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Regional Language Studies...Newfoundland
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
     ISSN (Print) 0079-9335
     Published by Memorial University of Newfoundland Homepage  [2 journals]
  • NEW DIALECT FORMATION IN HAPPY VALLEY-GOOSE BAY: A REPORT ON ONGOING
           RESEARCH

    • Authors: Jenna Edwards
      Abstract: IN THIS PAPER, I REPORT on the early stages of my M.A. (Linguistics) research, which focuses on the variety of English spoken in the relatively new Labrador community of Happy Valley-Goose Bay (henceforth HVGB), founded in 1941. The English of HVGB is a mixed variety that has emerged from a number of input dialects which have been in sustained contact over the past 62 years. These include English regional dialects from coastal Labrador as well as various parts of the island of Newfoundland, along with American, Mainland Canadian, Innu, Inuit, and Southern Inuit dialects of English. This complex linguistic scenario served as the linguistic input to subsequent generations of native-born Happy Valley-Goose Bayers.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • RLS Style Sheet

    • Authors: Suzanne Power
      Abstract: Please follow this style sheet when preparing submissions for RLS. If you have questions, please contact Suzanne Power at elrc@mun.ca.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • INNU LANGUAGE PROJECT ACTIVITIES IN LABRADOR

    • Authors: Marguerite MacKenzie, Laurel Anne Hasler
      Abstract: THE INNU LANGUAGE PROJECT (ILP) in the Department of Linguistics has been very productive over the past few years: The Innu dictionary is finally out; a large number of books have been produced for use in Innu schools and homes; specialized workplace vocabularies have been developed in the fields of law, education, environment, with a medical glossary currently in final revision; older Innu language books have been reprinted; and websites and mobile apps have been developed in order to make use of the newest technology to make Innu language tools and resources more easily accessible than ever.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • LABRADOR AND THE DICTIONARY OF NEWFOUNDLAND ENGLISH

    • Authors: Suzanne Power
      Abstract: OVER THE PAST COUPLE OF YEARS, the English Language Research Centre has fielded a number of inquiries about the representation of Labrador in the Dictionary of Newfoundland English (DNE; Story, Kirwin and Widdowson 1982). This paper reports on some of the Labrador and Labrador-related terms in the DNE. These terms can be divided loosely into three categories: Newfoundland English terms that are Labrador-related; terms for flora and fauna belonging to Labrador; and words from Labrador's two aboriginal languages, Inuttitut (spoken by the Inuit) and Innu-aimun (formerly called Montagnais-Naskapi), and spoken by the Innu. The Labrador Virtual Museum (http://www.labradorvirtualmuseum.ca/) is a good resource for more background  as is the Innu Language Project (ILP, Department of Linguistics, Memorial University; see www.innu-aimun.ca) which published the Innu-English Dictionary and the English-Innu Dictionary in 2013.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • ENGLISH IN LABRADOR: DEMONSTRATING DIFFERENCE

    • Authors: Martha MacDonald
      Abstract: THE IDEA OF "OTHERNESS" REGARDING the sense of difference and distance Labrador people feel from their Newfoundland neighbours, and the emic expression of this view in language, is the subject of this paper. Folklorist Gerald Pocius has written: In a sense, all identity deals with the issue of contrast. We can argue that there can be no identity (individual, regional or national) without contrast of other persons or groups. Identity first centers on the individual and how we experience differences among those in our immediate context. The construction of individual and community identities has as much to do with actual confrontations with "the other" as anything. (Pocius 2001: 1) Labrador is a place of contradictions: part of a province which glories in its insularity, yet located on the mainland, and situated at a point where the north meets the east, displaying the powerful cultural traits of both places. This paper discusses the idea of "otherness" as it relates to identity construction in Labrador.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • FROM SHOE-CROPS TO MOSQUITO HAWKS: LABRADOR ENGLISH IN THE ONLINE DIALECT
           ATLAS OF NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

    • Authors: Sandra Clarke
      Abstract: NEWFOUNDLAND ENGLISH IS WITHOUT DOUBT the best-described of any variety of Canadian English. Yet though this observation may be true for the island portion of the province, research into the English spoken in Labrador has lagged considerably. Fortunately, this situation is changing, as for example in the recent and ongoing work of Memorial university Linguistics graduate students (e.g. Thorburn 2014; Edwards this volume). Likewise, the new online Dialect Atlas of Newfoundland and Labrador (www.dialectatlas.mun.ca), launched by the English Language Research Centre in October 2013, offers insights into the traditional spoken English of Labrador. In this paper, I present some Labrador findings from the online Atlas.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • Map of Labrador

    • Authors: David Mercer
      Abstract: Map of Labrador showing communities relevant to theis issue of RLS and more recently established communities. Prepared by David Mercer, Library Assistant, Map Room, QEII Library, Memorial University.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
  • THE COMPLETE INUTTITUT VOCABULARY COLLECTED BY WILLIAM RICHARDSON
           CA.1765-1771

    • Authors: Marianne P. Stopp
      Abstract: William Richardson is known to researchers of Labrador history for his account of a 1771 voyage along the coast of southern Labrador. A re-examination of the Richardson material at the University of Toronto Libraries revealed a 92-entry Inuttitut vocabulary that has heretofore never been published and is among the earliest collected in the English language. Many of the entries in the vocabulary directly reflect the nature of the relationship between Inuit and Europeans at the time, namely the exchange of furs and sea mammal products for objects of European manufacture. In order to assess the vocabulary's relevance and authenticity, this article presents research findings on Richardson's naval career, which show that he voyaged to western Newfoundland and southern Labrador each year between 1765 and 1771. During these voyages he encountered not only Inuit, but naval officers, Moravian missionaries, and others familiar with Inuit language and culture, who might have been the source of his material.
      PubDate: 2014-04-24
      Issue No: Vol. 0 (2014)
       
 
 
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