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Perspectives on Terrorism
Number of Followers: 419  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2334-3745 - ISSN (Online) 2334-3745
Published by U of Massachusetts Homepage  [17 journals]
  • Welcome from the Editors

    • Authors: Various Authors
      Abstract: Welcome from the Editorial Board
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • ‘Terrorism’ or ‘Liberation’' Towards a Distinction: A Case
           Study of the Armed Struggle of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)
           

    • Authors: Muttukrishna Sarvananthan
      Abstract: This article based on extensive empirical field research and primary sources/data attempts to distinguish terrorism from liberation / freedom struggle by means of a case study of the armed struggle of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam in Sri Lanka. It is argued here that the LTTE was primarily a terrorist organisation/movement because: (i) it’s struggle was overwhelmingly based on armed violence; (ii) it demanded support from the masses through persecution; (iii) it intentionally targeted civilians; (iv) it substantially relied on suicide attacks; (v) it substantially deployed under-age children; and (vi) it was proactively involved in internecine war.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Tackling Terrorism’s Taboo: Shame

    • Authors: Matthew Kriner
      Abstract: This exploratory article provides a conceptual framework for explaining how shame is used by terrorist organizations in their recruitment and radicalization strategies. Shame is a universal emotion, experienced across all cultures, and as such presents scholars with a platform for easy cross-cultural comparisons of radicalization phenomena. Terrorist use of entitative identities to divide society into adherents and apostates, particularly in the study of religious extremists like jihadist entities, provides a verdant ground of understanding how organizations move people into higher states of radicalization, and potentially enticing them to engage in terrorism. However, as an aversive emotion, shame’s taboo status has, it is suggested here, led scholars to overlook its role in past studies of radicalization. This article postulates that emotions and identity are an integral aspect of the social self, and because of shame’s regulatory power over social identity and norm adherence, it should be at the core of the study of radicalization processes.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Spaces, Ties, and Agency: The Formation of Radical Networks

    • Authors: Stefan Malthaner
      Abstract: The literature on radicalization as well as studies on participation in high-risk activism have emphasized the role of personal ties and radical networks in shaping pathways towards political violence. Yet, our knowledge about how these radical networks are formed remains limited. Drawing on an in-depth case study of the network around the so-called “Sauerland-Group” in Germany, this article examines patterns of network-formation, focusing on: (i) the role and function of different types of social ties in creating and sustaining radical networks; (ii) the importance of different spaces and events in initiating and reinforcing connections between activists; and (iii) the role of individual agency and pro-active connection-making in this process. In a more general sense, this article seeks to contribute to a better understanding of radicalization as a relational process, emphasizing the fact that individual trajectories are closely interlinked with radical networks as the dynamic setting of jihadist micro-mobilization.This network facilitates and shapes pathways into violent activism and at the same time is created and constantly re-shaped by militant activists.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Headhunting Among Extremist Organizations: An Empirical Assessment of
           Talent Spotting

    • Authors: Steven Windisch, Michael K. Logan, Gina Scott Ligon
      Abstract: In recent years, terrorism scholars have proposed that more established and popular extremist organizations make pragmatic assessments of their human capital needs and modify operating standards to acquire members with advanced training and expertise such as medical, religious, or military backgrounds that may benefit extremist activities. To examine these claims, we rely on data pertaining to 105 extremist organizations gathered throughout the Leadership of the Extreme and Dangerous for Innovative Results (LEADIR) project. The results provide empirical support for these propositions by suggesting that older and more publicly supported extremist organizations contain membership populations that possess expertise, and these organizations also become increasingly diverse across demographic characteristics of members. We conclude with suggestions for future research that extend the study of extremist recruitment and provide recommendations for practitioners in terms of addressing terrorism prevention initiatives.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Interview with Max Hill, QC, Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation
           for the United Kingdom

    • Authors: Sam Mullins
      Abstract: The following text is a transcript of an interview between the author and the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation (IRTL) for the United Kingdom, Max Hill, QC, which took place on March 9, 2018 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. Topics discussed included the role of the IRTL, prosecution of terrorism in the UK, returning foreign fighters, terrorism prevention and investigation measures (TPIMs), deportation of terrorism suspects, the involvement of children in terrorism, hate-preachers, and the British government’s efforts to counter non-violent extremism. The transcript has been edited for brevity.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Erdogan’s Turkey and the Palestinian Issue

    • Authors: Ely Karmon, Michael Barak
      Abstract: President Recep Tayyip Erdogan attributes great importance to the Palestinian issue, portraying himself as the defender of the Palestinians and of the holy Islamic sites in Jerusalem. One should consider his infatuation with the Palestinian cause, and especially Turkey’s very robust relations with Hamas, the Palestinian radical Islamist movement, in the larger context of Erdogan and his party’s, the Justice and Development Party (AKP), ideological and strategic goals. The Islamist inclinations of President Erdogan endanger the already strained relations with Israel. In addition, they can also undermine relations with the Palestinian Authority and threaten the multifaceted Middle Eastern arena. Moreover, it seems Erdogan dreams of building an Islamist army, on the Iranian model, to fight for the liberation of Palestine.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • 130+ (Counter-) Terrorism Research Centres – an Inventory

    • Authors: Teun van Dongen
      Abstract: In the still expanding field of Terrorism Studies, it is difficult to keep track of who is doing what. Anyone looking for a research partner, a particular type of expertise or, perhaps, a research position, will have a hard time finding his or her way in the myriad of centres, institutes, think tanks, councils and foundations that seek to enlarge our understanding of terrorism. Since ‘enhancing security through collaborative research’ is the mission of the Terrorism Research Initiative (TRI), the editors of its journal Perspectives on Terrorism invited me to compile a list of terrorism research centres.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Ronen Bergman, Rise and Kill First: The Secret History of Israel’s
           Targeted Assassinations

    • Authors: Joshua Sinai
      Abstract: Targeted killing is a term used for premeditated extrajudicial assassination by a state organization, usually by its covert intelligence and special forces units. The targets are enemy operatives (e.g. managers of terrorist operations) who are perceived as posing an imminent security threat due to their involvement in murderous activities that endanger the state. An important consideration for opting for targeted killing is that the capture of the targeted persons for arrest is made impossible by their protected presence in hostile territory. Over the years, due to the protracted nature of conventional military and terrorist threats by some of its Middle Eastern adversaries against Israel, such as Iran, Syria, the Lebanese Hezballah, and the Palestinian Fatah and Hamas groups, the Jewish State has developed one the world’s top covert special operations capabilities to target selected adversaries for assassination worldwide.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Aviva Guttmann, The Origins of International Counterterrorism. Switzerland
           at the Forefront of Crisis Negotiations, Multilateral Diplomacy, and
           Intelligence Cooperation (1969-1977).

    • Authors: Beatrice de Graaf
      Abstract: In recent years, almost all European countries have been provided with one or more studies historicizing their approach to (counter-)terrorism. Until recently, Switzerland was an exception. That has now changed with Aviva Guttmann’s Ph.D. thesis turned into a Brill monograph, The Origins of International Counterterrorism. As she notes in her opening chapter, Europe was struck by a series of terrorist attacks in the early 1970s -both by domestic groups and by international terrorist organisations. Mainly due to transnational terrorist operations, Guttmann argues, countries such as Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and France started to cooperate, bilaterally, and sometimes, in a very ad hoc manner, multilaterally. However, Dutch, Belgian, French and German police officers already exchanged information and intelligence relating to fugitive domestic terrorists like those of the German RAF and, in later years, with the UK on IRA operatives running afoul on the continent. However, with that reservation, Guttmann is correct in noting that governments started to develop more institutionalised policies to counter the threat emanating from international terrorist organisations in the early 1970s. She also correctly notes that the Swiss government played an interesting part in early developments on the intelligence front. This is the history she sought to cover.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Counterterrorism Bookshelf: 20 Books on Terrorism & Counter-
           Terrorism-Related Subjects

    • Authors: Joshua Sinai
      Abstract: This column consists of 20 capsule reviews of books from various publishers. It is arranged into (i) general accounts (including works on specific topics), (ii) books on counterterrorism (general and legal issues), (iii) anarchism, and (iv) Boko Haram.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Bibliography: Islamic State (IS, ISIS, ISIL, Daesh) [Part 4]

    • Authors: Judith Tinnes
      Abstract: This bibliography contains journal articles, book chapters, books, edited volumes, theses, grey literature, bibliographies and other resources on the Islamic State (IS / ISIS / ISIL / Daesh) and its predecessor organizations. To keep up with the rapidly changing political events, the most recent publications have been prioritized during the selection process. The literature has been retrieved by manually browsing through more than 200 core and periphery sources in the field of Terrorism Studies. Additionally, full-text and reference retrieval systems have been employed to broaden the search.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Recent Online Resources for the Analysis of Terrorism and Related Subjects

    • Authors: Berto Jongman
      Abstract: Most of the items included below became available online in March and April 2018. They are categorised under these headings: 1. Non-Religious Terrorism: Actors, Groups, Incidents and Campaigns 2. Religious (mainly Jihadi) Terrorism: Actors, Groups, Incidents and Campaigns 3. Terrorist Strategies and Tactics 4. Conflict, Crime and Political Violence other than Terrorism 5. Counter-Terrorism – General 6. Counter-Terrorist Strategies, Tactics and Operations 7. State Repression and Civil War at Home and Clandestine & Open Warfare Abroad 8. Prevention and Preparedness Studies (including Countering Violent Extremism, De-Radicalization, Counter-Narratives) 9. Intelligence 10. Cyber Operations and Information Warfare 11. Risk & Threat Assessments, Forecasts, Analytical Studies 12. Also Worth Reading
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • A Response to Jacob Zenn on Boko Haram and al-Qa‘ida

    • Authors: Adam Higazi, Brandon Kendhammer, Kyari Mohammed, Marc-Antoine Pérouse de Montclos, Alex Thurston
      Abstract: A recent special issue of Perspectives on Terrorism, published in December 2017 (Volume 11, Number 6, pp. 174-190), included an article by Jacob Zenn entitled “Demystifying al-Qaida in Nigeria: Cases from Boko Haram’s Founding, Launch of Jihad and Suicide Bombings.” (URL: http://www.terrorismanalysts.com/pt/index.php/pot/article/view/666/1326 ) The article makes problematic claims that we - as specialists who have done research on Boko Haram - believe merit a response.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Upcoming and Recently Completed Ph.D. Theses

    • Authors: Ryan Scrivens, Jeanine de Roy van Zuijdewijn
      Abstract: The Terrorism Research Initiative (TRI) seeks to stimulate and coordinate high-quality research in the field of (Counter-)Terrorism Studies. One of TRI’s instruments are national and (sub-)regional networks of post-graduate students working on their doctoral theses. TRI networks, led by a local coordinator who is usually her- or himself working on a dissertation, exist in more than a dozen countries/regions. Two of the most active networks are two be found in Canada and the Netherlands (including the Flemish-speaking part of Belgium). The two lists below originate from these networks
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Job Vacancy at Perspectives on Terrorism

    • Authors: Various Authors
      Abstract: The Editorial Team of Perspectives on Terrorism (PoT) is looking for a new member whose task would be to maintain an online database on academic and professional conferences on terrorism and related subjects (e.g. radicalisation, countering violent extremism). The person we look for will be responsible for creating an online conference calendar that provides relevant information (venue, date, organiser, principal topics, call for papers, keynote speakers, and registration details) in the database. The Assistant Editor for Conference Monitoring will regularly provide conference-related information to over 8,000 readers and 16,000 social media followers of Perspectives on Terrorism, with updates and Conference Alerts. The new Assistant Editor would also develop and maintain a list of contact information of major associations and centres that are organisers of specialised conferences and workshops relevant to the study of terrorism and counterterrorism.
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Perspectives on Terrorism Vol 12, Issue 2

    • Authors: Various Authors
      Abstract: Complete issue
      PubDate: 2018-04-30
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
 
 
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