Journal Cover
IEEE Software
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.449
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 220  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0740-7459
Published by IEEE Homepage  [191 journals]
  • IEEE Computer Society Information
    • Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Jobs Board
    • Abstract: Advertisement.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Interact, Collaborate, Debate
    • Authors: Ipek Ozkaya;
      Pages: 3 - 6
      Abstract: How information is shared has changed signifi cantly due to technology and will continue to change. The pace of innovation in and dependence on software further creates an environment in which models of knowledge production and consumption are continually challenged. Information gets distributed quicker, almost real time, through myriad available social media channels.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Staff Listing
    • Pages: 4 - 5
      Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Requirements Engineering: The Quest for Meaningful Metrics: Time for a
           Change'
    • Authors: Sarah Gregory;
      Pages: 7 - 11
      Abstract: For many years, I quoted a misstatement of this quotation from statistician and quality guru W. Edwards Deming. From my graduate school days, "If you can't measure it, you can't manage it" has been drilled into my head as a mantra. While I gritted my teeth through many a metrics-focused activity, I consoled myself with the belief that the effort to get to some sort of objective measure-in requirements engineering (RE), defect density, the number of defects in an artifact or specification-would inevitably lead to better results. Measuring defects would lead to manageable requirements. Better requirements-requirements with fewer objective defects-would lead to better products.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Twenty Years of Open Source Software: From Skepticism to Mainstream
    • Authors: Gregorio Robles;Igor Steinmacher;Paul Adams;Christoph Treude;
      Pages: 12 - 15
      Abstract: Open source software (OSS) has conquered the software world. You can see it nearly everywhere, from Internet infrastructure to mobile phones to the desktop. In addition to that, although many OSS practices were viewed with skepticism 20 years ago, several have become mainstream in software engineering today: from development tools such as Git to practices such as modern code reviews.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Computing Edge Magazine Subscribe
    • Pages: 16 - 16
      Abstract: Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • How to Succeed in the Software Business While Giving Away the Source Code:
           The AdaCore Experience
    • Authors: Benjamin M. Brosgol;
      Pages: 17 - 22
      Abstract: Open source software or, more accurately, freely licensed open source software (FLOSS) at first appears to present a dilemma when adopted as part of a business model. If users are allowed to access, modify, and/or redistribute the source code, how does a company protect its intellectual property and, more fundamentally, sell something that can be easily and legally reproduced'
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Annals of the History of Computing
    • Pages: 22 - 22
      Abstract: Advertisement, IEEE.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • From Art to Science: The Evolution of Community Development
    • Authors: Diane Mueller;Daniel Izquierdo-Cortazar;
      Pages: 23 - 28
      Abstract: Community development in open source ecosystems is increasingly complex. This article focuses on the OpenShift and CNCF ecosystems and concludes that cross-community collaboration analysis is challenging and a more scientific approach is required.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Critical Factors for Open Source Advancement in the U.S. Department of
           Defense
    • Authors: Thomas P. Scanlon;
      Pages: 29 - 33
      Abstract: Leveraging open source components in Department of Defense (DoD) software systems remains challenging and is often met with resistance. This article describes several factors that will increase the likelihood of successfully deploying open source in DoD projects.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Who Can Maintain This Code': Assessing the Effectiveness of
           Repository-Mining Techniques for Identifying Software Maintainers
    • Authors: Guilherme Avelino;Leonardo Passos;Fabio Petrillo;Marco Tulio Valente;
      Pages: 34 - 42
      Abstract: In large and complex systems, identifying developers capable of maintaining a piece of code is an essential task. Repository-mining techniques can help by providing some level of automation; however, whether such techniques effectively identify skilled software maintainers is still unclear.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Software and Privacy Magazine Subscribe
    • Pages: 42 - 42
      Abstract: Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Lessons in Persisting Object Data Using Object-Relational Mapping
    • Authors: Gregory Vial;
      Pages: 43 - 52
      Abstract: In this article, object-relational mapping (ORM) engines in object-oriented programming are introduced. The tradeoffs that must be considered when using ORM are discussed and four lessons that will help software developers take advantage of ORM in transaction processing scenarios are provided.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Better Code Reviews With Design by Contract
    • Authors: George Fairbanks;
      Pages: 53 - 56
      Abstract: Design by contract (DBC) is a technique that improves the quality of your team's code. It yields code with both a logical and a procedural nature, where the contracts state declaratively what will happen, and the implementations procedurally cause the desired effect. The team can reason either logically, by using the contracts, or procedurally, by following the code line by line, but the former allows them to reason about far larger programs. It also creates conditions for deliberate practice so developers using DBC grow their design skills faster.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Ten Years of "Impact" Columns—The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
    • Authors: Michiel van Genuchten;Les Hatton;
      Pages: 57 - 60
      Abstract: Ten years ago, we started the "Impact" column in IEEE Software. The goal when we started was to "build better quantitative insight into how software impacts various businesses. How the product uses the software and how the company built it are equally important."1 This article is the 45th instance of the column. We have had 69 authors, mostly industry experts writing about the impact of software on their business and, in some cases, on its end users. Many of the authors had neither taken the time nor been given the opportunity to publish about their work before, so it gave them a forum to write about real systems: their size, their development methods, their economic and end-user impacts, and, perhaps most compelling of all, their ubiquity. The columns have been cited more than 400 times and have given our readers insights into some beautiful software solutions, in terms of both technology (e.g., the Mars rover2) and in terms of its impact on people (e.g., supporting farmers in Africa3). Our colleague, Zeljko Obrenovic, created a complete overview of the "Impact" column articles, which is available at https://www.obren359.com/collection.html'id=ieeesw/impact.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • One-Click Formal Methods
    • Authors: John Backes;Pauline Bolignano;Byron Cook;Andrew Gacek;Kasper Soe Luckow;Neha Rungta;Martin Schaef;Cole Schlesinger;Rima Tanash;Carsten Varming;Michael Whalen;
      Pages: 61 - 65
      Abstract: Formal methods are mathematically based approaches for specifying, building, and reasoning about software. Despite 50 years of research and development, formal methods have had only limited impact in industry. While we have seen success in such domains as microprocessor design and aerospace (e.g., proofs of security properties for helicopter control systems1), we have not seen wide adoption of formal methods for large and complex systems, such as web services, industrial automation, or enterprise support software.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Data Science: Technologies for Better Software
    • Authors: Christof Ebert;Jens Heidrich;Silverio Martinez-Fernandez;Adam Trendowicz;
      Pages: 66 - 72
      Abstract: Data science is mandatory in today's business to capitalize on achievements and assets. This specifically holds for modern software development, where data science facilitates analyzing product, process, and usage and thus managing evolution and performance. With the convergence of embedded and IT domains, such as the Internet of Things (IoT) and automotive systems, software systems are becoming more complex. Complexity has two faces. On one hand it means more functionality and fluid delivery models, thus offering markets more value, such as the ability to deliver a single-customer focus. Complexity, however, also means the growth of technical debt, which slows productivity and lowers quality. As software engineering generates ever larger and more varied data sets, such as feature usage, code analysis, test coverage, error logs, and maintenance data, companies face the challenge of unlocking the value of that data.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Code Overload
    • Authors: Gerard J. Holzmann;
      Pages: 73 - 75
      Abstract: I spend much of my time analyzing code. In most cases that code was written by someone else, but it could just as easily have been written by an evil earlier version of me from many years ago. Today, any nontrivial code base is typically hundreds of thousands of lines of code, and for large companies it often reaches into the megamillions. This makes the code-review process feel like you're exploring caves with myriads of little passages leading nowhere in particular.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Gender in Software Engineering
    • Authors: Jeffrey C. Carver;Alexander Serebrenik;
      Pages: 76 - 78
      Abstract: The topic of gender in software engineering received significant attention during the most recent International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE). Papers related to gender appeared in the main research track, the Software Engineering in Society (SEIS) track, and the second Gender Equity (GE) workshop (https://sites.google.com/view/ge-icse2019). Three of the papers summarized in this column are coauthored by the column authors.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • A Manifesto for Energy-Aware Software
    • Authors: Alcides Fonseca;Rick Kazman;Patricia Lago;
      Pages: 79 - 82
      Abstract: According to recent estimates, computing and communications could account for 20% of energy usage globally by 2025.1 This trend shows no sign of slowing. The annual growth in power consumption of Internet-connected devices is 20%. Data centers alone are now accounting for more than 3% of global emissions. Even if you are not worried about this trend on the mega scale, you are likely concerned with the power consumption of the devices in your pocket, on your wrist, and in your ears. Software, hardware, and network attributes all contribute to power usage, but little attention has been given to this topic by the information and communications technology (ICT) community.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Transactions on Big Data
    • Pages: 82 - 82
      Abstract: Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • Howard Chu on Lightning Memory-Mapped Database
    • Authors: Gavin Henry;
      Pages: 83 - 87
      Abstract: Gavin Henry: What's the history of LMDB [Lightning Memory-Mapped Database]'
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
  • IEEE Social Networking
    • Pages: 88 - 88
      Abstract: Prospective authors are requested to submit new, unpublished manuscripts for inclusion in the upcoming event described in this call for papers.
      PubDate: Nov.-Dec. 2019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 6 (2019)
       
 
 
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