Journal Cover
American Educational Research Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.913
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 196  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0002-8312 - ISSN (Online) 1935-1011
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1079 journals]
  • Giving Community College Students Choice: The Impact of Self-Placement in
           Math Courses
    • Authors: Holly Kosiewicz, Federick Ngo
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the impact of a “natural experiment” that gave students the choice to place into or out of developmental math because of an unintended mistake made by a community college. During self-placement, more students chose to enroll in gateway college- and transfer-level math courses, however, greater proportions of female, Black, and Hispanic students enrolled in the lowest levels of math relative to test-placed counterparts. Difference-in-difference estimates show that self-placement led to positive outcomes, but mostly for White, Asian, and male students. This evidence suggests areas of concern and potential for improvement for self-placement policies. Self-determination theory, behavioral decision theory, and stereotype vulnerability provide possible explanations for the observed changes.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-09-09T11:14:36Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219872500
       
  • “Dear Future President of the United States”: Analyzing Youth Civic
           Writing Within the 2016 Letters to the Next President Project
    • Authors: Antero Garcia, Amber Maria Levinson, Emma Carene Gargroetzi
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the civic writing practices of more than 11,000 students writing letters to the next president in the lead up to the 2016 U.S. election. We analyze how letter topics are associated with socioeconomic factors and reveal that 43 topics—including ones prevalent among students such as immigration, guns, and school costs—were significantly associated with socioeconomic and racial majority indicators. Furthermore, we conducted a qualitative analysis of the kinds of arguments and evidence developed in letters from five schools serving predominantly lower income students and/or students of color in different regions of the country. Student arguments and types of evidence used were site dependent, suggesting the importance of teacher instruction. This analysis expands previous conceptions of youth civic learning.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T07:22:17Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219870129
       
  • Do Schools Reduce or Exacerbate Inequality' How the Associations
           Between Student Achievement and Achievement Growth Influence Our
           Understanding of the Role of Schooling

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Hanna Dumont, Douglas D. Ready
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how the associations between student achievement and achievement growth influence our understanding of the role schools play in academic inequality. Using nationally representative data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010–2011 (ECLS-K:2011), we constructed parallel growth and lagged score models within both seasonal learning and school effects frameworks to study how student- and school-level socioeconomic and racial/ethnic backgrounds relate to student learning. Our findings suggest that seasonal comparative scholars, who generally argue that schools play an equalizing role, and scholars focused on school compositional effects, who typically report that schools exacerbate inequality, come to these contrasting findings not only because they ask different questions but also because they treat student initial achievement differently when modeling student learning.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-20T04:57:34Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219868182
       
  • Fostering Democratic and Social-Emotional Learning in Action Civics
           
    • Authors: Molly W. Andolina, Hilary G. Conklin
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This research examines the factors that shape high school students’ experiences with an action civics program—Project Soapbox—that fosters democratic and social-emotional learning. Drawing on pre- and postsurveys with 204 students, classroom observations, teacher interviews, student work samples, and student focus group interviews, the study illuminates how specific features of the curriculum and its implementation are linked to its promising outcomes. Our findings indicate that the curriculum’s emphases and structure, along with instructional decisions and context, play key roles in influencing student outcomes. Project Soapbox’s power lies in its alignment with many well-established civic education best practices and in its intentional linkage with key social-emotional learning practices, many of which are newly recognized as having particular civic import.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-16T06:52:07Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219869599
       
  • Teacher Responses to New Pedagogical Practices: A Praxeological Model for
           the Study of Teacher-Driven School Development
    • Authors: Sławomir Krzychała
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the teacher community as an agent of school development, and in the context of teacher engagement in new educational practices, it discusses how school change can be analyzed as a process of creating and transforming professional knowledge (orientation pattern). The qualitative research was conducted in 2015–2016 at 12 schools participating in an innovative tutoring program in Wrocław (Poland). A total of 12 group discussions and 52 individual interviews were interpreted using Mannheim’s documentary method. As a result, a typology of the four forms of new professional orientation patterns—niche, instrumental, apparent, and synergic activities—was elaborated, and in a case study, they were applied as a theoretical model to the sociogenetic analysis of the school development process.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-16T06:50:07Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219868461
       
  • Pedagogy and Profit' Efforts to Develop and Sell Digital Courseware
           Products for Higher Education
    • Authors: Matthew D. Regele
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      The individual economic benefits of higher education are largely determined by what students learn in the process of obtaining their degrees. Increasingly, for-profit companies that develop and sell digital courseware products influence what college students learn. Employees’ pedagogical expertise, content knowledge, and understanding of organizational goals are likely to affect product characteristics and outcomes associated with the use of those products. This study draws on 15 months of ethnographic data to examine one organization’s efforts to develop and sell courseware for use in higher education. The data suggest organization members’ interpretations of educational access and quality support product development and sales efforts consistent with profit aims, but that may promote credentialism, negatively affect learning, and exacerbate quality differences across institutions.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T05:12:00Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219869234
       
  • Parent Engagement and Satisfaction in Public Charter and District Schools
    • Authors: Zachary W. Oberfield
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Using nationally representative parent surveys over a 10-year period, this article asks if there were differences in parent engagement and satisfaction at public charter and district schools. It then examines whether any such differences persisted when accounting for observable school and family characteristics, including whether parents conducted a school search prior to selecting their child’s school. It finds that charter parents volunteered more but, in aggregate, were not more engaged in school-related activities, relative to district parents. In contrast, charter parents reported higher levels of satisfaction than district parents throughout the period. These differences persisted even when accounting for observable ways in which these families and schools differed.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-14T05:11:41Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219868983
       
  • Speaking Volumes: Professional Development Through Book Studies
    • Authors: Betty S. Blanton, Amy D. Broemmel, Amanda Rigell
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This research describes a professional book study experience and offers insight into its use in supporting professional development. Framed in situated learning theory, this qualitative case study examined the perceptions of 12 educators who voluntarily participated in multiple professional book studies over 4 years. Two major themes were found in the data. The Process Theme encompassed what occurred within the professional book studies and participants’ perceptions of the studies. The Outcomes Theme provided insight into how participants changed instructional practices, academic thinking, and personal beliefs. The book studies provided components of effective professional development and principles of adult learning. Participants believed that the book study groups provided professional development that met their needs in more powerful ways than traditional professional development.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-07T06:09:44Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219867327
       
  • Community Cultural Wealth Pedagogies: Cultivating Autoethnographic
           Counternarratives and Migration Capital
    • Authors: Rosa M. Jimenez
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Pedagogies employing critical traditions have increasingly been used to ameliorate achievement disparities and centralize issues of power in the education of Students of Color. In this study, I trace a teacher’s journey—new to critical pedagogies—as she learned about community cultural wealth and incorporated family histories as counterstorytelling curricula with her sixth-grade class of immigrant students in California’s Central Valley. I examine the pedagogical implementation with examples of students’ meaning making. The teacher and students demonstrated what I am advancing as migration capital—or knowledges, sensibilities, and skills cultivated through the array of migration/immigration experiences to the United States or its borderlands. This study highlights the potential of community cultural wealth pedagogies and as pedagogical tools to counter deficit narratives with Latina/o immigrant youth.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-07T06:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219866148
       
  • Bridging the Gap Between Research and Practice: Predicting What Will Work
           Locally
    • Authors: Kathryn E. Joyce, Nancy Cartwright
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses the gap between what works in research and what works in practice. Currently, research in evidence-based education policy and practice focuses on randomized controlled trials. These can support causal ascriptions (“It worked”) but provide little basis for local effectiveness predictions (“It will work here”), which are what matter for practice. We argue that moving from ascription to prediction by way of causal generalization (“It works”) is unrealistic and urge focusing research efforts directly on how to build local effectiveness predictions. We outline various kinds of information that can improve predictions and encourage using methods better equipped for acquiring that information. We compare our proposal with others advocating a better mix of methods, like implementation science, improvement science, and practice-based evidence.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-08-02T06:59:56Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219866687
       
  • Effects of a Science of Learning Course on College Students’
           Learning With a Computer
    • Authors: Jeffrey A. Greene, Nikki G. Lobczowski, Rebekah Freed, Brian M. Cartiff, Cynthia Demetriou, A. T. Panter
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      First-year courses have been used to bolster college student success, but empirical evidence on their efficacy is mixed. We investigated whether a first-year science of learning course, focused on self-regulated learning, would benefit first-generation college students. We randomly assigned students to a treatment condition involving enrollment in the course, a comparison condition in which students had access to online course materials only, or a control condition. From this larger study, we recruited 43 students to participate in a laboratory task involving learning about the circulatory system with a computer. We found that treatment and comparison students experienced greater changes in conceptual knowledge than the control group, and we found differences in the enactment of monitoring and strategy use across conditions.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-30T03:34:45Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219865221
       
  • To Understand Is to Forgive: Learning a Simple Model of Appraisal Leads to
           Emotion Knowledge Transfer and Enhances Emotional Acceptance and Empathy
    • Authors: Ilya Lyashevsky, Melissa Cesarano, John Black
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Social emotional learning (SEL) is an increasingly important area of study that aims to develop skills critical for healthy social functioning. Despite SEL’s growing ubiquity, little attention has been paid to how to achieve SEL knowledge transfer. One promising approach is to teach a model of the emotion system. A randomized control study was conducted with a sample of U.S. high school graduates (n = 303) to test this SEL methodology. The impact of a 1-hour online intervention involving learning a simple model of appraisal was tested. As predicted, the experimental groups rated their own and others’ emotional reactions as significantly less blameworthy than the control group did, signaling emotion knowledge transfer and greater empathy and emotion acceptance. These results are discussed.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-25T09:14:14Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219865220
       
  • Modes of Belonging: Debating School Demographics in Gentrifying New York
    • Authors: Alexandra Freidus
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the frameworks that stakeholders bring to debates about diversifying schools in gentrifying areas of New York City. Using critical ethnographic methods, I explore stakeholders’ hopes and fears about the effects of shifting school demographics and the relationships between student demographics and school quality. I find that stakeholders use racialized discourses of belonging to discuss whether, why, and how student demographics matter. These discourses of belonging overlap with perceptions of demographic change as opportunities for integration, fears of gentrification, and threats to individual property. Complicating celebrations of “diversity,” I explore the ways in which race is implicated in considerations of who belongs in a school and to whom a school belongs.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-23T05:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219863372
       
  • The Impact of Immigration Enforcement on the Nation’s Schools
    • Authors: Jongyeon Ee, Patricia Gándara
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      In response to growing concerns about the impact of harsh immigration enforcement policy since the 2016 presidential campaign, we examined its overall impact on the nation’s schools, using survey data completed by over 3,600 educators across the country. Our study results show that immigration enforcement is affecting all students—both those from immigrant homes and those that are not. In particular, Title I schools are the most affected by immigration enforcement. Our results also show that the higher the percentage of White students, the more educators reported immigrant students being exposed to a hostile, anti-immigrant environment. We conclude that the current policy of immigration enforcement significantly dismantles an equitable education for all students and creates a critical threat to their futures.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-19T05:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219862998
       
  • Converting to Privatization: A Discourse Analysis of Dyslexia Policy
           Narratives
    • Authors: Rachael E. Gabriel
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, I analyze written testimony submitted to the state legislature regarding Connecticut’s 2015 Act Concerning Students With Dyslexia (PA-15-97), in order to engage with the discourse and rhetoric occasioned by the policy-making process and investigate the phenomenon of dyslexia in contemporary education policy. Drawing on critical discursive psychology, positioning theory, and narrative policy analysis. I examine how dyslexia advocacy discourse forms a cohesive, compelling policy narrative. I argue that this narrative can be understood as a conversion narrative, which drives a privatization agenda in which public schools become mandated consumers for a growing dyslexia industry, and in which the nature of instruction for students with reading difficulties is narrowly prescribed.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-18T05:02:06Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219861945
       
  • Are All Head Start Classrooms Created Equal' Variation in Classroom
           Quality Within Head Start Centers and Implications for Accountability
           Systems
    • Authors: Terri J. Sabol, Emily C. Ross, Allison Frost
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Most accountability policies monitor Head Start quality at the center level by selecting a subset of classrooms within a center to represent quality. This study explores variation in classroom quality in Head Start and implications for accountability systems and children’s well-being. We find that one third to one half of the variation in quality was due to differences between classrooms within center and that 37% of centers would receive different accountability decisions depending on which classrooms were selected. Average center-level quality was not related to children’s development. However, differences in within-center classroom instructional quality were related to children’s academic and social skills. Findings suggest that accountability systems miss important variation in classroom quality within centers, which may lead to inaccurate high-stakes decisions.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T12:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219858920
       
  • “In Real Life, You Have to Speak Up”: Civic Implications of No-Excuses
           Classroom Management Practices
    • Authors: Eliot J. Graham
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Conceptualizing educational inequality as equivalent to the “achievement gap” has fueled the expansion of no-excuses charters, which purport to raise test scores and thereby equalize opportunities for low-income students of color. In contrast, I argue that the individual provision of opportunity is inadequate to address the structural inequalities that create differential achievement, and thus that no-excuses schools cannot be assessed using test scores alone. This ethnographic study examines how no-excuses classroom management shapes students’ development as citizens. My findings suggest that no-excuses classroom management is not a supportive structure that enables academic achievement, but a restrictive and often unfair system that reinforces compliance to institutional authority. I contend that the consequences of this system are more likely to perpetuate than to ameliorate inequality.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-15T05:03:11Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219861549
       
  • Classroom Language Contexts as Predictors of Latinx Preschool Dual
           Language Learners’ School Readiness
    • Authors: Maria C. Limlingan, Christine M. McWayne, Elizabeth A. Sanders, Michael L. López
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examined the relations between teacher-child interactions, teachers’ Spanish use, classroom linguistic composition, and the school readiness skills of low-income, Latinx, Spanish-speaking dual language learners (DLLs), controlling for home and teacher background characteristics, with a national probability sample of Head Start children (i.e., from the Family and Child Experiences Survey [FACES, 2009]). Findings revealed that Head Start classrooms with higher concentrations of DLLs had teachers who reported lower average levels of children’s cooperative behavior. In addition, DLL students in classrooms where teachers used more Spanish for instruction and demonstrated more emotionally supportive teacher-child interactions were found to have higher average scores on measures of approaches to learning. Implications and directions for future research related to classroom language contexts are discussed.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-13T09:50:56Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219855694
       
  • Paradigm Wars Revisited: A Cartography of Graduate Research in the Field
           of Education (1980–2010)
    • Authors: Sebastian Munoz-Najar Galvez, Raphael Heiberger, Daniel McFarland
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Education entails conflicting perspectives about its subject matter. In the late 1980s, the conflict developed into a war between interpretive and causal paradigms. Did the confrontation result in a balance between these warring sides' We use text analysis to identify research trends in 137,024 dissertation abstracts from 1980 to 2010 and relate these to students’ academic employment outcomes. Topics associated with the interpretive approach rose in popularity, while the outcomes-oriented paradigm declined. Academic employment remained stably associated with topics in the interpretive approach, but their effect is moderated by the prestige of the students’ institutions. The relation between topic popularity and employability provides insight into field change and how the benefits of cultural shifts fall along the lines of institutional power.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-10T05:19:16Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219860511
       
  • Organizing for Meaningful Inclusion: Exploring the Routines That Shape
           Student Supports in Secondary Schools
    • Authors: Laura Stelitano, Jennifer Lin Russell, Laura E. Bray
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      School organization is a key driver for meaningful inclusion for students with disabilities. While there are promising examples of how schools organize for inclusion with intensive technical assistance, little is known about how high schools organize without such supports. In a case study of two high schools, we compare school organization by looking at their formal design and teachers’ daily routines. While both schools incorporated models for supporting students into their formal design, their daily routines revealed practices that were at odds with the spirit of inclusion. Routines involved special educators helping students pass their classes, though often not through meaningful learning opportunities. We offer insight into the affordances and constraints of school organization, revealing implications for meaningful inclusion.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-05T06:21:04Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219859307
       
  • Vanished Classmates: The Effects of Local Immigration Enforcement on
           School Enrollment
    • Authors: Thomas S. Dee, Mark Murphy
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      For over a decade, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has formed partnerships allowing local police to enforce immigration law by identifying and arresting undocumented residents. Prior studies, using survey data with self-reported immigrant and citizenship status, provide mixed evidence on their demographic impact. This study presents new evidence based on Hispanic public school enrollment. We find local ICE partnerships reduce the number of Hispanic students by 10% within 2 years. We estimate partnerships enacted before 2012 displaced more than 300,000 Hispanic students. These effects are concentrated among elementary school students. We find no corresponding effects on the enrollment of non-Hispanic students and no evidence that ICE partnerships reduced pupil-teacher ratios or the percentage of students eligible for the National School Lunch Program.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-07-02T12:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219860816
       
  • Special Education and Individualized Academic Growth: A Longitudinal
           Assessment of Outcomes for Students With Disabilities
    • Authors: Sarah Hurwitz, Brea Perry, Emma D. Cohen, Russell Skiba
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the effectiveness of participating in special education on the academic outcomes of students with disabilities. A sample of 575 students from a large, urban school district were followed longitudinally as they transitioned between general and special education to evaluate whether receiving special education services was associated with improvements in academic trajectories. Using student fixed effects models of within-person change over time, individuals’ performance on standardized tests were compared before, during, and/or after special education placement. Results indicate that test scores of students with disabilities improved after being enrolled in special education. Additionally, students exiting special education exhibited a sustained trajectory of academic growth, suggesting that participation in special education in this district was associated with enduring improvements over time.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-26T05:29:57Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219857054
       
  • Learning From Adaptation to Support Instructional Improvement at Scale:
           Understanding Coach Adaptation in the TN Mathematics Coaching Project
    • Authors: Jennifer Lin Russell, Richard Correnti, Mary Kay Stein, Victoria Bill, Maggie Hannan, Nathaniel Schwartz, Laura Neergaard Booker, Nicole Roberts Pratt, Chris Matthis
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Attempts to scale up instructional interventions confront implementation challenges that mitigate their ultimate impact on teaching and learning. In this article, we argue that learning about adaptation during the design and implementation phases of reform is critical to the development of interventions that can be implemented with integrity at scale. Through analysis of data generated during a mathematics instructional coaching initiative, we examine the adaptations coaches made to diverse relational and organizational contexts. Findings from two studies of adaptation illustrate the need to attend to the extent to which adaptations are consistent with the core features of a reform. Based on our findings, we posit a generalizable model that supports evidence-based mutual adaptation.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-26T05:28:57Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219854050
       
  • Heretical Discourses in Post-Katrina Charter School Applications
    • Authors: Kevin Lawrence Henry
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Using New Orleans as a site of analysis, this article provides a critical race theory reading of a little studied policy mechanism, the charter school application and authorization process. Embedded and competing narratives within charter school applications are analyzed. The authorization process is the central gatekeeping mechanism in the reproduction of charter schools. The authorization process determines who gets to govern schools, including the freedom to set curriculum, discipline policies, personnel, utilization of funds, and their relationship to and role in the communities in which they are located. This article unpacks the community based and “no excuses” discourses within charter applications. It finds patterns of confluence between those narratives and the applicants’ racial and educational identities, suggesting that the authorization process worked as a site for the reproduction of racialized neoliberal dominance in post-Katrina New Orleans, disenfranchising local teachers and communities.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T11:57:58Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219853811
       
  • Do Relative Advantages in STEM Grades Explain the Gender Gap in Selection
           of a STEM Major in College' A Multimethod Answer
    • Authors: Elizabeth Stearns, Martha Cecilia Bottia, Jason Giersch, Roslyn Arlin Mickelson, Stephanie Moller, Nandan Jha, Melissa Dancy
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Using a multimethod approach, we investigate whether gender gaps in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) major declaration in college are explained by differences in the grades that students earn in STEM versus non-STEM subjects. With quantitative data, we find that relative advantages in college academic performance in STEM versus non-STEM subjects do not contribute to the gender gap in STEM major declaration. To explore alternative explanations for gender gaps in major declaration, we analyze interviews with college seniors, finding that they recognize many other factors, including their interests in subject matter and confidence, are key in pushing them from STEM or pulling them into non-STEM majors. We conclude that future research seeking to account for gender gaps in STEM majors must extend beyond academic performance.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T06:09:06Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219853533
       
  • Exploring Associations Between Playgroup Attendance and Early Childhood
           Development at School Entry in Australia: A Cross-Sectional
           Population-Level Study
    • Authors: Alanna Sincovich, Tess Gregory, Yasmin Harman-Smith, Sally Anne Brinkman
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Despite widespread utilization, research exploring associations between playgroup and child development is scarce. We analyzed a national data set measuring the holistic development of children aged 4 to 6 years who commenced school in Australia in 2015 (n = 104,767), the Australian Early Development Census, to explore developmental differences between children who did and did not attend playgroup before school. Children who attended playgroup had better development at school entry relative to those who had not attended playgroup, after adjustment for a range of confounding factors. These differences were observed across all five developmental domains and were universal to children from a range of backgrounds. Results support the need for future research to explore the causal effects of playgroup on children’s development.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T06:08:46Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219854369
       
  • Education Policy Networks: The Co-Optation, Coordination, and
           Commodification of the School-to-Prison Pipeline Critique
    • Authors: Danfeng Soto-Vigil Koon
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This study utilizes social network visualization and content analysis of policy reports to explore the changing structure and function of a network of organizations, including government agencies, philanthropies, think tanks, advocacy groups, research centers, and edu-businesses active in school discipline policy formation at the federal level from 2000 to 2014. This study illuminates the mechanism by which the state, working through a complex public-private network of education policy actors, co-opts more radical demands to address the school-to-prison pipeline, coordinates interests across a range of social forces with particular attention to law enforcement, and commodifies the school-to-prison pipeline critique into marketable products and services for schools and school districts.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T07:14:30Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219855338
       
  • The College Access and Choice Processes of High-Achieving African American
           Students: A Critical Race Theory Analysis
    • Authors: Eddie Comeaux, Thandeka K. Chapman, Frances Contreras
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored the college access and choice processes of high-achieving African American students who were admitted to University of California (UC) campuses but elected to enroll elsewhere. Employing critical race theory as an interpretive framework, the study found that many of these students were denied access to their priority UC campuses and were cascaded down to the least selective campuses. A small portion were not admitted to flagship UCs—Berkeley, Los Angeles, and San Diego—but were admitted to elite non-UC institutions. Moreover, these students decided to attend selective colleges and universities that demonstrated a commitment to admitting and financially supporting them. This study also discovered that these high-achieving students researched and experienced a range of racial climate issues at UC campuses, including racist activities and lack of compositional diversity, which contributed to their decisions not to enroll. The article includes recommendations for UC campus leaders and others committed to creating equitable postsecondary pathways for African American students.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T02:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219853223
       
  • Socioeconomic-Based School Assignment Policy and Racial Segregation
           Levels: Evidence From the Wake County Public School System
    • Authors: Deven Carlson, Elizabeth Bell, Matthew A. Lenard, Joshua M. Cowen, Andrew McEachin
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.
      In the wake of political and legal challenges facing race-based integration, districts have turned to socioeconomic integration initiatives in an attempt to achieve greater racial balance across schools. Empirically, the extent to which these initiatives generate such balance is an open question. In this article, we leverage the school assignment system that the Wake County Public School System employed throughout the 2000s to provide evidence on this issue. Although our results show that Wake County Public School System’s socioeconomic-based assignment policy had negligible effects on average levels of segregation across the district, it substantially reduced racial segregation for students who would have attended majority-minority schools under a residence-based assignment policy. The policy also exposed these students to peers with different racial/ethnic backgrounds, higher mean achievement levels, and more advantaged neighborhood contexts. We explore how residential context and details of the policy interacted to produce this pattern of effects and close the article by discussing the implications of our results for research and policy.
      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-11T12:23:03Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219851729
       
  • Ideology and Identity Among White Male Teachers in an All-Black, All-Male
           High School
    • Authors: Leoandra Onnie Rogers, Derrick R. Brooms
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T08:44:54Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219853224
       
  • Students’ Understanding of Institutional Practices: The Missing
           Dimension in Human Rights Education
    • Authors: Keith C. Barton
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-06-04T10:35:38Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219849871
       
  • “How Does a Black Person Speak English'” Beyond American
           Language Norms
    • Authors: Patriann Smith
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-25T07:24:26Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219850760
       
  • Juggling With Both Hands Tied Behind My Back: Teachers’ Views and
           Experiences of the Tensions Between Student Well-Being Concerns and
           Academic Performance Improvement Agendas
    • Authors: Alison Willis, Mervyn Hyde, Ali Black
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-18T10:35:19Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219849877
       
  • The Impossibility of Being “Perfect and White”: Black Girls’
           Racialized and Gendered Schooling Experiences
    • Authors: Dorinda J. Carter Andrews, Tashal Brown, Eliana Castro, Effat Id-Deen
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-18T10:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219849392
       
  • Moral Injury Among Professionals in K–12 Education
    • Authors: Erin P. Sugrue
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T06:42:25Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219848690
       
  • Practicing Justice, Justifying Practice: Toward Critical Practice Teacher
           Education
    • Authors: Sarah Schneider Kavanagh, Katie A. Danielson
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T06:20:46Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219848691
       
  • Standing Out and Sorting In: Exploring the Role of Racial Composition in
           Racial Disparities in Special Education
    • Authors: Rachel Elizabeth Fish
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T09:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219847966
       
  • Maintaining the Frame: Using Frame Analysis to Explain Teacher Evaluation
           Policy Implementation
    • Authors: John L. Lane
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-13T06:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219848689
       
  • Why High School Grades Are Better Predictors of On-Time College Graduation
           Than Are Admissions Test Scores: The Roles of Self-Regulation and
           Cognitive Ability
    • Authors: Brian M. Galla, Elizabeth P. Shulman, Benjamin D. Plummer, Margo Gardner, Stephen J. Hutt, J. Parker Goyer, Sidney K. D’Mello, Amy S. Finn, Angela L. Duckworth
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-03T08:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219843292
       
  • Looking Inside and Outside of Mentoring: Effects on New Teachers’
           Organizational Commitment
    • Authors: Yihua Hong, Kavita Kapadia Matsko
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-29T07:02:10Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219843657
       
  • Gender Achievement Gaps in U.S. School Districts
    • Authors: Sean F. Reardon, Erin M. Fahle, Demetra Kalogrides, Anne Podolsky, Rosalía C. Zárate
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-25T07:19:15Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219843824
       
  • The Provision of Public Pre-K in the Absence of Centralized School
           Management
    • Authors: Lindsay Bell Weixler, Jane Arnold Lincove, Alica Gerry
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-24T05:21:56Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219845623
       
  • Evaluating the Efficacy of a Learning Trajectory for Early Shape
           Composition
    • Authors: Douglas H. Clements, Julie Sarama, Arthur J. Baroody, Candace Joswick, Christopher B. Wolfe
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-22T05:42:34Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219842788
       
  • A Canonical Correlational Analysis Examining the Relationship Between Peer
           Mentorship, Belongingness, Impostor Feelings, and Black Collegians’
           Academic and Psychosocial Outcomes
    • Authors: Jerome Graham, Shannon McClain
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T08:13:33Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219842571
       
  • A Study of the Implementation of Formative Assessment in Three Large Urban
           Districts
    • Authors: Carla C. Johnson, Toni A. Sondergeld, Janet B. Walton
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T05:44:22Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219842347
       
  • The Consistency of Composite Ratings of Teacher Effectiveness: Evidence
           From New Mexico
    • Authors: Sy Doan, Jonathan D. Schweig, Kata Mihaly
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T05:42:42Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219841369
       
  • Exploring the Situated and Cultural Aspects of Communication in the
           Professions: Implications for Teaching, Student Employability, and Equity
           in Higher Education
    • Authors: Matthew T. Hora, Bailey B. Smolarek, Kelly Norris Martin, Luke Scrivener
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-10T05:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219840333
       
  • Emergent Change: A Network Analysis of Elementary Teachers’ Learning
           About English Learner Instruction
    • Authors: Megan Hopkins, Maxie Gluckman, Tara Vahdani
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-08T09:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219840352
       
  • Teaching Critically Where Rural and Nonrural Cultures Intersect
    • Authors: Jennifer T. Stephens
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-03T06:31:26Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219839311
       
  • Extracurricular Settings as a Space to Address Sociopolitical Crises: The
           Case of Discussing Immigration in Gender-Sexuality Alliances Following the
           2016 U.S. Presidential Election
    • Authors: V. Paul Poteat, Jerel P. Calzo, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Sarah B. Rosenbach, Christopher J. Ceccolini, Robert A. Marx
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-02T11:28:26Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219839033
       
  • A Look Inside Online Educational Settings in High School: Promise and
           Pitfalls for Improving Educational Opportunities and Outcomes
    • Authors: Carolyn J. Heinrich, Jennifer Darling-Aduana, Annalee Good, Huiping (Emily) Cheng
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-28T06:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219838776
       
  • Forestalling Preschool Expulsion: A Mixed-Method Exploration of the
           Potential Protective Role of Teachers’ Perceptions of Parents
    • Authors: Courtney A. Zulauf, Katherine M. Zinsser
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-27T07:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219838236
       
  • Public Accountability and Nudges: The Effect of an Information
           Intervention on the Responsiveness of Teacher Education Programs to
           External Ratings
    • Authors: Dan Goldhaber, Cory Koedel
      First page: 1557
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-01-16T05:54:44Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831218820863
       
  • Mathematics Teachers’ Learning: Identifying Key Learning Opportunities
           Linked to Teachers’ Knowledge Growth
    • Authors: Yasemin Copur-Gencturk, Debra Plowman, Haiyan Bai
      First page: 1590
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-01-11T12:36:28Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831218820033
       
  • Young Women Face Disadvantage to Enrollment in University STEM Coursework
           Regardless of Prior Achievement and Attitudes
    • Authors: Herbert W. Marsh, Brooke Van Zanden, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, James Conigrave, Marjorie Seaton
      First page: 1629
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-02-02T06:17:53Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831218824111
       
  • Illuminating the Enactment of High-Leverage Teaching Practices in an
           Exemplary World Language Teaching Video Library
    • Authors: Ling Zhai
      First page: 1681
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-01-24T10:12:29Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831218824289
       
  • Relationships Between Instructional Coaches’ Time Use and District- and
           School-Level Policies and Expectations
    • Authors: Britnie Delinger Kane, Brooks Rosenquist
      First page: 1718
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-02-09T07:09:50Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219826580
       
  • How Do Academically Selective School Systems Affect Pupils’
           Social-Emotional Competencies' New Evidence From the Millennium Cohort
           Study
    • Authors: John Jerrim, Sam Sims
      First page: 1769
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-01T12:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219830965
       
  • Grading Teachers: Race and Gender Differences in Low Evaluation Ratings
           and Teacher Employment Outcomes
    • Authors: Steven Drake, Amy Auletto, Joshua M. Cowen
      First page: 1800
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-05-14T09:15:54Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219835776
       
  • Missing Bus, Missing School: Establishing the Relationship Between Public
           Transit Use and Student Absenteeism
    • Authors: Marc L. Stein, Jeffrey A. Grigg
      First page: 1834
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-11T05:30:00Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219833917
       
  • Pathways to Racial Equity in Higher Education: Modeling the Antecedents of
           State Affirmative Action Bans
    • Authors: Dominique J. Baker
      First page: 1861
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T06:10:25Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219833918
       
  • “To Be Strict on Your Own”: Black and Latinx Parents Evaluate
           Discipline in Urban Choice Schools
    • Authors: Joanne W. Golann, Mira Debs, Anna Lisa Weiss
      First page: 1896
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-08T06:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219831972
       
  • Does Early Algebra Matter' The Effectiveness of an Early Algebra
           Intervention in Grades 3 to 5
    • Authors: Maria Blanton, Rena Stroud, Ana Stephens, Angela Murphy Gardiner, Despina A. Stylianou, Eric Knuth, Isil Isler-Baykal, Susanne Strachota
      First page: 1930
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-11T05:35:38Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219832301
       
  • Ethnic Discipline Gap: Unseen Dimensions of Racial Disproportionality in
           School Discipline
    • Authors: Bach Mai Dolly Nguyen, Pedro Noguera, Nathan Adkins, Robert T. Teranishi
      First page: 1973
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T06:11:03Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219833919
       
  • An Investigation of Teachers Encouraged to Reform Grading Practices in
           Secondary Schools
    • Authors: Brad Olsen, Rebecca Buchanan
      First page: 2004
      Abstract: American Educational Research Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: American Educational Research Journal
      PubDate: 2019-04-11T07:16:33Z
      DOI: 10.3102/0002831219841349
       
 
 
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