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Journal Cover Perspectives on Terrorism
  [416 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2334-3745 - ISSN (Online) 2334-3745
   Published by U of Massachusetts Homepage  [17 journals]
  • Welcome from the Editors

    • Authors: The Editors
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Reconsidering Radicalization: Fanaticism and the Link Between Ideas and
           Violence

    • Authors: Bart Schuurman, Max Taylor
      Abstract: A central issue with many interpretations of radicalization remains their tendency to overemphasize the role of extremist beliefs in motivating involvement in terrorism. After elaborating on this critique, the authors propose that ‘fanaticism’, a concept developed by Taylor in the early 1990s, offers a way of overcoming this deficiency in radicalization-based approaches through its conditional understanding of when radical beliefs can lead to violent behavior. Primary-sources driven empirical analysis supports both the critique of radicalization and the discussion of fanaticism’s benefits. Results are relevant to both academics and counterterrorism practitioners working to understand the role of extremist beliefs in motivating involvement in terrorist violence.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Explaining Civilian Attacks: Terrorist Networks, Principal-Agent Problems
           and Target Selection

    • Authors: Max Abrahms, Matthew Ward, Ryan Kennedy
      Abstract: Terrorist groups exhibit variation in their targeting choices. Why do some groups direct their violence against civilians while others limit this occurrence' This study analyzes the network relationships between terrorist groups to elucidate their targeting behavior. Drawing upon insights from the organizational ecology and conflict literatures, we predict that terrorist group affiliates will be significantly more likely than their parent group to attack civilian targets. Our original principal-agent theory consistently outperforms extant explanations in a multi-method analysis of 238 terrorist groups from 1998 to 2005. These results shed new light on why certain terrorist groups are more likely than others to target civilians.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Terrorist Tactics by Criminal Organizations: The Mexican Case in Context

    • Authors: Brian J. Philips
      Abstract: In the past 10 years in Mexico, more than 100,000 people have been killed in violence related to organized crime. Some attacks have left horrific scenes, meant to send messages to the public or government. Debate continues about how to characterize this violence, and some observers describe it as “terrorism” or its perpetrators as “terrorists.” This article emphasizes that Mexico has experienced terrorist tactics by criminal organizations. This implies that while the perpetrators are better thought of (and dealt with) as criminal groups, some of their violence at least partially fulfills the criteria to be defined as terrorism. The use of terrorist tactics by criminal groups is an understudied aspect of the crime-terror nexus because more research examines crime by terrorist groups. The article discusses three tactics seen in Mexico: bombings, violent communication, and attacks against politicians. It then presents comparable examples from other countries, such as Brazil, Colombia, Italy, and Russia. Similarities and differences between criminal groups and terrorist groups are discussed. The violence in Mexico is relatively unique for its scale, for the number of people killed, but in general the use of terrorist tactics by criminal organizations is not new.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Terrorist Prison Breaks

    • Authors: Trevor Cloen, Yelena Biberman, Farhan Zahid
      Abstract: Why would an insurgent group which employs terrorist tactics intentionally stage a quiet, nonviolent prisonbreak when it could instead carry out a violent spectacle' Insurgent targeting of prisons poses a puzzle to our understanding of security in state-building environments, but it has yet to be explored. This article addresses the question of why terror groups choose to employ nonviolent means for a prison break with a comparative study of prison break attempts in Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, and Nigeria. Using an original dataset consisting of all known prison break attempts carried out by a terrorist organization between 2001 and 2015, this article discerns the conditions under which nonviolent tactics are pursued. We argue that insurgents engage in nonviolent tactics when the predominant security authority signals the imminent withdrawal of military assets. This incentivizes them to limit violent activity, thereby encouraging the completion of the withdrawal process.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Radicalisation: A Subtype of Religious Conversion'

    • Authors: Julien van Elzen
      Abstract: This Research Note starts by evaluating Lofland and Stark’s conversion model. By comparing it with several radicalisation models, it was found that conversion and radicalisation processes have much in common. Based on this observation, the idea of a radical-conversion model is formulated. Subsequently, five hypotheses derived from the radical-conversion model are tested with a sample of foreign fighters database (n = 408). It was found that converts and non-converts can be seen as equals. The convert’s involvement in suicide missions and perceived trustworthiness are relatively the same as non-converts. However, due to certain predisposition factors, differences for rank, desertion, and the role of women were found. This Research Note suggests that there are strong indications that radicalisation is a sub-type of conversion and that more research is needed on this topic.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Black-boxing the Black Flag: Anonymous Sharing Platforms and ISIS Content
           Distribution Tactics

    • Authors: Ahmad Shehabat, Teodor Mitew
      Abstract: The study examines three anonymous sharing portals employed strategically by the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS) to achieve its political ends. This study argues that anonymous sharing portals such as Sendvid.com, Justpast.it, and Dump.to have been instrumental in allowing individual jihadists to generate content, disseminate propaganda and communicate freely while routing around filtering practiced by popular social media networks.The study draws on Actor Network Theory (ANT) in examining the relationship between ISIS jihadists and the emergence of anonymous sharing portals. The study suggests that, even though used prior to the massive degrading operation across social media, anonymous sharing portals were instrumental in allowing ISIS to maintain its networking structure in the face of coordinated disruption.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Counterterrorism Bookshelf: 18 Books on Terrorism and
           Counter-Terrorism-Related Subjects

    • Authors: Joshua Sinai
      Abstract: This column consists of two parts: an account of this reviewer’s attendance at the books exhibit of the 132nd Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association in Washington, DC, which was held in early January 2018, and 18 capsule reviews of books from various publishers.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Bibliography: Social Aspects of Terrorism

    • Authors: Judith Tinnes
      Abstract: This bibliography contains journal articles, book chapters, books, edited volumes, theses, grey literature, bibliographies and other resources on the social aspects of terrorism. Individual-, organizational-, and community-level aspects are considered. Though focusing on recent literature, the bibliography is not restricted to a particular time period and covers publications up to January 2018. The literature has been retrieved by manually browsing more than 200 core and periphery sources in the field of Terrorism Studies. Additionally, full-text and reference retrieval systems have been employed to expand the search.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Bibliography: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict (Part 2)

    • Authors: Judith Tinnes
      Abstract: This bibliography contains journal articles, book chapters, books, edited volumes, theses, grey literature, bibliographies and other resources on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. To keep up with the rapidly changing political events, more recent publications have been prioritised during the selection process. The literature has been retrieved by manually browsing more than 200 core and periphery sources in the field of Terrorism Studies. Additionally, full-text and reference retrieval systems have been employed to expand the search.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Recent Online Resources for the Analysis of Terrorism and Related Subjects

    • Authors: Berto Jongman
      Abstract: Most of the items included below became available online in January and February 2018. They are categorised under twelve headings: 1. Non-Religious Terrorism: Actors, Groups, Incidents and Campaigns 2. Religious (mainly Jihadi) Terrorism: Actors, Groups, Incidents and Campaigns 3. Terrorist Strategies and Tactics 4. Conflict, Crime and Political Violence other than Terrorism 5. Counter-Terrorism – General 6. Counter-Terrorist Strategies, Tactics and Operations 7. State Repression and Civil War at Home and Clandestine & Open Warfare Abroad 8. Prevention and Preparedness Studies (including Countering Violent Extremism, De-Radicalization,Counter-Narratives) 9. Intelligence 10. Cyber Operations and Information Warfare 11. Risk & Threat Assessments, Forecasts, Analytical Studies 12. Also Worth Reading
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • 200+ Academic Theses (Ph.D. and MA) on Terrorism- and Counter-Terrorism -
           related Issues, written in French, Spanish, Italian, German, Dutch, and
           Norwegian

    • Authors: Ryan Scrivens
      Abstract: This bibliography contains doctoral dissertations (Ph.D.) and Master’s (MA) Theses on issues relating to terrorism and counter-terrorism. Titles were retrieved manually by browsing the Open Access Theses and Dissertations (OATD) database, using the search terms ‘terrorisme’, ‘terrorismo’, and ‘Terrorismus’. More than 1,000 entries were evaluated, of which slightly more than 200 were ultimately selected for this list. All theses are open source. However, readers should observe possible copyright restrictions. The title entries are ‘clickable’, allowing access to full texts.
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • TRI Thesis Award 2017

    • Authors: The Editors
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Words of Appreciation

    • Authors: The Editors
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
  • Perspectives on Terrorism Vol 12, Issue 1

    • Authors: Various Authors
      Abstract: Various authors
      PubDate: 2018-02-26
      Issue No: Vol. 12 (2018)
       
 
 
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