. Nichols;
      Pages: 71 - 75
      Abstract: One often-quoted truism in software engineering is that good programmers are "much much better" than bad programmers. The size of "much much better" is widely debated, but ranges such as 10 times more productive are often cited as conservative estimates. This article argues that such statements are misleading and miss numerous important effects. Based on the studies described later, it would appear that some programmers are not inherently exceedingly better than others.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Subscribe to Security & Privacy Magazine
    • Pages: 75 - 75
      Abstract: Advertisement, IEEE.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Healthy Code Reveals the Problem and Solution
    • Authors: George Fairbanks;
      Pages: 76 - 79
      Abstract: Source code reveals abstractions from two places: the problem and the solution. It's easier to design and evolve a system when you understand each of them separately before you combine them in code. With skill, it's possible to separate those concerns in the code. Declarative understanding of the abstractions is the most useful and easy to convey. However, current software development processes rarely guide developers to do this.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • Jonathan Boccara on Legacy Code
    • Authors: Adam Gordon Bell;
      Pages: 80 - 84
      Abstract: Presents an interview conducted with Jonathan Boccara, author of The Legacy Code Programmer’s Toolbox. To hear the full interview, visit http://www.se-radio.net or access our archives via RSS at http://feeds.feedburner.com/se-radio.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
  • 2019 IEEE Computer Society Election
    • Pages: 84 - 84
      Abstract: Presents an advertisement to vote in upcoming CS society elections.
      PubDate: Sept.-Oct. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 5 (2019)
       
 
 
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