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Journal Cover Research & Reviews : Journal of Dairy Science and Technology
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 2349-3704 - ISSN (Online) 2319-3409
   Published by STM Journals Homepage  [67 journals]
  • Strategies to Minimize Heat Stress in Broiler and Layer Chickens
    • Authors: Manoj Kumar, D. S. Dalal, Poonam Ratwan, A. S. Yadav
      Abstract: Heat stress is one of the most important thermal environmental factors challenging broiler and layer production throughout world. Negative effects of heat stress on broilers and layer production range from reduced growth and egg production to reduced egg quality. Heat stress is more in chickens with high production performance and more feed conversion efficiency. Prolonged exposure to hot weather will lead to imbalance of acid-base equilibrium in body, decreases blood supply to visceral organs, water imbalance and immune suppression in birds. Use of balanced nutrition reduces the negative effects of heat stress by maintaining feed intake, electrolytic and water balance. Supplementation of micronutrients such as vitamins and essential minerals is necessary to fulfill the special needs during heat stress. Increase in birds' thermotolerance by early heat conditioning or feed restriction seems to be one of the most important management methods in enhancing heat resistance of layer and broiler chickens.  Keywords: Heat stress, broiler, layer, productionCite this Article Manoj Kumar, D.S. Dalal, Poonam Ratwan et al. Strategies to Minimize Heat Stress in Broiler and Layer Chickens. Research and Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2):   26–30p.
      PubDate: 2017-10-09
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Interventions and Package of Practices needed to Enhance Farmer’s
           Income through Livestock
    • Authors: Poonam Ratwan, Manoj Kumar, Pooja Joshi, Nisha Sharma, Pooja Devi, Siddharth Deswal
      Abstract: Livestock plays a vital role in Indian economy. In India, large number of population is dependent on livestock for their livelihood. India has vast store of livestock breeds but milk productivity is still low in the country as compared to many countries. Various livestock species contributes differently to the income of poor and marginal farmers but among different livestock species, cattle and buffalo are largely maintained by farmers to earn their livelihood through sale of milk. There is need to adopt new technologies and package of practices by farmers to enhance the income from rearing of livestock. These include breeding, nutritional, management and health interventions. Dairy technologies such as processing of milk and augmentation of nutritive value of milk are needed to be adopted to increase the income of farmers. Organic farming and Integrated Farming System supplement all other interventions in enhancing the returns to farmers.  Keywords: livestock, farmer’s income, package of practicesCite this Article Ratwan P, Kumar M, Joshi P et al. Interventions and Package of Practices needed to Enhance Farmer’s Income through Livestock. Research and Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 20–25p.
      PubDate: 2017-10-03
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Prolific Garole Sheep: Pride of Bengal
    • Authors: Ajoy Mandal, Prabir Kumar Karmakar, R. Behera, S. Pan
      Abstract: Garole, a micro sheep breed of India, are distributed in the Sundarban area of 24-Parganas district of West Bengal and is famous for high prolificacy rate, resistance to foot rot disease, grazing in knee-deep water, good adaptability to hot humid conditions and high mothering instinct for their neonates. This meat type animal is of short stature with a light brown coarse texture coat and produces coarse wool, good quality skin and low-fat mutton. This breed is generally maintained by marginal farmers and landless labourers in its native tract. Flocks are stationary and average flock size ranges from five to seven. The animals are allowed to graze on rice fallow land and natural grass cover on the roadsides and water channels. The average live weight of adult animals ranged between 10 and 14 kg. The animal is having high fecundity rate, with mean litter size of 2.27. Twin and triplet births are very common in this breed. Owing to their high fecundity and ability to thrive on low quality forages and agro-byproducts, these animals constitute a major source of income for their owners. As the population of this sheep breed is declining sharply over the years in its home tract, so it needs more concerted efforts towards conservation as well as improvement of this breed in its home tract. Keywords: Garole sheep, body weights, genetic parameters, conservation, India Cite this Article Ajoy Mandal, Prabir Kumar Karmakar, Behera R et al. Prolific Garole Sheep: Pride of Bengal. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 11–19p. 
      PubDate: 2017-08-04
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Chemically Well-Defined Extender for Preservation of Black Bengal Buck
           Semen
    • Authors: M. Karunakaran, Pangdun Konyak, Ajoy Mandal, M. Mondal, C. Bhakat, D.K. Mandal, S.K. Das, M.K. Ghosh
      Abstract: This experiment was carried with the aim to prepare a chemically well defined semen extender with soybean lecithin (SL) for cryopreservation of black Bengal buck semen. Semen samples were collected from five black Bengal bucks. The semen samples were extended in Tris buffer with 5% glycerol containing either 15% egg yolk (control group) or SL at different concentrations (1, 1.5 and 2% SL). The semen samples were cooled gradually to 5°C and equilibrated for 3 h at 5°C and frozen in static liquid nitrogen vapor and stored in liquid nitrogen. Semen samples were evaluated after initial dilution, after completion of equilibration and after freeze thawing for sperm motility. Semen sample preserved in extender containing 1% SL was able to maintain sperm motility at par with extender containing egg yolk. However, reduction in motility was observed as the concentration of soybean lecithin increased above 1% level. Artificial insemination of goats with frozen semen preserved with 1% SL gave 51.95% kidding rate. It is concluded that an extender containing soybean lecithin @ 1% can be used as a chemically well defined extender for cryopreservation of black Bengal buck semen. Keywords: Buck, semen, preservation, soybean lecithin, motilityCite this Article Karunakaran M, Pangdun Konyak, Ajoy Mandal, et al. Chemically Well-Defined Extender for Preservation of Black Bengal Buck Semen. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 7–10p. 
      PubDate: 2017-08-04
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Status and Market Potential of Oats-Based Fermented Milk Products
    • Authors: K. M. Gawai, S. Balakrishanan
      Abstract: Fermented milk is considered best career of probiotics with its nutritive composition and natural buffering capacity. Positive health effects of fermented foods and especially of those with probiotic microorganisms are reported in many recent publications. Most common food matrices used to deliver probiotic are dairy-based products; plant-based foods, dried formulations and blended products. In connection with these health effects of probiotics ingredients such as WPC, WPI, and Na-Cn improve nutritional values and biological effects of yogurt on health. It could be interpreted that nutritional components from milk, oat (Avena sativa L.) and probiotic bacteria could be a novel concept of designing a functional food. Limited reports are available with regards to the development of fermented product using oat components and milk to produce yoghurt-like products. Keywords: Oats, fermented milks, market, health benefits, β-glucanCite this Article Gawai KM, Balakrishanan S. Status and Market Potential of Oats-Based Fermented Milk Products. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(2): 1–6p. 
      PubDate: 2017-07-11
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Significance of Butyrophilin Gene in Relation to Milk Constituents in
           Dairy Animals
    • Authors: Poonam Ratwan, Manoj Kumar, Vikas Vohra
      Abstract: Butyrophilin (BTN1A1) is a QTL candidate gene that affects milk yield and milk composition (fat) in dairy animals. It has a tissue-specific expression in lactating mammary tissue and gene product BTN1A1 function in secretion of milk fat. BTN1A1 is classified into transmembrane proteins of immunoglobulin family. BTN1A1 constitutes more than 40% by weight of total protein associated with fat globule membrane of bovine milk. BTN1A1 is synthesized as a peptide of 526 amino acids with an amino-terminal hydrophobic signal sequence of 26 amino acids which is cleaved before secretion in association with milk fat globule membrane (MFGM). Among health beneficial components of MFGM is cholesterolemia-lowering factor, inhibitors of cancer cell growth, vitamin binders and inhibitor of various bacterial diseases. The gene frequency of polymorphism in BTN1A1 gene has been found to vary among dairy animals. Association studies relates BTN1A1 gene with high milk yield, fat content and protein yield in dairy animals. These associations provide insight into gene polymorphisms that can be used for selection of superior dairy animals. Keywords: bovine, butyrophilin, milk fat globule membrane (MFGM), milk fat secretionCite this Article Ratwan P, Kumar M, Vohra V. Significance of Butyrophilin Gene in Relation to Milk Constituents in Dairy Animals. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(1): 24–30p.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Electrospun Structures for Dairy and Food Packaging Applications
    • Authors: Gaurav Kumar Deshwal, Narender Raju Panjagari
      Abstract: Electrospinning is an electrostatic fiber fabrication technique, in which a nonwoven mat of long fibers can be assembled into a three-dimensional structure due to bending instability of the spinning jet. Owing to its versatile nature and potential for applications in diverse fields including food packaging has been gaining more interest. It is a flexible and easy tool for producing ultrathin sized by applying electrical force. In this process, altering the spinning solutions and process parameters could lead to fiber production with different properties enabling scope for different applications such as gas sensors, antimicrobial structures, water absorbing pads, etc. Keywords: Electrospun, food, fibres, packagingCite this Article Deshwal GK, Panjagari NR. Electrospun Structures for Dairy and Food Packaging Applications. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(1): 17–23p.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Sexed Semen: A Boon for Indian Dairy Farming
    • Authors: Talokar Amol J., Rajalaxmi Behera, Laishram Arjun Singh, Ajoy Mandal
      Abstract: The sexed semen technology is a breakthrough technology for sorting of X and Y bearing chromosome to produce progeny of a desired sex with 80–90% accuracy. Among several methods of sorting X and Y bearing semen, flow cytometry is the best method, as it doesn’t changes more sperm morphology. The sexed semen technology has several advantages like production of more female calves and more milk, lowered risk of dystocia, increased efficiency of progeny testing (PT), embryo transfer and in-vitro fertilization program. However, involvement of high cost and reduced conception rate with sexed semen are the major hurdles in adoption of this technology. In India, first male calf named Shreyas was born on 1st January, 2011 using sexed semen. After that predetermined sex of female as well as male calves were born. Sexed semen with proper management practices on dairy farms will help to grow herd internally with improved traits of female calves. Thus, with more organized dairy farming, the demand for sexed semen is expected to rise in near future. Keywords: Sexed semen, flow cytometry, X and Y chromosome, sperm sexing, dairyCite this Article Talokar Amol J, Rajalaxmi Behera, Laishram Arjun Singh et al. Sexed Semen: A Boon for Indian Dairy Farming. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(1): 10–16p.

      PubDate: 2017-03-22
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Effect of Coat Colour and Sex on Carcass Characteristics of Local Rabbits
           in Northern Region of Ghana
    • Authors: Shuaib M.A. Husein, Jakper Naandam, Serekye Y. Annor, Peter T. Birteeb
      Abstract: This study was conducted to assess the effect of coat colour and sex on carcass characteristics of local rabbits in the northern region of Ghana. Data were collected on 24 rabbits (12 males and 12 females) from six colour varieties. Animals were slaughtered according to standard abattoir procedure and parameters recorded were live weight, bled weight, skinned weight, hot carcass dressing weight, lung weight, heart weight, liver weight, kidney weight, empty intestine weight and cold carcass dressing weight. Carcass data were analyzed using GLM of SPSS to investigate the effect of colour variety and sex on carcass measurements. The effect of colour variety was not significant (p>0.05) for all parameters measured. Sex was a highly significant (p<0.01) source of variation for hot carcass dressing percentage and empty intestine weight. The males had higher (p<0.01) hot carcass dressing percentage (50.57%) than the females (47.43%), and higher (p<0.05) cold carcass dressing percentage (47.04%) than the females (44.56%). However, the females had significantly (p<0.05) heavier liver weight (47.13±2.4g) and significantly (p<0.01) heavier empty intestine weight (104.03± 5.7g) than the respective values of 40.12±2.3g and 82.78±2.5g for the males. Conclusively, coat colour of rabbits showed no substantial differences in all carcass characteristics while males had higher carcass dressing percentage (both hot carcass and cold carcass) than the females). Keywords: Dressing percentage, meat, slaughter, weightCite this Article Shuaib MA Husein, Jakper Naandam, Serekye Y. Annor, et al. Effect of Coat Colour and Sex on Carcass Characteristics of Local Rabbits in Northern Region of Ghana. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(1): 5–9p.
       
      PubDate: 2017-03-22
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
  • Role of Dairy Farming in Irrigated Ecosystem: A Village Level Case Study
           from Eastern India
    • Authors: R. Bera, A. Seal, T.H. Das, D. Sarkar, R. Roy Chowdhury
      Abstract: Dairy farming is one of the important components of irrigated ecosystem and plays a major role towards sustaining agricultural livelihoods. In the present study, a detailed survey was conducted regarding the livestock potentials of the farmers in irrigated ecosystem in relation to the socio-economic status. Maintenance of dairy and related economics was evaluated for each socio-economic class as well as the constraints perceived by each group of farmers. While in case of large and medium farmers, absence of proper and organized marketing facility is one of the major constraint, lack of infrastructural facilities like breeding, health care etc. are major setbacks for small and marginal farmers. However, dairy forms an important livelihood component for the farmers especially for small and marginal classes in the irrigated ecosystem.   Keywords: Farmers class, economics, constraints of dairy farmingCite this Article Bera R, Seal A, Das TH, et al. Role of Dairy Farming in Irrigated Ecosystem: A village level case study from Eastern India. Research & Reviews: Journal of Dairy Science and Technology. 2017; 6(1): 1–4p. 
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      Issue No: Vol. 6 (2017)
       
 
 
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